Hot Best Seller

Unschooling Rules: 55 Ways to Unlearn What We Know about Schools and Rediscover Education

Availability: Ready to download

While most schools continue to resist change, homeschooling families are abandoning the K-12 system and rediscovering what childhood education means. They are identifying new methods and goals that are powerful, born of common sense, and incompatible with today's schools. The author, education expert Clark Aldrich, has explored the cultures and practices of homeschoolers a While most schools continue to resist change, homeschooling families are abandoning the K-12 system and rediscovering what childhood education means. They are identifying new methods and goals that are powerful, born of common sense, and incompatible with today's schools. The author, education expert Clark Aldrich, has explored the cultures and practices of homeschoolers and unschoolers. He has distilled a list of rules that shake the foundations of national education to its core.


Compare

While most schools continue to resist change, homeschooling families are abandoning the K-12 system and rediscovering what childhood education means. They are identifying new methods and goals that are powerful, born of common sense, and incompatible with today's schools. The author, education expert Clark Aldrich, has explored the cultures and practices of homeschoolers a While most schools continue to resist change, homeschooling families are abandoning the K-12 system and rediscovering what childhood education means. They are identifying new methods and goals that are powerful, born of common sense, and incompatible with today's schools. The author, education expert Clark Aldrich, has explored the cultures and practices of homeschoolers and unschoolers. He has distilled a list of rules that shake the foundations of national education to its core.

30 review for Unschooling Rules: 55 Ways to Unlearn What We Know about Schools and Rediscover Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melody Warnick

    Take-away: When your kid's wild about something, move mountains to feed their passion. Take-away: When your kid's wild about something, move mountains to feed their passion.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Crikkett

    Ugh, this author has an ego the size of Alaska. While he makes some valid (and obvious) points about the need for allowing students time and freedom to explore their own interests and learning styles, he spends so much time talking down his nose at educators that the only result can be to increase the antagonism between parents and schools. Meanwhile, his level of privilege-blindness is staggering. Who, exactly, are these parents who can afford to stay home from work every day to "unschool" thei Ugh, this author has an ego the size of Alaska. While he makes some valid (and obvious) points about the need for allowing students time and freedom to explore their own interests and learning styles, he spends so much time talking down his nose at educators that the only result can be to increase the antagonism between parents and schools. Meanwhile, his level of privilege-blindness is staggering. Who, exactly, are these parents who can afford to stay home from work every day to "unschool" their children? What are the solutions for parents who have to work two or three jobs to meet basic expenses and whose neighborhoods are not safe enough to walk around (never mind whether they have the means or funds to "travel often" - even an hour's drive away)? The best thing I can say about this book is that it was a quick read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Casey

    I have actually read this book a few times now. It really lends itself to quick reading. Short chapters that often build on one another with enough writing to encourage thought and discussion but without the overwhelming technical speak of education books. As a teacher who also just went through the graduate phase of my career, Mr. Aldrich gives much food for thought that is current with on-going debates in education on how to make learning meaningful and authentic for learners. Unschooling Rule I have actually read this book a few times now. It really lends itself to quick reading. Short chapters that often build on one another with enough writing to encourage thought and discussion but without the overwhelming technical speak of education books. As a teacher who also just went through the graduate phase of my career, Mr. Aldrich gives much food for thought that is current with on-going debates in education on how to make learning meaningful and authentic for learners. Unschooling Rules provides some subtle and not-so-subtle reminders for teachers, administrators and parents alike.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Herlofsen

    This book is an incendiary bomb aimed at US educational system, but as a teacher in Norway (where home schooling is practically forbidden) most of the descriptions felt painfully relevant. The system IS broken, and its pathology is painfully accurately outlined here. The book is very short and to the point, and this is why some parts seem slightly underdeveloped (special needs and social/class differences are basically ignored). On the other hand there's no reason why anyone concerned with educa This book is an incendiary bomb aimed at US educational system, but as a teacher in Norway (where home schooling is practically forbidden) most of the descriptions felt painfully relevant. The system IS broken, and its pathology is painfully accurately outlined here. The book is very short and to the point, and this is why some parts seem slightly underdeveloped (special needs and social/class differences are basically ignored). On the other hand there's no reason why anyone concerned with education anywhere shouldn't take the time to read this.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gwenn Wright

    Less a book than a glorified pamphlet. If you're more of a "Well-Trained Mind" parent, this is not the book for you. Truthfully he lost me at: a spellchecker frees us up from memorization and thus, spelling tests. Really? He also doesn't seem to believe in the reading of classics and instead encourages Internet reads, material that is more relevant, current. Don't take tests, see how many followers you can get on Twitter because that will gauge your knowledge and skill. His philosophy goes a lit Less a book than a glorified pamphlet. If you're more of a "Well-Trained Mind" parent, this is not the book for you. Truthfully he lost me at: a spellchecker frees us up from memorization and thus, spelling tests. Really? He also doesn't seem to believe in the reading of classics and instead encourages Internet reads, material that is more relevant, current. Don't take tests, see how many followers you can get on Twitter because that will gauge your knowledge and skill. His philosophy goes a little too far down the spectrum for me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Contarino

    I already homeschool my children and this book challenged me immensely. Homeschoolers are not exempt from buying into the flawed method of the today’s educational philosophy, just in a home setting. I will reread for sure as I attempt to untangle myself from the world’s standard of education.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Challice

    It was an ok book. I didn't dislike it. I didn't really like it. It was nothing new for me and the information was valid and stuff I already knew. It was a good reminder as to what I am striving for, education vs knowledge. I think this would be very beneficial for someone beginning the homeschool journey rather. It was an ok book. I didn't dislike it. I didn't really like it. It was nothing new for me and the information was valid and stuff I already knew. It was a good reminder as to what I am striving for, education vs knowledge. I think this would be very beneficial for someone beginning the homeschool journey rather.

  8. 4 out of 5

    April Winder

    This was an easy and quick reference style book. I enjoyed how short the chapters were and although the author has an obviously big ego, there were plenty of things that he wrote which made me think differently about the subjects. I never would have pondered many of the items his opinion brought up and some of them I still not agree with. However, I did enjoy looking at things from a different perspective and several of the chapters have made me begun my own research. I recommend it to anyone, n This was an easy and quick reference style book. I enjoyed how short the chapters were and although the author has an obviously big ego, there were plenty of things that he wrote which made me think differently about the subjects. I never would have pondered many of the items his opinion brought up and some of them I still not agree with. However, I did enjoy looking at things from a different perspective and several of the chapters have made me begun my own research. I recommend it to anyone, not just home schoolers and un schoolers, but public school families as well.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Aphoristic, sometimes cliché. Many great theories, but the real work is in the implementation. As a teacher about to join a school with this unschooling philosophy at heart, I wish there were fewer platitudes and more real-world examples.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Wadd

    Having been a teacher and then losing the love, I get this book. It scratches the surface of many challenges within education in the 21st century, but i found it very light on with actual evidence that these rules work. I would need much more evidence to follow his path fully, but I admire the intent. Thank you for expressing your views clearly.

  11. 4 out of 5

    George

    A very easy read offering ideas on how to best educate children. You may not agree with everything contained within. It doesn't offer much in terms of academic research to back most of its claims. That said from my perspective the ideas offered are intriguing alternatives to the industrialized approach to public (and most private) school education. A very easy read offering ideas on how to best educate children. You may not agree with everything contained within. It doesn't offer much in terms of academic research to back most of its claims. That said from my perspective the ideas offered are intriguing alternatives to the industrialized approach to public (and most private) school education.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    This is a very short read. I wanted to like it more than I did. Some of the ideas in it I heartily agreed with, but others I just didn't. Mostly this seems like a book of ideas designed to stir the pot to get people thinking about education and what it should be. Most of these ideas would need a fair amount of fleshing out to figure out how you would incorporate it into a real education (or school). It is worth reading for the sake of pondering education and how it might be better or different t This is a very short read. I wanted to like it more than I did. Some of the ideas in it I heartily agreed with, but others I just didn't. Mostly this seems like a book of ideas designed to stir the pot to get people thinking about education and what it should be. Most of these ideas would need a fair amount of fleshing out to figure out how you would incorporate it into a real education (or school). It is worth reading for the sake of pondering education and how it might be better or different than it is. I admit I am a bit skeptical about some of the claims about how fabulous technology is and how it totally changes everything we should be about in education. I'm still thinking that people need to learn to think and understand things deeply and not so superficially which I'm not sure tech is always the answer to. Anyway, it was okay, but not something that has revolutionized my own thinking.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    I literally read this book (more of a pamphlet, really) in 20 minutes. I have no idea why he invested the time, money, and effort publishing it as a book; he should have put it out on the web as an e-book. It's fine for as far as it goes, but it doesn't go far. He's writing as an expert who has studied these issued deeply, yet all he's published here are his bottom-line conclusions with no supporting evidence or research, no depth, very little explanation. As a long-time homeschooling father and fer I literally read this book (more of a pamphlet, really) in 20 minutes. I have no idea why he invested the time, money, and effort publishing it as a book; he should have put it out on the web as an e-book. It's fine for as far as it goes, but it doesn't go far. He's writing as an expert who has studied these issued deeply, yet all he's published here are his bottom-line conclusions with no supporting evidence or research, no depth, very little explanation. As a long-time homeschooling father and fervent advocate of "unschooling" and alternative education, I learned nothing new from this book. Personally, I found the foreword and afterword by Jeff Sandefer to be more valuable than the author's content. But having said all that, I can this this being a good introduction for newbies to the national education crisis and alternative education.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    The surely well-meaning author bandies around the most annoying word in education, "should." This word does not require evidence, research, or even polling. The kinds of items that provide support from a broad set of information. "Should," is just one person's like experience, which as we know is flawed. Occasionally, in this list of platitudes Clark hits on something that may have merit. His style of no substance and weird chapter design lead me to easily discount it. The surely well-meaning author bandies around the most annoying word in education, "should." This word does not require evidence, research, or even polling. The kinds of items that provide support from a broad set of information. "Should," is just one person's like experience, which as we know is flawed. Occasionally, in this list of platitudes Clark hits on something that may have merit. His style of no substance and weird chapter design lead me to easily discount it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Betsie

    There really wasn't any new information presented in this book, but it did serve to help me focus back on what our actual goals for education are. Love of learning and exposure to as much as possible are what we consider truly important; and I had gotten off that track in the last year or so. This was a great book to start off the year with and we'll start making the shift back to child-directed learning now. There really wasn't any new information presented in this book, but it did serve to help me focus back on what our actual goals for education are. Love of learning and exposure to as much as possible are what we consider truly important; and I had gotten off that track in the last year or so. This was a great book to start off the year with and we'll start making the shift back to child-directed learning now.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dusty

    Meh. I don't disagree, but I don't totally agree either. This book states that there are many things children need to learn that aren't taught in school. I agree, but I don't think the school should be teaching them, it's the family's job, or the church's, or it's the kids job to just figure out some truths on their own. I didn't even finish the book, it just didn't appeal to me. "You don't have to go to school to get an education, " but I didn't learn that tidbit from school. Meh. I don't disagree, but I don't totally agree either. This book states that there are many things children need to learn that aren't taught in school. I agree, but I don't think the school should be teaching them, it's the family's job, or the church's, or it's the kids job to just figure out some truths on their own. I didn't even finish the book, it just didn't appeal to me. "You don't have to go to school to get an education, " but I didn't learn that tidbit from school.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kelli

    Super fast read (about an hour). Mr. Aldrich is insightful and dead on in his summation of the public school system. He doesn't only highlight the problems, he provides "doable" solutions. It's obvious his primary concern is that children incorporate learning into everything they do and for it to be viewed as a gift, instead of curse. Super fast read (about an hour). Mr. Aldrich is insightful and dead on in his summation of the public school system. He doesn't only highlight the problems, he provides "doable" solutions. It's obvious his primary concern is that children incorporate learning into everything they do and for it to be viewed as a gift, instead of curse.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

    Much of what Clark Aldrich writes in Unschooling Rules is incredibly spot-on, precise and a refreshing breath of fresh air. He has many excellent suggestions for improving the archaic public school education system. Great insight for public schoolers, home schoolers/unschoolers, parents, teachers or anyone else interested in gaining new perspective on education.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alba

    Though, this book would appeal more to Unschoolers, I think that Non Unschoolers could benefit from this book. It is an easy read of 55 tips of thinking outside the box. Full of great ideas and worth having a copy to reference now and then as reminders.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    This book offered some good thoughts and motivation. Simple and easy to read, offered me direction in a time of doubt.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Great book for people who want to find better ways to teach and educate children

  22. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Great, quick read. Just what I needed to keep my homeschooling motivation up. 1. Learn to be; learn to do; learn to know 2. Focus on reading, writing, and arithmetic 3. Learn something because you need it or because you love it 4. Twenty-five critical skills not taught in school adapting analyzing and managing risks applying economic, value, and governing models behaving ethically being a leader building and nurturing relationships communicating creating or process reengineering new actions, proces Great, quick read. Just what I needed to keep my homeschooling motivation up. 1. Learn to be; learn to do; learn to know 2. Focus on reading, writing, and arithmetic 3. Learn something because you need it or because you love it 4. Twenty-five critical skills not taught in school adapting analyzing and managing risks applying economic, value, and governing models behaving ethically being a leader building and nurturing relationships communicating creating or process reengineering new actions, processes, and tools developing security efficiently meeting complex needs gathering evidence identifying and using boards of mentors and advisors maintaining and practicing stewardship of important systems and capabilities making prudent decisions managing conflict managing projects negotiating planning long term prioritizing tasks and goals probing procurement scheduling solving problems innovatively sourcing/buying goods and services using containment strategies 5. Schools spend too much time teaching kids how to be novelists, musicians, and professional mathematicians 6. Avoid the academic false dichotomy of "The cultural literacy track" or "The Vocational Track" 7. Throughout life, everyone unschools most of the time 8. What a person learns in a classroom is how to be a person in a classroom 9. Sitting through a classroom lecture is not just unnatural for most people, it is painful 10. Animals are better than books about animals 11. Use microcosms as much as possible in learning programs fish tanks lemonade stands and bake sales gardens one-person business team sports blog reporting plan a trip to any location, down to budgets, flight times, and hotels 12. Internships, apprenticeships, and interesting jobs beat term papers, textbooks, and tests 13. Include meaningful work 14. Create and use periods of reflection 15. If you care about learning, start by feeding your kids good, nutritious foods 16. Embrace all technologies 17. Listen to audio books and podcasts while doing things that don't require concentration 18. Use spreadsheet software to teach math 19. Have a well-stocked library that includes movies, documentaries, and television series, picture books of geographical locations and art, computer games (like SimCity and Civilization), maps, personal photographs and home movies 20. Read what normal people read 21. Books vs Computer Games Books: develop empathy through presentations of inner monologues, present facts, rely less on violence, exposure to brilliant writing styles, represent the oldest accessible art form of our culture Computer games: active content, modern artists, teaches resolution of frustration 22. Formally learn only what is reinforced during the next 14 days (you will forget everything else anyway) 23. Build more, consume less 24. Teaching is leadership. Most teaching is bad leadership 25. Expose more, teach less Do: travel, talk intimately to authentic experts, observe experts in their environment, follow the child's interests (leave if the child is uninterested) Don't: use a checklist to make sure that you cover all subject areas. There are too many subjects. Don't subvert the experience with directive-style teaching techniques like tests or papers 26. Biological order of learning is: explore, play, then add rigor 29. Homework helps school systems, not students 30. Every day, adults are role models of learning (whether or not they want to be) 33. In education, customization is important like air is important 34. There is no one answer to how to educate a child. There may not be any answers 35. Be what schools pretend to be, not what schools are. School mission or vision statements can be ideals to emulate 37. Feed passions and embrace excellence 38. Children learn unevenly, even backwards 39. Five subjects a day? Really? 40. Maturing solves a lot of problems 41. Socialize your children. Just don't use schools to do it 43. Minimize "the drop-off"- your children are your responsibility, not others' 44. Increase exposure to non-authority figure adults 45. Tests don't work. Get over it. Move on. 46. The future is portfolios not transcripts 47. Keep a focused journal-develops situational awareness write down everything you eat or spend, weather, steps taken, types of commercials during half an hour of television, number and makes of cars that go through red lights, take a picture of the exact spot each day for a season to observe change. 50. Outdoors beats indoors 51.Walk a lot 52. Under-schedule to take advantage of the richness of life 54. Children should be raised by people who love them.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mateo Ovalle

    I'll give Unschooling Rules by Clark Aldrich 4 stars out of 5 because I really enjoyed the book and was very engaging to read. The first important thing that I read that kept me thinking a lot was that there are 3 types of learning: Learn to Be, Learn to Do and Learn to Know. At traditional schools, they only focus on Learning to Know, that is learning information from books, but they miss the other two types of learning that are more important for the Hero's Journey of each person. In Learning t I'll give Unschooling Rules by Clark Aldrich 4 stars out of 5 because I really enjoyed the book and was very engaging to read. The first important thing that I read that kept me thinking a lot was that there are 3 types of learning: Learn to Be, Learn to Do and Learn to Know. At traditional schools, they only focus on Learning to Know, that is learning information from books, but they miss the other two types of learning that are more important for the Hero's Journey of each person. In Learning to Be, you discover who you are and what you want to be, and here is where you set the road you want to take in your life and without it, you don't have a purpose or a reason for doing the things that you are doing now and that is why a lot of students don't even try to make an effort in school because they think is more like an obligation. The other type of learning that is very important is Leaning to Do, and in this learning, you focus on developing skills that you will use in the real world. When students finish school, they don't know how to make a speech, or how to be leaders and university is not school and they are not going to teach you that. Another thing that intrigued me is that the learning process is not just memorizing things that are not important for you, but learning something that you really want to know or that you need and the process of learning is easy especially if you really want to learn something “And then there are things that one loves, Here, learning is automatic”. That is why you need to have some freedom to learn things that you love and schools don't give you that chance because not only you have to be at school for a lot of hours, but then you have to do a lot of homework and you don't have time to explore your passions, and worst, you don't have time left to spend it with your family. And the last idea that is one of the most important things that the book taught me is this quote: “When a child has a serious and productive interest in something, do anything possible to feed it. Be the perfect enabler”. At my age, we are very curious about things and we have a lot of interests that we need to explore, and not only the parents but schools need to give us the opportunities and the tools to discover those things because that is the way that we are going to find our passions and purpose in life, our Hero’s Journey. This book changed me as a reader because it is a different type of book that I read normally and I learned a lot from it because it made me realize how lucky I am to have the opportunity to be in a school that has my best interest and also the book gave me all the reasons why all that Acton makes us do are important and that is why I recommend this book to all my fellow travelers because they will appreciate more Acton.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ella

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Unschooling Rules Author: Clark Aldrich Lexile: N/A Pitch: I think this deep book would be necessary for my hero's journey because it will tell me how to teach my kids in the future. Review: How did the book change you in a significant way, whom you would recommend it to and why? I would recommend the book to teenagers or adults, not little kids, because they dont have the attention span to read it. This book made alot of sense to me, and I realize just how lucky I am to be here in an Acton Academy Unschooling Rules Author: Clark Aldrich Lexile: N/A Pitch: I think this deep book would be necessary for my hero's journey because it will tell me how to teach my kids in the future. Review: How did the book change you in a significant way, whom you would recommend it to and why? I would recommend the book to teenagers or adults, not little kids, because they dont have the attention span to read it. This book made alot of sense to me, and I realize just how lucky I am to be here in an Acton Academy because we follow the book. Observations about the author's style and voice: The author is knowledgeable; he has this way of speaking to you. The central questions raised by the book and, for fiction, a description of its characters, setting, and plot: I agree with many things about this book, like: Have you noticed problems with children's educational systems? Did you know Children learn faster if they strive to learn? If you do not have the strive to do something, you will not become successful in life. Lectures are awful! If you sit through more than one lecture, your brain starts creating creativeness because you are bored and you learn nothing .use technology young learners' advantages. That you need to write down notes, or you will forget everything you learned, whether that be in math or somewhere else. And ordinary traditional school teachers get upset when you come back from summer break, and no one remembers anything. The teachers should not get mad at the students; they should get mad at the public school system; that is what is at fault. Parents dont believe they choose where they can put their kids for school or do it because it is an easy choice of school and all they have to do Is drive them. Parents with that mindset will never make their kids successful, and the bad news is that everybody is different. There is no natural way to raise a child. If a child has a good interest in something, provide everything for them to grow. Maturing helps kids focus and grow in a classroom or anywhere else. Kids need to socialize. Many schools make it impossible to let their kids socialize. Children should be given peer time to spend with adults because maybe the child can learn something. Tests do not work; the school systems cram 12 hours of hard-to-remember information in your head, and they accept you to remember it while taking a test. They focus on short-term goals. We should be using portfolios, not transcripts. In conclusion, things work until they do not. Homeschool families are trying to stick with this book's plan, but overall someone needs to stop the traditional schooling sequence; it's time for a change. So parents think of different ways to teach their kids because they will never have grit or be successful in the future.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brogan

    Unschooling Rules Author: Clark Aldrich Lexile: could not find Pitch: This book is already deep, but I think this book will help with how we feel and how we as people could also help with what we choose to do, like the choice we can make. How did the book change you significantly, who would you recommend it to, and why? I think this book will help change my journey as a kid going to an adult and support the way people think about what unschooling people do. I also believe that this book tries to Unschooling Rules Author: Clark Aldrich Lexile: could not find Pitch: This book is already deep, but I think this book will help with how we feel and how we as people could also help with what we choose to do, like the choice we can make. How did the book change you significantly, who would you recommend it to, and why? I think this book will help change my journey as a kid going to an adult and support the way people think about what unschooling people do. I also believe that this book tries to get others to make some of the rules. I believe other unschooling kid's all might have different laws because if you are in another place or state, you will have to follow your directions to help them. I also think that this book will help you set boundaries for yourself, even if you're in school or not. This book Will also help me with how I do with all of them at school and the other things that I do and how I think, so I will try to satisfy all of the people I would make fun of. So I will now try to put the rules and apply them into my life And make some of the rules what I do first in life so when I have a job I will make some of these rules like how I think and some of the rules you should try to put into your life. A description of the history and impact of the book and its author. So this author has been unschooling his kids. He would also make some of the rules and how they would affect teaching his kids and other kids. So when I am reading it, I'm going to try and put myself up to some of the rules to see how they will work for me. The way he talks through the book can help you put yourself in a mindset of what you should do first in the mornings. Observations about the author's style and voice. I will also try to help others with the rules and make other things help with more things like you should go outside, and you could also apply thighs to you and other people. Mr.Clark Aldrich would make it sound like he would talk to other people in person. But unfortunately, he would also make it sound like he was trying to get other people into doing unschooling. The central questions raised by the book and, for fiction, a description of its characters, setting, and plot; How he had the time to end up helping his kids would be more challenging than I would think with a job, and I would think he was a married man who would be the one to help his kids and people around him,and I just wonder how he would think he could do all of it lie teach and work its just crazy to me to think that way.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Trinity

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. For my first Nga deep book badge, I chose to read a book called “Unschooling Rules. 55 Ways To Unlearn What We Know About Schools And Rediscover Education.” First off, let me say this book was not only interesting to read, but I also was never tired of reading it. The chapters were sectioned in a very pleasing way, making them enjoyable to read. The actual contents of this book, although, were challenging to understand. I got everything for the most part, but if the author chose to substitute ce For my first Nga deep book badge, I chose to read a book called “Unschooling Rules. 55 Ways To Unlearn What We Know About Schools And Rediscover Education.” First off, let me say this book was not only interesting to read, but I also was never tired of reading it. The chapters were sectioned in a very pleasing way, making them enjoyable to read. The actual contents of this book, although, were challenging to understand. I got everything for the most part, but if the author chose to substitute certain words and make the vocabulary a little more general, this story would have reached a lot more people and had a more profound impact. This book was difficult for me to read because of the vocabulary and how it spoke about the public school system. I firmly believe in Acton Academy and all of its values; however, I find some aspects of public school beneficial to society. Overall, the pros and cons of this unschooling book did not sway my opinion much on Public school vs. Alternative schools. While I do not believe this book changed my mind on anything, I think it opened my mind to more ideas about the dreams of a school I could own one day. When trying to fully understand what learning style works best for a child, you must know and love them. I believe parents need to spend more time trying to understand their children and their children’s emotions. If more kids felt heard, they would be more willing to speak up. I want to make sure that the students who go to my school are given the tools to express themselves with their words, clothes, hair, etc. I firmly believe if a child can be themselves, they can be a true hero. I also know that I want many extracurricular activities available for my school. Art, sport, and Stem clubs are probably the most important. I want my school to be a safe place where students can go and learn at a pace that is right for them. If they do not get something, we will not just brush past it. They will use the tools provided to them to solve their problem. If they cannot find a suitable solution, that is a learning opportunity in itself. Overall, I learned a lot about Unschooling with this book. It helped me finish a deep book badge and progress in my guide badge plan. Studying different points of view on various subjects you are passionate about is crucial in understanding the world and how you process it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Darien Contu

    Dear Friend, Unschooling Rules was a quick read, I'm talking under two hours. It was great for a concise statement of what is wrong with the current education landscape in America. I especially appreciated Aldrich's comparison of the education system to the industrial revolution, referring to it as the educational industrial complex throughout the book. It feels as if the book is designed to provoke conversation and be quick witted. Some points that stood out were that class sizes should be more Dear Friend, Unschooling Rules was a quick read, I'm talking under two hours. It was great for a concise statement of what is wrong with the current education landscape in America. I especially appreciated Aldrich's comparison of the education system to the industrial revolution, referring to it as the educational industrial complex throughout the book. It feels as if the book is designed to provoke conversation and be quick witted. Some points that stood out were that class sizes should be more like 5 instead of 15 or 30, and that school days should have content for about 2 hours and no more because children cannot focus or comprehend past that. I appreciated his emphasis on bringing children outdoors and ensuring parents find the time and space to reflect on life with unscheduled time. It was interesting to learn that you learn less when your schedule is packed, but rather that your brain does need time to process. I found myself wanting more analysis and research to back up some claims throughout, especially those around drop off culture and the two-tiered educational system (based on cultural literacy or vocational programs). He made compelling points about each, but I was left with questions around his conclusions and assumptions. Aldrich writes, "The bloating of most curricula comes from a simple flaw. Each generation believes that what they love the next generation needs." This unschooling rule stood out and reinforces the main point made throughout this book, which is that children are all individuals with unique passions and talents. We should hone and encourage learning around those because developing the ability to make contributions to society with unique talents and interests will help us feel fulfilled in life, and ultimately, that is what we want for our children (and ourselves). Sandefer comments in the Afterword, "Children are not raw materials to be made into productive citizens by the "system". Children are beautiful living souls, as much angel as devil, each deserving of a hero's journey through life, where they can strive and fail and grow up to change the world." To that I say, here here! Cheers, Darien

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    A quick test of this book's insightfulness was to run it by my 15 year-old, who has been educated in a combination of homeschooling, classics-focused co-ops, and now a public charter school. I showed him some of the author's observations, like: "Homework helps school systems, not students;" and: "What a person learns in a classroom is how to be a person in a classroom." He gave a grim nod. As we plan to start a small private school, I found this book valuable for challenging preconceptions I have A quick test of this book's insightfulness was to run it by my 15 year-old, who has been educated in a combination of homeschooling, classics-focused co-ops, and now a public charter school. I showed him some of the author's observations, like: "Homework helps school systems, not students;" and: "What a person learns in a classroom is how to be a person in a classroom." He gave a grim nod. As we plan to start a small private school, I found this book valuable for challenging preconceptions I have about what education should look like. The author is no theorist, and quickly encourages us to read thinkers like Maria Montessori. But his quick hits -- both against the Education-Industrial Complex and for a more child-centered, exploratory approach to learning -- are provocative. The one area I think he's way off is his critique of some schools' obsession with "the classics." He's got an unfortunate utilitarian streak, combined with what appears to be a thoroughly inadequate grounding in literature. This leads him to the mistaken conclusion that we should judge books based on whether they teach us how to do something, or to be better people in some demonstrable way. There's a far richer way to approach literature than that. But the beauty of the educational philosophy he advocates is that you don't have to agree with how he would position literature in his school. You and the child learners in your care are free to chart your own courses. Which is ultimately the radical message underlying this book -- that we should enable children to determine their own learning paths while nurturing their curiosity, rather than hammer them into a mass-production line that destroys creativity, curiosity, and independent thought.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katie Langford

    Unschooling Rules: 55 Ways to Unlearn What We Know About Schools and Rediscover Education is a quick introduction into the world of disruptive education. An easy read split into chapters as short as two pages, Aldrich moves through best practices emerging in educational research, all of which bring the inadequacies of traditional schooling into focus. The overarching theme is that the way children are hard-wired for learning, with innate curiosity and an eagerness to gain knowledge is stamped ou Unschooling Rules: 55 Ways to Unlearn What We Know About Schools and Rediscover Education is a quick introduction into the world of disruptive education. An easy read split into chapters as short as two pages, Aldrich moves through best practices emerging in educational research, all of which bring the inadequacies of traditional schooling into focus. The overarching theme is that the way children are hard-wired for learning, with innate curiosity and an eagerness to gain knowledge is stamped out through the expectations of most traditional schooling practices: sit in a chair quietly, listen to the lecture, absorb the information, study for the exam, get the grades. The lack of intrinsic motivation encouraged by traditional schooling is detrimental to children on a journey to discover their passions and hone their strengths. The best practices may seem revolutionary but in the context of how people learn best, they make complete sense. The style of writing is quippy and can, at times, be a bit brash. The points Aldrich makes, however, are concise, clear, and important. In my opinion, the brashness is a tactic to hold your attention, point to the inefficiency of traditional schooling, and the immediate need for change. The best practices are not cited and the book does not have an index, unfortunately. Throughout the book, Aldrich does point to websites and other books that dig deeper into most of the ideas put forward. Unschooling Rules is a good place to start if you are unfamiliar with the concept of disruptive education and have had a nagging feeling that the traditional ways of educating are failing you or your child.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jess Levy

    A disappointing start to learning about unschooling. To begin with, it is beyond classist. The author asserts that people who are unable to eat well has "failed in his or her own ability to systematically learn." Inability to eat well is often caused by living in a food desert, which is often caused by poverty, and that poverty is a reflection of systematic societal inequalities. Aldrich also suggests that you drop everything and cancel plans to follow the interests of your children. Imagine tha A disappointing start to learning about unschooling. To begin with, it is beyond classist. The author asserts that people who are unable to eat well has "failed in his or her own ability to systematically learn." Inability to eat well is often caused by living in a food desert, which is often caused by poverty, and that poverty is a reflection of systematic societal inequalities. Aldrich also suggests that you drop everything and cancel plans to follow the interests of your children. Imagine that conversation with your employer! "Hi, I won't be coming into work for the foreseeable future. You see, my three year old has taken a liking to cows so we're about to vacate the city in favor of a farm until when and if his interest wanes." Aldrich also asserts that a police station is an appropriate place for a child to seek an internship! I for one will certainly not allow my child to be in a room full of people with loaded weapons. Most infuriating is that Aldrich says that "children should be taught by adults who love them," a sentiment I wholeheartedly agree with, but clarifies that the only people who could possibly love a child are parents, grandparents, and possibly in a pinch, an aunt or an uncle. If this man is unable to love anyone who isn't directly related to him or imagine a world where anyone could love a child who isn't their own, I feel sorry for him. What saved the book from being only one star were the points about giving children ample free time, learning not being one size fits all, etc.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...