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Heart to Heart: New Poems Inspired by Twentieth-Century American Art

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Prompted by paintings, scuplture, prints and photographs the poems in this text lend new meaning to art appreciation. Artists whose work is represented include Edward Hopper, Jim Dine, Andy Warhol and many others.


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Prompted by paintings, scuplture, prints and photographs the poems in this text lend new meaning to art appreciation. Artists whose work is represented include Edward Hopper, Jim Dine, Andy Warhol and many others.

30 review for Heart to Heart: New Poems Inspired by Twentieth-Century American Art

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Fantastic concept. Seeing the works of art through the poets' eyes really helped me see more in them, connect with them on a deeper level. Many were new to me, though, and that was interesting, too. I really liked what Bobbi Katz did in "Lessons from a Painting by Rothko" for one of Marc Rothko's untitled colored boxes from 1960. She used a particular format (that I've forgotten the name for) that repeats lines in each subsequent verse, giving (me, at least) a sense of opening up, then bringing Fantastic concept. Seeing the works of art through the poets' eyes really helped me see more in them, connect with them on a deeper level. Many were new to me, though, and that was interesting, too. I really liked what Bobbi Katz did in "Lessons from a Painting by Rothko" for one of Marc Rothko's untitled colored boxes from 1960. She used a particular format (that I've forgotten the name for) that repeats lines in each subsequent verse, giving (me, at least) a sense of opening up, then bringing together, then opening up again. Some of the pieces didn't appeal to me as much as they might to you, and vice-versa. I won't be buying this, but I do recommend it to English teachers of children age 12-17 or so. And I think it would make a great gift from a god- or grandparent. Bio. notes for both poets and artists included at end. I do wish the size of the original artwork had been mentioned - artists do think about the impact the piece will make on those seeing it in person, as opposed to just in a book. I hope I can find the companion, Side by Side: New Poems Inspired by Art from Around the World.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I did not expect to enjoy this book. I couldn't get a clear idea of what to expect, and the subtitle, I think, sounded so technical or something. But I really enjoyed it. The poetry and the artwork work together to give insight into something that might not be straightforward. I loved seeing the ideas that the ports brought to the art, especially in the Stories section. I did not expect to enjoy this book. I couldn't get a clear idea of what to expect, and the subtitle, I think, sounded so technical or something. But I really enjoyed it. The poetry and the artwork work together to give insight into something that might not be straightforward. I loved seeing the ideas that the ports brought to the art, especially in the Stories section.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Erin Ramai

    Heart to Heart: New Poems Inspired by Twentieth-Century American Art is appropriate for students in grades 6 and up. It received a Printz Honor Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature in 2002. In Heart to Heart, poets and artists are involved in silent, meditative and creative conversation. The artwork speaks to the poet and the poet speaks for or about the artwork in the form of poetry that tells a story either about the art or the poet's life, gives a voice to the object or person depic Heart to Heart: New Poems Inspired by Twentieth-Century American Art is appropriate for students in grades 6 and up. It received a Printz Honor Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature in 2002. In Heart to Heart, poets and artists are involved in silent, meditative and creative conversation. The artwork speaks to the poet and the poet speaks for or about the artwork in the form of poetry that tells a story either about the art or the poet's life, gives a voice to the object or person depicted, details the poet's impression of the elements of the artwork, or expresses the nature of the art and artist. The poetry, like the artwork is varied--sculpture, painting, print, silkscreen, collage, quilt, photograph, drawing, and mixed media inspire free verse, diamante, pantoum, concrete, sonnet, rhymed verse, pattern and repetition. The reader and viewer experiences what the artist created through the eyes, mind and heart of the poet. The poems make readers see the art from a different perspective and as such call attention to details that they might not have noticed otherwise. The best part about this book is that the work of art imprints itself on the mind, so that even if readers cannot remember the exact words of the poem, they remember their gut reaction to the text and to the way it helped them imagine, explore, and experience the art. My favorite poems were: "The Peacock", "A Word", "Martha Graham in 'Letter to the World' ", "Breaking Away from the Family", "Grant Wood: American Gothic", "Pantoum for These Eyes"(which could be used to teach pantoum form), "Diamante for Chuck" (which could be used to teach diamante form), "On Lichtenstein's 'Bananas & Grapefruit' " (which could be used to teach both end and internal rhyme), "Girl Writing", "Pas de Trois", "Man Ray Stares into the Future of Jazz: 1919", "Ladies and Gentlemen, Step Right Up, The Drawer is Open!" and "The World, Starring You". This book would be a fantastic introduction to a poetry writing activity where students use artwork to inspire verse. I have used art in the classroom as a muse for other types of writing, but never poetry. After reading this book, I can't imagine why. My students are writing poetry collections right now and next week during check out, I'm going to have them choose an art book that contains a piece of artwork they think they could write a poem about. I'm really excited. I wish you guys could see the end result; maybe I'll send some via e-mail. :) As a side note, if you like this text, Jan Greenberg also edited Side by Side: New Poems Inspired by Art from Around the World. That's next on my list. Happy reading, viewing and writing!

  4. 4 out of 5

    (NS) Lauren

    Grade/Interest Level: 6-12 Heart to Heart offers an original way to approach poetry and art—with new works by distinguished American poets, specially commissioned for this book by editor Jan Greenberg. Prompted by paintings, sculpture, prints, and photographs by American artists working in the 20th century, these poems lend a new meaning to “art appreciation” and make each page of Heart to Heart an exciting discovery. This anthology of original poems inspired by American artwork was a true integr Grade/Interest Level: 6-12 Heart to Heart offers an original way to approach poetry and art—with new works by distinguished American poets, specially commissioned for this book by editor Jan Greenberg. Prompted by paintings, sculpture, prints, and photographs by American artists working in the 20th century, these poems lend a new meaning to “art appreciation” and make each page of Heart to Heart an exciting discovery. This anthology of original poems inspired by American artwork was a true integration of text and illustration. Both poetry and artwork give new meaning and interpretation to each other, and I found myself wishing poetry was a regular accompaniment to pieces of art within museums. A lot of thought went into the organization of this anthology, with poetry categorized by those that tell stories, assume the voice of the subject, describes emotions/impressions, and describes the techniques of the artist. A variety of forms are used, including free verse, haiku, concrete, and narrative, along with elements of rhythm, rhyme, and imagery. I would use this anthology with students at the end of a poetry unit as a way for them to identify various forms and elements of poetry within the collection. It would also be a terrific accompaniment to a field trip to an art museum. Students could select a favorite work of art as inspiration for an original poem.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Krista Stevens

    Famous and not so famous American artwork accompanied by poems by famous and no so famous American poets. Would be great in the classroom with a document camera. Consider for Creative Writing, 4-12. (At SHS) My favorites: "Stag at Sharkey's" oil of two boxers by George Bellows paired with "Ringside" by Ron Koertge "Tar Beach" acrylic on canvas bordered with printed, painted, quilted and pieced cloth by Faith Ringgold paired with "From Above" by Angela Johnson (absolutely brilliant - both pieces) "Ho Famous and not so famous American artwork accompanied by poems by famous and no so famous American poets. Would be great in the classroom with a document camera. Consider for Creative Writing, 4-12. (At SHS) My favorites: "Stag at Sharkey's" oil of two boxers by George Bellows paired with "Ringside" by Ron Koertge "Tar Beach" acrylic on canvas bordered with printed, painted, quilted and pieced cloth by Faith Ringgold paired with "From Above" by Angela Johnson (absolutely brilliant - both pieces) "How Mali Lost her Accent" acrylic, oil and collage by Pacita Abad paired with "Fresh from the Island Angel" by David Mura "Martha Graham, Letter to the World" gelatin silver print by Barbara Morgan paried with "Martha Gramahm in 'Letter to the World'" by Lyn Lifshin ("You have so little time, she writes, each instant is so exciting.") Great for championing being unique and ignoring the taunts of others "Six O'Clock" watercolor by Charles Burchfield paired with "The Painting Comes Home" by Stephen Corey" (..."But here we have home and suppertime,/the air on that edge between day and evening,/the family gathered as the wall of dark grows hard...") "Brooklyn Bridge: Variation on an Old Theme" by Joseph Stella paired with "River Song" by Warren Woessner (the painting makes me think of the Zakim Bridge into Boston from the North.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Yesenia

    Heart to Heart is amazing collection of poems inspired by twentieth century American Art. The editor of the book Jan Green berg organized the poems around four sections which are stories,voices,impressions and expressions. The book includes introduction by Green berg explaining the project how poems are arrange in the book. Each poem presented next to a photograph of the artwork. The book also contains interesting biographical notes on each of the poets and artist. It features famous artist such Heart to Heart is amazing collection of poems inspired by twentieth century American Art. The editor of the book Jan Green berg organized the poems around four sections which are stories,voices,impressions and expressions. The book includes introduction by Green berg explaining the project how poems are arrange in the book. Each poem presented next to a photograph of the artwork. The book also contains interesting biographical notes on each of the poets and artist. It features famous artist such as Jackson Pollack and George O'Keeffe and many more. I love the idea that images can inspire so many different poems. This book is a terrific way to make poetry come alive. One of my favorite poems was by carol Boston Wetherferd, tittle " the Brown Bomber" this poem is about a fighter named Joe, who they called "The Brown Bomber". The authors were all different and I enjoyed all of their works. This book would serve students as a good introduction to famous America artist and contemporary poets for middle and older students.It also would also serve as a good example for students to write their own poem inspired by their favorite piece of art.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Hanley

    This collection is a great read for people of all ages. It features poerty melded with artwork to truly appeal to all different types of creative minds and learners. This collection highlights the different physical ways that poems can the laid out. It was important to me to find great examples using this, because I think it will appeal to my students to get to do this. One of my favorite poems is " Fresh from the Island Angel," which is about a child moving somewhere different, but holding on t This collection is a great read for people of all ages. It features poerty melded with artwork to truly appeal to all different types of creative minds and learners. This collection highlights the different physical ways that poems can the laid out. It was important to me to find great examples using this, because I think it will appeal to my students to get to do this. One of my favorite poems is " Fresh from the Island Angel," which is about a child moving somewhere different, but holding on to their roots. Many of my students move frequently, so this poem would reverberate well with them. Overall, this anthology was visaully stunning and enjoyable to sit down with.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This certainly isn't the most conventional book of poetry, as it is all new and inspired by certain 20th-century works of art (which are also included in this book). It's not something that everyone would enjoy, but I know I did immensely. I think one of my favorites in this slim volume was "The World, Starring You" by Naomi Shihab Nye. How I long to have been alive to see Broadway in the Roaring Twenties! I also remember really enjoying "Fresh from the Island Angel" by David Mura. I'd really reco This certainly isn't the most conventional book of poetry, as it is all new and inspired by certain 20th-century works of art (which are also included in this book). It's not something that everyone would enjoy, but I know I did immensely. I think one of my favorites in this slim volume was "The World, Starring You" by Naomi Shihab Nye. How I long to have been alive to see Broadway in the Roaring Twenties! I also remember really enjoying "Fresh from the Island Angel" by David Mura. I'd really recommend this stunning collection of new poetry. It's not for everyone, but I hope that you will enjoy it as much as I did.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I read and used this book when I taught teens about poetry and creative writing one summer. We used it to guide our own trip to the Art Museum and writing creatively about that art (I subsequently had a piece published from this project, too, inspired by an Edmund Teske photograph). Rereading it, I'm surprised (and pleased) how many well-known poets are included. The art selected is a nice range of styles and the poetry, too, ranges from really restricted form poems to free verse. I read and used this book when I taught teens about poetry and creative writing one summer. We used it to guide our own trip to the Art Museum and writing creatively about that art (I subsequently had a piece published from this project, too, inspired by an Edmund Teske photograph). Rereading it, I'm surprised (and pleased) how many well-known poets are included. The art selected is a nice range of styles and the poetry, too, ranges from really restricted form poems to free verse.

  10. 5 out of 5

    elissa

    Art/poetry combo that was a Printz Honor book. Not a bad intro to 20th c. art, but I found the poetry to be somewhat forgettable.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel Weaver

    I appreciated the organization of the book, although I couldn't help being distracted by some of the line breaks for certain poems. I am curious how much the poets had a say in the formatting. I could endlessly read a book like this -- a book wherein artists share perspectives on art, but not in a judgmental or flippant manner. No, the book clearly contained thoughtful ruminations on works of art that I was familiar with and works/artists I have never heard of before. Some highlights for me were I appreciated the organization of the book, although I couldn't help being distracted by some of the line breaks for certain poems. I am curious how much the poets had a say in the formatting. I could endlessly read a book like this -- a book wherein artists share perspectives on art, but not in a judgmental or flippant manner. No, the book clearly contained thoughtful ruminations on works of art that I was familiar with and works/artists I have never heard of before. Some highlights for me were the following: "Ringside" by Ron Koertege (accompanying George Bellows's "Stag at Sharkey's") -- I could see this being an engaging read for my middle school students. "Martha Graham in 'Letter to the World'" by Lyn Lifshin (acc. Barbara Morgan's photo of the same name) -- I loved the concise biography of a legend. "Breaking Away from the Family" by Susan Terris (acc. Marisol's "The Family"). -- The poem deepened the curiosity and investigation of the audience, at least it did for me. "It's Me" by David Harrison (acc. Andy Warhol's "Marilyn Diptych") -- Content dictates form, folks. "Grant Wood: American Gothic" by Jane Yolen (acc. well . . . ) -- She forced a new perspective. How many times have we seen this painting? More times than we can count, but we saw it anew with Yolen's urge. "Pantoum for These Eyes" by Kristine O'Connell George (acc. Kiki Smith's "Untitled (Fluttering Eyes)" -- Again, content dictates form. A masterclass. "The Poppy of Georgia O'Keefe" by Janine Pommy Vega (acc. well . . .) -- Poppy = Flamenco dancer. Can't unsee it. The power of poetry. "Diamante for Chuck" by Jan Greenberg (acc. Chuck Close's "Self-Portrait") -- How cheeky. "Lessons from a Painting by Rothko" by Bobbi Katz (acc. Mark Rothko's "Untitled" 1960) -- This invited contemplation over craftsmanship. "Girl Writing" by Jane O. Wayne (acc. Milton Avery's "Girl Writing") -- This poem served as a gentle conviction about paying attention to detail as the viewer. "More Light" by Donald Finkel (acc. Edward Hopper's "Nighthawks") -- Same feelings as the American Gothic poem.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marlee

    I've had this on my TBR for exactly 1 million years, and to be perfectly honest, it did not live up to my expectations. The concept is still great, just somewhat poorly executed. Many of the piece read more like scrambled word salads than poems. Far too many exclamation points for my taste. That said, the art was cool, and covered a wide range of genres and eras. Plus, it includes my new most favorite piece of literature I have ever encountered: On Lichtenstein's "Bananas & Grapefruit" by Debora I've had this on my TBR for exactly 1 million years, and to be perfectly honest, it did not live up to my expectations. The concept is still great, just somewhat poorly executed. Many of the piece read more like scrambled word salads than poems. Far too many exclamation points for my taste. That said, the art was cool, and covered a wide range of genres and eras. Plus, it includes my new most favorite piece of literature I have ever encountered: On Lichtenstein's "Bananas & Grapefruit" by Deborah Pope. I'll give you one guess as to what piece of art it's representing. There's something about the form, the rhyming, the vibrant word choice paired with such a pristinely energetic painting that I found overwhelmingly pleasing. The book is worth picking up just for such an animated, fun little piece. Other poems I particularly enjoyed are Early Sunday Morning by Dan Masterson (it really captured the quiet, pre-bustle atmosphere of the painting by Edward Hopper), Red Hills and Bones (a lovely encapsulation of the painting by Georgia O'Keefe - you really can't go wrong with Georgia), Big French Bread by Marvin Bell (pays nice attention to the detail in the creation "French Bread" by Red Grooms), and Map by J. Patrick Lewis (based on the painting by Jasper Johns; I especially like the invention of the word "oxymoronicamerica").

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kyle G

    This book was very cool. All the artists and the writers did an amazing job on this book. The pictures were amazing and they went very well with the poems. This is one of the best poem books I have ever read. I think that the "choice-maker" of the poems in this book did an amazing job. I recommend this book to people who like poems and love America. -Kyle Garland This book was very cool. All the artists and the writers did an amazing job on this book. The pictures were amazing and they went very well with the poems. This is one of the best poem books I have ever read. I think that the "choice-maker" of the poems in this book did an amazing job. I recommend this book to people who like poems and love America. -Kyle Garland

  14. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    This collection pairs pieces of Twentieth-Century American art with poems written by several authors inspired by the art. It is a cool concept and I enjoyed the poems. I can see this being used in an art or a writing class, but I don't see many teens picking it up on their own. This collection pairs pieces of Twentieth-Century American art with poems written by several authors inspired by the art. It is a cool concept and I enjoyed the poems. I can see this being used in an art or a writing class, but I don't see many teens picking it up on their own.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Sheetz

    This is a beautiful combination of 20th century art and poetry. The poems are as diverse as the artwork. Great for a combined lesson of an art project with writing for poetry for 3rd through 6th grade. Classroom library 3rd through 6th grade.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    Dreamy and delicious world of poems that shows the 20th century American art. I loved the whole book and the various choice of the poems.

  17. 4 out of 5

    derek

    Brilliant concept and well executed

  18. 4 out of 5

    Matt Miles

    The pairings of classic artwork and reflective poems are simply beautiful.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Greenberg introduces this collection by stating that the poems, which are inspired by the images, are arranges in “four distinct but complimentary motifs:” there are stories, which are “poems that conjured a memory or tell an anecdote.” Some examples of poem/art pairings include “Woman at the Piano” (poem) by William Jay Smith with “Woman at the Piano” (painting) by Elie Nadelman; “The Bison Returns” (poem) by Tony Johnston and “Standing Buffalo” (sculpture) by Charles M. Russell; and “Early Sun Greenberg introduces this collection by stating that the poems, which are inspired by the images, are arranges in “four distinct but complimentary motifs:” there are stories, which are “poems that conjured a memory or tell an anecdote.” Some examples of poem/art pairings include “Woman at the Piano” (poem) by William Jay Smith with “Woman at the Piano” (painting) by Elie Nadelman; “The Bison Returns” (poem) by Tony Johnston and “Standing Buffalo” (sculpture) by Charles M. Russell; and “Early Sunday Morning” (poem) by Dan Masterson and “Early Sunday Morning” (painting) by Edward Hopper. [return][return]Another motif is that of voices, which “contains poems in which the poet steps inside the artwork and assumes the voice of the object or person depicted there.” Some examples of poem/art pairings in this motif include “From Above” (poem) by Angela Johnson and “Tar Beach” (painting and textile) by Faith Ringgold; “Martha Graham in ‘Letter to the World’” (poem) by Lyn Lifshin and “Martha Graham, Letter to the World” (photograph) by Barbara Morgan; and “America Talks” (poem) by Peter F. Neumeyer and “Barber Shop” (painting) by Jacob Lawrence.[return][return]The third motif is impressions, which display “the poets’ powers of description as they examine the elements of the artwork and offer vibrant word pictures based on what is contained there.” Notable poem/art pairings in this section include “Red Hills and Bones” (poem) by Laura Kasischke and “Red Hills and Bones” (painting) by Georgia O’Keeffe; “Big French Bread” (poem) by Marvin Bell and “French Bread” (mixed media) by Red Grooms; and “Diamante for Chuck” (poem) by Jan Greenberg and “Self-Portrait (painting) by Chuck Close.[return][return]Finally, the fourth motif, expressions, “explores aspects of visual form that concern the nature of art and the artist.” Included in this section are “”Lessons from a Painting by Rothko” (poem) by Bobbi Katz and “Untitled” (painting) by Mark Rothko; “River Song (poem) by Warren Woessner and “Brooklyn Bridge: Variation on an Old Theme” (painting) by Joseph Stella; and “The World, Starring You” (poem) by Naomi Shihab Nye and “The Cathedrals of Broadway (painting) by Florine Stettheimer.[return][return]What is notable about the art is that Greenberg includes a variety of mediums here: there is mixed media, oil on canvas, photographs, sculptures, aerographs, prints, silkscreens, and collages. The wide array of mediums presented will appeal to all tastes. Further, the poems are presented in a variety of formats: there is free verse but also standardized verses such as sonnets and patterns. Heart to Heart is an excellent, accessible interdisciplinary work appropriate for middle school ages and up.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Casey

    1. Genre: poetry, junior books 2. Summary: This is a collection of poems, each one inspired by a twentieth-century American work of art. It features famous artists such as Jackson Pollock and Georgia O'Keefe. 3. Critique: a.) My favorite part about this book of poems is the artwork. b.) Artwork can be defined as many different things. It could include what most people consider art, asthetically appealing paintings, drawings, etc. but it can also include words strung together to create a beautiful po 1. Genre: poetry, junior books 2. Summary: This is a collection of poems, each one inspired by a twentieth-century American work of art. It features famous artists such as Jackson Pollock and Georgia O'Keefe. 3. Critique: a.) My favorite part about this book of poems is the artwork. b.) Artwork can be defined as many different things. It could include what most people consider art, asthetically appealing paintings, drawings, etc. but it can also include words strung together to create a beautiful poem. This book does such an amazing job marrying the two together to create a wonderful book of poetry. c.) As I was reading this book of poetry there was one poem and piece of artwork that immediately caught my eye. The poem, "From Above" by Angela Johnson caught my eye because of the artwork. Her poem was inspired by the story Tar Beach by Faith Ringgold. When I was a kid, this was one of my absolute favorite books! I remember reading this book in my art class in the 2nd grade and creating a quilt out of everyone in my classes "quilt pieces." This poem and artwork just warmed my heart because of my experience. 4. Curriculum Connection: This book of poetry is such a great art inspiration. This would be good to read aloud to students in the upper elementary grades because some of the words are difficult and the meanings are hard to figure out so I think it would be confusing to the children but the artwork can be used for any grade to inspire an art activity. For instance, you could use the Tar Beach picture to do what my teacher did and use the inspiration of a quilt to create a class quilt. Have each student recieve a square of fabric and let them use fabric paints to create their own square that tells the story of their own life. When the quilt pieces are finished you could sew them all together to create a story book quilt of the classroom's story of their lives.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    Initially, I thought this book was amazing and had decided I was going to get a copy for the kids to have. I really liked that you had poetry inspired by and about art. I also read this a little while after we'd finished going through a pretty solid poetry unit with the Corbin. Following that assignment, I felt compelled to find poetry books for the kids to have so that they could broaden their minds a bit and start to become intelligent and worthwhile persons. (I'm sure people who knew me when Initially, I thought this book was amazing and had decided I was going to get a copy for the kids to have. I really liked that you had poetry inspired by and about art. I also read this a little while after we'd finished going through a pretty solid poetry unit with the Corbin. Following that assignment, I felt compelled to find poetry books for the kids to have so that they could broaden their minds a bit and start to become intelligent and worthwhile persons. (I'm sure people who knew me when are rolling their eyes at my advocacy of poetry. Or they're on their knees repenting since The End Must Surely Be Nigh. Either or. But exposure to Sarah will do that to you.) So I was excited when I found this book that married poetry with my other academic love—art. Now that some time has passed, I find that my feelings of love and adoration have quelled significantly. There was more poetry in there that didn't impress than there was that did. At least in terms of what I remember. I think the organizational breakdown for the book is a good concept but ineffectively realized. Even so, I'm pleased that this book won the Printz honor if for no other reason than it puts a book of poetry (much of which is not bad even if I'm not interested in reading it again) in the canon for kids to come across.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Todd Burleson

    This is an additional title for 520 With the premise that a photo is worth a thousand words, I love the idea that images can inspire so many different poems.  Jan Greenberg organized the poems in this book around four central ideas:  Stories, Voices, Impressions and Expressions.  These four themes provide the link between the sometimes disparate poems.  As one who loves photography, I was drawn particularly to the photographs.  My favorite image in the book is by Alfred Stieglitz entitled: The St This is an additional title for 520 With the premise that a photo is worth a thousand words, I love the idea that images can inspire so many different poems.  Jan Greenberg organized the poems in this book around four central ideas:  Stories, Voices, Impressions and Expressions.  These four themes provide the link between the sometimes disparate poems.  As one who loves photography, I was drawn particularly to the photographs.  My favorite image in the book is by Alfred Stieglitz entitled: The Steerage.  It was taken in 1907.  Maybe intentional, maybe not, the image that precedes it is of Georgia O'Keefe's 'Poppy.' Stieglitz and O'Keefe revolved around one another in the early 1900's New York art world.  The book has a nice combination of challenging poems and simple verse. This book is a terrific way to make poetry come alive. I would use this book to inspire children's poetry. They might write poetry about the pieces of artwork inside the book, or they might even be able to create their own photographs or other works of art and use them as springboards for their own poetry.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Penny Ziegler

    Michael Printz Book VOYA Book Review Codes ~ Quality 5Q; Popularity 2P; Grade Level Interest M, J, S Developmental Assets: None This book is a magnificent book! The numerous art works represented are top notch and the accompanying poems by a variety of poets are first rate and relate well to the art work. The book is divided into four sections. The poems accompanying the art pieces "Woman at the Piano," "The Brown Bomber," "Early Sunday Morning" and "Big French Bread" were particularly interesting. Michael Printz Book VOYA Book Review Codes ~ Quality 5Q; Popularity 2P; Grade Level Interest M, J, S Developmental Assets: None This book is a magnificent book! The numerous art works represented are top notch and the accompanying poems by a variety of poets are first rate and relate well to the art work. The book is divided into four sections. The poems accompanying the art pieces "Woman at the Piano," "The Brown Bomber," "Early Sunday Morning" and "Big French Bread" were particularly interesting. The poem "Ringside" which was written to coinside with "Stag at Starkey's" by George Bellows has a great surprise ending! This book would be an interesting way for an art teacher and language arts teacher to corroborate. It would be a great book to use to introduce poetry to young adults many of whom have had no exposure to this literary form. This book would provide inspiration for young adults who would enjoy the short poems and find exploring the art a worthwhile way to spend time. It would make a great gift!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    An anthology of original poetry inspired by American art. An impressive cast of poets is featured, including: Jane Yolen, Nancy Willard, X. J. Kennedy, Naomi Shihab Nye, David Mura, and Angela Johnson, among others. Artworks by Thomas Hart Benton, Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, Grandma Moses, Faith Ringgold, Man Ray, Georgia O'Keeffe, and more serve as subject matter. Each poem is presented next to a photograph of the artwork. The book includes biographical notes on the poets and artists, as we An anthology of original poetry inspired by American art. An impressive cast of poets is featured, including: Jane Yolen, Nancy Willard, X. J. Kennedy, Naomi Shihab Nye, David Mura, and Angela Johnson, among others. Artworks by Thomas Hart Benton, Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, Grandma Moses, Faith Ringgold, Man Ray, Georgia O'Keeffe, and more serve as subject matter. Each poem is presented next to a photograph of the artwork. The book includes biographical notes on the poets and artists, as well as an index. An introduction by Greenberg explains the project and how the poems are arranged. This book would serve as a good introduction to famous American artists and contemporary poets for middle and high school students. It would also serve as a good example for students to write their own poem inspired by their favorite piece of art, either as a school project or a library program. The incorporation of images may encourage reluctant poetry readers to give this book a try. A recommended purchase for school and public libraries.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Corbett

    Heart to Heart is a unique collection of poetry. Each poem was inspired by a work of 20th century American art. The artwork represents some of the most important artistic movements of the past century. The poetry was written by distinguished American poets whose work allows the reader an opportunity to see the artwork from a new perspective. Together the artwork and poetry form a beautiful image which highlights the power of art and language to touch the soul. Sections in the book include storie Heart to Heart is a unique collection of poetry. Each poem was inspired by a work of 20th century American art. The artwork represents some of the most important artistic movements of the past century. The poetry was written by distinguished American poets whose work allows the reader an opportunity to see the artwork from a new perspective. Together the artwork and poetry form a beautiful image which highlights the power of art and language to touch the soul. Sections in the book include stories, voices, impressions, and expressions. The book also contains interesting biographical notes on each of the poets and artists. I especially enjoyed the poem "The Painting Comes Home" by Stephen Corey which was written to accompany the watercolor painting, "Six O'Clock" by Charles Burchfield about the love of family and home.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    I loved my high school English teacher's assignments to write in response to art; perhaps that's why I enjoyed "Heart to Heart" so much. The editor has collected art from such luminaries as Georgia O'Keefe, Christo and Jackson Pollock, and put them side by side with poetry inspired by the pieces. The writers and poets are excellent, too, including a few who write for children, like Naomi Shihab Nye. Some of the poems are abstract and difficult; others are light and amusing. There's a whole wide I loved my high school English teacher's assignments to write in response to art; perhaps that's why I enjoyed "Heart to Heart" so much. The editor has collected art from such luminaries as Georgia O'Keefe, Christo and Jackson Pollock, and put them side by side with poetry inspired by the pieces. The writers and poets are excellent, too, including a few who write for children, like Naomi Shihab Nye. Some of the poems are abstract and difficult; others are light and amusing. There's a whole wide range to draw from when bringing this to children. My favorite is "Bato con Khakis" in which a nerdy, bifocal-wearing Jacinto Jesús Cardona sighs over the cool cat bato in shades portrayed in César Martínez' painting. I would bring this book to a writer's workshop, along with some favorite art pieces or an art museum field trip.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Staci Browning

    I enjoyed this book of poems. It was interesting because it really focused on different variety of poems and it gives a different perspective of the way poems can be written. The authors were all different and I really enjoyed almost all of their works. One of my favorite poems was by Carol Boston Weatherford, titled "The Brown Bomber" This poem was about a fighter named Joe, who they called "The Brown Bomber". This poem was interesting in the diction she used, and the story was really interesti I enjoyed this book of poems. It was interesting because it really focused on different variety of poems and it gives a different perspective of the way poems can be written. The authors were all different and I really enjoyed almost all of their works. One of my favorite poems was by Carol Boston Weatherford, titled "The Brown Bomber" This poem was about a fighter named Joe, who they called "The Brown Bomber". This poem was interesting in the diction she used, and the story was really interesting. A poem I didn't like as much was called, "Naming" by Joy Harjo. In this poem there was no clear purpose of what she was trying to get across, I guess to me that makes it hard to relate to the author and the work.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I thought this anthology of poems was quite entertaining. Each poem was written by a different person and was somehow inspired by a twentieth-century American work of art. What made it even better was the fact that the poem appeared on the page next to the artwork that inspired it. That made it easier to see how the poet was impacted by the art and made it more friendly to read too. It is in color with large pictures and is divided into four section based on the themes of the poetry. For someone I thought this anthology of poems was quite entertaining. Each poem was written by a different person and was somehow inspired by a twentieth-century American work of art. What made it even better was the fact that the poem appeared on the page next to the artwork that inspired it. That made it easier to see how the poet was impacted by the art and made it more friendly to read too. It is in color with large pictures and is divided into four section based on the themes of the poetry. For someone who isn't a huge poetry buff this book is a good one to start with. The quality of poems is excellent--it is clear why it is a Printz honor book. I really enjoyed this book and would read it again.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I am really confused as to why this won a Printz Honor. I found nothing remarkable about this book. In fact, I was a little bored while reading it. The artwork was not very impressive, I didn't feel moved by the pieces. I was also unfascinated with the poetry. I did not feel as if they added to the artwork and vice versa. The reason this book doesn't have the lowest rating is because it just was not absolutely horrible. I would not recommend. *Taken from my book reviews blog: http://reviewsatmse. I am really confused as to why this won a Printz Honor. I found nothing remarkable about this book. In fact, I was a little bored while reading it. The artwork was not very impressive, I didn't feel moved by the pieces. I was also unfascinated with the poetry. I did not feel as if they added to the artwork and vice versa. The reason this book doesn't have the lowest rating is because it just was not absolutely horrible. I would not recommend. *Taken from my book reviews blog: http://reviewsatmse.blogspot.com/2009...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    This is a book of poems created by various famous writers. Each poem was inspired by a work of twentieth century American art which appears on the page with it. The pictures, unfortunately, were the best part of this book. Some of the poems were well-crafted and offered a unique idea, but most of them failed to draw a meaningful interpretation from the art they were connected to and came across as sloppy and tired. A cool idea poorly executed. Recommended to people interested in art, but not so This is a book of poems created by various famous writers. Each poem was inspired by a work of twentieth century American art which appears on the page with it. The pictures, unfortunately, were the best part of this book. Some of the poems were well-crafted and offered a unique idea, but most of them failed to draw a meaningful interpretation from the art they were connected to and came across as sloppy and tired. A cool idea poorly executed. Recommended to people interested in art, but not so much poetry.

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