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It's Me, Eddie: A Fictional Memoir

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Obsceniška, exhibicionistinė, kunkuliuojanti emocijomis, pilna prisipažinimų ir kaltinimų visam pasauliui knyga, kurią viešai degino rusų emigrantai Amerikoje ir kurią galiausiai pats Limonovas uždraudė leisti Rusijoje. Meilė ir išsiskyrimas, narkotikai ir padugnės, Niujorko socialistai ir homoseksualai, maištas prieš buržuazinę visuomenę ir melu gyvenančią Ameriką (naujaus Obsceniška, exhibicionistinė, kunkuliuojanti emocijomis, pilna prisipažinimų ir kaltinimų visam pasauliui knyga, kurią viešai degino rusų emigrantai Amerikoje ir kurią galiausiai pats Limonovas uždraudė leisti Rusijoje. Meilė ir išsiskyrimas, narkotikai ir padugnės, Niujorko socialistai ir homoseksualai, maištas prieš buržuazinę visuomenę ir melu gyvenančią Ameriką (naujausias 2004 m. šios knygos leidimas vokiškai pervadintas Fuck off, Amerika), užgniaužiančią asmenybę bei individualumą... „Duokit man, broleliai, kulkosvaidį, oi, duokit kulkosvaidį!”, – vapa apsirūkęs Edička. Ši knyga tiems, kurie nors kartą gyvenime kad ir patylom yra ištarę: „Eikit jūs visi...”


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Obsceniška, exhibicionistinė, kunkuliuojanti emocijomis, pilna prisipažinimų ir kaltinimų visam pasauliui knyga, kurią viešai degino rusų emigrantai Amerikoje ir kurią galiausiai pats Limonovas uždraudė leisti Rusijoje. Meilė ir išsiskyrimas, narkotikai ir padugnės, Niujorko socialistai ir homoseksualai, maištas prieš buržuazinę visuomenę ir melu gyvenančią Ameriką (naujaus Obsceniška, exhibicionistinė, kunkuliuojanti emocijomis, pilna prisipažinimų ir kaltinimų visam pasauliui knyga, kurią viešai degino rusų emigrantai Amerikoje ir kurią galiausiai pats Limonovas uždraudė leisti Rusijoje. Meilė ir išsiskyrimas, narkotikai ir padugnės, Niujorko socialistai ir homoseksualai, maištas prieš buržuazinę visuomenę ir melu gyvenančią Ameriką (naujausias 2004 m. šios knygos leidimas vokiškai pervadintas Fuck off, Amerika), užgniaužiančią asmenybę bei individualumą... „Duokit man, broleliai, kulkosvaidį, oi, duokit kulkosvaidį!”, – vapa apsirūkęs Edička. Ši knyga tiems, kurie nors kartą gyvenime kad ir patylom yra ištarę: „Eikit jūs visi...”

30 review for It's Me, Eddie: A Fictional Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Vit Babenco

    Eduard Limonov is an incorrigible rebel. And he is one of those rebels that would revolt anywhere and against anything. I am on welfare. I live at your expense, you pay taxes and I don't do a fucking thing. Twice a month I go to the clean, spacious welfare office at 1515 Broadway and receive my checks. I consider myself to be scum, the dregs of society, I have no shame or conscience, therefore my conscience doesn't bother me and I don't plan to look for work, I want to receive your money to the Eduard Limonov is an incorrigible rebel. And he is one of those rebels that would revolt anywhere and against anything. I am on welfare. I live at your expense, you pay taxes and I don't do a fucking thing. Twice a month I go to the clean, spacious welfare office at 1515 Broadway and receive my checks. I consider myself to be scum, the dregs of society, I have no shame or conscience, therefore my conscience doesn't bother me and I don't plan to look for work, I want to receive your money to the end of my days. And my name is Edichka, ‘Eddie-baby.’ And you, gentlemen, can figure you're getting off cheap. Early in the morning you crawl out of your warm beds and hurry – some by car, some by subway or bus – to work. I hate work. I gobble my shchi, drink, sometimes drink myself into oblivion, seek adventure in dark city blocks; I have a magnificent, expensive white suit and an exquisite nervous system; I wince at your belly laugh in the movie theatre and wrinkle my nose. It's Me, Eddie by Eduard Limonov reminded me of the books by Charles Bukowski and Henry Miller – whatever they write about they write only about themselves. There are only them in the entire world, all the rest and all the others are just scenery and entourage… The laws were devised by the rich. But, as one of the proudest slogans of our unsuccessful Russian Revolution proclaims, “The right to life is higher than the right to private property!” I have said that I did not hate the specific bearers of evil, the rich. I have even admitted that there might be among them victims of the world order. What I hated was the system, in which one man goes out of his fucking mind from boredom and idleness, or from the daily production of fresh hundreds of thousands, while another man barely earns a living at hard labor. I wanted to be an equal among equals. It's Me, Eddie is stark graphic – it is a wild mixture of nostalgia and loathing, of sentimentality and squalor. But Eduard Limonov is sincere and he writes without ostentation. My God! The past is so disgusting, and there's so much of it. I have more of it than most – yet I haven't amassed any things. And I do not foresee having things in the future. Shall I ever have all these little boxes, labels, tags… Never, I'm sure. I amass the immaterial… Everyone is a smith of one’s own unhappiness.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nataliya

    Until recently, I was content thinking of Russian writer-turned-politician Eduard Limonov, a founder of Russia's National Bolshevik Party, as just another strange puzzling figure on the murky Russian political landscape. Then I stumbled upon an article in my morning-off internet perusal spree that made me cautiously curious about the writer part of his image¹ (since the political part makes me really try to do a one-eyebrow raise, and I'm horrible at that).The aforementioned article, if you're in Until recently, I was content thinking of Russian writer-turned-politician Eduard Limonov, a founder of Russia's National Bolshevik Party, as just another strange puzzling figure on the murky Russian political landscape. Then I stumbled upon an article in my morning-off internet perusal spree that made me cautiously curious about the writer part of his image¹ (since the political part makes me really try to do a one-eyebrow raise, and I'm horrible at that).The aforementioned article, if you're interested: http://globalvoicesonline.org/2013/05... And so I started (and, honestly, ended) my literary acquaintance with Limonov through his first novel It's Me, Eddie, a cynical memoir (or at least a memoir-ized work of fiction) of young Limonov's life in New York after leaving Soviet Union in the mid-1970s. Let's see if I can summarize: (1) a rambling story of a pretentious, cynical, angry and quite passive young man (a poet, by the way) full of disillusionment and bitterness... (2) ...feeling lost in a new country that is not fitting his sensitive artsy personality; (3) pathetically and creepily obsessed with the wife who left him; (4) a man high on misogyny, full of feelings of exaggerated superiority over everyone and anyone while at the same time battling insecurity, depression and anger; (5) casually experimenting with homosexuality while dwelling on the images of the aforementioned ex-wife; (6) with a dab of not atypical Russian antisemitism, quite repulsive attitudes towards women, and feeling that however down he may be, the world still remains beneath him and his amazing nature; (7) constantly dwelling on some aspect of his presumed moral/ethical/whatever cynical superiority ... (8) ... all while he has deep feelings of resentment for the way his new country is treating his special snowflakeness. (9) All this, by the way, is on the background of fully typed out frequent obscenities - not that common in Russian literature where they frequently would be spelled to the equivalent of f--k or m****r-f****r. (10) Oh, and a few candid descriptions of sex. Phew! No, I did not like Limonov's book. Yes, the only feelings it evoked in me was bored irritation and frequent checking of how much longer until the end of it. Limonov's protagonist was simply irritating (reading his thoughts was similar to imagining the screeching sounds the nails make on a chalkboard, if I have to compare it to anything), and sex and obscenities alone are not enough to sustain attention of this freely-swearing gynecologist. On the other hand, misogyny, self-pity mixed with self-entitlement, and constant whining and bile were grating on my nerves in a very unsettling fashion. The intended message of this book, as far as I can even find one, is that because the world sucks it's okay to be an asshole bitching about unfairness in the most pretentious fashion one can imagine. If the intent was to shock the reader, it failed with me. If the intent was to sigh in relief that this very "meh" book has ended, then it served its purpose. From now on, I'm content with occasionally seeing mentions of Limonov in Russian political news (since Russian politics can often be a neverending source of black humor) and to stay way from his literary efforts. 1 exasperated star.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John Christy

    One of the best books of the 20th century. Limonov stirs up a poet's rage against everything that is anti-human, everything that is repressive and stifling . . . His solution - tear it all down. Eddie-Baby leaves the USSR for America with promises of riches, women, drugs, and artistic liberty. He finds abject poverty, his wife leaves him, wine and vodka still suffice, and unique voices are marginalized as much in America as they are in Russia; in short, nothing changes. Passion and love are juxt One of the best books of the 20th century. Limonov stirs up a poet's rage against everything that is anti-human, everything that is repressive and stifling . . . His solution - tear it all down. Eddie-Baby leaves the USSR for America with promises of riches, women, drugs, and artistic liberty. He finds abject poverty, his wife leaves him, wine and vodka still suffice, and unique voices are marginalized as much in America as they are in Russia; in short, nothing changes. Passion and love are juxtaposed with the rote boredom of work and urban life. Along the way, Limonov takes aim at political activists, Russians, Americans, men, women, and especially our predilection to surrender to life. He rarely misses his mark . . . The sentiment is close to that one found in the romantics, especially the 19th century rebellion against urbanity and the industrial mode of life. There's a short section early in the book where Limonov accuses his reader of being a slave to work, of having a petty bourgeois mentality, and a pathetic soul. This is capped off by the admonition, "You're shit!" It's hard to disagree, put in those terms. With Eddie as my accuser, I'd confess to anything . . . Ignore the reviewers who are shocked by Limonov's provocations. What is shocking is not sleeping with a black man on the street, but living a beige life. For those interested, Limonov's politics also show an early alignment with national bolshevism and a repudiation of anglo liberalism. We see somewhat weaker critiques of the early Bolsheviks, and especially a condemnation of the post-Khrushchev Russian bureaucratic state. Limonov's prose has a tendency to reach hysterical levels of emotion; whether this is a good or bad mark will probably depend on the reader.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    An incredibly vulgar and pretentious book. Written in an attempt to "shock" and most of it copies Henry Miller in his "Sexus, Plexus, Nexus" Trilogy. Overall entertaining, and I could see and understand where he was coming from... definitely not boring! Made me blush while reading in the NY subways. So cocky! An incredibly vulgar and pretentious book. Written in an attempt to "shock" and most of it copies Henry Miller in his "Sexus, Plexus, Nexus" Trilogy. Overall entertaining, and I could see and understand where he was coming from... definitely not boring! Made me blush while reading in the NY subways. So cocky!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    This is the first russian book I read that had curses actually printed in it. I know in English it is not a big deal but actually see in the Cyrillic print, in the same font my pledge of allegiance to the young pioneers had been printed in -- "I fingerfucked her cunt for what seemed to be forever" was an unsettling and unforgettable experience. Besides the shock volume it's ok -- the usual bitch and moan of a misunderstood artist. This is an important book in the content of its time -- the close This is the first russian book I read that had curses actually printed in it. I know in English it is not a big deal but actually see in the Cyrillic print, in the same font my pledge of allegiance to the young pioneers had been printed in -- "I fingerfucked her cunt for what seemed to be forever" was an unsettling and unforgettable experience. Besides the shock volume it's ok -- the usual bitch and moan of a misunderstood artist. This is an important book in the content of its time -- the close-up of the apocalyptic horseman.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Charles Baudelaire

    Yeah...someone recommended this book to me in a dentist's office...I found it on the street and loved it. Actually, memoires of Russian punk might be even better. Yeah...someone recommended this book to me in a dentist's office...I found it on the street and loved it. Actually, memoires of Russian punk might be even better.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Pat Schakelvoort

    I read this book, cause I was curious about the "Limonov sucked a black man's cock" allegations. Thankfully the Dutch ( and also the French and Italian ) translation is called "The Russian poet likes big Negroes" Leave it to the Germans to call it "Fuck off, America" Maybe Germans don't see sucking a black man's cock as such a big deal. The content, of course it could do with less gay sex and masturbation. It tells the story of a Russian emigre dissident, who is forced to take welfare and has lo I read this book, cause I was curious about the "Limonov sucked a black man's cock" allegations. Thankfully the Dutch ( and also the French and Italian ) translation is called "The Russian poet likes big Negroes" Leave it to the Germans to call it "Fuck off, America" Maybe Germans don't see sucking a black man's cock as such a big deal. The content, of course it could do with less gay sex and masturbation. It tells the story of a Russian emigre dissident, who is forced to take welfare and has lost all hope about free America. He becomes cynic and depressed and so on and so on. It criticizes the glorifying rhetoric about America of Russian dissidents at that time and the neglect of the Russian dissidents by the American government. Russian scholars and poets were forced to work as busboys and movers. It served them right probably.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    This book is partly responsible for my acting like an asshole for as long as i did. I heard that Ayn Rand has the same effect. Eduard collects welfare in his crummy apartment, buys wine, and walks around at night wearing a white three-piece suit. He carries no money and therefore doesn't have to worry about being robbed. Plus he hates women. That about sums it up. Arrested for attempting to assemble an army in Russia to invade Kazakhistan. I heard him on NPR recently discussing the protest movem This book is partly responsible for my acting like an asshole for as long as i did. I heard that Ayn Rand has the same effect. Eduard collects welfare in his crummy apartment, buys wine, and walks around at night wearing a white three-piece suit. He carries no money and therefore doesn't have to worry about being robbed. Plus he hates women. That about sums it up. Arrested for attempting to assemble an army in Russia to invade Kazakhistan. I heard him on NPR recently discussing the protest movement in Russia. They never mentioned the novels he wrote.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Aditya /

    This was not a perfect book, but it's one of the best books ever written. The protagonist was a miserable wretch sometimes, but his life was that of a miserable wretch sometimes too. Deeply romantic and moving. Both in the classical sense and the general sense. The version I read was translated from Russian by S.L.Campbell (1983). I cannot speak for any other translation, but I do recommend this one as fantastic. Some of the diction and dialogue is what makes it one of the best books ever writte This was not a perfect book, but it's one of the best books ever written. The protagonist was a miserable wretch sometimes, but his life was that of a miserable wretch sometimes too. Deeply romantic and moving. Both in the classical sense and the general sense. The version I read was translated from Russian by S.L.Campbell (1983). I cannot speak for any other translation, but I do recommend this one as fantastic. Some of the diction and dialogue is what makes it one of the best books ever written.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Pitt

    If you read this book with any trace of pride or insecurity - in other words, in a normal state of mind - you're not going to understand it. If you're at home, or if you feel comfortable somewhere else, or if you have anything to lose at all, you're going to hate it. If you read this at your worst, when nothing seems to be going right and you don't belong anywhere, then you'll understand it. If you read this book with any trace of pride or insecurity - in other words, in a normal state of mind - you're not going to understand it. If you're at home, or if you feel comfortable somewhere else, or if you have anything to lose at all, you're going to hate it. If you read this at your worst, when nothing seems to be going right and you don't belong anywhere, then you'll understand it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris Tempel

    For me the antidote to my political problem with the novel was Limonov, who is styled as a commoner literature, writing frankly about personal adventures, problems, and dreams. And, I must say, I identified with it. Once Limonov gets in your brain you'll never try to write a Great American Novel. For me the antidote to my political problem with the novel was Limonov, who is styled as a commoner literature, writing frankly about personal adventures, problems, and dreams. And, I must say, I identified with it. Once Limonov gets in your brain you'll never try to write a Great American Novel.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ibrahim Niftiyev

    I evaluate this book as an angry self-manifestation of a young rebellion and anarchist soviet boy who turned into a man in the USA during the 1970s, not by choice but by the severe force of the circumstances. Some parts were too much, some were disgusting, some were cheap, and some were unnecessary. Mr. Limonov said the things that we usually do not prefer to speak. Not only speak, actually but also we prefer not to see or accept those details of our lives that are included in the category of sm I evaluate this book as an angry self-manifestation of a young rebellion and anarchist soviet boy who turned into a man in the USA during the 1970s, not by choice but by the severe force of the circumstances. Some parts were too much, some were disgusting, some were cheap, and some were unnecessary. Mr. Limonov said the things that we usually do not prefer to speak. Not only speak, actually but also we prefer not to see or accept those details of our lives that are included in the category of small things. He deconstructed those small things and transformed into something nasty. Meanwhile, that nastiness created a loud scream of unsatisfied needs and demands. Thus, I can not evaluate it as an innovation because still, it was a process of going in circles but that circle was very familiar and warm to me, so I could emphasize. I was extremely annoyed because of his women problems during my reading. Sometimes just wanted to shout to this dumb skull that "be a man!" not a sassy that cries over the ruined dreams for the females. That anger he has is just a flip side of sadness that he could not get rid of. He argued that it is because he loves and knows what is love and etc. Well, makes sense but still "adapt or die inside" philosophy shows itself under the deep layers of the existence of a human being. The pathetic existence of this Eddie boy does not deserve any respect neither from himself not by the society around him. We can talk and talk about this book. It reminded me of my youth and rebel times. I never held an angry position to myself or to the world but even if I did, it is understandable. It is also understandable in Eddie's case, as well. I totally get why youngsters or teens accumulate anger and a huge need for self-manifestation. Long story short, "It's me, Eddie" is a provocative, mind-blowing, disgusting, and unnecessary book that you might read from an absolutely lunatic mind owner.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Reuben Woolley

    Eduard Limonov was a horrible little shit, and the world is a better place without him in it. He got away with a lot of what he did in the public eye because people saw him as a cool outsider or an avant-garde rebel. This is the book that propelled him to cult status, and supposedly one of his best. I haven’t read any others, so I can’t vouch for that statement, but this book is not very good. He has a genuine talent for writing pretty prose, I only wish he had used it for literally anything oth Eduard Limonov was a horrible little shit, and the world is a better place without him in it. He got away with a lot of what he did in the public eye because people saw him as a cool outsider or an avant-garde rebel. This is the book that propelled him to cult status, and supposedly one of his best. I haven’t read any others, so I can’t vouch for that statement, but this book is not very good. He has a genuine talent for writing pretty prose, I only wish he had used it for literally anything other than what he did for his entire life, which is being a reactionary little shit. The story manages to be predictable when it’s supposed to be breaking taboos, and offensive when it’s supposed to be likeable. Besides everything else, it’s honestly just quite boring. Please, do not waste your time reading Eduard Limonov.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Grizel

    I read this book because Mark Sedgwick talks about it in `Against the Modern World.' While it starts off promisingly enough with Limonov eating sauerkraut in the nude in the flophouse where he lives, it quickly degenerates into a non-stop whine about how his wife left him. After about 90 pages of this, you start to see why. While the author comes across as a man of modest talents and exagerated self-regard, there are some good insights on Russians, Russian emigres and their experience in America I read this book because Mark Sedgwick talks about it in `Against the Modern World.' While it starts off promisingly enough with Limonov eating sauerkraut in the nude in the flophouse where he lives, it quickly degenerates into a non-stop whine about how his wife left him. After about 90 pages of this, you start to see why. While the author comes across as a man of modest talents and exagerated self-regard, there are some good insights on Russians, Russian emigres and their experience in America, and untalented artists who think emigrating to a foreign country will get them the respect they aren't getting at home. P.S. the wife who left him tried to cash in on his `success' by writing her own book, `It's me, Elena' which is apparently even more pretentious. I haven't read it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Constantin Gavrilescu

    I've read the "Memoirs of a Russian Punk" and it was a lot better. I can start to see the formula in Limonov's books. "It's Me, Eddie" is a little do drawn out and whiny, but it has a great ending! It seemed to me like a grown up Holden Caulfield, and whiny depressed soul with a few good redeeming qualities! I've read the "Memoirs of a Russian Punk" and it was a lot better. I can start to see the formula in Limonov's books. "It's Me, Eddie" is a little do drawn out and whiny, but it has a great ending! It seemed to me like a grown up Holden Caulfield, and whiny depressed soul with a few good redeeming qualities!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    I read about this guy in the NYT magazine. I guess he's one of the leading anti-Putin figures in Russia now. This book is about him living in New York in the late 70s. Kind of derivative of beat literature, but entertaining and a quick read. He does seem like a pretentious jerk, though. I read about this guy in the NYT magazine. I guess he's one of the leading anti-Putin figures in Russia now. This book is about him living in New York in the late 70s. Kind of derivative of beat literature, but entertaining and a quick read. He does seem like a pretentious jerk, though.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Monika Saraf

    Amazing book. If you wanna know about real life of emigrate- this is the book you need. Limonov provokes you in every sentences, he shows you life without unicorns and rainbow. And if you are ready for it- read it and enjoy

  18. 5 out of 5

    Reed

    Russian novelist and principal leader of the neo-Bolsheviks

  19. 5 out of 5

    Iamazai

    the best book i ever read!

  20. 5 out of 5

    J Benedetti

    love me some Eddie-baby.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris Molnar

    Now that he’s dead Limonov should get the Mishima rehabilitation. Or at least the Celine pass. If you represent his estate, contact me - I am an editor and I have had trouble contacting you. Unbelievable this is out of print and impossible to find in English, not to mention that it isn’t a Penguin or NYRB Classic. Real autofiction in the best way (hard and class conscious, not as society blind as the Beats, or gentrified academic like the latest American wave), dirty New York, the era of Eileen M Now that he’s dead Limonov should get the Mishima rehabilitation. Or at least the Celine pass. If you represent his estate, contact me - I am an editor and I have had trouble contacting you. Unbelievable this is out of print and impossible to find in English, not to mention that it isn’t a Penguin or NYRB Classic. Real autofiction in the best way (hard and class conscious, not as society blind as the Beats, or gentrified academic like the latest American wave), dirty New York, the era of Eileen Myles or more specifically Richard Hell (who gets a shoutout), unsentimental but sweet and vulnerable and perceptive even (sometimes) despite itself, always willing to play the fool in service of truth. Uniquely, it is a resolutely bohemian work of emigre literature, cleareyed about the ruin and greatness of America and the Soviet Union alike (on Rauschenberg’s decline into a bauble of capital - “America gets even with its artists by other means than Russia does”) as we follow Eddie freshly immigrated to mid-70’s NYC from Moscow and talking shit about Solzhenitsyn. Imagine Trotsky’s time in the Bronx, if he were a poet and a fucking dirtbag. Absorbing poetic and philosophical riffs, thumbnail character sketches, and so on. Uncensored in thought, but with a less dated translation could perhaps pass muster in current climes. The hook at the time being Limonov’s wanton bisexual anarchism, which seems innocent now, even farsighted in how he knowingly plays with gender. Even more so, his paeans to welfare, anti-statism in defense of art, and subsequent warm relation to the down and out (mixed with antagonism towards his fellow “artistic” emigres - angling for the career boosts they can get by sucking up to the conservative establishment eager to use them as antileft propaganda) speak even louder today in our terminally self-destructing hellscape of austere late capital. Not to mention his jeremiad against the editorial staff of the New York Times. In any case, the idea of being Against, clearheadedly, believing in the truth of eccentricity not as a pose but a brutal and unforgiving lifestyle always preferable to abetting the state, is one whose time is here again. It’s time for Limonov as author, and specifically for this book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ugnius Narutis

    Was introduced to this book by an old hippie who gave me and a friend a ride while we were hitchhiking. He said - "I wouldn't care a damn about you two being left on the road for the night if it wasn't for this book. Here, open the cabinet, you'll find it, take read". So I did that, ant the first pages were about Eddie being naked in his balcony in front of an office building making sour cabbage soup saying things, like: "the hell if they see me, I'm just making my soup and listening to the radi Was introduced to this book by an old hippie who gave me and a friend a ride while we were hitchhiking. He said - "I wouldn't care a damn about you two being left on the road for the night if it wasn't for this book. Here, open the cabinet, you'll find it, take read". So I did that, ant the first pages were about Eddie being naked in his balcony in front of an office building making sour cabbage soup saying things, like: "the hell if they see me, I'm just making my soup and listening to the radio. But if one day they won't see me, hope they'll think where did that crazy disappeared". Eddie, or Edička, is... well.. obnoxiously filthy, rude, angry and vulgar, yet pure, sensitive, sentimental, funny and determined. Wandering carelessly with the sole desire to find the comfort and bliss of love he once had with a woman that couldn't care less about him now. Is it written to shock - most definitely, but you can find quite a few reason to love this guy nevertheless. The sheer willpower to fight for what's true in your heart despite all the paradoxes and misadventures. And the ending... well.. that's just more than what a teenager could desire from an ending of a book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shanda Carlsen

    Even though the book was pretty vulgar, I thought it was an excellent read. My understanding is when it was first released many countries wouldn't publish it due to the 'leave it to Beaver' atmosphere at the time. Eddie speaks from a true protagonist point of view. You can feel his anger in his writing over his wife leaving him and how the world has done HIM wrong. I got a really good depiction of those times through his writing and really enjoyed the book overall. Even though the book was pretty vulgar, I thought it was an excellent read. My understanding is when it was first released many countries wouldn't publish it due to the 'leave it to Beaver' atmosphere at the time. Eddie speaks from a true protagonist point of view. You can feel his anger in his writing over his wife leaving him and how the world has done HIM wrong. I got a really good depiction of those times through his writing and really enjoyed the book overall.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Julia Lipina

    Strangly, this book turned to be about love, even though it's difficult to see love behind all this obscene language. The main hero is a real poet after all :) But I don't recommend reading it in public places like metro: I was blushing all the time afraid that somebody will accidentally look over my shoulder at what I was reading :) Strangly, this book turned to be about love, even though it's difficult to see love behind all this obscene language. The main hero is a real poet after all :) But I don't recommend reading it in public places like metro: I was blushing all the time afraid that somebody will accidentally look over my shoulder at what I was reading :)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Arkadi

    This is a book that at a few points I thought to abandon it. I'm glad I did not. A few notes: - people that read a translation will lose a (very) considerable part of it's charm; be prepared to be familiar with - russian culture, - history of the USSR/Russia in 50s and 60s, - do much googling. This is a book that at a few points I thought to abandon it. I'm glad I did not. A few notes: - people that read a translation will lose a (very) considerable part of it's charm; be prepared to be familiar with - russian culture, - history of the USSR/Russia in 50s and 60s, - do much googling.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    It's an interesting book but the material feels overly familiar considering how thoroughly it was summarized in Carrère's Limonov. Which is my own fault, of course. I definitely prefer Limonov's Kharkov to his New York. I liked the last chapter, though, and I'll read His Butler's Story eventually. It's an interesting book but the material feels overly familiar considering how thoroughly it was summarized in Carrère's Limonov. Which is my own fault, of course. I definitely prefer Limonov's Kharkov to his New York. I liked the last chapter, though, and I'll read His Butler's Story eventually.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Konstantin

    Ok, this is not masterpiece for me. Especially, when I'm thinking that Limonow nowdays - sick idiot, but here, what is that? Scream, cry, sex - anyway, I'd recommend it to read only in case of interest of russian literature Ok, this is not masterpiece for me. Especially, when I'm thinking that Limonow nowdays - sick idiot, but here, what is that? Scream, cry, sex - anyway, I'd recommend it to read only in case of interest of russian literature

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paulius

    Was amazing from a perspective of 16-years-old. I appreciate the impact of the book

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vladimir

    Completely different experience in terms of literature. At least for me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kobe Bryant

    Sure he sucked a black mans dick and obsesses over peepkas and poopkas but poor Eddie-baby just needs to feel some love and affection

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