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Physarum Machines: Computers from Slime Mould

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A Physarum machine is a programmable amorphous biological computer experimentally implemented in the vegetative state of true slime mould Physarum polycephalum. It comprises an amorphous yellowish mass with networks of protoplasmic veins, programmed by spatial configurations of attracting and repelling gradients.This book demonstrates how to create experimental Physarum ma A Physarum machine is a programmable amorphous biological computer experimentally implemented in the vegetative state of true slime mould Physarum polycephalum. It comprises an amorphous yellowish mass with networks of protoplasmic veins, programmed by spatial configurations of attracting and repelling gradients.This book demonstrates how to create experimental Physarum machines for computational geometry and optimization, distributed manipulation and transportation, and general-purpose computation. Being very cheap to make and easy to maintain, the machine also functions on a wide range of substrates and in a broad scope of environmental conditions. As such a Physarum machine is a ‘green’ and environmentally friendly unconventional computer.The book is readily accessible to a nonprofessional reader, and is a priceless source of experimental tips and inventive theoretical ideas for anyone who is inspired by novel and emerging non-silicon computers and robots.


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A Physarum machine is a programmable amorphous biological computer experimentally implemented in the vegetative state of true slime mould Physarum polycephalum. It comprises an amorphous yellowish mass with networks of protoplasmic veins, programmed by spatial configurations of attracting and repelling gradients.This book demonstrates how to create experimental Physarum ma A Physarum machine is a programmable amorphous biological computer experimentally implemented in the vegetative state of true slime mould Physarum polycephalum. It comprises an amorphous yellowish mass with networks of protoplasmic veins, programmed by spatial configurations of attracting and repelling gradients.This book demonstrates how to create experimental Physarum machines for computational geometry and optimization, distributed manipulation and transportation, and general-purpose computation. Being very cheap to make and easy to maintain, the machine also functions on a wide range of substrates and in a broad scope of environmental conditions. As such a Physarum machine is a ‘green’ and environmentally friendly unconventional computer.The book is readily accessible to a nonprofessional reader, and is a priceless source of experimental tips and inventive theoretical ideas for anyone who is inspired by novel and emerging non-silicon computers and robots.

32 review for Physarum Machines: Computers from Slime Mould

  1. 5 out of 5

    Darnell

    This book is accessible to non-specialists, but it doesn't put much effort into being engaging for them. The authors state near the beginning that they don't want to "get bogged down in theory" - and unfortunately that means much of this book is reporting experiments without context or explanation of why they're being done. Though disappointing results are useful scientific data, they don't make for interesting reading. For example, I was anticipating the chapter on creating programming gates in This book is accessible to non-specialists, but it doesn't put much effort into being engaging for them. The authors state near the beginning that they don't want to "get bogged down in theory" - and unfortunately that means much of this book is reporting experiments without context or explanation of why they're being done. Though disappointing results are useful scientific data, they don't make for interesting reading. For example, I was anticipating the chapter on creating programming gates in slime mould and wondering, "How does that possibly work?" It turns out the answer is, "It doesn't really work very well." I'm sure this book is of use and interest to experts, or those already running experiments like this, but I can't recommend it for learning much about this subject.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Melih Kamaoğlu

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sheffielder

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  5. 5 out of 5

    Reuvenc

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    chris

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    Evan Fillon

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    María Orellana

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    Jandro Manríquez

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    Alan

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    Arash Ashrafzadeh

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    aleph3

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    Mark Aldridge

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    Mathew Blackburn

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    Rishi

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    Kimberley

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    Ben

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    Ryan May

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    Christopher Granholm

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    Matthew Ellis

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    A. Rosner

  22. 5 out of 5

    Susan

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    Marti Dolata

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    K

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    Bill Broderick

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    Claire

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    Ronak Gupta

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lorraine Valera

  29. 5 out of 5

    Judy Gehrig

  30. 5 out of 5

    Helen

  31. 4 out of 5

    Dgopa

  32. 4 out of 5

    Max Strother

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