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Some of My Lives: A Scrapbook Memoir

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Rosamond Bernier has lived an unusually full life--remarkable for its vividness and diversity of experience--and she has known many (one is tempted to say all) of the greatest artists and composers of the twentieth century. In Some of My Lives, Bernier has made a kind of literary scrapbook from an extraordinary array of writings, ranging from diary entries to her ma Rosamond Bernier has lived an unusually full life--remarkable for its vividness and diversity of experience--and she has known many (one is tempted to say all) of the greatest artists and composers of the twentieth century. In Some of My Lives, Bernier has made a kind of literary scrapbook from an extraordinary array of writings, ranging from diary entries to her many contributions to the art journal L'OEIL, which she cofounded in 1955. The result is a multifaceted self-portrait of a life informed and surrounded by the arts. Through the stories of her encounters with some of the twentieth century's great artists and composers, including Pablo Picasso, Leonard Bernstein, Max Ernst, Aaron Copeland, Malcolm Lowry, and Karl Lagerfeld, we come to understand the sheer richness of Bernier's experiences, interactions, and memories. The result is pithy, hilarious, and wise--a richly rewarding chronicle of many lives fully lived.


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Rosamond Bernier has lived an unusually full life--remarkable for its vividness and diversity of experience--and she has known many (one is tempted to say all) of the greatest artists and composers of the twentieth century. In Some of My Lives, Bernier has made a kind of literary scrapbook from an extraordinary array of writings, ranging from diary entries to her ma Rosamond Bernier has lived an unusually full life--remarkable for its vividness and diversity of experience--and she has known many (one is tempted to say all) of the greatest artists and composers of the twentieth century. In Some of My Lives, Bernier has made a kind of literary scrapbook from an extraordinary array of writings, ranging from diary entries to her many contributions to the art journal L'OEIL, which she cofounded in 1955. The result is a multifaceted self-portrait of a life informed and surrounded by the arts. Through the stories of her encounters with some of the twentieth century's great artists and composers, including Pablo Picasso, Leonard Bernstein, Max Ernst, Aaron Copeland, Malcolm Lowry, and Karl Lagerfeld, we come to understand the sheer richness of Bernier's experiences, interactions, and memories. The result is pithy, hilarious, and wise--a richly rewarding chronicle of many lives fully lived.

30 review for Some of My Lives: A Scrapbook Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Rosamond Bernier knew everyone who was anyone. As the daughter of a well-to-do family in Philadelphia, she grew up surrounded by famous musicians. As a young woman, she became friends with composers and artists. She then got a job for Vogue that sent her to Paris, where she eventually started her own magazine devoted to the arts, and became chums with the likes of Matisse, Picasso, Miro, Giacometti, etc. etc. etc. For those who love to read about the lives of the rich and famous, this is all gre Rosamond Bernier knew everyone who was anyone. As the daughter of a well-to-do family in Philadelphia, she grew up surrounded by famous musicians. As a young woman, she became friends with composers and artists. She then got a job for Vogue that sent her to Paris, where she eventually started her own magazine devoted to the arts, and became chums with the likes of Matisse, Picasso, Miro, Giacometti, etc. etc. etc. For those who love to read about the lives of the rich and famous, this is all great fun, but i found Bernier's real insights to be minimal (sum them up as "artists are people too!"), and her ability to turn her life of privilege to her advantage became tiresome after awhile. Moreover, the "scrapbook" style of the book means that events are not told in chronological sequence: we jump back and forth in time, and certain details and anecdotes get repeated over and over. Bernier led a charmed life, and in some ways, this book is charming, too. For me, however, like a chatty guest who enjoys hearing herself talk, this one overstayed its welcome.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    "I found it very soothing when I had a migraine to use the ocelot as a pillow under my head." p. 33. This is the point at which I probably should have stopped reading this book, but instead I read the whole thing. This woman's life seems to have been quite interesting and to have intersected with several famous people's lives, particularly artists and composers. Unfortunately for readers, the book is not nearly so interesting as the life it is trying to share. She tries, and she's in her 90s, so "I found it very soothing when I had a migraine to use the ocelot as a pillow under my head." p. 33. This is the point at which I probably should have stopped reading this book, but instead I read the whole thing. This woman's life seems to have been quite interesting and to have intersected with several famous people's lives, particularly artists and composers. Unfortunately for readers, the book is not nearly so interesting as the life it is trying to share. She tries, and she's in her 90s, so there is that, but the scrapbook memoir approach means we get the same information in multiple places, and that the chronology is a bit confusing. Mostly I found the name-dropping overwhelming and a bit pretentious seeming, but I also realize that's just the life she led, I suppose, with Picasso and company making appearances in one's everyday life.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Amari

    Truly horrible. Boring, self-indulgent, with no sense of what is of interest to the reader. I love the work of so many of the artists included that I've read on longer than I've wanted to, hoping to glean something meaningful about them. However, it's just the Rosamond show, all about proving how wonderful and irresistible the great artists thought she was. Well, I think she should be resisted at all turns. How they managed to put up with her is a mystery. How can one write in such a shamelessly Truly horrible. Boring, self-indulgent, with no sense of what is of interest to the reader. I love the work of so many of the artists included that I've read on longer than I've wanted to, hoping to glean something meaningful about them. However, it's just the Rosamond show, all about proving how wonderful and irresistible the great artists thought she was. Well, I think she should be resisted at all turns. How they managed to put up with her is a mystery. How can one write in such a shamelessly shallow manner about these luminaries? It is beyond my comprehension.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Judith

    This book could have been good if someone else had written it. Here we have the story of Rosamond Bernier, who co-founded a literary journal in 1955 in Paris. As such, she met and interacted with some of the most interesting artists of that century: Picasso, Miro, Georges Braque, and not just artists but authors, designers, musicians. These weren't limited to quick meetings, but were close friendships providing intimate knowledge of their family lives. Fascinating stuff, but so boringly told tha This book could have been good if someone else had written it. Here we have the story of Rosamond Bernier, who co-founded a literary journal in 1955 in Paris. As such, she met and interacted with some of the most interesting artists of that century: Picasso, Miro, Georges Braque, and not just artists but authors, designers, musicians. These weren't limited to quick meetings, but were close friendships providing intimate knowledge of their family lives. Fascinating stuff, but so boringly told that even the lofty name-droppings can't get the fire started in this book. She needed a co-author or ghost writer and she didn't go that route, assuming that the subject matter would hold up the book. It does not.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eva Gerald

    By the third chapter of the book I got the impression that the reason so many fascinating artists kept company with Rosamond Bernier is because not a one of them would be threatened by the possibility that she might be more interesting than they. A very dull book and, at times, a chore to read. I hung in there because every now and then there might be an illuminating sentence about a particular artist, easily found when skimming the text.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David

    One of those book picked up at random on a remainder table, turned out to be fascinating. Never heard of the author, but she knew so many fascinating people! Lots of great stories. Just one example: She's taken to lunch by the editor of Vogue, who wants to hire her as a fashion editor. The author protests that she knows nothing about fashion or editing, but the editor hires her anyway. The author proceeds to be a huge success, much to her own surprise. This is by no means the best story in the boo One of those book picked up at random on a remainder table, turned out to be fascinating. Never heard of the author, but she knew so many fascinating people! Lots of great stories. Just one example: She's taken to lunch by the editor of Vogue, who wants to hire her as a fashion editor. The author protests that she knows nothing about fashion or editing, but the editor hires her anyway. The author proceeds to be a huge success, much to her own surprise. This is by no means the best story in the book, which is full of things like her friendship with Frida Kahlo, her description of sitting for a portrait by David Hockney, how Picasso helped her launch her magazine, etc., etc., etc.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jenny McPhee

    Eloise Grows Up: The Charmed Life of the Charming Rosamond Bernier Like that clever, witty, audacious inhabitant of the Plaza Hotel, the notorious children’s book heroine Eloise, Rosamond Bernier acquits herself in every situation, no matter how extraordinary, with a grand measure of aplomb. Zelig style, Bernier cruised through the greater part of the twentieth century hobnobbing with the western hemisphere’s best and brightest artists, writers, and composers while building her own successful car Eloise Grows Up: The Charmed Life of the Charming Rosamond Bernier Like that clever, witty, audacious inhabitant of the Plaza Hotel, the notorious children’s book heroine Eloise, Rosamond Bernier acquits herself in every situation, no matter how extraordinary, with a grand measure of aplomb. Zelig style, Bernier cruised through the greater part of the twentieth century hobnobbing with the western hemisphere’s best and brightest artists, writers, and composers while building her own successful career as writer, editor, and art curator. Accurately described as “a scrapbook,” her memoir is a motley collection of anecdotal snapshots, genteel and tantalizing, of her dear friends and acquaintances, among them Aaron Copeland, Leonard Bernstein, Malcolm Lowry, Paul and Jane Bowles, Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo, Henri Mattise, René Clair, Vittorio De Sica, Pablo Picasso, Fernand Léger, Alberto Giacometti, Joan Miró, Henry Moore, Max Ernst, Mary McCarthy, Louise Bourgeois, David Hockney, Jerome Robbins, Janet Flanner, Philip Johnson, Richard Avedon, and Irving Penn. Bernier was born in 1916 to an English mother and a Jewish American father whose family never forgave him for marrying a non-Jew, and would have little to do with Rosamond. She was brought up in the Philadelphia suburbs as if to the manor born with riding lessons and an English governess to educate her at home. When she was ten, by herself she boarded the Orduna and crossed the Atlantic to England where she would attend The Sherbourne School for Girls, as her mother, who had died two years earlier, had wished. After attending Sarah Lawrence for three years, she married Lew Riley (first husband of three), and moved to Acapulco. Barely five pages into the book the aptness of Bernier’s title, Some of My Lives, becomes apparent: by the age of twenty she had already lived several lifetimes, and her life had barely begun. Read the rest of my review at Bookslut: http://www.bookslut.com/the_bombshell...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    This is a lovely book. But (and I can't believe I'm about to say this about a book by a distinguished art critic and Vogue editor) I wish it had had firmer editing. While it's obviously designed as a scrapbook, I wish it was a bit more organized, a bit more structured, and more cohesive, showing more of the progression of her life, career, and acquaintances, rather than disjointed chapters about this artist and that musician. The end chapter where she tells the brief story of her husband's life This is a lovely book. But (and I can't believe I'm about to say this about a book by a distinguished art critic and Vogue editor) I wish it had had firmer editing. While it's obviously designed as a scrapbook, I wish it was a bit more organized, a bit more structured, and more cohesive, showing more of the progression of her life, career, and acquaintances, rather than disjointed chapters about this artist and that musician. The end chapter where she tells the brief story of her husband's life proves out my point that her reminisces would be all the more powerful with more storytelling and chronology. That being said, Rosamund is such an intelligent, ambitious, and tasteful woman, an example of being a strong feminist woman with feminine glamour. And her writing is strong and bright as well.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hayley Dyer

    I really dislike Rosamond Bernier's writing style - at once it is both choppy and overly wordy. The editor for this book did her no favors - the stories are not quite arranged in chronological order and some facts are told over and over from story to story - definitely not necessary and definitely annoying. Lastly, Rosamond writes with her nose in the air and the attitude that she shits rainbows. She's the ultimate self-proclaimed "It Girl" and I did not find her to be a likeable woman. That bei I really dislike Rosamond Bernier's writing style - at once it is both choppy and overly wordy. The editor for this book did her no favors - the stories are not quite arranged in chronological order and some facts are told over and over from story to story - definitely not necessary and definitely annoying. Lastly, Rosamond writes with her nose in the air and the attitude that she shits rainbows. She's the ultimate self-proclaimed "It Girl" and I did not find her to be a likeable woman. That being said, there are some interesting stories in this book. I possess a signed copy if you wish you take it off my hands.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emily A. Clifford

    Great for getting a sense of 20th century artists' personalities. She has a dry sense of humor and when she makes an understatement, it's delightfully shocking. However, it takes perseverance to keep at it and there's a lot that is annoying about it: especially how much everybody loves her to pieces and gives her everything she asks for and more. Maybe that's just me being bitchy, but hey! Great for getting a sense of 20th century artists' personalities. She has a dry sense of humor and when she makes an understatement, it's delightfully shocking. However, it takes perseverance to keep at it and there's a lot that is annoying about it: especially how much everybody loves her to pieces and gives her everything she asks for and more. Maybe that's just me being bitchy, but hey!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Oh to have lived Rosamond Bernier's lives, any or all of them. She knew artists from Frieda Kahlo to Max Ernst. Composers and couturiers willingly sat for interviews. She started her own contemporary art magazine in Paris. I swoon to think of the majesty of it all. To top it off, she was to become a famous art lecturer for the Museum of Modern Art. If only.... Oh to have lived Rosamond Bernier's lives, any or all of them. She knew artists from Frieda Kahlo to Max Ernst. Composers and couturiers willingly sat for interviews. She started her own contemporary art magazine in Paris. I swoon to think of the majesty of it all. To top it off, she was to become a famous art lecturer for the Museum of Modern Art. If only....

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    Bland writing. The random pieces on the fascinating people she met were fairly interesting, but it felt more like name dropping versus warm stories told over, say, dinner and drinks (which I suppose I was hoping for).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Engerrand

    I read the novel upon meeting her, after a lecture she gave. She is a fascinating lady to read about. I highly recommend this book to anyone. Much more interesting than your average biography.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mjmiyargmail.com

    A wonderful book to read in these pandemic times. Of course it helps if you are familiar with the cast of characters Bernier writes about, but since I was familiar with most and very familiar with some, I enjoyed the book enormously. The intimate portraits of Matisse, Picasso, Max Ernst and many others offer glimpses of their private personas and round out a lifetime of academic readings.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Rosamond Bernier was born in 1916 and has led a remarkable life, living in Mexico in her 20's, then moving to Paris where she first worked for Vogue and then founded the Art Magazine L'Oeil. When she returned to the U.S. in the mid-1970's she began a career lecturing on the arts which culminated when she retired from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2008 at the age of 92. Her memoir tells the story of artists she came to know along the way. Many of these relationships happened by pure coinciden Rosamond Bernier was born in 1916 and has led a remarkable life, living in Mexico in her 20's, then moving to Paris where she first worked for Vogue and then founded the Art Magazine L'Oeil. When she returned to the U.S. in the mid-1970's she began a career lecturing on the arts which culminated when she retired from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2008 at the age of 92. Her memoir tells the story of artists she came to know along the way. Many of these relationships happened by pure coincidence, when she happened to be at the right place at the right time. That is how she met Aaron Copeland, who became a dear lifelong friend, Malcolm Lowry, Freida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. I particularly enjoyed her stories about Picasso, whose support of L'Oeil contributed in no small part to its success, Matisse, Miro, Leger, Giacometti, and other European early modern artists. Most of the chapters are devoted to a particular artist, the story of their meeting and subsequent interactions. Although there's a lot of name dropping and the memoir has an air of smugness, I found the stories interesting and the book worth reading.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Bernier has a dry, delicate, almost deadpan style that reminds me of Joan Didion. When reminiscing about the menagerie of animals she had in Mexico, she writes: I had one problem animal, a kinkajou. It drank. It was nocturnal and spent its days in the darkened quarters I had provided for the night shift. At the cocktail hour, it would come swinging along the beams above the terrace bar by its long prehensile tail, drop onto the bar, to the dismay of the human customers, and grab a glass. I am not Bernier has a dry, delicate, almost deadpan style that reminds me of Joan Didion. When reminiscing about the menagerie of animals she had in Mexico, she writes: I had one problem animal, a kinkajou. It drank. It was nocturnal and spent its days in the darkened quarters I had provided for the night shift. At the cocktail hour, it would come swinging along the beams above the terrace bar by its long prehensile tail, drop onto the bar, to the dismay of the human customers, and grab a glass. I am not making this up: it would then head for town and find its way to the Seite Mares Bar. I would get an angry telephone call from the bar’s owner to please come and get it because it was annoying the customers. About a local artist: We found him at work on the beach, an emaciated figure painting at an easel propped in the sand. There was a second easel and a second figure busily painting away: his pet monkey. This was accepted by all as the most natural thing in the world. The book overall is way too name-droppy and boastful, but her slightly off-center observations about major artists of the twentieth century are unlike anything else I’ve read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Allyson

    What an amazing life she led with an array of famous people orbiting around her . I was curious whether her money, charm, or intelligence won over so many irascible characters as she seemed not particularly attractive enough on her own. Overall I was disappointed with the scattered chapters which often jumped forwards and backwards, but it seemed better to divide by person, rather than time period and when I considered her age, it seemed appropriate. I am slightly curious how many are her word What an amazing life she led with an array of famous people orbiting around her . I was curious whether her money, charm, or intelligence won over so many irascible characters as she seemed not particularly attractive enough on her own. Overall I was disappointed with the scattered chapters which often jumped forwards and backwards, but it seemed better to divide by person, rather than time period and when I considered her age, it seemed appropriate. I am slightly curious how many are her words and how many her stepson's, but in the end, it matters little. To simply have the inside scoop on so many glittering lives is so cool. I would have preferred her chapter on John Russell to be the final one instead of Irving Penn. That actually disappointed me immensely and can only blame sloppiness of someone who should have known better. It was similar to a great meal ending with an apple. Weird.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cyndie Todd

    Reading this book is akin to taking tea with a dear old wordly auntie who regales you with her stories of world travel and renowned associates. You're astonished by the places she's been, the people she's known, the times in which she lived, yet she remains completely unaffected, except to admit that she was pretty lucky a time or two. Manage your expectations about the writing because this book is not meant to be a highly polished autobiography. I imagine that the only way anyone was going to g Reading this book is akin to taking tea with a dear old wordly auntie who regales you with her stories of world travel and renowned associates. You're astonished by the places she's been, the people she's known, the times in which she lived, yet she remains completely unaffected, except to admit that she was pretty lucky a time or two. Manage your expectations about the writing because this book is not meant to be a highly polished autobiography. I imagine that the only way anyone was going to get a book out of Bernier was to let her just write as she speaks and that is the feel you get throughout. She is not waxing poetic. She is talking to you. A pleasant read for art and history lovers who aren't big writing snobs.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carol Wakefield

    Fascinating book by an intelligent and entertaining woman. Bernier was born in the USA, traveled between the us and Europe, spent her young adult life in Mexico, from there to Paris where she wrote for vogue, then published her own magazine of the arts and style, eventually ending in the us again where she lectured in a variety of venues on the arts. She interviewed and became friends with an amazing number of artists, authors, fashion designers and musicians. the book details the personalities Fascinating book by an intelligent and entertaining woman. Bernier was born in the USA, traveled between the us and Europe, spent her young adult life in Mexico, from there to Paris where she wrote for vogue, then published her own magazine of the arts and style, eventually ending in the us again where she lectured in a variety of venues on the arts. She interviewed and became friends with an amazing number of artists, authors, fashion designers and musicians. the book details the personalities she interviewed mostly in Paris. Helps to have a nodding acquaintance with art figures of the 50s and 60s. Many I recognized and quite a few I didn't. A personal chronicle of her life and 3 marriages which this is not would be a great seller, I should imagine.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    While this book is not going to win any literary prizes, Rosamond is such a compelling and beloved figure that it's just enjoyable to sit back and absorb the amazing facts of her life, the people she knew, and her professional accomplishments. I had the good fortune to meet her on several occasions - she even took me out to lunch once! - so I read the book with her voice in my head. Many facts are repeated which sometimes makes it seem like a dotty but fabulous old aunt is telling you her life s While this book is not going to win any literary prizes, Rosamond is such a compelling and beloved figure that it's just enjoyable to sit back and absorb the amazing facts of her life, the people she knew, and her professional accomplishments. I had the good fortune to meet her on several occasions - she even took me out to lunch once! - so I read the book with her voice in my head. Many facts are repeated which sometimes makes it seem like a dotty but fabulous old aunt is telling you her life story, and in some ways, that is exactly what this book is. But it is fun to be transported into her world, albeit superficially. It is indeed as the title describes, a "scrapbook memoir."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bernadette

    Interesting content but tone is sometimes arrogant. If each person’s life could be characterized as a dessert, Bernier’s life sounds like a small ramekin of decadent creme brulee. It’s interesting to see how she put her connections to use to produce a creative and international career, surrounded by the top artists, musicians, and fashion designers of the time - a very culturally rich, intellectual stimulated life. As she recounted her friendships with various artists, it was interesting to read Interesting content but tone is sometimes arrogant. If each person’s life could be characterized as a dessert, Bernier’s life sounds like a small ramekin of decadent creme brulee. It’s interesting to see how she put her connections to use to produce a creative and international career, surrounded by the top artists, musicians, and fashion designers of the time - a very culturally rich, intellectual stimulated life. As she recounted her friendships with various artists, it was interesting to read about these artists' lives and personaities as real people vs. Wikipedia entries.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sar

    this book had so much potential, full of unique and interesting experiences and people, but, ohmygoodness, it was told horribly. the title should have tipped me off as, indeed, it is written exactly like a scrapbook, little bits here and there, but with little to tie them together or get an idea of timeline. within a chapter, the commentary shifts from subject to subject until you have no idea what the original intent was. i wanted to love this book, but ultimately i made it 13 chapters in and h this book had so much potential, full of unique and interesting experiences and people, but, ohmygoodness, it was told horribly. the title should have tipped me off as, indeed, it is written exactly like a scrapbook, little bits here and there, but with little to tie them together or get an idea of timeline. within a chapter, the commentary shifts from subject to subject until you have no idea what the original intent was. i wanted to love this book, but ultimately i made it 13 chapters in and had to put it down. maybe i'll finish the other 957 chapters later, but i doubt it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Meaghan Kroener Janson

    Added this to my list due to the "Downton Abbey" effect. I'm finding that Downton has really opened up Edwardian England in a whole new way. It's truly fascinating to learn about the Manor house in England and how at the turn of the century how moments like the Titanic sinking and the influx of American capital in the form of advantageous marriages then plowed right into World War I and life as the aristocracy knew it changed in a relatively short amount of time. This and The Sisters are two boo Added this to my list due to the "Downton Abbey" effect. I'm finding that Downton has really opened up Edwardian England in a whole new way. It's truly fascinating to learn about the Manor house in England and how at the turn of the century how moments like the Titanic sinking and the influx of American capital in the form of advantageous marriages then plowed right into World War I and life as the aristocracy knew it changed in a relatively short amount of time. This and The Sisters are two books that take a historical story-telling approach.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carolamex

    This woman's life was amazing. The fact that she got to meet and become friends with SO MANY interesting, important and absolutely fascinating artist of the times makes me so jealous! But I have to say I would have liked more continuity and a little bit more backstory. We jump from one to another. At times, it's a bit repetitive and a bit arrogant but a very interesting read. It is a collection of stories that feel put together and not edited as an ensemble. But definitely recommendable. Excelle This woman's life was amazing. The fact that she got to meet and become friends with SO MANY interesting, important and absolutely fascinating artist of the times makes me so jealous! But I have to say I would have liked more continuity and a little bit more backstory. We jump from one to another. At times, it's a bit repetitive and a bit arrogant but a very interesting read. It is a collection of stories that feel put together and not edited as an ensemble. But definitely recommendable. Excellent. 4 stars.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    Really recommend if you enjoy bits and pieces of artists lives.. and the unusual life carved out by someone self taught w/ a terrific boost from parents (Jewish immigrant father and English mother) w/ music and talented persons all around growing up in Phil.. then Mex., Paris, NY and all around the world, too..she knew them all.. Picasso, Matisse, Miro, Braque, Ernst, Giacometti, Pierre Matisse, Copeland, Robbins, Diego & Frieda, Orozco, Bourgeois, Hockney, H. Moore, Chanel, married art critic J Really recommend if you enjoy bits and pieces of artists lives.. and the unusual life carved out by someone self taught w/ a terrific boost from parents (Jewish immigrant father and English mother) w/ music and talented persons all around growing up in Phil.. then Mex., Paris, NY and all around the world, too..she knew them all.. Picasso, Matisse, Miro, Braque, Ernst, Giacometti, Pierre Matisse, Copeland, Robbins, Diego & Frieda, Orozco, Bourgeois, Hockney, H. Moore, Chanel, married art critic John Russel (husband #3, Leger.....

  26. 5 out of 5

    Roben

    Rosamond Bernier had the richest of experiential lives. She has a character that has allowed her to mix and mingle with legendary folk in the arts from all over the world. She dwells on the tiny details of the many great artists who became her friends. I particularly loved a piece that she included on Janet Flanner.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    This seemed very slight at first but the more I read, the more I enjoyed, especially the chapters about the artists she knew. I loved the chapter about visting Julia Morisot, Berthe Morisot's daughter in Paris. Very poignant. Plus, the last three chapters are taken from longer essays or exhibit catalogs and the writing is very fine indeed. This seemed very slight at first but the more I read, the more I enjoyed, especially the chapters about the artists she knew. I loved the chapter about visting Julia Morisot, Berthe Morisot's daughter in Paris. Very poignant. Plus, the last three chapters are taken from longer essays or exhibit catalogs and the writing is very fine indeed.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Jones

    This is more than just the memoir of a journalist who knew everybody in the fashion and art worlds. Bernier describes the creative process of many of her artist friends, including Matisse, Miro, Aaron Copeland, Frida Kahlo, Chanel, Lagerfeld, and many others. She ties her "Lives" together to give a sense of the zeitgeist, especially in post WWII Paris. This is more than just the memoir of a journalist who knew everybody in the fashion and art worlds. Bernier describes the creative process of many of her artist friends, including Matisse, Miro, Aaron Copeland, Frida Kahlo, Chanel, Lagerfeld, and many others. She ties her "Lives" together to give a sense of the zeitgeist, especially in post WWII Paris.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Carole Prior

    Truly an intoxicating read that is filled with people who changed the world either throught art or music or literature or fashion or design. She was living in the vortex of art in a world filled with fascinating and thrilling people who were creative and lively. Can't stop reading it... Truly an intoxicating read that is filled with people who changed the world either throught art or music or literature or fashion or design. She was living in the vortex of art in a world filled with fascinating and thrilling people who were creative and lively. Can't stop reading it...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Miki

    I'm thoroughly enjoying the stories concerning famous composers and musicians, but I'm having trouble finishing the book becuase I find the lack of linear timeline frustrating. In one chapter she is meeting someone and in the very next that person is long past. It's very distracting. I'm thoroughly enjoying the stories concerning famous composers and musicians, but I'm having trouble finishing the book becuase I find the lack of linear timeline frustrating. In one chapter she is meeting someone and in the very next that person is long past. It's very distracting.

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