Hot Best Seller

The Seashell Anthology of Great Poetry

Availability: Ready to download

Poems emphasizing the personal aspect of poetry, from Walt Whitman's vision of America to Maya Angelou's remembrances of her mother. Other poets include Sandburg, Frost, Ginsburg, Browning, Sexton, Yeats, Lowell, Levertov & more. Poems emphasizing the personal aspect of poetry, from Walt Whitman's vision of America to Maya Angelou's remembrances of her mother. Other poets include Sandburg, Frost, Ginsburg, Browning, Sexton, Yeats, Lowell, Levertov & more.


Compare

Poems emphasizing the personal aspect of poetry, from Walt Whitman's vision of America to Maya Angelou's remembrances of her mother. Other poets include Sandburg, Frost, Ginsburg, Browning, Sexton, Yeats, Lowell, Levertov & more. Poems emphasizing the personal aspect of poetry, from Walt Whitman's vision of America to Maya Angelou's remembrances of her mother. Other poets include Sandburg, Frost, Ginsburg, Browning, Sexton, Yeats, Lowell, Levertov & more.

30 review for The Seashell Anthology of Great Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Gary George

    Marvelous. A tonic for a bad day.

  2. 4 out of 5

    revcodes

    This is a diverse collection of favorite poets from Carl Sandburg to Chaucer organized into eleven interesting sections such as "Creation" and "What Lips My Lips". It's on my Kindle and even though I've read the entire 349 pages a couple of times, I am always delighted to read poems such as "Digging" by Seamus Heaney, "The Song of the Wandering Aengus" by William Butler Yeats, "One Art" by Elizabeth Bishop and many, many others. This is a diverse collection of favorite poets from Carl Sandburg to Chaucer organized into eleven interesting sections such as "Creation" and "What Lips My Lips". It's on my Kindle and even though I've read the entire 349 pages a couple of times, I am always delighted to read poems such as "Digging" by Seamus Heaney, "The Song of the Wandering Aengus" by William Butler Yeats, "One Art" by Elizabeth Bishop and many, many others.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jon-Paul

    I've marked this book as read, but, really, a book like this is never truly finished. It's the kind of thing you just keep reading and if you own a Kindle this is one of the best poetry anthologies out there for it. I've marked this book as read, but, really, a book like this is never truly finished. It's the kind of thing you just keep reading and if you own a Kindle this is one of the best poetry anthologies out there for it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Field

    Inexpensive addition to your Kindle collection -- I keep this on my phone! “Like a seashell held your year, a poem resonates to the beating of your heart, matching the designs of its inner chamber to the contours of your mind.” So opens Christopher Burns on this anthology of favorites. Like Martin Gardner’s Best Remembered Poems, this collection is full of old warhorses, much of it written in traditional meter or else highly disciplined free verse, making it a wonderful introduction to poem-readi Inexpensive addition to your Kindle collection -- I keep this on my phone! “Like a seashell held your year, a poem resonates to the beating of your heart, matching the designs of its inner chamber to the contours of your mind.” So opens Christopher Burns on this anthology of favorites. Like Martin Gardner’s Best Remembered Poems, this collection is full of old warhorses, much of it written in traditional meter or else highly disciplined free verse, making it a wonderful introduction to poem-reading for any young person, or else a poetry reader like myself who has strayed too long into the dark prosaic woods of history, philosophy and social novel. The poets represented here feel remarkably balanced and just, with a good selection of African-American poets, most notably Langston Hughes, but also three intriguing pieces by Mari Evans, b. 1923, whom I had not heard of. The most well-represented woman writer is Edna St. Vincent Millay, whom I remember Auden and his boyfriend made fun of. It’s understandable, as her big, epic optimism holds less room for irony and layers of psyche than modern consciousness calls for. But Millay gives us gorgeous song, as much as any Beethoven symphony. In fact, Millay seems an American Romantic, along with Thoedore Roethke and Carl Sandburg, two more favorites of the volume. Roethke is dark, though, and Sandburg is darker still. It’s like Whitman met the twentieth century and just had to have a few drinks, and tawdry affairs. There’s a lot of Anne Sexton in here, too, and quite rightly, for she, like Sandburg and Roethke and Millay, pours modern ironies into tight, formal, musical poems. There is virtually no lazy verse or doggerel anywhere in the volume, a nice thing about anthologies, I suppose. Why I think this is a five-star book: the arrangement of the anthology. The thematic sequencing of the poems makes for substantial connections between poems, and occasionally makes us reflect on a poem’s theme, which we might not have noticed before. By beginning with “The Creation” and ending with “Death Be Not Proud,” a sense of narrative automatically sets in, making the anthology something a picaresque, in which some collective “we” gives praise, then rebels (“For My People,” “The Highwayman”), fights in the war, then wanders in the woods, (“Arms and the Boy,” “The Way Through the Woods”), loves, marries (“What Lips My Lips Have Kissed,” “If Ever Two Were One”), has a family, wanders again (“My Papa’s Waltz,” “Wanderer’s Song”), passes through the dark night of the soul, and at last dies (“Acquainted with the Night,” “Death Be Not Proud”). Not that I read all of the poems in order, far from it, but this narrative feel makes poems resonate with one another. “My Papa’s Waltz,” for example, when it juxtaposes voices as various as Theodore Roethke and Maya Angelou and Imamu Amiri Baraka on the fragmentary nature of family sentiment, a deeper sense of humanity emerges. Other times the placement of a poem in a category gives us productive pause, as when we find in “The Wanderer’s Song,” contemplative poems like “My Erotic Double” by John Ashbery or “The Soul Selects Her Own Society” by Emily Dickinson. And while in “The Way Through the Woods” we are not surprised to see “The Road Not Taken,” or even “The Tiger,” it is curious to read there “Love Calls Us to Things of This World” by Richard Wilbur, or “Root Cellar” by Theodore Roethke. But Wilbur and Roethke are wanderers of the mind, first and foremost. A humble triumph, and a reminder that anthologies can be fun.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robin Christophersen

    Loved this collection. A book I will keep and return to often. In particular, enjoyed how the poems are classified. Be sure to read the forward to understand intent of how the anthology is organized .

  6. 4 out of 5

    Janet Lynch

    I like to have a book of poetry going. This took me over a year to read by delving into just a few selections a day. It has a wide variety and some great poems. It's a good book to have around to open up randomly when you just happen to need to read a poem or two. I like to have a book of poetry going. This took me over a year to read by delving into just a few selections a day. It has a wide variety and some great poems. It's a good book to have around to open up randomly when you just happen to need to read a poem or two.

  7. 4 out of 5

    John Cain

    I enjoyed this collection. Most of the poets I knew and some were new to me. I read the book over several weeks. I read a poem or two each morning.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Amazing. Captivating. Beautiful. Heartbreaking. All the things.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Booty

    Great selection of poems. I love to pick it up and read a random poem.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nina Meade

    I loved this selection of poems. It was wide ranging and beautiful.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Oliver

    Good, not great I would say this is average far as anthologies go. Fair selections but I've definitely read better. Good, not great. Good, not great I would say this is average far as anthologies go. Fair selections but I've definitely read better. Good, not great.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eric Steere

    Thank you Burns. There are better collections out there for sure, but I like the inclusion of so many contemporary authors, and especially glad to see a collection that isn't demonstrably politically correct WASP-y. THis anthology doesn't apologize. Glad to see Sandburg along the likes of Creeley, too much Langston Hughes, Sexton, and where is T. Hughes? The possiblities of an anthology are of course limited, I don't recommend this anthology and would instead recommend shorter more pointed colle Thank you Burns. There are better collections out there for sure, but I like the inclusion of so many contemporary authors, and especially glad to see a collection that isn't demonstrably politically correct WASP-y. THis anthology doesn't apologize. Glad to see Sandburg along the likes of Creeley, too much Langston Hughes, Sexton, and where is T. Hughes? The possiblities of an anthology are of course limited, I don't recommend this anthology and would instead recommend shorter more pointed collections, adn for those interested in contemporary poetry, Norton has a a great collection.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Michelle

    I won this book through a goodreads giveaway. This is the ultimate collection for the long-time poetry lover or for those who are just "dipping their toes in the pond". I read old favorites and undiscovered gems. I finished the book in two day but have since carried it around with me everywhere. I even read a poem or two a night to my thirteen year old daughter who I found shares my affinity to Romantics. I wholeheartedly recommend this book to anyone, anywhere at anytime; the words within have t I won this book through a goodreads giveaway. This is the ultimate collection for the long-time poetry lover or for those who are just "dipping their toes in the pond". I read old favorites and undiscovered gems. I finished the book in two day but have since carried it around with me everywhere. I even read a poem or two a night to my thirteen year old daughter who I found shares my affinity to Romantics. I wholeheartedly recommend this book to anyone, anywhere at anytime; the words within have the ability to "speak" to all if only they crack the cover.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway. The introduction is well written and charming. The anthology is arranged thematically rather than chronologically. Reading this book taught me a little about myself. It has been 31 years (yikes!) since I got my B.A. in English, and in the years since I have indulged in the luxury of only reading poets I like. This anthology reminded me of the scope of poetry and its themes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    Wow, this is an amazingly good collection! Burns is a great anthologist -- the poems are arranged so that they reflect or comment on each other. I bought it for the Kindle -- I probably have a quarter or more of the poems already in various physical books, but this lets me carry them along wherever I go. I don't usually read poetry anthologies straight through, from cover to cover, but this one I did. Wow, this is an amazingly good collection! Burns is a great anthologist -- the poems are arranged so that they reflect or comment on each other. I bought it for the Kindle -- I probably have a quarter or more of the poems already in various physical books, but this lets me carry them along wherever I go. I don't usually read poetry anthologies straight through, from cover to cover, but this one I did.

  16. 4 out of 5

    James

    So far the good poems are sparse, but I am not far into the book. All are well written, but much of the substance is questionable. The first poem is on how God created the world because he was bored. Not very illuminating, and quite untrue if one is consulting special revelation. However, I would be pleased to find at least 20 gems in this anthology. I suspect that I will. I will share them as I do.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shannan

    One of the best anthologies I've read. The chapter on love poems was my favorite because they included the dark poems one seldom reads about love and relationships that were sometimes funny sometimes sad but always very very true. One of the best anthologies I've read. The chapter on love poems was my favorite because they included the dark poems one seldom reads about love and relationships that were sometimes funny sometimes sad but always very very true.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Slotto

    The is a "best of" collection that I keep handy on my Kindle at all times. The anthology features renowned poets of the English language and is a must-have for all writers and readers of poetry. If you are a poet, dip into it when you're feeling stuck. The poems are organized by theme. The is a "best of" collection that I keep handy on my Kindle at all times. The anthology features renowned poets of the English language and is a must-have for all writers and readers of poetry. If you are a poet, dip into it when you're feeling stuck. The poems are organized by theme.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    An excellent collection - one of the first books to go on my kindle. Great for dipping

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Albrecht

    I've always been skeptical of poetry collections, but this one is so well collected and organized that I can't help but love it. I've always been skeptical of poetry collections, but this one is so well collected and organized that I can't help but love it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Darren

    Simply Amazing!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Will

  23. 5 out of 5

    Fenia

  24. 5 out of 5

    mohammad

  25. 5 out of 5

    Emily B

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten E. Mitchell

  27. 5 out of 5

    Debi

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rico

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lorrie Briggs

  30. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Vietze

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...