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Aleister Crowley - The Biography: Spiritual Revolutionary, Romantic Explorer, Occult Master and Spy

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This definitive biography of Aleister Crowley (1875 - 1947), the most notorious and controversial spiritual figure of the 20th century, brings together a life of world-shaking 'magick', sexual and psychological experimentation at the outer limits, world-record-beating mountaineering and startling prophetic power - as well as poetry, adventure, espionage, wisdom, excess, an This definitive biography of Aleister Crowley (1875 - 1947), the most notorious and controversial spiritual figure of the 20th century, brings together a life of world-shaking 'magick', sexual and psychological experimentation at the outer limits, world-record-beating mountaineering and startling prophetic power - as well as poetry, adventure, espionage, wisdom, excess, and intellectual brilliance. The book reveals the man behind the appalling reputation, demolishing a century of scandalmongering that persuaded the world that Crowley was a black magician, a traitor and a sexual wastrel, addicted to drugs and antisocial posing, rather than the mind-blowing truth that Crowley was a genius as significant as Jung, Freud or Einstein. Churton has enjoyed the full co-operation of the world's Crowley scholars to ensure the accuracy and plausibility of his riveting narrative. The author has also been in contact with Crowley's grandson, who has vouchsafed rare, previously untold accounts of family relationships. The result is an intimate portrait that has never before been shown, and one that has great emotional impact. The book contains the first ever complete investigation of Crowley's astonishing family background - including facts he concealed in his lifetime for fear of social prejudice. Tobias Churton also gives us a detailed account of Crowley's work as a British spy during World War I in Berlin during the early 1930s and during World War II. This information has not been available to any previous biographer.


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This definitive biography of Aleister Crowley (1875 - 1947), the most notorious and controversial spiritual figure of the 20th century, brings together a life of world-shaking 'magick', sexual and psychological experimentation at the outer limits, world-record-beating mountaineering and startling prophetic power - as well as poetry, adventure, espionage, wisdom, excess, an This definitive biography of Aleister Crowley (1875 - 1947), the most notorious and controversial spiritual figure of the 20th century, brings together a life of world-shaking 'magick', sexual and psychological experimentation at the outer limits, world-record-beating mountaineering and startling prophetic power - as well as poetry, adventure, espionage, wisdom, excess, and intellectual brilliance. The book reveals the man behind the appalling reputation, demolishing a century of scandalmongering that persuaded the world that Crowley was a black magician, a traitor and a sexual wastrel, addicted to drugs and antisocial posing, rather than the mind-blowing truth that Crowley was a genius as significant as Jung, Freud or Einstein. Churton has enjoyed the full co-operation of the world's Crowley scholars to ensure the accuracy and plausibility of his riveting narrative. The author has also been in contact with Crowley's grandson, who has vouchsafed rare, previously untold accounts of family relationships. The result is an intimate portrait that has never before been shown, and one that has great emotional impact. The book contains the first ever complete investigation of Crowley's astonishing family background - including facts he concealed in his lifetime for fear of social prejudice. Tobias Churton also gives us a detailed account of Crowley's work as a British spy during World War I in Berlin during the early 1930s and during World War II. This information has not been available to any previous biographer.

30 review for Aleister Crowley - The Biography: Spiritual Revolutionary, Romantic Explorer, Occult Master and Spy

  1. 4 out of 5

    James Bojaciuk

    Great biography can only issue from two people: the clear-headed honesty of the admirer (Edmund Morris' Theodore Roosevelt biography trilogy is a great example of this), or from the unclouded hatred of a detractor (any Hitler biography worth the paper it is written on). Tobias Churton is neither of these. Instead, one gets the sensation that Churton does not merely admire Crowley, and does not merely worship Crowley, but actively wishes he could be Crowley himself in all his satanic glory and blac Great biography can only issue from two people: the clear-headed honesty of the admirer (Edmund Morris' Theodore Roosevelt biography trilogy is a great example of this), or from the unclouded hatred of a detractor (any Hitler biography worth the paper it is written on). Tobias Churton is neither of these. Instead, one gets the sensation that Churton does not merely admire Crowley, and does not merely worship Crowley, but actively wishes he could be Crowley himself in all his satanic glory and black magic influence. He waxes poetic on every aspect of Crowley's life and influence with the desperate rush to be the man he writes about. This could be forgivable. But then Churton commits the unforgivable crime of biography: ignorance. He's so ignorant of the world that he falls prey to an event that never happened. I don't mean that he chooses to believe something Crowley believed was real; instead, he writes at length on "The East African Accord." Supposedly, in 1926, France and England nearly went to war over a border dispute between French's territory on the western border of Egypt and England's hold on Egypt. Crowley was, of course, fairly intimately involved. Only one problem: France has never had a territory just to the west of Egypt, and "The East African Accord" is wholly fictional. The whole account emerges from an alternate history fiction site--I'm quite serious: take a moment to Google "The East African Accord" and you'll find where Churton found this story--and, apparently, neither Churton nor his editors checked the source or the story. Churton knows nothing about the Bible, and nothing about its composition or study. His every mention of it is a failing rant that left this reader stunned that, no where along the line or production, no editor caught these errors and amended a footnote. Churton's comparison of the beasts from Ezekiel and the beast from Revelation is not only insipid, but ignorant. The world Crowley lived in seems poorly researched. Churton knows a great deal about Crowley, in the way a young man knows everything about the girl he secretly admires, and this is the one redeeming feature of the book. He focused on the "who" over the "what." If I must say something positive about this book, it was quite the thrill to know that G.K. Chesterton, the apostle of common sense, rode to literary war against the great beast of letters. But, alas, there are no more than a handful of sentences scattered throughout the text on this subject. And, moreover, we only ever hear pieces of Crowley's retorts and never, not once, any of Chesterton's cannonades. I wonder if this is because Chesterton, in the world outside Churton's love letter, demolished Crowley's forts just as he demolished so many others. I wonder if this is because Chesterton, with paradoxes and logic, dismantled all of Crowley's books. I wonder if this is because, if these wars were given their dues we would see Crowley in a light his biographer cannot bear. My only regret is that I received this book from the library, and therefore paid nothing. In a just world, the author would have paid me to sit through his book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eve Kay

    It's really amazing how an author of a biography can make every little shit detail of the subject's life seem like it was either fate or an act of a god. Name dropping every page just so he can point out every single person who walked past Crowley on the street. At times it reads more like a whole bunch of notes on a subject (Crowley) bundled together inbetween covers. This is a badly constructed biography which at the same time hails Crowley till the cows come home and bored me out of my mind. Ho It's really amazing how an author of a biography can make every little shit detail of the subject's life seem like it was either fate or an act of a god. Name dropping every page just so he can point out every single person who walked past Crowley on the street. At times it reads more like a whole bunch of notes on a subject (Crowley) bundled together inbetween covers. This is a badly constructed biography which at the same time hails Crowley till the cows come home and bored me out of my mind. How's that even possible? The beginning promised so, so much more: "Commerce was anti-romantic. -- Beer was common. According to the diktats of temperance, its profits derived from exploitation of human weakness."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Alcazaze

    At one stage Crowley began a psychedelic purging period where he was only allowed ‘lean meats, eggs, fruit, green vegetables and heroin’. At times, reading this book felt like a similar experience. I started this over a year ago and just gave up. The constant onslaught of new names was hard to keep up with. Crowley travelled the world attracting and repelling multitudes of people as he went. It seems Churton wants to mention every single one of them. Having eventually slogged on to finish it I’m At one stage Crowley began a psychedelic purging period where he was only allowed ‘lean meats, eggs, fruit, green vegetables and heroin’. At times, reading this book felt like a similar experience. I started this over a year ago and just gave up. The constant onslaught of new names was hard to keep up with. Crowley travelled the world attracting and repelling multitudes of people as he went. It seems Churton wants to mention every single one of them. Having eventually slogged on to finish it I’m giving this 3 stars for the sheer amount of research it packs in, even if Churton comes across as rather biased in his pro-Crowley attitude. Having clearly taken umbrage with John Symond’s largely negative biography of Crowley, Churton cleans up the Beast 666’s life in a way that gives us a similarly unfair picture. The motivation behind Churton doing this reflects some of the unjust (and often homophobic) criticism of Crowley’s character and Thelemic principles. But by washing over much of the semen-soaked debauchery, which we have details of from Crowley’s own writings, Churton’s text left me questioning his overall reading of Crowley.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Walter Five

    One might have thought that with such recent and revealing biographies as "Perdurabo, Revised and Expanded Edition: The Life of Aleister Crowley" and "Secret Agent 666: Aleister Crowley, British Intelligence and the Occult," that there was little left unsaid, or undiscovered about Aleister Crowley. One would be wrong. In this book, the author, Tobias Churton, suprisingly grips the reader's attention in the first few chapters, revealing insights to family matters and ancestors never before brought One might have thought that with such recent and revealing biographies as "Perdurabo, Revised and Expanded Edition: The Life of Aleister Crowley" and "Secret Agent 666: Aleister Crowley, British Intelligence and the Occult," that there was little left unsaid, or undiscovered about Aleister Crowley. One would be wrong. In this book, the author, Tobias Churton, suprisingly grips the reader's attention in the first few chapters, revealing insights to family matters and ancestors never before brought up in any other Crowley biography, and it just gets better and better from there. Many previously uncited sources, letters, diaries, make this a most revealing biography, not just a re-hash of dirt and outrages that have been attributed to Crowley in several sordid and inaccurate sensationalist ersatz biographies. Well written, well researched, and very informative, this book reveals much of several sides of Crowley's life and personality for even the most stickeling experts of "The Master Therion."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jill393

    It was thick, it was hard to read, and it didn't give me much insight into why he was the way he was. It was interesting in that I realized how little I know about the time he lived... and my understanding of world history is severely lacking. It was thick, it was hard to read, and it didn't give me much insight into why he was the way he was. It was interesting in that I realized how little I know about the time he lived... and my understanding of world history is severely lacking.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Something of a drag in the end, Aleister Crowley exists to provide some degree of sensation, I wanted to be given the threads of sex magick, Thelema, poetry etc. rearranged in complex new forms - but then this is a British book by a British scholar about a British visionary and so conformity must apply. I think Tobias Churton tried too desperately to 'rescue' Crowley from being dismissed as a weirdo, as is the auto-response mechanism for anything even faintly subversive in the UK, but relentless Something of a drag in the end, Aleister Crowley exists to provide some degree of sensation, I wanted to be given the threads of sex magick, Thelema, poetry etc. rearranged in complex new forms - but then this is a British book by a British scholar about a British visionary and so conformity must apply. I think Tobias Churton tried too desperately to 'rescue' Crowley from being dismissed as a weirdo, as is the auto-response mechanism for anything even faintly subversive in the UK, but relentlessly drilling the idea that he was some kind of passive inspiration for Ian Fleming's James Bond. Bond is ok for adults and children, it's safe and romantic, Bond offends almost no one, everyone understands it, and so papering Crowley's face over Daniel Craig's is a he's-not-so-bad tactic. But what's the point? I want an honest biography, but Crowley's more interesting than this - at some point you realise that the shock value of the book lies in the fact that Crowley may have worked as a SPY! A vastly well-travelled patriotic aristocrat with money, connections, a minor illness that precluded him from combat, quite openly a member of masonic orders was, during the First World War, possibly working for British Intelligence. Devoting such a huge percentage of the book to recording the tenuous and tedious connections between Crowley and the plethora of people who may have had a passing interest in the maintenance of the establishment seems futile. Large sections were typical of space-filling, what Crowley said to his daughter on such and such a date, blah blah. Once in a while Churton lets slip the Crowley influence on his own philosophy, and it's elegant and heartening to read. The Churton style is delicately modern, particularly fine in the opening few chapters, but the book lacks colour. Hard to do with someone as psychedelic as Crowley - his role as a proto-social revolutionary, his engagement with drugs and other members of freak 1920s society is skipped through, hungry to 'reveal' more shreds of evidence that he had a couple of fellows who sat sipping cocktails in Roman bars, half an eye on Mussolini. This did nothing to diminish my longstanding fascination with Crowley, but an attempt to normalise him for the modern, post-education Brit audience, to distance him from the infantile but romantic joys of black magic, poetry and reckless intoxication, to repackage Crowley as a Bond villain who was actually Bond, is not much fun to read if you are of the open minded persuasion to begin with.

  7. 5 out of 5

    AL

    After reading “Perdurabo” by Kaczynski, I thought I had an accurate picture of The Beast, but this book gave me a bit of a 180 degree turn in many respects. It reveals many of Kaczynski’s biases and gaps of information, but in doing so, this book provides its own gaps in the story, that are annoyingly absent when you are expecting a more in depth analysis. I guess this author chose to mainly reveal the newly found information of his spying activities that Kaczynski mostly glosses over with a sen After reading “Perdurabo” by Kaczynski, I thought I had an accurate picture of The Beast, but this book gave me a bit of a 180 degree turn in many respects. It reveals many of Kaczynski’s biases and gaps of information, but in doing so, this book provides its own gaps in the story, that are annoyingly absent when you are expecting a more in depth analysis. I guess this author chose to mainly reveal the newly found information of his spying activities that Kaczynski mostly glosses over with a sense of doubt, yet omits many of the accounts in Kaczynski that were poignant to the narrative of Crowley. I suggest reading both, but this one has excellent scholarship and a fine style that make it of great value in understanding this genius and prophet of the New Aeon of Horus.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael Kelly

    An excellent biography, and a very fair one, which makes plain just what a genius the man was. This is borne out by quotes and letter extracts from the people who really knew him, giving perhaps the most accurate portrait of the Beast that has yet emerged. It sets a few old myths straight through accounts from people who were actually there and covers matters which are often ignored, such as his relationships with his extended family and his children. Proper weight is given to the latter years of An excellent biography, and a very fair one, which makes plain just what a genius the man was. This is borne out by quotes and letter extracts from the people who really knew him, giving perhaps the most accurate portrait of the Beast that has yet emerged. It sets a few old myths straight through accounts from people who were actually there and covers matters which are often ignored, such as his relationships with his extended family and his children. Proper weight is given to the latter years of his life, which often get shorter shrift. Excellent.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rupert Rawnsley

    Starts well, but is far too long; some chapters read like a biographers unedited notes. The author assumes to much knowledge of the dark arts, and having clearly "drunk the Kool-Aid", is unable to offer any skeptical view of what is patently medieval mumbo jumbo. None of this diminishes the man himself, who was fascinating and misunderstood. Starts well, but is far too long; some chapters read like a biographers unedited notes. The author assumes to much knowledge of the dark arts, and having clearly "drunk the Kool-Aid", is unable to offer any skeptical view of what is patently medieval mumbo jumbo. None of this diminishes the man himself, who was fascinating and misunderstood.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carmen Tracey

    A satisfactory overview of the life and times of "The Beast," this biography does a great deal to polish up Crowley's oft-tarnished reputation. Unfortunately, the author's favorable opinion of Crowley ends up whitewashing many of his major flaws and presents a biased viewpoint. Keeping that in mind, however, this is an enjoyable read. A satisfactory overview of the life and times of "The Beast," this biography does a great deal to polish up Crowley's oft-tarnished reputation. Unfortunately, the author's favorable opinion of Crowley ends up whitewashing many of his major flaws and presents a biased viewpoint. Keeping that in mind, however, this is an enjoyable read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Of all the many Crowley biographies, Churton's approach has done more to reveal the uniqueness of Crowley the person in conjunction with the uniqueness of the times and events in which he lived and reacted and impacted. The book became more enjoyable as it progressed, although a bit heavy-handed on the spying aspects (real or conjectured) of Crowley's life. A refreshing and subtle exploration of a larger-than-life yet all-too-human personality. Of all the many Crowley biographies, Churton's approach has done more to reveal the uniqueness of Crowley the person in conjunction with the uniqueness of the times and events in which he lived and reacted and impacted. The book became more enjoyable as it progressed, although a bit heavy-handed on the spying aspects (real or conjectured) of Crowley's life. A refreshing and subtle exploration of a larger-than-life yet all-too-human personality.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mancman

    I came to this knowing only Crowley’s reputation, and thought I could learn a lot more. I did from this book, and it reset my thoughts on the clearly maligned Crowley. But, and there is a but, this is dry, very factual, detailed, but dry. There’s so much material here, and such fascinating facts, but they’re buried in, what I found, a desert of prose. It’s reset my views on the subject, and given me a taste of the man/Beast, but didn’t satisfy fully.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Crippled_ships

    Some nuggets of information, but overall a quite messy and badly edited book. Definitely not the "end all" biography heralded by the blurb... Some nuggets of information, but overall a quite messy and badly edited book. Definitely not the "end all" biography heralded by the blurb...

  14. 5 out of 5

    El Sh'Booms

    It appears that The Beast, The Most Dangerous Man Alive, of one era is nothing more evil than your average Silverlake resident of the current era. He liked smoking dope and sucking some dick and was an above-average mountain climber. He tried very hard to be a spy and maybe he was. Not exactly the embodiment of evil today, though in more Christian times he must have seemed like a specter. A life worth examining, nevertheless.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Simeon Readingape

    #003.05 SIMEON: This sounds like something out of "Gravity's Rainbow". p. 379 "In May 1940, as the 'outsider', the man 'too dangerous' became PM, Karl Germer was deported from Belgium and interned in France. The Germans advanced, the British evacuated Dunkirk in June and the country braced itself. Crowley contacted the Ministry of Information: 'Saw Sunday Dispatch Girl Friday. Stuart of Ministry of Information was there. Submitted England, Stand Fast with a little lecture.' Despite the patriotic #003.05 SIMEON: This sounds like something out of "Gravity's Rainbow". p. 379 "In May 1940, as the 'outsider', the man 'too dangerous' became PM, Karl Germer was deported from Belgium and interned in France. The Germans advanced, the British evacuated Dunkirk in June and the country braced itself. Crowley contacted the Ministry of Information: 'Saw Sunday Dispatch Girl Friday. Stuart of Ministry of Information was there. Submitted England, Stand Fast with a little lecture.' Despite the patriotic objective, Crowley's sex magick skills, at age 64, were under attack: Ruby Butler, the blond bombshell, to lunch. @ Weak erection. Too rapid ejaculation. Very feeble concentration: could not formulate purpose. Purpose. The lesson was not lost on him. Britain also needed to 'get it up'. As Luftwaffe bombers boiled the autumn skies, an idea grew in his mind, even as his health suffered. Bombing aggravated his asthma. Torquay, scene of teenage liberation, was chosen for recuperation. There was a downside - 9 October 1940: 'Nerves on edge for lack of cunt.' He dreamt of Greta Sequeira at a big hill station in India. While Crowley made love to the Greta of his dreams, Liverpool was blitzed and John Winston Lennon entered this world. On 16 November the worst asthma attack in memory put him in hospital. Struggling for life, Frieda rushed to his bedside. A few days later, Dr RH Lodge pronounced him recovered, advising a trip to the USA: just what Crowley wanted. But he needed money and a passport. Sex magick with new girl Sophie Burt aimed to secure the former. Cammell considered 666's recovery smacked of resurrection. 666 was thinking of national resurrection. He would devise a militant aphrodisiac, or, as he put it: a 'Magical "Union of Men" to beat Nazis': a 'symbol to bring victory'. He hit on the idea of the 'V-sign'. 'V [is] for Valentine [sexual love] and Victory', he wrote.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    This is a slightly tidied up version of a review I posted on Amazon a few years ago. At last The Great Beast gets the biography he deserves, well researched, well thought out and well written. Tobias Churton has shown due respect and to my mind has helped reconcile Crowley's position on the world stage. Crowley was a polymath of extraordinary talent and courage whose reputation was always tarnished with the negative ramblings of lesser minds that focused on scandal and sensationalism. Don't get This is a slightly tidied up version of a review I posted on Amazon a few years ago. At last The Great Beast gets the biography he deserves, well researched, well thought out and well written. Tobias Churton has shown due respect and to my mind has helped reconcile Crowley's position on the world stage. Crowley was a polymath of extraordinary talent and courage whose reputation was always tarnished with the negative ramblings of lesser minds that focused on scandal and sensationalism. Don't get me wrong The Beast was sensational and deliberatly so on many occasions, so was Johhny Rotten. However his contribution to the evolution of consciousness among other things has been sorely overlooked. Churton wisely decided not to pay too much heed to the darkness that surrounds him as this has been done many times over by other authors. He has somehow managed to bring light to bear on Crowley's achievments and dare I say exposed some of his inner beauty. Yes I did say inner beauty. For instance how dark can this man be, he was a true psychedelic and was experimenting with meascaline well before Aldous Huxley gave us the Doors of Perception, it is rumoured that he was the one to turn Huxley on. No wonder he's a Rock & Roll hero, he deserves his place on the cover of Sgt Peppers. He was also having the likes of Hedy Lamarr and Christopher Isherwood over for dinner and no doubt influenced other great minds of his generation. To his detracters I put this question, by what criteria do you judge this man's life to be a failure? Konx Om Pax means light in extension and his light is still extending, no small achievment. Tobias Churton you have done your job well.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laneth

    The life of one of history's most notorious esoteric figures glides off the pages in this biography, detailing without reservation the best and worst parts of the man and the legend he built around himself. While there's no doubt in my mind that he achieved most of what he boasted throughout his life, a healthy dose of scepticism should be taken when it comes to some of his more grandiose claims. Without having been there, it's impossible to verify the truth of such things, but I like to believe The life of one of history's most notorious esoteric figures glides off the pages in this biography, detailing without reservation the best and worst parts of the man and the legend he built around himself. While there's no doubt in my mind that he achieved most of what he boasted throughout his life, a healthy dose of scepticism should be taken when it comes to some of his more grandiose claims. Without having been there, it's impossible to verify the truth of such things, but I like to believe that there's much more to Crowley than could ever truly be revealed.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Neil Michaelis

    After reading a few Crowley bios and finding them either biased totally against AC or so fundamentally packed with minute facts and detail, that they became daunting or frankly dull, I was somewhat surprised by this gem. Well written from excellent (and purportedly previously unpublished) sources I think that this is one of (if not the) finest example of a Crowley biography out there.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lilly

    I found it all melted into one big lump of text, and sadly as with so many books on Crowley, there are more claims than facts, (imo) there are a lot of things claimed that seem fantacy. I gave up on this book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Meadfairy

    Although this book did debunk many of the myths of Crowley, it was difficult to read mainly because of the format. Although documented chronologically, it did jump back and forth within chapters often making it hard to keep track of what happened when.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    Second attempt at reading this biography. I cant believe I am saying this but it is too complete (and I read Chernow), too much magic, too much to stop reading and research. Almost have to know the material already to read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Bryan

    I love biographies, and I had much higher hopes for this one. I had trouble staying focused with the writing style, and it seemed a bit biased. Still, I'll give it two stars instead of one; I did learn a few things from the read. I love biographies, and I had much higher hopes for this one. I had trouble staying focused with the writing style, and it seemed a bit biased. Still, I'll give it two stars instead of one; I did learn a few things from the read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Derek Fenner

    Just not up to par with Perdurabo.

  24. 4 out of 5

    David

    Interesting take on Crowley. I'm not entirely convinced by the spy stuff. Leaves him feeling quite like Jung when you strip it all down Interesting take on Crowley. I'm not entirely convinced by the spy stuff. Leaves him feeling quite like Jung when you strip it all down

  25. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    surprisingly very interesting- didn't think "Perdurabo" left much out, but this book clears up a lot of things. highly recommended. surprisingly very interesting- didn't think "Perdurabo" left much out, but this book clears up a lot of things. highly recommended.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris O'connore

    A great read. I've always been suspicious of Crowley's bad rep, and this book sheds a lot of light on his life and ideas. He's a very inspiring fellow! A great read. I've always been suspicious of Crowley's bad rep, and this book sheds a lot of light on his life and ideas. He's a very inspiring fellow!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Whitman

    "As to my reputation, I'm the Silent Martyr. Jesuit calumny is the shining token of my Mission". p. 352 "As to my reputation, I'm the Silent Martyr. Jesuit calumny is the shining token of my Mission". p. 352

  28. 4 out of 5

    Damien

    B+ for content, F for terrible writing.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    Informative but drags Learned a lot about the man behind the myth book did drag on and on about his magic and orders got very boring after awhile

  30. 5 out of 5

    Madeleine

    Churton writing Bill Breeze's fantasy of AC. Churton writing Bill Breeze's fantasy of AC.

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