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Poetry of the Gods

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The following entries include the first publication of this work and any publications currently in print. * The United Amateur, 20, No. 1 (September 1920), 1-4. * The Tomb and Other Tales. New York: Ballantine Books, 1970, 157-64. * Dagon and Other Macabre Tales. Ed. S.T. Joshi. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1987, 349-56. * The Transition of H.P. Lovecraft: The Road to Madn The following entries include the first publication of this work and any publications currently in print. * The United Amateur, 20, No. 1 (September 1920), 1-4. * The Tomb and Other Tales. New York: Ballantine Books, 1970, 157-64. * Dagon and Other Macabre Tales. Ed. S.T. Joshi. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1987, 349-56. * The Transition of H.P. Lovecraft: The Road to Madness. New York: Ballantine Books, 1996, 15-21. * Shadows of Death. New York, NY: Del Rey, 2005, 292300.


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The following entries include the first publication of this work and any publications currently in print. * The United Amateur, 20, No. 1 (September 1920), 1-4. * The Tomb and Other Tales. New York: Ballantine Books, 1970, 157-64. * Dagon and Other Macabre Tales. Ed. S.T. Joshi. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1987, 349-56. * The Transition of H.P. Lovecraft: The Road to Madn The following entries include the first publication of this work and any publications currently in print. * The United Amateur, 20, No. 1 (September 1920), 1-4. * The Tomb and Other Tales. New York: Ballantine Books, 1970, 157-64. * Dagon and Other Macabre Tales. Ed. S.T. Joshi. Sauk City, WI: Arkham House, 1987, 349-56. * The Transition of H.P. Lovecraft: The Road to Madness. New York: Ballantine Books, 1996, 15-21. * Shadows of Death. New York, NY: Del Rey, 2005, 292300.

30 review for Poetry of the Gods

  1. 4 out of 5

    ᴥ Irena ᴥ

    Poetry and the Gods by H. P. Lovecraft with Anna Helen Crofts Another collaboration. The themes common to some of his other works are dreams and travelling through them. It follows a young woman whose dream enables her to talk to Greek gods. They tell her that poetry is the language of gods. Usually, there is at least an awesome story/an idea behind it all and it makes it fun to read. Here, though, there is no such story. Marcia falls asleep, dreams Greek gods, talks to them and gets snippets fro Poetry and the Gods by H. P. Lovecraft with Anna Helen Crofts Another collaboration. The themes common to some of his other works are dreams and travelling through them. It follows a young woman whose dream enables her to talk to Greek gods. They tell her that poetry is the language of gods. Usually, there is at least an awesome story/an idea behind it all and it makes it fun to read. Here, though, there is no such story. Marcia falls asleep, dreams Greek gods, talks to them and gets snippets from poetry of Goethe, Keats, Shakespeare and others.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linton

    The first non-horror story I have read by Lovecraft, though there is still an element of unease throughout the tale. There's a large amount of references to Greek mythology within the work and is the basis for the tale. The first non-horror story I have read by Lovecraft, though there is still an element of unease throughout the tale. There's a large amount of references to Greek mythology within the work and is the basis for the tale.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mark T. Arkey

    Excuse me. Waiter? Yes, I think there's been a mistake. I expressly asked for the Lovecraft *without* the overly indulgent deluge of allusion to Greek mythology. Can you please have the cook prepare another? Thank you ever so much. Excuse me. Waiter? Yes, I think there's been a mistake. I expressly asked for the Lovecraft *without* the overly indulgent deluge of allusion to Greek mythology. Can you please have the cook prepare another? Thank you ever so much.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    Poetry is the language of the gods. A surprisingly lovely tale with a Narnia-like setting and a touch of Poe’s romantic poetry.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    too dramatic

  6. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Not for me. I found this interminable. Audible edition narrated by Pamela Garelick. Not a fan of the narration either.

  7. 5 out of 5

    FameL

    It’s so elaborate. I think such genre as "poetry" isn't for Lovecraft. The story is just a lengthy boring stuff about poetry. The idea is prominent if convoluted. It’s so elaborate. I think such genre as "poetry" isn't for Lovecraft. The story is just a lengthy boring stuff about poetry. The idea is prominent if convoluted.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rizzie

    Yeah I'm not sure what this was going for. Doesn't sound like Lovecraft at all. Very self-important love letter to poetry and poets, but very lost in itself. One of the few Lovecraft stories I dislike. Yeah I'm not sure what this was going for. Doesn't sound like Lovecraft at all. Very self-important love letter to poetry and poets, but very lost in itself. One of the few Lovecraft stories I dislike.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David

    Poetry is the language of the gods, Greek gods, specifically. Interesting idea, and very flowery prose, but that's about it for me. Poetry is the language of the gods, Greek gods, specifically. Interesting idea, and very flowery prose, but that's about it for me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Austin Wright

    "Poetry and the Gods" is a short story by H. P. Lovecraft and Anna Helen Crofts. The two authors wrote the story in or shortly before the summer of 1920. It was published the following September in United Amateur, which credits Lovecraft as Henry Paget-Lowe. In the story, a young woman dreams that she has an audience with Zeus, who explains to her that the gods have been asleep and dreaming, but they have chosen a poet who will herald their awakening. The story was written after "The Green Meadow "Poetry and the Gods" is a short story by H. P. Lovecraft and Anna Helen Crofts. The two authors wrote the story in or shortly before the summer of 1920. It was published the following September in United Amateur, which credits Lovecraft as Henry Paget-Lowe. In the story, a young woman dreams that she has an audience with Zeus, who explains to her that the gods have been asleep and dreaming, but they have chosen a poet who will herald their awakening. The story was written after "The Green Meadow", and before "The Crawling Chaos"—two tales that Lovecraft and Winifred Jackson co-wrote with a Greek mythology basis.[2] What Anna Helen Crofts contributed to "Poetry and the Gods" is unknown. Lovecraft scholar S. T. Joshi reports that she "appeared sporadically in the amateur press, and may have been introduced to [Lovecraft] by Winifred Jackson." Lovecraft's surviving letters do not mention "Poetry and the Gods". In his 1955 essay on the Cthulhu Mythos, Lovecraft scholar George Wetzel compares the messenger god Hermes in "Poetry and the Gods" with Nyarlathotep, the "messenger of Azathoth". Wetzel considers the dream communication used by Hermes to be "the same psychic device used later by Cthulhu to contact his cult followers. The story begins in a drawing room on an April evening "just after the Great War". A young woman, Marcia, is there alone, feeling an "immeasurable gulf that [separates] her soul" from her uninspiring surroundings: 20th-century life and the "strange home" in which she lives. She wonders whether she was born in the wrong age. She leafs through a magazine to look for some soothing poetry, and lands on an atmospheric free verse poem. With its sensually rich images, the poem sends her into a reverie. Marcia believes it to herald a new age. She repeats its words to herself as she drifts off to sleep. Hermes appears before her sleeping body, and confirms that a new age is indeed coming: one in which the gods wake from their own dream-filled sleep, and take action. Hermes carries her to the court of Zeus, where Apollo, Dionysus, the Muses, and the Bacchae also wait. "Long have we… spoken only through our dreams," Zeus tells her, "but the time approaches when our voices shall not be silent. It is a time of awakening and change." He says that the gods have chosen a poet "to blend into one glorious whole all the beauty that the world hath known before, and to write words wherein shall echo all the wisdom and the loveliness of the past." This consummate poet is to be the harbinger of the gods' awakening. He was chosen not only by the gods themselves, but by select poets whom Zeus and Apollo granted immortality and honor. In turn, these six poets come forth and contribute lines of verse: Homer, Dante, Goethe, Shakespeare, Milton, and Keats. They continue until just before dawn, and Hermes carries Marcia back to her house. Years later, Marcia is with the poet foretold by Zeus. When she tells him that his poetry is "fit for the gods", Zeus sends her a vision and declares: "By his word shall thy steps be guided to happiness, and in his dreams of beauty shall thy spirit find all that it craveth."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Keenan Crone

    A poet's dream of a world where the paradise of the Gods could be achieved through writing. "Before the laurel-draped mouth of the Corycian cave sat in a row six noble forms with the aspect of mortals, but the countenances of Gods. These the dreamer recognized from images of them which she had beheld, and she knew that they were none else than the divine Maeonides, the avernian Dante, the more than mortal Shakespeare, the chaos-exploring Milton, the cosmic Goethe and the musalan Keats. These were A poet's dream of a world where the paradise of the Gods could be achieved through writing. "Before the laurel-draped mouth of the Corycian cave sat in a row six noble forms with the aspect of mortals, but the countenances of Gods. These the dreamer recognized from images of them which she had beheld, and she knew that they were none else than the divine Maeonides, the avernian Dante, the more than mortal Shakespeare, the chaos-exploring Milton, the cosmic Goethe and the musalan Keats. These were those messengers whom the Gods had sent to tell men that Pan had passed not away, but only slept; for it is in poetry that Gods speak to men." The first of Lovecraft's collaborative efforts that I have read, it seems to do him well to have a woman's influence in his writing. I enjoyed the poetry that is included here; somewhat living up to the lofy purpose it so purposes: Moon over Japan, White butterfly moon! Where the heavy-lidded Buddhas dream To the sound of the cuckoo's call... The white wings of moon butterflies Flicker down the streets of the city, Blushing into silence the useless wicks of sound-lanterns in the hands of girls ... When old age shall this generation waste, Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st “Beauty is truth — truth beauty” — that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know. The goings on about the gods would be more enjoyable if I was more familiar with their mythology. I loved the concept of the Messiah coming as a writer, but the way it is portrayed in the ending is a little lackluster. It also taught me the word 'hie' which I must remember for scrabble. I can only assume that such low ratings on Goodreads come from people expecting Lovecraftian horror and getting something entirely different. This just shows that Lovecraft could be a good collaberator and step out of his comfort zone. Too bad people aren't more open-minded, but you can apply that statement to every aspect of our society.

  12. 5 out of 5

    R.J. Salem

    "For it is in poetry that Gods speak to men." Lovecraft partnered with friend Anna Helen Crofts to produce this short tale of a woman who, after reading a brief piece of poetry, dreams that she encounters Zeus as well as other Greek gods and "god-like" mortals of poetic renown. As it does in many of Lovecraft's other publications, a dream state provides the primary setting for this story, this time heavily incorporating elements of Greek mythology. Like "A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson," or " "For it is in poetry that Gods speak to men." Lovecraft partnered with friend Anna Helen Crofts to produce this short tale of a woman who, after reading a brief piece of poetry, dreams that she encounters Zeus as well as other Greek gods and "god-like" mortals of poetic renown. As it does in many of Lovecraft's other publications, a dream state provides the primary setting for this story, this time heavily incorporating elements of Greek mythology. Like "A Reminiscence of Dr. Samuel Johnson," or "The White Ship" (to an extent), "Poetry and the Gods" is another departure from Lovecraft's common themes of mystery and cosmic horror. The plot is quite simple, but the prose is absolutely beautiful. I'll close this review with another quote: “By his word shall thy steps be guided to happiness, and in his dreams of beauty shall thy spirit find all that it craveth.”

  13. 5 out of 5

    Oleksandr Fediienko

    Я впевнений, що колись посилався на це коротке оповідання, але не можу згадати, де саме. Тут розповідається про те, як одного разу Марсія зачитується поезією і замріюється. Посланець богів Гермес піднімає її на Парнас, святилище поезії. Там давні боги на чолі з Зевсом дрімають і чекають часу свого повернення. Зевс знайомить її з Гомером, Данте, Шекспіром, Мілтоном, Гете і Кітсом, які були вісниками богів, і наказує чекати появи сьомого поета, який своїм мистецтвом поверне їх на землю. Заслуговують Я впевнений, що колись посилався на це коротке оповідання, але не можу згадати, де саме. Тут розповідається про те, як одного разу Марсія зачитується поезією і замріюється. Посланець богів Гермес піднімає її на Парнас, святилище поезії. Там давні боги на чолі з Зевсом дрімають і чекають часу свого повернення. Зевс знайомить її з Гомером, Данте, Шекспіром, Мілтоном, Гете і Кітсом, які були вісниками богів, і наказує чекати появи сьомого поета, який своїм мистецтвом поверне їх на землю. Заслуговують на увагу розлогі монологи Гермеса і Зевса - зразки поезії в прозі. Доречними також є уривки з творів зазначених поетів.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sean Harding

    Well I didn't feel the love for this craft - it never engaged me at all. The title sounded somewhat intriguing, but that was as far as it goes. A title alone does not make a good story, let that be my philosophical utterance from this book. Maybe the next craft by Lovecraft will float in my general direction! Well I didn't feel the love for this craft - it never engaged me at all. The title sounded somewhat intriguing, but that was as far as it goes. A title alone does not make a good story, let that be my philosophical utterance from this book. Maybe the next craft by Lovecraft will float in my general direction!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Станислав

    Какое-то символистское дерьмо.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Thor The Redbeard

    4/10

  17. 4 out of 5

    Trevor Dailey

    Honestly didn't really click with me. Honestly didn't really click with me.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Per

    https://my.w.tt/o9FGKhUAW3 — https://my.w.tt/o9FGKhUAW3 —

  19. 4 out of 5

    Musaab Osman

    This is the authors' love letter to poetry. This is the authors' love letter to poetry.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ernie

    Interesting but I didn’t enjoy it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lucas

    "Los poetas son los sueños de los dioses; y en todas las épocas ha habido alguien que cantara sin saberlo el mensaje y la promesa de los jardines de lotos que hay mas allá del crepúsculo" "Los poetas son los sueños de los dioses; y en todas las épocas ha habido alguien que cantara sin saberlo el mensaje y la promesa de los jardines de lotos que hay mas allá del crepúsculo"

  22. 5 out of 5

    Josh Bulmer

    Y'know, I'm not really sure what this story is about or why it exists besides it just being a girl talking to Greek gods in her sleep. Reading all of Lovecraft's fiction: 28/106 Y'know, I'm not really sure what this story is about or why it exists besides it just being a girl talking to Greek gods in her sleep. Reading all of Lovecraft's fiction: 28/106

  23. 4 out of 5

    Forked Radish

    A Macheninian paean to Epicureanism.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    1920: “Poetry and the Gods” (with Anna Helen Crofts) ”Attired simply, in a low-cut evening dress of black, she appeared outwardly a typical product of modern civilisation; but tonight she felt the immeasurable gulf that separated her soul from all her prosaic surroundings. Was it because of the strange home in which she lived; that abode of coldness where relations were always strained and the inmates scarcely more than strangers? Was it that, or was it some greater and less explicable misplaceme 1920: “Poetry and the Gods” (with Anna Helen Crofts) ”Attired simply, in a low-cut evening dress of black, she appeared outwardly a typical product of modern civilisation; but tonight she felt the immeasurable gulf that separated her soul from all her prosaic surroundings. Was it because of the strange home in which she lived; that abode of coldness where relations were always strained and the inmates scarcely more than strangers? Was it that, or was it some greater and less explicable misplacement in Time and Space, whereby she had been born too late, too early, or too far away from the haunts of her spirit ever to harmonise with the unbeautiful things of contemporary reality?” “Poetry and the Gods” is arguably the 26th oldest surviving fictional work by American weird fiction author H.P. Lovecraft (1890-1937). He co-wrote it with Anna Helen Crofts, probably in the summer of 1920, and used the pseudonym Henry Paget-Howe. It was first published in the journal The United Amateur in September 1920. HPL’s reason for disguising his identity and the whole origin of the story are a mystery. Out of the approximately 10,000 letters by Lovecraft that survive, none of them mention “Poetry and the Gods” or Croft. Very little information about Croft survives either and we don’t know how much she contributed to the story. The tale is about a woman named Marcia and most of the narrative takes place in a dream. She meets several ancient Greek gods such as Hermes and Zeus, along with great mortal poets such as Homer, Dante, “the more than mortal Shakespeare,” Milton, Goethe, and Keats. “These were those messengers whom the Gods had sent to tell men that Pan had passed not away, but only slept; for it is in poetry that Gods speak to men.” This may remind the reader of how Lovecraft would later describe his concept of the Elder Gods remaining alive, only sleeping until the stars are right. They communicate through humans that are unusually sensitive, such as dreamers, artists, and poets. Overall, “Poetry and the Gods” has pretty prose but I found very little of interest in it. The story strikes me as “okay.” Title: “Poetry and the Gods,” sometimes called “Poetry & the Gods” or “Poetry of the Gods” Author: H.P. Lovecraft & Anna Helen Crofts Dates: 1920 (written and published) Genre: Fiction - Short story, fantasy Word count: 2,534 words Date(s) read: 2/20/22 Reading journal entry #58 in 2022 Sources: The story: https://hplovecraft.com/writings/fict... The United Amateur vol. 20, no. 1 (September 1920): 1–4. Joshi, S. T., & Schultz, D. E. (2001). An H.P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia. Greenwood Press. The photograph is of the grave of author Anna Helen Crofts in North Adams, Massachusetts. See the new article that it is from here: https://www.berkshireeagle.com/histor...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Austin Wright

    "Poetry and the Gods" is a short story by H. P. Lovecraft and Anna Helen Crofts. The two authors wrote the story in or shortly before the summer of 1920. It was published the following September in United Amateur, which credits Lovecraft as Henry Paget-Lowe. In the story, a young woman dreams that she has an audience with Zeus, who explains to her that the gods have been asleep and dreaming, but they have chosen a poet who will herald their awakening. The story was written after "The Green Meadow "Poetry and the Gods" is a short story by H. P. Lovecraft and Anna Helen Crofts. The two authors wrote the story in or shortly before the summer of 1920. It was published the following September in United Amateur, which credits Lovecraft as Henry Paget-Lowe. In the story, a young woman dreams that she has an audience with Zeus, who explains to her that the gods have been asleep and dreaming, but they have chosen a poet who will herald their awakening. The story was written after "The Green Meadow", and before "The Crawling Chaos"—two tales that Lovecraft and Winifred Jackson co-wrote with a Greek mythology basis.[2] What Anna Helen Crofts contributed to "Poetry and the Gods" is unknown. Lovecraft scholar S. T. Joshi reports that she "appeared sporadically in the amateur press, and may have been introduced to [Lovecraft] by Winifred Jackson." Lovecraft's surviving letters do not mention "Poetry and the Gods". In his 1955 essay on the Cthulhu Mythos, Lovecraft scholar George Wetzel compares the messenger god Hermes in "Poetry and the Gods" with Nyarlathotep, the "messenger of Azathoth". Wetzel considers the dream communication used by Hermes to be "the same psychic device used later by Cthulhu to contact his cult followers. The story begins in a drawing room on an April evening "just after the Great War". A young woman, Marcia, is there alone, feeling an "immeasurable gulf that [separates] her soul" from her uninspiring surroundings: 20th-century life and the "strange home" in which she lives. She wonders whether she was born in the wrong age. She leafs through a magazine to look for some soothing poetry, and lands on an atmospheric free verse poem. With its sensually rich images, the poem sends her into a reverie. Marcia believes it to herald a new age. She repeats its words to herself as she drifts off to sleep. Hermes appears before her sleeping body, and confirms that a new age is indeed coming: one in which the gods wake from their own dream-filled sleep, and take action. Hermes carries her to the court of Zeus, where Apollo, Dionysus, the Muses, and the Bacchae also wait. "Long have we… spoken only through our dreams," Zeus tells her, "but the time approaches when our voices shall not be silent. It is a time of awakening and change." He says that the gods have chosen a poet "to blend into one glorious whole all the beauty that the world hath known before, and to write words wherein shall echo all the wisdom and the loveliness of the past." This consummate poet is to be the harbinger of the gods' awakening. He was chosen not only by the gods themselves, but by select poets whom Zeus and Apollo granted immortality and honor. In turn, these six poets come forth and contribute lines of verse: Homer, Dante, Goethe, Shakespeare, Milton, and Keats. They continue until just before dawn, and Hermes carries Marcia back to her house. Years later, Marcia is with the poet foretold by Zeus. When she tells him that his poetry is "fit for the gods", Zeus sends her a vision and declares: "By his word shall thy steps be guided to happiness, and in his dreams of beauty shall thy spirit find all that it craveth."

  26. 5 out of 5

    Austin Wright

    "Poetry and the Gods" is a short story by H. P. Lovecraft and Anna Helen Crofts. The two authors wrote the story in or shortly before the summer of 1920. It was published the following September in United Amateur, which credits Lovecraft as Henry Paget-Lowe. In the story, a young woman dreams that she has an audience with Zeus, who explains to her that the gods have been asleep and dreaming, but they have chosen a poet who will herald their awakening. The story was written after "The Green Meadow "Poetry and the Gods" is a short story by H. P. Lovecraft and Anna Helen Crofts. The two authors wrote the story in or shortly before the summer of 1920. It was published the following September in United Amateur, which credits Lovecraft as Henry Paget-Lowe. In the story, a young woman dreams that she has an audience with Zeus, who explains to her that the gods have been asleep and dreaming, but they have chosen a poet who will herald their awakening. The story was written after "The Green Meadow", and before "The Crawling Chaos"—two tales that Lovecraft and Winifred Jackson co-wrote with a Greek mythology basis.[2] What Anna Helen Crofts contributed to "Poetry and the Gods" is unknown. Lovecraft scholar S. T. Joshi reports that she "appeared sporadically in the amateur press, and may have been introduced to [Lovecraft] by Winifred Jackson." Lovecraft's surviving letters do not mention "Poetry and the Gods". In his 1955 essay on the Cthulhu Mythos, Lovecraft scholar George Wetzel compares the messenger god Hermes in "Poetry and the Gods" with Nyarlathotep, the "messenger of Azathoth". Wetzel considers the dream communication used by Hermes to be "the same psychic device used later by Cthulhu to contact his cult followers. The story begins in a drawing room on an April evening "just after the Great War". A young woman, Marcia, is there alone, feeling an "immeasurable gulf that [separates] her soul" from her uninspiring surroundings: 20th-century life and the "strange home" in which she lives. She wonders whether she was born in the wrong age. She leafs through a magazine to look for some soothing poetry, and lands on an atmospheric free verse poem. With its sensually rich images, the poem sends her into a reverie. Marcia believes it to herald a new age. She repeats its words to herself as she drifts off to sleep. Hermes appears before her sleeping body, and confirms that a new age is indeed coming: one in which the gods wake from their own dream-filled sleep, and take action. Hermes carries her to the court of Zeus, where Apollo, Dionysus, the Muses, and the Bacchae also wait. "Long have we… spoken only through our dreams," Zeus tells her, "but the time approaches when our voices shall not be silent. It is a time of awakening and change." He says that the gods have chosen a poet "to blend into one glorious whole all the beauty that the world hath known before, and to write words wherein shall echo all the wisdom and the loveliness of the past." This consummate poet is to be the harbinger of the gods' awakening. He was chosen not only by the gods themselves, but by select poets whom Zeus and Apollo granted immortality and honor. In turn, these six poets come forth and contribute lines of verse: Homer, Dante, Goethe, Shakespeare, Milton, and Keats. They continue until just before dawn, and Hermes carries Marcia back to her house. Years later, Marcia is with the poet foretold by Zeus. When she tells him that his poetry is "fit for the gods", Zeus sends her a vision and declares: "By his word shall thy steps be guided to happiness, and in his dreams of beauty shall thy spirit find all that it craveth."

  27. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Stahl

    Meh.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Morcys

    Sorry H.P but poetry is not your strong suit.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Julieta Mora

    Magical, spellbounding. It amazed me

  30. 5 out of 5

    Claire Orion

    Un relato escrito junto con Anna Helen Crofts. Palabras mágicas y oníricas, y poesía obsequiada por los dioses. Sólo los soñadores podemos sentir identificados con la protagonista. <3

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