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Does the Noise in My Head Bother You?: A Rock 'n' Roll Memoir

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Born Steven Victor Tallarico on March 26, 1948, in Yonkers, New York, Steven Tyler is the iconic songwriter, composer, and voice of Aerosmith roll band. After coming together in Sunapee, New Hampshire, in the late sixties, five musicians moved to Boston and became the band we know today as Aerosmith: Tyler as front man, guitarist Joe Perry, bassist Tom Hamilton, guitarist Born Steven Victor Tallarico on March 26, 1948, in Yonkers, New York, Steven Tyler is the iconic songwriter, composer, and voice of Aerosmith roll band. After coming together in Sunapee, New Hampshire, in the late sixties, five musicians moved to Boston and became the band we know today as Aerosmith: Tyler as front man, guitarist Joe Perry, bassist Tom Hamilton, guitarist Ray Tabano, later replaced by Brad Whitford, and drummer Joey Kramer. The band has sold more than 100 million records worldwide and won multiple Grammys, American Music awards, Billboard awards, MTV awards, and an Oscars World, The Simpsons, at Superbowl XXXV and was immortalized in their own version of Guitar Hero. Tyler is considered one of rocks most recognizable and dynamic front men. Rolling Stone has cited Tyler as one of the greatest singers of all time. In December 2010, he performed for President Obama and the First Lady in a special tribute to Sir Paul McCartney at the Kennedy Center Honors, and in January 2011, Tyler joined Jennifer Lopez, Randy Jackson, and host Ryan Seacrest as a judge on the Fox TV phenomenon American Idol.


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Born Steven Victor Tallarico on March 26, 1948, in Yonkers, New York, Steven Tyler is the iconic songwriter, composer, and voice of Aerosmith roll band. After coming together in Sunapee, New Hampshire, in the late sixties, five musicians moved to Boston and became the band we know today as Aerosmith: Tyler as front man, guitarist Joe Perry, bassist Tom Hamilton, guitarist Born Steven Victor Tallarico on March 26, 1948, in Yonkers, New York, Steven Tyler is the iconic songwriter, composer, and voice of Aerosmith roll band. After coming together in Sunapee, New Hampshire, in the late sixties, five musicians moved to Boston and became the band we know today as Aerosmith: Tyler as front man, guitarist Joe Perry, bassist Tom Hamilton, guitarist Ray Tabano, later replaced by Brad Whitford, and drummer Joey Kramer. The band has sold more than 100 million records worldwide and won multiple Grammys, American Music awards, Billboard awards, MTV awards, and an Oscars World, The Simpsons, at Superbowl XXXV and was immortalized in their own version of Guitar Hero. Tyler is considered one of rocks most recognizable and dynamic front men. Rolling Stone has cited Tyler as one of the greatest singers of all time. In December 2010, he performed for President Obama and the First Lady in a special tribute to Sir Paul McCartney at the Kennedy Center Honors, and in January 2011, Tyler joined Jennifer Lopez, Randy Jackson, and host Ryan Seacrest as a judge on the Fox TV phenomenon American Idol.

30 review for Does the Noise in My Head Bother You?: A Rock 'n' Roll Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Keeten

    I'm not really sure what most of the reviewers/readers of this book expected. They are complaining about the adolescent, egotistical, drug abusing, sex indulgent lifestyle of a rock star. This was what I already knew about Steven Tyler and that description pretty much fits any other hard rocking successful star from his era or any other era. He is hormonally driven. He is an addict. He is convinced of his own rock star immortality. I think that a large part of his success comes from being all of I'm not really sure what most of the reviewers/readers of this book expected. They are complaining about the adolescent, egotistical, drug abusing, sex indulgent lifestyle of a rock star. This was what I already knew about Steven Tyler and that description pretty much fits any other hard rocking successful star from his era or any other era. He is hormonally driven. He is an addict. He is convinced of his own rock star immortality. I think that a large part of his success comes from being all of those things. I don't believe you can get up in front of thousands of people and not be convinced you are one of the best at what you do. Maybe people reading this biography were looking for humbleness or... haha... maturity from a 63 year old rock warrior. He walked the walk. He was lucky to survive it. He is more aware than anyone of his own faults. Despite his...imperfections... he does realize that he has value and can still contribute more music. He is honest, revealing aspects of his life that many people would have felt much more comfortable leaving in the deep woods where they could never be found again. His deviant lifestyle left many readers aghast. Unfortunately I believe that a lot of people are picking up this autobiography because they enjoyed Steven's quirky behavior on American Idol. They are finding more thorns and thistles than expected and finding it all... a bit... unsavory. I enjoyed this book. I laughed out loud. I cringed. At times I felt sorry for him because life was treating him too harshly. At other times I felt he needed to suffer more. The book is written in his voice. I could almost believe that I was sitting down with Steven Tyler over drinks and a cornucopia of pharmaceuticals. The whole time I'm encouraging him to tell me more, and more, and more. His mind skitters around much as you would expect it to. He is a unique individual and makes people feel uncomfortable. We need him to be this way. I don't want his life. I'm not sure I would survive even a week of walking around in Steven Tyler's shoes. (I don't want his feet either. *shudder*) He works hard and plays hard. He enjoys the rewards and suffers the consequences. Overall a great ride through a life that few have the opportunity to experience.

  2. 4 out of 5

    JenniferD

    Dear Steven Tyler; The noise in your head doesn't bother me so much, I get a lot of noise in my own head so I can relate, to a degree, but the words in your book really bothered me. A lot. Because the words in your book are a poorly put together bunch of sentences and nonsensical tripe. Way worse than almost any noise. Except for maybe that noise Jim Carey makes in "Dumb & Dumber" when they are having that most irritating noise contest. Your anecdotes aren't even funny or entertaining. Also - you Dear Steven Tyler; The noise in your head doesn't bother me so much, I get a lot of noise in my own head so I can relate, to a degree, but the words in your book really bothered me. A lot. Because the words in your book are a poorly put together bunch of sentences and nonsensical tripe. Way worse than almost any noise. Except for maybe that noise Jim Carey makes in "Dumb & Dumber" when they are having that most irritating noise contest. Your anecdotes aren't even funny or entertaining. Also - you sound a bit whiny. Did you know that? I mean, look, those who know even a bit about Aerosmith know about the drugs and the girls and the antagonistic relationship you and Joe Perry share. So, none of this is new(s). It felt like, in reading, someone doth protest too much. Seriously. This book could have been 100 pages shorter if the repetition had been edited properly. Usually, if someone is a dick or a jerk or an ass-hat but they are aware of that aspect of their personality and are upfront about said trait, I can deal with them and even find them funny or appreciate their eccentricities. For some reason, your upfrontness did not translate into me caring about your story (or you). I didn't expect that from reading your book. I thought it would be a bit of fun, a brain-cleanse for the end of the year. SIGH! Also - I didn't count but totally should - never have I encountered the word 'placenta' used so often in situations having nothing to do with birth or pregnancy. I do not think that words means what you think it means. So that I am not a total cranky-pantsI about this read, I do have to give you props for your apparent Bookishness. The literary references were cool to find and I wouldn't have guessed that about you, Steven Tyler. Still, I would offer a bit of advice (that I know you won't listen to, or even read for that matter but it's fun to pretend): a) placenta - get a dictionary, look it up and then use the word sparingly and in its appropriate context; b) quit whining - no one likes to hear a person of wealth and privilege whine and complain; c) find a boxing club, take Joe Perry and then hammer the hell out of each other in the ring for a while, The two of you really need to punch each other and I would say it is really time to get that shit out of your systems. d) photos of nearly-naked 60+-year-old men are never a good idea. EVER. I don't care who you are. e) you should find something fun to do. FUN. Have some. Preferably with laughter. Antics equal not fun. I think that's it. There might be more but, frankly, reading your book made me tired. Best, Jennifer

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Steven said it best, "like most rock stars I suffer from Terminal Adolescence." And I felt like I was reading the diary of a 13-year-old. His story has become cliche: sex, drugs, and (a little bit of) rock n' roll. There's no revelation here. No deep insight into him, his songs, or the band. In fact, you could probably guess and come close to writing the book yourself, but it'd probably be better written and less juvenile and vulgar. Steven said it best, "like most rock stars I suffer from Terminal Adolescence." And I felt like I was reading the diary of a 13-year-old. His story has become cliche: sex, drugs, and (a little bit of) rock n' roll. There's no revelation here. No deep insight into him, his songs, or the band. In fact, you could probably guess and come close to writing the book yourself, but it'd probably be better written and less juvenile and vulgar.

  4. 5 out of 5

    J.K. Grice

    One of rock music's most enigmatic "free spirit" characters, Steven Tyler is also an accomplished drummer and song writer. This book chronicles the early days of his youth, his formative years, his union with Joe Perry, and the ultimate formation of Aerosmith. As may be expected, Tyler diverges down various roads and goes on tangents when the mood hits him. Still, this memoir is an entertaining read, especially if you are an Aerosmith fan. One of rock music's most enigmatic "free spirit" characters, Steven Tyler is also an accomplished drummer and song writer. This book chronicles the early days of his youth, his formative years, his union with Joe Perry, and the ultimate formation of Aerosmith. As may be expected, Tyler diverges down various roads and goes on tangents when the mood hits him. Still, this memoir is an entertaining read, especially if you are an Aerosmith fan.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Buggy

    Opening line: “Life is short. Break the rules, forgive quickly, kiss slowly, laugh uncontrollably, and never regret anything that makes you smile.” Reading about rock stars and their insane lives of excess is one of my guilty pleasures. I find the rise to success intriguing and then there are always the drugs, the girls, the inevitable rehab, more rehab and the stories behind the story. You know, how a song originated, what the lyrics really mean, why he fell off the stage. Then there’s also the Opening line: “Life is short. Break the rules, forgive quickly, kiss slowly, laugh uncontrollably, and never regret anything that makes you smile.” Reading about rock stars and their insane lives of excess is one of my guilty pleasures. I find the rise to success intriguing and then there are always the drugs, the girls, the inevitable rehab, more rehab and the stories behind the story. You know, how a song originated, what the lyrics really mean, why he fell off the stage. Then there’s also the feuds with band mates, personal relationships and dirty little secrets of other stars they party with. Steven Tyler's bio is no different, all the goods are here, and he doesn’t hold anything back (understatement) the only thing is in order to get to “the goods” you have to wade through utter randomness to find them. Yes Steve the noise is your head does bother me because most of the time I can’t keep up with what you’re talking about. This is written exactly how Tyler talks (and sings) with a what-will-he-say next, conversationally feel to it. And while its fun it’s also bizarre, crazy and at times difficult to follow. Jumping all over the place without a logical timeline and obscure song lyrics and poems thrown in whenever he feels like it. He wants to sniff J.Lo, he’s doing lines on tour, he’s driving around in a yellow convertible with some hot babe, suddenly he’s back in school, he’s married, he’s in rehab, it’s all Joe Perry’s fault, this is what black tastes like, I like to walk naked in my garden and talk to the fairies. Page 90-“I sat down at the drums and wrote the drum line for Walk This Way. You want the story now or when we get to Toys in the Attic? Hey, I never said this was gonna be a completely linear read. How could it be? (Ha!) But we’re on DRUMS so… what the f---” Anyways maybe if I were a true Aerosmith fan I would have appreciated this more, I don’t know? As it was though once I was able to turn the noise down there was a lot of interesting stuff here because at 63 and with 40 years in the business Steve has seen and done it all with everyone. As expected theres a ton of drug use here which actually gets kind of boring after a while I will admit though at being surprised when after 12 years of sobriety, a slew of health problems (Hepatitis C, false brain tumour diagnosis, torn ACL, broken blood vessel in throat and all the problems with his twisted feet) sent him spinning out of control with an addiction to post surgery pain meds and back for an 8th stint in rehab in 2009. He goes into great detail about his wardrobe and scarves which I’m sure will interest some and although his “brother” Joe Perry’s name is mentioned throughout we learn little about their ongoing love/hate relationship. We also hear about his wives (3 and counting), his children (4 and counting) and how Aerosmith always came before his family. I personally found the sections on song writing super interesting; the process, what the lyrics mean or in his case don’t because sometimes he just likes how the words feel on his tongue. With 32 pages of great photos fans will lick this up however I could only give it 3 stars because it took me ages to finish and at times drove me mad.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Swaye

    To be honest, I wasn't a fan of Steven Tyler or Aerosmith until I saw Steven on the Joe Rogan podcast. I had always just assumed he was a douchebag. But right then and there, not even a minute in, I realized how incredibly wrong I had been. Steven Tyler is a fucking sweetheart of the first order, with an aura of sensuality and charisma around him like some holy light. I watched the whole thing and immediately went on a mad quest to make up for lost time. I listened to every Aerosmith song and fo To be honest, I wasn't a fan of Steven Tyler or Aerosmith until I saw Steven on the Joe Rogan podcast. I had always just assumed he was a douchebag. But right then and there, not even a minute in, I realized how incredibly wrong I had been. Steven Tyler is a fucking sweetheart of the first order, with an aura of sensuality and charisma around him like some holy light. I watched the whole thing and immediately went on a mad quest to make up for lost time. I listened to every Aerosmith song and found out everything I could about this beautiful unicorn of a man. This book is like diving into the phosphorescent wonderland of Steven's mind, and I'm so glad I took the plunge. I am in love! Me in smitten sloth form:

  7. 4 out of 5

    Allison Renner

    As a huge Aerosmith fan, part of me worried this book would be self-indulgent, clearing Steven's own name while sullying everyone else's. Another part of me thought it would be all about his rock & roll decadence, drug problems, women. Walk The Way (the band's autobiography), but focused solely on Steven. I'll admit that part of me wanted that, to hear his side of the story and all the juicy gossip. I didn't get it. At first, I was disappointed. The narrative was scattered - a section on Steven's As a huge Aerosmith fan, part of me worried this book would be self-indulgent, clearing Steven's own name while sullying everyone else's. Another part of me thought it would be all about his rock & roll decadence, drug problems, women. Walk The Way (the band's autobiography), but focused solely on Steven. I'll admit that part of me wanted that, to hear his side of the story and all the juicy gossip. I didn't get it. At first, I was disappointed. The narrative was scattered - a section on Steven's childhood veered off into discussing his own children. There was no timeline. After a few pages, I was in. I got it. The stream-of-consciousness was originally distracting, but a polished narrative would have been moreso. This book is Steven talking to the reader. You can hear him, not the ghost writer, not an editor. He addresses his music, his career, the drugs, the women, but it's so much more. This gives me a feel for who he is more than any other autobiography I've read about anyone else. It's stream of consciousness, it's how he sees the world, it's what he thinks when he writes a song. "STEVEN TYLER, an aging but well-preserved rock star moodily stares into space... He's talking into a digital tape recorder, which he barely knows how to operate." [jokingly (?) writing his movie script] I think this is probably the most real autobiography I've read. Steven talked into a tape recorder; the ghost writer, David Dalton, transcribed it, maybe edited and organized it slightly. But I think Steven took it back, went through and made sure certain words were spelled phonetically so you could hear his voice, hear him burst into lyrics and rhymes, hear his signature scat, drag words out so you feel the weight of them. Much of the book is like this; it's very poetic, with rhymes and alliteration. If Stephen Davis had come in and smoothed everything out, polished the tales and lined them up in chronological order, it would have been another Walk This Way. But what we have is Steven Tyler. To sum it all up, I would have to say this book is Steven Tyler, as opposed to being about Steven Tyler. If you want the stories from his life, read Walk This Way. If you want to get inside his head, read this. A fun aside - while the cover looks typical, make sure you take off the dust jacket and check out what's underneath - shots of Steven in action like some sort of flipbook. It's pretty much the best thing ever. Quotables On his life: "Sometimes it feels like... all I'm doing is rearranging the deck chairs on the fucking Titanic." On women: "She could bend over backward - my kinda girl - and she had a flat head where I could rest my beer." On Joe's amp volume: "He'd play so loud, even Helen Keller could sing along." On fame/the media: "...they're looking at me, and what they see is this Steven Tyler entity. I began to think of myself in the third person..." "So go on, make it up! By now Steven Tyler is pretty much a fictional character anyway... I read about him and I don't know who it is." On lyrics: "People ask me all these questions about 'Dream On.' 'What does it mean?' What do you mean, 'What does it mean?' It means Dream On. You figure it out. You're the one listening to it... make up your own meaning."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    Actually, yes, yes it does. This book reads like being cornered at a party by that one guy who's a little older than everyone else and obviously went to a party one day years ago and never quite made it back. That guy who just goes on and on and just when you think you're following him, he veers and you can't make sense of him again. He won't shut up and you can't get away from him. That's how this book felt to me. One of the worst rock memoirs I've read. Actually, yes, yes it does. This book reads like being cornered at a party by that one guy who's a little older than everyone else and obviously went to a party one day years ago and never quite made it back. That guy who just goes on and on and just when you think you're following him, he veers and you can't make sense of him again. He won't shut up and you can't get away from him. That's how this book felt to me. One of the worst rock memoirs I've read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    This book was a little better than merely okay (which is the two star rating here at Goodreads). I actually give this book two and a half stars. Steven is a great front man and rock singer, but not much of a writer. His voice and style are too much like the way he actually talks and after a while that makes for sordid reading. I enjoyed the history of his band Aerosmith; I've been a fan since 1977. I also enjoyed his own history, the descriptions of how he developed his music, touring, bands he This book was a little better than merely okay (which is the two star rating here at Goodreads). I actually give this book two and a half stars. Steven is a great front man and rock singer, but not much of a writer. His voice and style are too much like the way he actually talks and after a while that makes for sordid reading. I enjoyed the history of his band Aerosmith; I've been a fan since 1977. I also enjoyed his own history, the descriptions of how he developed his music, touring, bands he encountered, people he met, etc. What got old as I read was 1) his excessive narcissism, 2) the "talking" narrative he constantly used, 3) his constant gloating about how many drugs he had done over the years (as if other rock bands had not done those type of things) and 4) his relentless whining about how so many people took advantage of him, and how his band was constantly "after him" for one thing or the other. Really? Seriously? That all got a bit childish. I have read several autobiographies of other rock stars, and have quite a few more to read this year. In the mix, Steven's is about average. If you enjoy Aerosmith's music and would like to know more about the band and its lead singer, then this book will give you some insight. I'm a huge fan of Aerosmith, and I love Steven Tyler—he's an awesome singer and front-man (one of the best ever), but this book was not as good as I thought it might be.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Yes, I gave it five stars. I loved this book. Most people look at me as though I am crazy for having even bought it, much less read it, and no one thinks he has the brains to write a book and don't believe that he did so. But he has a very powerful voice, and I don't mean a singing one. As someone who has created a public persona, Steven Tyler is a bit over the top. But he is also Steven Tallarico; a boy who grew up summers in Sunapee, N.H. There is no doubt that the tie-in of living in the same Yes, I gave it five stars. I loved this book. Most people look at me as though I am crazy for having even bought it, much less read it, and no one thinks he has the brains to write a book and don't believe that he did so. But he has a very powerful voice, and I don't mean a singing one. As someone who has created a public persona, Steven Tyler is a bit over the top. But he is also Steven Tallarico; a boy who grew up summers in Sunapee, N.H. There is no doubt that the tie-in of living in the same area adds to the charm of the book. He admits he is who he is. But he is much more than who you think he is. Much. I have seen him over the years, always acting a little goofy in restaurants, but I don't think he knows how to turn himself off when he is in public. I would agree that he seemed "out there," and many times probably was. I can picture him climbing out of a Delorean one hot summer day in front of the ice cream stand dressed in leather and feather. That isn't just an everyday occurrence and you do think WEIRDO! I enjoyed it, and I hope that I bump into him at some point so I can tell him so!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I read this when it was first published and am just catching up to writing a review. This was pretty much as expected from an iconic rock star. Humorous, colorful, and full of excess. It's not the deepest spot in the ocean, but a wild ride on a rock and roll legend's wave of debauchery that kept me entertained! Told in the first person, (a sanitized version I would think) this gave the impression of Tyler speaking directly to me or anyone else caring to listen. I am conflicted though. Should a livi I read this when it was first published and am just catching up to writing a review. This was pretty much as expected from an iconic rock star. Humorous, colorful, and full of excess. It's not the deepest spot in the ocean, but a wild ride on a rock and roll legend's wave of debauchery that kept me entertained! Told in the first person, (a sanitized version I would think) this gave the impression of Tyler speaking directly to me or anyone else caring to listen. I am conflicted though. Should a living legend remain reclusive thus generating excitement by just showing his face once in a while? Or risk being downgraded to "human" by exposure? Mystery is a rarefied commodity of late.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    WOW! I've read quite a few memoirs, and I think this is one of the best. Is it spazzy and hard to follow at times? You bet. But you know, it's the noise in his head. I believe he writes how he probably talks. I've seen other reviews complaining that it's about sex, drugs and rock & roll. Well - DUH! It's Steven Tyler. That's his life. He's an addict. He owns it. He gets help. Will it ever stick? Who knows, but he's not denying what he is. He tells of the love/hate he and Joe Perry have. He's hon WOW! I've read quite a few memoirs, and I think this is one of the best. Is it spazzy and hard to follow at times? You bet. But you know, it's the noise in his head. I believe he writes how he probably talks. I've seen other reviews complaining that it's about sex, drugs and rock & roll. Well - DUH! It's Steven Tyler. That's his life. He's an addict. He owns it. He gets help. Will it ever stick? Who knows, but he's not denying what he is. He tells of the love/hate he and Joe Perry have. He's honest in this book I think. He's a womanizer, he owns that too. Music is his life. I think he's such a talented man and I think the addiction he has is very sad. Love the music he has created in his life. I believe he really did love the women he had children with. I believe he *wanted* a family. But I also believe that the drugs and his lifestyle made that difficult for him to ever achieve. He seems to have a very deep love for his kids. I believe he loves Joe Perry and *needs* him and this is what brings on the love/hate. Enjoyed reading about his childhood, his parents, how his music started. How he wanted to be like Mick. I think he kept trying to get himself "home" as he even ended up back where he grew up. I also think that although Aerosmith is huge, he always felt he was a step away from losing it all (and that probably is partially due to the drugs). Yet here he is, in his 60's and still going. He knows he's luck to be alive Although this book was sad with the addition and all, I think he's a funny guy and think the way he wrote it is all *STEVEN*. He has a huge potty mouth, but it works for this book. If you're a child of the 80's, if you're a rock fan, if you're an Aerosmith fan, I'd recommend this book!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    From looking at the reviews for this book, evidently, I'm the lone dissenter. Aerosmith is one of the few bands/artists I've seen in person multiple times. Their songs are mostly silly and super fun. I like them a lot, but I'm not a super fan. So, when this book came out, I saw a lot of positive reviews. My library had it, so I put it on hold. I don't get it. Let me say that I'm not a terribly creative person. I'm certainly not a musician. And I've never done drugs. Maybe I just can't relate. Th From looking at the reviews for this book, evidently, I'm the lone dissenter. Aerosmith is one of the few bands/artists I've seen in person multiple times. Their songs are mostly silly and super fun. I like them a lot, but I'm not a super fan. So, when this book came out, I saw a lot of positive reviews. My library had it, so I put it on hold. I don't get it. Let me say that I'm not a terribly creative person. I'm certainly not a musician. And I've never done drugs. Maybe I just can't relate. This book is very stream of consciousness, veering off in any and all directions. It's like a very long conversation with someone with no structure at all. He talks about his childhood one moment and the next he's talking about his kids. The stories started to majorly blend together after a while. Most of the drug references were lost on me 'cause I had no idea what he was talking about. This is not the book for me. Evidently I'm in the minority, but there ya go.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mahlon

    If you like Steven Tyler's stream of consciousness ramblings… Then you'll love this book. It's verbal diarrhea… Of the most charming kind If you like Steven Tyler's stream of consciousness ramblings… Then you'll love this book. It's verbal diarrhea… Of the most charming kind

  15. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    Quite The Ride Through A Wild & Crazy Life!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    I'm a huge Aerosmith fan, they are definitely in my top 5 bands of all time. I'm also a big Steven Tyler fan, as he and Robert Plant are who I consider to be the two best rock vocalists ever. This book gives a look at his life from his own viewpoint, and it does come across as very honest. The first thing I have to say, most of this book seems to deal with his drug use. I would say 2/3 of the book (if not more) have at least a slight focus on his drug addictions. He started as a teenager, and it I'm a huge Aerosmith fan, they are definitely in my top 5 bands of all time. I'm also a big Steven Tyler fan, as he and Robert Plant are who I consider to be the two best rock vocalists ever. This book gives a look at his life from his own viewpoint, and it does come across as very honest. The first thing I have to say, most of this book seems to deal with his drug use. I would say 2/3 of the book (if not more) have at least a slight focus on his drug addictions. He started as a teenager, and it seems he's done almost every drug under the sun. He's also been addicted to most of them. I lost count of how many times he was in rehab, but it was a lot. I remember seeing them in concert in 1989, and that was being called their first "clean" tour. That didn't last long, as most of the band has been in and out of rehab several times since then. I knew the band had trouble with drugs, I just didn't realize how much trouble. Now, this book is from Steven Tyler's POV, and in his mind the entire band were all addicts just like him. (With the possible exception of Joey Kramer, who at least seems to have been the cleanest of the group, but even he had his demons.)I was left wondering if the entire band truly was as bad as Steven, or if that was just him trying to justify his own behavior. Probably somewhere in between. Another topic touched on was his, for lack of a better term, sex addiction. One thing that really stuck out in my mind was his views on infidelity. He seems to think if you get married and your vows say "for better or worse, til death do us part" then his affairs should be overlooked. He honestly seems to think that because he's a rock star he should be able to have sex with groupies and his wife should understand that and let it go. It's a mind blowing philosophy to say the least. He even gave an example and said if he married Pam Anderson, and she had sex with Kid Rock behind his back, he'd understand. He said that because she was a "sex symbol" it was only understandable she'd have sex with other people, regardless of whether she was married or not. (He only used her as an example, and nothing was said about her real sex life, so this isn't a reflection on Pamela Anderson or her own philosophy.) I just found that as the strangest part of the book. He thinks because he's Steven Tyler, he should be able to bang all the groupies he wants, and his wives (yes there were a few, gee wonder why?) should just say "oh well, he's Steven Tyler, of course he'll be sleeping around! La la la!" At least he was honest, though. As far as the musical aspects go, I was surprised to see he and the band are still having friction even today. (Unless they buried the hatchet in the few years since the book came out.)As late as 2010 they were barely speaking to one another, or at least barely speaking to Steven. The roots of the band were about as expected, and there were no huge surprises in their rise to fame. As you can see, my review deals more with Tyler's personal life than his musical career, and really that was the focus of the book. There were plenty of stories about the music itself, but it seemed overshadowed by Tyler's personal demons. Some biographies can leave you liking a person more or less then before you read them. I liked Steven before I read it, and even after reading it I still like him, so it's not like he comes across as a total jerk. If you would like to read an account of Steven Tyler's personal battles and demons, this is definitely the book for you. If you are strictly wanting to read about Aerosmith the band, you probably will still like this book, but you'll have to wade through a lot of baggage to pick out the choice bits.

  17. 4 out of 5

    M Tremmel

    Music documentaries and biographies (auto or otherwise) are my guilty pleasures. I cannot get enough. That is, perhaps, until now. Steven has the gift of gab as we've all seen who have tuned in to American Idol 2.0. However, the problem is that his publisher and editor do not limit the verbosity. Not even the most ardent music and Aerosmith fan wants to read or listen to the minute details of his upbringing and the endless stories of his rock n roll debauched lifestyle. What makes matters worse Music documentaries and biographies (auto or otherwise) are my guilty pleasures. I cannot get enough. That is, perhaps, until now. Steven has the gift of gab as we've all seen who have tuned in to American Idol 2.0. However, the problem is that his publisher and editor do not limit the verbosity. Not even the most ardent music and Aerosmith fan wants to read or listen to the minute details of his upbringing and the endless stories of his rock n roll debauched lifestyle. What makes matters worse is that up until (Disc 9 of 16) I had to return the audio version of the book to the library there was no pay-off. And when I say pay-off I mean any sense of remorse for the marriages he destroyed or lives (read daughters) he damaged by his reckless, absentee and devil may care disposition. He glazes right over some of the most interesting and sometimes devastating car wrecks in his life story where you're expecting some growth of character. Oddly, there are moments, brief flickers where he seems almost soulful only to be followed by some misogynistic joke. Perhaps, he careened to these brief respites throughout his multitude of experiences. His childhood story is quite interesting and his love of language leads to some funny chapter names and even funnier allusions. I just wish there was a morale to the story. Maybe that is actually his point. There is none. Because if he had remorse, he probably would have had so much it would be unbearable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Melissa T

    I don't really know if it's fair to write a review of a book I only read 19 pages of, but I'm going to anyway. I know Steven Tyler is a bit odd. He's entitled to that, with a 40 year career in music, having gone through drug addiction and all that sort of lifestyle. But, that does not mean that I'm going to suffer through horrible transitions and prose that's all over the place. It's like talking to someone who's manic depressive when they're going through a manic episode. And the random capitali I don't really know if it's fair to write a review of a book I only read 19 pages of, but I'm going to anyway. I know Steven Tyler is a bit odd. He's entitled to that, with a 40 year career in music, having gone through drug addiction and all that sort of lifestyle. But, that does not mean that I'm going to suffer through horrible transitions and prose that's all over the place. It's like talking to someone who's manic depressive when they're going through a manic episode. And the random capitalization of words? Annoying. This isn't a computer chat room. You don't have to use all caps to get your point across. Italicization is more subtle. But, I forgot, Steven Tyler probably doesn't know the meaning of subtle. There are nice stories about growing up in the 50's but they are juxtaposed with stories of him being left out by the side of a summer house as a young child and being dragged off into the woods by a fox.... Um? Ok then. What does that have to do with anything? I honestly don't know what I was expecting out of this book but I'm glad I didn't spend anymore time on it than I did.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Well, that was a terribly ADHD, non-linear memoir! Not that I expected more, but, well, maybe I did. It was very Steven Tyler, but a little more from A to B to C might have helped. I'm not a real big Aerosmith fan, but when a friend loaned me this book I thought it would be pretty entertaining. I do like some Aerosmith songs, they are catchy and fun. This book did entertain. There were some funny parts and some sad parts. And all the while you are watching a train wreck. When that train derails, Well, that was a terribly ADHD, non-linear memoir! Not that I expected more, but, well, maybe I did. It was very Steven Tyler, but a little more from A to B to C might have helped. I'm not a real big Aerosmith fan, but when a friend loaned me this book I thought it would be pretty entertaining. I do like some Aerosmith songs, they are catchy and fun. This book did entertain. There were some funny parts and some sad parts. And all the while you are watching a train wreck. When that train derails, its gonna be one massive, gruesome, bloody accident. So, questions arise. I wanted him to discuss meeting Liz when she's a teen, after finding out Steven Tyler is her dad. And what did his patents think of all of this? He stops mentioning them at some point. Does he hate his band members at the end of this book? Do they hate HIM? I don't think less or more of Steven Tyler. He came across as I expected. The drug addiction, sad. The sex addiction? Sad, yes, but more disturbing than the drugs and alcohol. Okay, he has zero self control as far as girls. Some men are like that. He has a problem with women NOT understanding that. I don't even know what to say about that. I guess I can say I wouldn't date him and at least he's honest and not hypocritical. I did read some of this to my husband. He found his escapades pretty amusing. Big ego, Big, big ego. That's why he's who he is. He's in his own world, he is his world.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Detroit

    The scarves, the mirror shades, the rakishly cocked bottle of Jack. For Aerosmith, it is forever 1971. They are the Counterfeit Stones, Fake Faces, and Led Zep-lite, swaggering down four decades, scoring nul points for originality but rocking like a bastard anyway. At least until they got off the dope and sauce, if indeed they ever did. It’s hard to imagine any Aerosmith soul-purge topping 1997’s “Walk This Way,” a tome so seedy with tales of Class 1 narcotic hoovering, shooting, and gulping that The scarves, the mirror shades, the rakishly cocked bottle of Jack. For Aerosmith, it is forever 1971. They are the Counterfeit Stones, Fake Faces, and Led Zep-lite, swaggering down four decades, scoring nul points for originality but rocking like a bastard anyway. At least until they got off the dope and sauce, if indeed they ever did. It’s hard to imagine any Aerosmith soul-purge topping 1997’s “Walk This Way,” a tome so seedy with tales of Class 1 narcotic hoovering, shooting, and gulping that it’ll make you either run for a hazmat disinfect or crawl off to the bathroom and start chasing the dragon yourself. That’s not to say Steven Tyler doesn’t do his best to portray the band during the past 40 years as somewhere between roach and dung beetle on the roster of animated existence and if you prefer your Aerosmith with a twist of heroin there’s plenty here to snort, especially if you’re interested in that section of their resume summarizing their first five or six albums, when they stalked the planet’s hockey barns and arenas on their own personal crusade to liberate most of middle America’s hearing, frilly undergarments, and wage packet. The only problem is wading through Tyler’s hippie, dipshit philosophy on life, dipping his wick, rhyming, and puppy dogs in order to get to it. I’m not sure if the details have been lost in the ether somewhere or whether Tyler just chose to gloss over it, but there’s precious little here on just how and why the band jumped on the MTV gravy train via a series of albums and power ballads that fell on the wrong side of memorable and tasted like acid reflux, nor their sharing a stage with Britney Spears and some boy band during halftime of the Super Bowl, which was just wrong. Whatever... Even God has his foibles. How best to explain lite beer, hip hop, and Lady Gaga? I still say Tyler deserves to be carried around Boston on a throne for the rest of his life for having written "Mama Kin," "Sick As a Dog," and "No Surprize" (his spelling, not mine), even though my ears rang for four or five days after their "Rocks" tour rolled through Cobo Hall in December of 1976.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mignon King

    Just started it, having waited months for the library copy to be available. Yes, I'm thrifty, but I'm also the only person I know who had read/bought "Walk This Way: The Autobiography of Aerosmith"--so I'm sure my Rock god will forgive me. INTRO/CH.1 The first almost-20 pages of the book make my brain hurt. A little less stream-of-consciousness from a rocker who has done 50 years worth of drugs would assist readers who are not a)poets and b)drooling Tyler fans like myself. I love ya, Baby, but Ye Just started it, having waited months for the library copy to be available. Yes, I'm thrifty, but I'm also the only person I know who had read/bought "Walk This Way: The Autobiography of Aerosmith"--so I'm sure my Rock god will forgive me. INTRO/CH.1 The first almost-20 pages of the book make my brain hurt. A little less stream-of-consciousness from a rocker who has done 50 years worth of drugs would assist readers who are not a)poets and b)drooling Tyler fans like myself. I love ya, Baby, but Yeah! the noise in your head is arguing with the voices in mine! --Editing dept.? Anybody in today? CH.1: 21) This is where the storyteller Tyler finds his groove. He tells about meeting Joe Perry--fry cook at the Anchorage restaurant across the street from the "rock 'n' roller-skate" Barn in Sunapee, NH. Next he describes childhood culture shocking shifts from summers in the woods to school years in the Bronx. He'd make up stories about bear wrestling to impress the tough city kids, refering to himself as "Huck Finn from Hell's Kitchen." A move to Yonkers combined the best of both worlds as there were woods and a lake nearby. He ordered a baby raccoon from a catalog...and exhibited a lot of other "wayward" teenage behavior that'll have you laughing til Ch.2. CH.2: "That was the end of the sixties. That's what Janis [Joplin] was to me--a revolutionary spirit, someone who changed the emotional weather" (38). If this descriptive, emotional, sexy chapter on how Tyler fell in love with rock doesn't send you a-Googling his refs, you are unrockable. ***NOTE: I've finished the book and handwriting the review, but will gradually type it up on my blog and add a link here when I'm done; it's almost 9 pages, more like reading notes--too long to put on here.*** Short form: Now I'll spring for a copy for my permanent library. It rocks!!!***

  22. 5 out of 5

    Apatters

    The noise didn't bother me as much as some of the jibberish. I am the same age as Steven Tyler and dated boys in bands when I was in high school. Additionally, I also spent summers in New Hampshire when I was growing up so appreciate the the duality/dichotomy of his two lives. Although I was familiar with some of his music, I couldn't have told you that they were "Aerosmith" songs or that he was their lead singer - this could be that by time he was famous I was into other groups? I actually wante The noise didn't bother me as much as some of the jibberish. I am the same age as Steven Tyler and dated boys in bands when I was in high school. Additionally, I also spent summers in New Hampshire when I was growing up so appreciate the the duality/dichotomy of his two lives. Although I was familiar with some of his music, I couldn't have told you that they were "Aerosmith" songs or that he was their lead singer - this could be that by time he was famous I was into other groups? I actually wanted to read his bio after watching him on American Idol - I didn't watch much until he and Jennifer Lopez started judging - and after that I was addicted to the show. I loved him as a judge and thought casting him and Lopez was brillant. However, after reading his book I don't even like him - what a sexist pig - the drugs I can understand and how they got out of control but drugs seem more a physical addiction while the gratuitous sex is just low moral values and lack of respect. I do think he is a brillant musician but would have liked to have read more about how his words were put to the music? I also think he is very clever about marketing himself - his style etc.that he seemed to have innately. It was also endearing in a way to realize that even at 60 he was still in awe of his own idols - the Beatles, Stones etc. Hope that as a grandfather he may have come full circle to become the person I sense he wants to be. On to Keith Richards and George Harrison...

  23. 4 out of 5

    David Rickert

    I probably would never have picked up this book if I hadn't enjoyed Steven Tyler so much on American Idol (and there's a good chance that Steven Tyler saw American Idol as a good way to promote his boko and upcoming solo album). I also enjoyed Keith Richards' autobiography, and thought this might be another worthy read. However, I thought this one was just okay. For one thing, it's pretty raunchy, and seems filled with locker room talk of sexual conquests and "can you believe I did this and I'm I probably would never have picked up this book if I hadn't enjoyed Steven Tyler so much on American Idol (and there's a good chance that Steven Tyler saw American Idol as a good way to promote his boko and upcoming solo album). I also enjoyed Keith Richards' autobiography, and thought this might be another worthy read. However, I thought this one was just okay. For one thing, it's pretty raunchy, and seems filled with locker room talk of sexual conquests and "can you believe I did this and I'm still alive?" At one level, I was able to remember how much I really enjoyed Aerosmith, a band I hadn't listened to in years once they started writing songs with other people and courting top 40 stardom. But this book is really about Steven Tyler and his personality and his viewpoint; even the writing style screams (sometimes literally) STEVEN TYLER! It's difficult to find a narrative thread here, and I really wanted to hear more about the band, which is what I got from "Life." However, it's safe to say after reading this book that Steven Tyler really doesn't give a damn about the rest of the band anymore. He comes off as an egotistical buffoon who happened to create great music.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rae

    I received this book as a gift and was very unsure how I felt about it while reading. One thing I found distracting was the fact that he would get side-tracked during the telling of a memory and end up somewhere entirely. He even seemed incredibly self-centred, egotistical and narcissistic. Despite the fact that I did not like his writing and story telling style, a lot of his stories were very interesting especially earlier on in his life leading up to the formation of Aerosmith. You also get a I received this book as a gift and was very unsure how I felt about it while reading. One thing I found distracting was the fact that he would get side-tracked during the telling of a memory and end up somewhere entirely. He even seemed incredibly self-centred, egotistical and narcissistic. Despite the fact that I did not like his writing and story telling style, a lot of his stories were very interesting especially earlier on in his life leading up to the formation of Aerosmith. You also get a good idea of how Steven Tyler came to be the person he is which I found intriguing. I love reading and learning about music and artists that I like and this book made me dive deeper into Aerosmith's catalogue and listen to songs I hadn't heard before. Overall, this is not a bad read. The stories are great, I just found the writing style a little distracting and Steven quite full of himself.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Wow - there should be a disclaimer on this book that says if you are offended by ANYTHING, you better not read it! It is very raw and a bit shocking in some parts (but it's Steven Tyler, should I have been surprised???). That being said, Steven Tyler really is talented. I was impressed to learn that he's not just some that screams into a mic - he's a musician! I enjoyed his descriptions of how they mixed the songs and how he came up with a bunch of his lyrics. Wow - there should be a disclaimer on this book that says if you are offended by ANYTHING, you better not read it! It is very raw and a bit shocking in some parts (but it's Steven Tyler, should I have been surprised???). That being said, Steven Tyler really is talented. I was impressed to learn that he's not just some that screams into a mic - he's a musician! I enjoyed his descriptions of how they mixed the songs and how he came up with a bunch of his lyrics.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Charlene

    Forget anyone Steven Tyler might have had sex with, been in love with,  or married. His true love, without question, has been and will always be "Joe Fucking Perry".  They have been through everything together and this bond, more than any other, seems to be what has been the most meaningful connection Steven Tyler will ever have.  The book itself is what you would expect from Steven Tyler-- outdated ideas of gender, uneducated and unscientific ideas about energy and medicine, justifications for c Forget anyone Steven Tyler might have had sex with, been in love with,  or married. His true love, without question, has been and will always be "Joe Fucking Perry".  They have been through everything together and this bond, more than any other, seems to be what has been the most meaningful connection Steven Tyler will ever have.  The book itself is what you would expect from Steven Tyler-- outdated ideas of gender, uneducated and unscientific ideas about energy and medicine, justifications for cheating on his significant others, and yet, wildly entertaining! Couldn't put it down. I was constantly compelled to listen to each song as he discussed it.  It is written in a very conversational style. You will feel like you are sitting down in a living room with Tyler, listening to his captivating stories (detecting bullshit now and then) and then, bam, suddenly it's 15 hours later, it feels like one hour has passed, and you feel incredibly satisfied.   I really liked Tyler's discussions about drugs. He didn't do that thing where drugs are either wonderful or evil. I felt like I really got a very detailed and in depth idea about what role drugs played in his life. People are forever speculating how the use of drugs influenced (or did not influence) various songs. Tyler's writing style is very informal and really resulted in me feeling like I lived through a lot of his experiences with him. Jonie's Butterfly had always been my favorite song from Rock In A Hard place. I like it a lot less now after Tyler's description of its drug induced emergence, but at the same time, I kind of like Aeorsmith as a whole better than I did before reading this book.  One song that wasn't even very much on my radar was Seasons of Wither. I loved how much Steven Tyler loved writing this song. He was so proud of it and that boyish pride still shown through in his 70s. To me that was probably the most magical aspect of the book. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who enjoys rock biographies. 

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anton Koval

    Content is good but the writing style is no walk in the park. Felt like he shouted the whole damn book right into my ear. And perhaps the ghost writer didn't do a good job leaving tons of unnecessary details to the extent that you find yourself flipping pages to skip boring parts eventually. Content is good but the writing style is no walk in the park. Felt like he shouted the whole damn book right into my ear. And perhaps the ghost writer didn't do a good job leaving tons of unnecessary details to the extent that you find yourself flipping pages to skip boring parts eventually.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shana Dines

    I haven't finished this book yet. The book sounds like Steven Tyler. ADHD and wild and crazy, just like Steven Tyler is. I was more interested in his childhood and his recovery. He is a phenomenal artist and like many is plagued with addiction. It is worse for those who are put on pedestals and have access to all the drugs that they could possibly want. He also talks about how insane it was to be on the road. The artists, musicians make a lot of money and are pushed to make more for those who re I haven't finished this book yet. The book sounds like Steven Tyler. ADHD and wild and crazy, just like Steven Tyler is. I was more interested in his childhood and his recovery. He is a phenomenal artist and like many is plagued with addiction. It is worse for those who are put on pedestals and have access to all the drugs that they could possibly want. He also talks about how insane it was to be on the road. The artists, musicians make a lot of money and are pushed to make more for those who represent them. The lifestyle might sound appealing until you read about the insanity and workaholism of it all. His personal relationships suffered with other addicts. There was a lot about his sexcapades and using. I am more interested in his recovery. I hope that he makes it, not just in the book but in real life. I was not impressed when he joined American Idol, but I really love the way he treats the idol contestants. He is wild and crazy but he has a very good and soft heart. I highly recommend the book. Wade through the sexcapades and get to the recovery part, it is well worth it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Edmund

    Reading this book is alot like listening to a drunken ramble (if they lasted 60 years.) Not because of genuine intoxication of the author (although I can't be 100%) but because of Steven's eccentric, non-linear, thought process. While this biography will take you from whoa to go in the right order, be ready to jump forward, back, sideways and outways as the author's sidetracks threaten to take over the whole book. So if you can put up with that, the story of Aerosmith's LSD is a fascinating tale Reading this book is alot like listening to a drunken ramble (if they lasted 60 years.) Not because of genuine intoxication of the author (although I can't be 100%) but because of Steven's eccentric, non-linear, thought process. While this biography will take you from whoa to go in the right order, be ready to jump forward, back, sideways and outways as the author's sidetracks threaten to take over the whole book. So if you can put up with that, the story of Aerosmith's LSD is a fascinating tale of drugs debauchery and domestic squabbles (band and family.) Don't expect depth and detail - Tyler is more of an expressive writer, so get ready for wierd, bitchy and thoughtful reactions to the events of his life. I wouldn't grab this one if you are looking for a more factual or analytical look at Aerosmith, but if you want to see into the head of this iconic lead singer than this book is what you want.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Madman Reads & Rocks

    I only enjoyed reading about the part that involves the beginnings of Aerosmith. Everything else felt like filler material but that might be because I'm not a diehard Aerosmith fan. Otherwise, Steven Tyler revealed exactly what one would expect a rockstar to reveal in a memoir. I only enjoyed reading about the part that involves the beginnings of Aerosmith. Everything else felt like filler material but that might be because I'm not a diehard Aerosmith fan. Otherwise, Steven Tyler revealed exactly what one would expect a rockstar to reveal in a memoir.

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