Hot Best Seller

Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy: Exploring Belief Systems through the Lens of the Ancient Christian Faith

Availability: Ready to download

Are you an Orthodox Christian who wonders how to explain to your Baptist grandmother, your Buddhist neighbor, or the Jehovah’s Witness at your door how your faith differs from theirs? Or are you a member of another faith who is curious what Orthodoxy is all about? Look no further. In Orthodoxy & Heterodoxy, Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick covers the gamut of ancient heresies, mo Are you an Orthodox Christian who wonders how to explain to your Baptist grandmother, your Buddhist neighbor, or the Jehovah’s Witness at your door how your faith differs from theirs? Or are you a member of another faith who is curious what Orthodoxy is all about? Look no further. In Orthodoxy & Heterodoxy, Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick covers the gamut of ancient heresies, modern Christian denominations, fringe groups, and major world religions, highlighting the main points of each faith. This book is an invaluable reference for anyone who wants to understand the faiths of those they come in contact with—as well as their own.


Compare

Are you an Orthodox Christian who wonders how to explain to your Baptist grandmother, your Buddhist neighbor, or the Jehovah’s Witness at your door how your faith differs from theirs? Or are you a member of another faith who is curious what Orthodoxy is all about? Look no further. In Orthodoxy & Heterodoxy, Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick covers the gamut of ancient heresies, mo Are you an Orthodox Christian who wonders how to explain to your Baptist grandmother, your Buddhist neighbor, or the Jehovah’s Witness at your door how your faith differs from theirs? Or are you a member of another faith who is curious what Orthodoxy is all about? Look no further. In Orthodoxy & Heterodoxy, Fr. Andrew Stephen Damick covers the gamut of ancient heresies, modern Christian denominations, fringe groups, and major world religions, highlighting the main points of each faith. This book is an invaluable reference for anyone who wants to understand the faiths of those they come in contact with—as well as their own.

30 review for Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy: Exploring Belief Systems through the Lens of the Ancient Christian Faith

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kristofer Carlson

    I first heard what became this book as a series of podcasts on Ancient Faith Radio. This book, while crossing much the same ground, isn't simply a transcription, but a re-imagining of the subject in book form. It seems to me the chapter on Roman Catholicism in particular has been much expanded, as have the sections on history of the Reformation and Protestantism in general. What is especially good about this book is that it is not merely critical, but also shows what the various different hetero I first heard what became this book as a series of podcasts on Ancient Faith Radio. This book, while crossing much the same ground, isn't simply a transcription, but a re-imagining of the subject in book form. It seems to me the chapter on Roman Catholicism in particular has been much expanded, as have the sections on history of the Reformation and Protestantism in general. What is especially good about this book is that it is not merely critical, but also shows what the various different heterodoxies share in common with Orthodoxy. Fr. Damick is very clear that you cannot argue someone into Orthodoxy, but you can begin from a common starting point and work your way forward from there.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Elise

    Having grown up Protestant, attended many of the churches described in this book, explored new paganism and finally becoming orthodox almost 20 years ago, this book is a respectful comparison of many of these groups. Highly recommended for any orthodox wanting to understand other religious groups or for those spiritual seekers interested in orthodoxy. Highly recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Yeranouhi Astaldamar

    I found fr. Andrew through his Ancient Faith podcasts, Amon Sul and the Areopagus. This particular book was a great tool in understanding what Orthodoxy really is, which is, after all, the church in which I was born, but purified by the pagan rituals and corruption that sometimes stains it in the regions where it's the official religion. I truly appreciated his humble tone even when highlighing the major problems of the other doctrinary systems, and also him sharing his conversion story. I found fr. Andrew through his Ancient Faith podcasts, Amon Sul and the Areopagus. This particular book was a great tool in understanding what Orthodoxy really is, which is, after all, the church in which I was born, but purified by the pagan rituals and corruption that sometimes stains it in the regions where it's the official religion. I truly appreciated his humble tone even when highlighing the major problems of the other doctrinary systems, and also him sharing his conversion story.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mimi

    What I found most helpful about this book was that it gave me a vocabulary that I have lacked before. The survey was interesting and filled in gaps for me.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    I really liked it up to chapter 6, and then the structure or tone of the book shifted. Up until this point, Damick's treatment on what distinguishes Orthodoxy from Roman Catholicism and mainstream Protestantism was well written, and in-depth. I really didn't detect any snark, other than the provocative sub-heading under the Papacy, "A Different God?". (But we are often hardest on those to whom we are closest.) If anything, I felt Damick was very respectful in presenting various faiths and Christ I really liked it up to chapter 6, and then the structure or tone of the book shifted. Up until this point, Damick's treatment on what distinguishes Orthodoxy from Roman Catholicism and mainstream Protestantism was well written, and in-depth. I really didn't detect any snark, other than the provocative sub-heading under the Papacy, "A Different God?". (But we are often hardest on those to whom we are closest.) If anything, I felt Damick was very respectful in presenting various faiths and Christian denominations, and then providing, clearly and succinctly, the Orthodox response. However, as I said above, at chapter 6, I felt the book went from being a straightforward treatment, one that could be extremely useful to the seeker outside of Orthodoxy, to more or less an Orthodox version of the Handbook of Denominations in the United States (which, btw, is a really cool book). Probably more like 3 1/2 stars, but I'm rounding up because of the book's usefulness as an ongoing reference source.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Duffy

    Very good catalog of the differences (and similarities, but mostly differences) in doctrine and practice between the Orthodox Faith and other religions. Primarily focuses on heterodox Christian communions, but at least touches briefly on all major religions. I imagine it will be a text I use fairly frequently as a resource. It also features helpful appendices for quick reference, especially the list of major heresies. Fr. Andrew's writing is clear and to the point. While he pulls no punches in r Very good catalog of the differences (and similarities, but mostly differences) in doctrine and practice between the Orthodox Faith and other religions. Primarily focuses on heterodox Christian communions, but at least touches briefly on all major religions. I imagine it will be a text I use fairly frequently as a resource. It also features helpful appendices for quick reference, especially the list of major heresies. Fr. Andrew's writing is clear and to the point. While he pulls no punches in regard to clear errors of other faiths, he also is diligent in locating areas of commonality as Orthodox believe that Christ -- through whom all things were created -- is at least dimly intimated in all genuine religious impulses, and that these areas of accord can be starting points for sympathetic dialogue.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elissa

    This book tells the story of how Christians have splintered from Orthodoxy over the years. It moves through the various denominations, grouping them and clarifying the theology that separates each of them. It's a fascinating read straight through (though to the Orthodox reader, it brings some sadness as we watch exactly how the Enemy has confused so many people over these years), and then does double-duty, remaining on your shelf as a valuable resource -- a reference book, listing denominations a This book tells the story of how Christians have splintered from Orthodoxy over the years. It moves through the various denominations, grouping them and clarifying the theology that separates each of them. It's a fascinating read straight through (though to the Orthodox reader, it brings some sadness as we watch exactly how the Enemy has confused so many people over these years), and then does double-duty, remaining on your shelf as a valuable resource -- a reference book, listing denominations and their beliefs so that you can look anyone up as needed. Absolutely recommended.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Hayes

    In the plural multicultural world in which we live we encounter all kinds of religious ideas and worldviews. We very often encounter them as soundbites on broadcast media or tweets on social media, without any context, and so have no way to evaluate them in relation to what we already know. Orthodox Christians experience this, and, especially for those living outside traditionally Orthodox countries, what they hear from the world around the is likely to be different in many ways from Orthodoxy. T In the plural multicultural world in which we live we encounter all kinds of religious ideas and worldviews. We very often encounter them as soundbites on broadcast media or tweets on social media, without any context, and so have no way to evaluate them in relation to what we already know. Orthodox Christians experience this, and, especially for those living outside traditionally Orthodox countries, what they hear from the world around the is likely to be different in many ways from Orthodoxy. This book sets out to give Orthodox Christians the information and tools they need to cope with that. If, for example, you see an adherent of Cao Dai being interviewed on TV, you may think, "Cao Dai? What's that?" This book gives a summary of its history and teachings, and how those teachings differ from the Orthodox Christian faith. It starts with a brief summary of Orthodox history and doctrine, and then deals with other religious groups, both Christian and non-Christian. There are chapters on the Roman Catholic Church, the Magisterial Reformation (a term that was new to me), the Radical Reformation, Evangelicalism and Revivalism, and several more Christian and semi-christian movements. Then there are chapters on other religions, including major religions like Islam, Judaism and Hinduism, and others like Santeria and Cao Dai, with an appendix on atheism and agnosticism. In good postmodern fashion, the author also includes an appendix telling of his own journey from Evangelical Protestantism to Orthodoxy, not that this is really so necessary, as he makes clear where he is coming from in the first chapter, but it is also good to know. All too often in online discussions of religion, and sometimes in printed books, people are quick to say what they think is wrong, but fail to say what they think is right, and do not mention the criteria by which they judge such things. This book does not suffer from that failing. The author generally tries to be as fair as possible to the groups whose teachings and practices he describes, and then to explain not only the points at which they differ from Orthodox Christianity, but also the things they have in common. I found the book was generally pretty good in accomplishing what it sets out to do. The descriptions seemed adequate and fair, and the critique was perceptive. Some chapters and sections, however,were better than others. Chapters 2-4, on the Roman Catholic Church and the Protestant Reformation are good, but, rather surprisingly, in view of the author's Evangelical Protestant background, the chapter on Evangelicalism and Revivalism was the weakest in the book, and a bunch of 18th and 19th-century religious movements were tossed in, some of them questionably evangelical. The following chapter, on Pentecostalism was, in rather surprising contrast, the most thorough in the book. Another weakness I found was that some groups and movements were dealt with in considerable detail, even though their membership is small (the Branch Davidians, for example), while other more influential movements, like Neopaganism and Wicca, were given a briefer treatment. The section on Hinduism could have made some mention of Hindutva as well. I think the book generally accomplishes what it sets out to do, and will be useful to Orthodox Christians who want to know how other religious groups differ from their own. I would strongly recommend it for Orthodox seminary students, especially those from non-Orthodox backgrounds. It could also be useful for members of other groups who want to learn more about Orthodoxy, though there is a caveat here: in Western Christianity there is an expectation that theology is something written in books, but even in Western theology, and much more in Orthodoxy, what can be written about theology in books is not all there is to theology.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anam Cara

    I believe that every Orthodox Christian should read this book. Not only are differences explained between Orthodoxy and other faiths, but the similarities are pointed out. The reader also understands how various heterodox beliefs logically came about due to the thinking of the age or the founders. Many are reactions to the movement that preceded it. I can't say enough good about this book. I believe that every Orthodox Christian should read this book. Not only are differences explained between Orthodoxy and other faiths, but the similarities are pointed out. The reader also understands how various heterodox beliefs logically came about due to the thinking of the age or the founders. Many are reactions to the movement that preceded it. I can't say enough good about this book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Roger Bennett

    I think Father Damick's reach exceeded his grasp a little bit on a few religious traditions. But it was a very ambitious undertaking and a remarkably good job overall. I think Father Damick's reach exceeded his grasp a little bit on a few religious traditions. But it was a very ambitious undertaking and a remarkably good job overall.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    Really great book. I would go so far as to say a must read for the Orthodox laity. I especially like the pastoral guidance near the end of the book and in the epilogue!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Loved the "quick reference" guide on Church heresy and Church belief. Loved the "quick reference" guide on Church heresy and Church belief.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Lee

    A high level overview of various religious systems. At times it feels a bit simplistic, but that has to do with length. Doing a comparative religions study in such a short book is challenging.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ross Bradfield

    An extremely thought provoking and eye-opening book. I would recommend this to not only fellow Orthodox Christians, but to anyone with questions concerning the faith.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah Morgan

    More of a useful comparative encyclopedia than a full book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alex of Yoe

    Dear America: Stop what you're doing. Put down this review. Go buy this book. I'm serious. This book is for anyone who has looked at the religious (and even secular) culture of the Western world and wondered what on earth what going on. This is for anyone who's stopped at a light and saw three "Christian" churches side by side, all with different names, and wondered why there were so many religious denominations in the Western world. This is for anyone who's asked, "why can't we all just get alon Dear America: Stop what you're doing. Put down this review. Go buy this book. I'm serious. This book is for anyone who has looked at the religious (and even secular) culture of the Western world and wondered what on earth what going on. This is for anyone who's stopped at a light and saw three "Christian" churches side by side, all with different names, and wondered why there were so many religious denominations in the Western world. This is for anyone who's asked, "why can't we all just get along???" and especially for anyone who's wondered how the Christian culture of today would look to an ancient follower of the same faith. It stretches way beyond the scope of comparison to give the reader a bird's eye view of the history of Western Christianity from the time of Christ all the way to today while also describing how each era and theological change impacted the mindset and culture around it. This book is vastly more than just a helpful guide for Orthodox Christians engaging other faiths; it is an honest, respectful, and extremely well researched guide for all Westerners (especially Western Christians) on understanding who they are and how they got to this point. I've been a Christian my entire life, went from church to church, tradition to tradition, and NEVER understood the differences or history behind the many branches of Christianity like I do now. You can even use this book to see deeper into Western culture as a whole, especially in the United States, as it gives a backdrop and context for the behaviours and values that have shaped our country from its very conception. I feel like this is the book I've been looking for my entire religious life (and I do not say that lightly). FINALLY all my experiences of different church denominations and practices make sense. The author is primarily speaking from an Eastern Orthodox view to other Orthodox Christians about the various forms of Christianity (and even other religions) that they will find in the Western world and how these forms came about, what they teach, and how they influenced successive generations or brought about new expressions. It compares each one to what Eastern Orthodoxy believes, but in a very respectful way. The author warns against using his book as a tool to beat down those who don't believe as you do. The goal is mutual understanding, and though it is written to Orthodox Christians, the author warmly invites anyone to sit in on the conversation. It is not overly technical nor dry. The writing style is engaging and informative as well as humble. You do not need to be Orthodox or even Christian to understand the concepts in this book. It is written to help the confused Westerner understand the religious landscape of his culture and how it came to be that way (as well as how it differs to Orthodoxy). It is truly fascinating. The author will not argue or try to subdue the reader into Orthodoxy. It is his desire, but not his aim, making for a calm, safe read for anyone of differing opinions. It is truly written simply to help us all understand one another and how to engage each other. I highly recommend this to anyone who's been confused or curious about the very complicated Western Christian culture of today. No matter what you walk away believing, you will learn a lot from reading this book!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chaz Konkle

    A very bold walkthrough on the world religions from an Orthodox Christian’s perspective. Although almost all basics are covered, it’s target audience is Western readers, perhaps specifically, Americans. The first part is a heavy look at Roman Catholicism vs Eastern Orthodoxy and the events and decisions that led to the Great Schism. All the info is very nuanced for an introductory write up. I had to re read a few parts a few times to digest it properly. Even from a 10,000 ft level, the schism is A very bold walkthrough on the world religions from an Orthodox Christian’s perspective. Although almost all basics are covered, it’s target audience is Western readers, perhaps specifically, Americans. The first part is a heavy look at Roman Catholicism vs Eastern Orthodoxy and the events and decisions that led to the Great Schism. All the info is very nuanced for an introductory write up. I had to re read a few parts a few times to digest it properly. Even from a 10,000 ft level, the schism is very heavy with many specific events. The second part or “act” is the Reformation. This is my first read on the history of the reformation since my Chrismation into the Church and it’s very sobering to think of how modern evangelicals are missing out on the “fun”. I hope that doesn’t offend any of my evangelical friends, I grew up with it and was blessed by it and many family members and friends receive continuous blessings as evangelicals. However, it seems like hundreds of people interpreted the scriptures on their own because they relied on the 5 “solas” and therefore started a new church. Interpret what you want from that, but there is a lot of disharmony in today’s Christian movements as a result. The third part is very brief when going over other non-Christians that are monotheistic as well. Judaism and Islam are well covered but brief. This is in part due to Fr. Damick’s minimal first hand knowledge of Islam and Judaism. And that’s okay. 10,000 ft level on origins and practical and modern life with these religions, not a study. Anything more would be a disservice. Towards the end it goes into others like Buddhism, Shintoism, etc. but not forgetting Mormonism, Branch Davidians, Christian Science and others. A lot of the third part started with Pentecosts and the resulting influence on modern day evangelicals and how a lot of American Christian worship has roots in Pentecostal ideals even if they renounce that movement. I think noting the Pentacostal movement in depth was worth it. It’s part of the American fabric of faith and somehow we are connected to it. This book is for cradle and converted Orthodox Christians. It prepares us when a friend asks why is our church different. Or asking us to sum up how to describe our worship and faith. It is not meant for arguments, debates or apologetics. I suppose you can use this book for that. But the intentions are very different since the author consulted with many well educated friends that are part of other faiths.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Heinz Reinhardt

    This is an indispensable survey of how the Orthodox Church, the First and Ancient Church, compares, and largely differs, from the rest of Christianity and other major non-Christian religions. Fr. Damick has done a very good job of balancing the depth of the theology with an excellent historical narrative that is interspersed with personal accounts and reflections as well as explaining how Orthodoxy differs as well as agrees with the various confessions in mention. Beginning with a look at the ea This is an indispensable survey of how the Orthodox Church, the First and Ancient Church, compares, and largely differs, from the rest of Christianity and other major non-Christian religions. Fr. Damick has done a very good job of balancing the depth of the theology with an excellent historical narrative that is interspersed with personal accounts and reflections as well as explaining how Orthodoxy differs as well as agrees with the various confessions in mention. Beginning with a look at the early Church, the Roman Church and the Schism and the evolution of Catholic doctrine and theology, carrying over to the Magisterial Reformation, the Radical Reformation, the Evangelical movement and the rise of the non denoms, and then ending the discussion of mainline Christianity with a quite long and detailed look at the chaos of the Pentecostals and the Charismatic movement. Fr. Damick then looks into, albeit briefly, quasi and non mainstream Christian groups such as the Jehovah's Witnesses, and Mormons, and then ends with a discussion of non Christian faiths, focusing upon Judaism, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism. The revised edition also discusses neo-paganism, militant atheism, and how he joined The Church from Protestantism and became a Priest. The discussion of how Orthodoxy differs from the groups that have grown from the Schism (he makes the wonderful point that the history of Protestantism is nothing more than a further evolution of Catholic doctrine taken to its logical conclusion, or as I call it a never ending attempt to reinvent the Orthodox wheel and failing continuously), and further fractured from there is done in a fashion that is not aggressive, and yet forcefully honest in detailing where the others err. While certainly he does not condemn those others who are belonging to say the Catholics, the Baptists or the Methodists, he makes no bones in portraying their errors and their heresies. In doing so, however, he also relays how Orthodox can dialogue with the others, and where we share agreements. The only real weak section of the book is the discussion of the major non Christian faiths. It is simply far too short and does not go into meaningful detail, though carries the same format when discussing those who have heritage from the Schism. All in all this is a useful resource for both new Orthodox such as myself and those who have been in The Church from childhood. Highly recommended.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Samantha (AK)

    This is only technically a reread. I read the first edition of Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy in 2016, but the revised and expanded edition lives up to its name. There's a lot of new content here. And the old content that remained has been altered in two ways: 1.) Tone --Where before it was largely aimed at Orthodox Christians looking to understand other traditions, it is now more broadly focused, and thus more accessible to the average reader. I think there's a good takeaway here for most readers, whe This is only technically a reread. I read the first edition of Orthodoxy and Heterodoxy in 2016, but the revised and expanded edition lives up to its name. There's a lot of new content here. And the old content that remained has been altered in two ways: 1.) Tone --Where before it was largely aimed at Orthodox Christians looking to understand other traditions, it is now more broadly focused, and thus more accessible to the average reader. I think there's a good takeaway here for most readers, whether religious or not. 2.) Clarity -- there were some parts of the first edition I thought were overly brief or generalized. This has largely been corrected. "To assert that all religions are really just different paths to God is to do violence to the fundamental beliefs of those religions." Doctrine still matters. There's an impulse, especially in contemporary American (U.S.) society, to strip faith down to the bare minimum essentials, and gloss over any differences as 'unimportant' or 'extra.' Fr. Andrew has undertaken the monumental task of demonstrating how seemingly-minor differences are much larger than they appear, and how different groups may use the same terminology to mean completely different things. Perhaps most importantly, he digs down into history to show the progression of doctrinal developments in various Christian groups. One not-really-a-criticism: Although there is a chapter on non-Christian religions, it's incredibly brief. If you're a reader seeking to know the nitty-gritty differences between Orthodoxy and Islam, or Buddhism, etc., you're only going to get the broad strokes here. But there's enough to make it clear that they're not the same, which is really the goal of the chapter. Whether you're an Orthodox Christian trying to figure out where your friends are coming from, an athiest or agnostic student trying to figure out what all the fuss is about doctrine, or something in between, I really do think there's a takeaway here for everyone.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Miruna Belea

    I am halfway through this book and can say with confidence it's the best €5 I've spent. Structurally, it is very well-organised and the arguments easy to follow. Firstly, the main theological and dogmatic principles of the Orthodox faith are listed. Secondly, a series of heresies throughout the history of the Church are explained. What follows is an exposition of the history of other Christian denominations and their beliefs, how they relate to each other and to Orthodoxy. What I really appreciat I am halfway through this book and can say with confidence it's the best €5 I've spent. Structurally, it is very well-organised and the arguments easy to follow. Firstly, the main theological and dogmatic principles of the Orthodox faith are listed. Secondly, a series of heresies throughout the history of the Church are explained. What follows is an exposition of the history of other Christian denominations and their beliefs, how they relate to each other and to Orthodoxy. What I really appreciate is the tone of the book. It explains the differences in an objective manner, without condemnation or judgement. It is not a history book - you don't need to have any prior knowledge or advanced reading skills. As a cradle Orthodox, I'm learning a lot about "the others" and I'm happy to have the differences explained dogmatically, beyond the various customs and traditions in each church. This book, if not already translated, would come in handy in Eastern European languages, where many enquirers choose heterodox churches over their Oxthodox ones, without being fully aware of the theology of either.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Colter Nakai McAddis

    Perfect for the Ortho-curious Some of my friends and I have been on a journey to find the true church. Disenchanted by the products of Protestantism and struggling to believe that what Jesus came to found as His church is an invisible bond between hundreds of different groups professing different teachings and often condemning each other, we have recently begun to investigate Orthodoxy. In that investigation this book has proved a powerful tool. I would have paid the full price for this book if i Perfect for the Ortho-curious Some of my friends and I have been on a journey to find the true church. Disenchanted by the products of Protestantism and struggling to believe that what Jesus came to found as His church is an invisible bond between hundreds of different groups professing different teachings and often condemning each other, we have recently begun to investigate Orthodoxy. In that investigation this book has proved a powerful tool. I would have paid the full price for this book if it had only contained the authors exploration of the Protestant presuppositions (the Solas) and their logical consequences and historical fruits and then happily paid the full price again for the rest if the book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kristopher Godwin

    Great book. I'm a Non-Orthodox Christian whose been thinking of converting and found this book very informative. It goes into a lot of different denominations and religions, even some nearly unheard of ones. A down fall of it is that it isn't able to go but so deep into some, that would be rather helpful; however, while the book isn't able to go all the way into some denominations and religions to give full understanding, the book doesn't pretend it does, and explains why (mostly that you can't Great book. I'm a Non-Orthodox Christian whose been thinking of converting and found this book very informative. It goes into a lot of different denominations and religions, even some nearly unheard of ones. A down fall of it is that it isn't able to go but so deep into some, that would be rather helpful; however, while the book isn't able to go all the way into some denominations and religions to give full understanding, the book doesn't pretend it does, and explains why (mostly that you can't put all of that in a single book). Also I like the fact that it admits it is from the Orthodox perspective and subject to bias and error, but I think it did a pretty good and honest job. Even if I don't become Orthodox, I am glad to have read it

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Wow, I loved this book. It is not a book I would normally be interested in reading as I like reading the lives of Saints, book by or about Saints or elders, the desert fathers and mothers, etc. However, I am so happy I picked it up. Really, really great read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rob Marney

    Great, accessible introduction to the varieties of Christianity and why the Orthodox think they're wrong. Damick is refreshingly up front about his viewpoint and limitations, which makes it easier to read these polemics in the charitable light they were intended. Great, accessible introduction to the varieties of Christianity and why the Orthodox think they're wrong. Damick is refreshingly up front about his viewpoint and limitations, which makes it easier to read these polemics in the charitable light they were intended.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Noah Myers

    As a Protestant this was a fascinating read. I’ve also loved to study world religions so a slightly different critique of them from an orthodox perspective was interesting. As for its critiques of Protestantism I honestly have a lot to chew on as I read over my highlights.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    I highly recommend this book!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Billy

    A must read book for all Orthodox and Non-Orthodox, plus all walks of life. Gives a better understanding with all different religions and beliefs and how it exist and founded.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Your time will not be wasted A wonderful look at many religions through the lens of Orthodox Christianity. If your at all interested, you will not be disappointed

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    A great overview of world religions and how they differ from Orthodox Christianity, written with a loving spirit, without judgement or condemnation toward the non- Orthodox.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    This review is written with reference to the second edition (blue cover). WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW The Second Edition of Orthodoxy & Heterodoxy (O&H 2.0) is not the same thing as the first edition. When I started reading it I found that, even though I read the First Edition and listened to both podcasts (O&H 1.0 & 2.0) prior to picking up the Second Edition of the book, it still held my interest and attention. While a lot of topics covered in the book are the same (such as Roman Catholicism, Evangeli This review is written with reference to the second edition (blue cover). WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW The Second Edition of Orthodoxy & Heterodoxy (O&H 2.0) is not the same thing as the first edition. When I started reading it I found that, even though I read the First Edition and listened to both podcasts (O&H 1.0 & 2.0) prior to picking up the Second Edition of the book, it still held my interest and attention. While a lot of topics covered in the book are the same (such as Roman Catholicism, Evangelicalism, non-mainstream Christian confessions, and some non-Christian religions) there is a lot of new material (such as the chapter on Pentecostalism, additional non-mainstream and non-Christian religions, and several appendices). In addition, critiques of the first book (which were given to Fr. Andrew by members of the religions he was speaking about) were taken into consideration, re-researched, and the content was adjusted where necessary. Because of this, the Second Edition presents a balanced, well-informed approach to other Christian confessions. In all, he presents a fair treatment of the religions he covers and, at the same time, contrasts it with Eastern Orthodox dogma and practice. The result: the reader not only walks away knowing more about both major and obscure Christian confessions, but also more about Orthodoxy – and perhaps how to interact, in an Orthodox way, with these religions. WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW If you read the First Edition and listened to the Podcast, you will still benefit from owning this book. It has an excellent index in that back that enables the reader to quickly reference specific topics, beliefs, or religions (in the first edition, the quick reference index was only 1 page; the second edition boasts a 19 page index). If you did not read the First Edition or listen to the Podcast, you should read this book. It's a good run down of Church history—both digestible and interesting. Whether you’re an Orthodox Christian, Roman Catholic, or Evangelical you will get something out of this book – perhaps in learning more about the history of the Church, how your particular Christian confession evolved into what it is today, or in how other Christian confessions are similar or different from your own. If you are Hindu, Agnostic, or Atheist, you will find something of interest in it—perhaps you want to be more aware of the variety of Christian confessions. Fr. Andrew Damick’s second edition of Orthodoxy & Heterodoxy claims new content (it’s almost twice the size of the first edition), better writing style, and more accurate representation of the belief systems it represents. And it does not disappoint. WHAT I WALKED AWAY FEELING/THINKING The effect of reading this book from cover to cover is incredible. Fr. Andrew presents a timeline of Christianity starting with the early Church (its very beginning) and ending with the many different versions we find in our world today. The reader walks away with a clear understanding of how we got to where we are now (in Christendom) because Fr. Andrew demonstrates how one twist in dogma or practiced imagaugarated change after change—which eventually resulted in the tens of thousands of denominations we have today. But there is only one Christian Church that preserved the faith unchanged: to find out which Church that is, you will have to read the book. After you do, you will find it hard to see it any other way. Reasons to buy the book: –as a reference book –to familiarize yourself with important Christian truths amidst the relativism of the world –to discover the riches of Christian history –to learn about the origin of your Christian confession –for your friends and family –for strangers –because it's a great read

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...