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Molly's Cookbook: A Peek at Dining in the Past With Meals You Can Cook Today

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Easy recipes help girls make Molly's favorite foods. Plans for a 1940s-style slumber party and fun facts about cooking on the home front bring Molly's times to life. Easy recipes help girls make Molly's favorite foods. Plans for a 1940s-style slumber party and fun facts about cooking on the home front bring Molly's times to life.


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Easy recipes help girls make Molly's favorite foods. Plans for a 1940s-style slumber party and fun facts about cooking on the home front bring Molly's times to life. Easy recipes help girls make Molly's favorite foods. Plans for a 1940s-style slumber party and fun facts about cooking on the home front bring Molly's times to life.

30 review for Molly's Cookbook: A Peek at Dining in the Past With Meals You Can Cook Today

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tatuu

    Acquired this alongside Samantha's Craftbook. Some lady who was in College then borrowed it and she never returned it. Trust me, the only reason I still remember that lady and I continually search for her is because she never returned this book. Time must have passed, but she remains unforgiven. Lol! [Read in the 90s]. Acquired this alongside Samantha's Craftbook. Some lady who was in College then borrowed it and she never returned it. Trust me, the only reason I still remember that lady and I continually search for her is because she never returned this book. Time must have passed, but she remains unforgiven. Lol! [Read in the 90s].

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    This book is out-of-print, but has been repackaged as Molly's Cooking Studio with the same recipes. My daughter has the Molly doll and I found this book at her school library. We decided to have a Molly-themed cooking weekend. She picked out some breakfast and dinner recipes. Our Molly breakfast included: Toad-in-a-Hole, Fried Bacon, Quick Coffee Cake, and Frozen Fruit Cups. The only one I wouldn't make again is the Frozen Fruit Cup. It was difficult to eat, not too tasty and made a ton. I ended This book is out-of-print, but has been repackaged as Molly's Cooking Studio with the same recipes. My daughter has the Molly doll and I found this book at her school library. We decided to have a Molly-themed cooking weekend. She picked out some breakfast and dinner recipes. Our Molly breakfast included: Toad-in-a-Hole, Fried Bacon, Quick Coffee Cake, and Frozen Fruit Cups. The only one I wouldn't make again is the Frozen Fruit Cup. It was difficult to eat, not too tasty and made a ton. I ended up throwing the extras away. Quick Coffee Cake was basic, but my daughter really liked it. For dinner she picked out Vitality Meat Loaf and Volcano Potatoes. I have to say, I've made a number of different meatloaf recipes, but this was a very good one. A nice tasty classic meatloaf. And the Volcano Potatoes were cute and fun to make as well as being yummy. My daughter helped with all of the cooking and Molly got dressed up and joined us for breakfast and dinner. It was a fun time and if your daughter has the Molly doll, I'd recommend this cookbook if you want to cook together.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abraham Ray

    nice book about food during ww2!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    I read this series months ago, and am wildly delayed in sharing my thoughts. However, I really loved this! I enjoyed the historic photographs, the cultural context for WWII America, the rations-based recipe ideas, and the delightful fun fact sidebars. I have enjoyed telling people that U.S. stores stopped selling sliced bread in 1943 to reduce food waste, and that pilots used to make ice cream by putting the ingredients in a can, leaving it in the back of their plane, and letting the turbulence I read this series months ago, and am wildly delayed in sharing my thoughts. However, I really loved this! I enjoyed the historic photographs, the cultural context for WWII America, the rations-based recipe ideas, and the delightful fun fact sidebars. I have enjoyed telling people that U.S. stores stopped selling sliced bread in 1943 to reduce food waste, and that pilots used to make ice cream by putting the ingredients in a can, leaving it in the back of their plane, and letting the turbulence do its work. This book is a trove of interesting information and fun tie-ins to Molly's established character and circumstances, and I am very glad that I added it to my American Girl library. --- When I first pursued the American Girl craft books, I wasn't sure if I was even interested in the cooking series, since I am on a very restricted diet for health reasons and wouldn't be able to use almost any of these recipes in the kitchen. However, I knew that I should get the Molly cookbook for the WWII-specific recipe ideas and historical information about rationing, and I decided that I may as well get all of the books. After all, after being on a very restricted diet for the past ten years, it's hard for me to come up with stuff for my characters to eat when I'm writing. It's all research! I am very glad that I got these books, and they far surpassed my expectations. Although I enjoyed the craft-related books and would be far more likely to use them, the domestic history in the cookbooks absolutely fascinated me. These are far more than just recipe collections, and include detailed, specific information about domestic life and women's experiences. I would recommend the series to kids who are interested in making food that their favorite American Girl characters ate, but I would also recommend this series to adults who are interested in women's history or cultural anthropology related to food. Each book includes introductory information and sidebars related to what cooking was like during the character's era, how cooking and food connected with the daily rhythms of family life, how people preserved food, and what was unique about cookbooks during that time. The recipes themselves also briefly include historical information, and the team responsible for these cookbooks did an amazing job of selecting recipes that kids and their parents can realistically make with minimal hassle, while still truly experiencing the types of foods that were common during specific times in history. Each book also concludes with ideas for themed parties that would connect to the character's background and celebrations that they would have participated in.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    I was all in on American Girls as a kid and I loved these cookbooks. This one was pretty good, with some recipes I recognize now as really kitschy and fun but as a kid seemed normal? Mashed potato volcano -- sure why not.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cws

    J6415Ath

  7. 4 out of 5

    PottWab Regional Library

    SM

  8. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alli

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mrs.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Autumn Rybin

  12. 5 out of 5

    Msbookworm

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leah

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jill

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

  16. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  18. 5 out of 5

    Judy Bohardt

  19. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  22. 4 out of 5

    Trish

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lily

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kàrrïn Ràçhêllé

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  27. 4 out of 5

    Holly Miller

  28. 4 out of 5

    Erynn Christopherson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Prock

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lily Tice

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