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If you want to learn Early African History START HERE (Reklaw Education Lecture Series)

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If you want to learn Early African History START HERE is probably the best introduction to the ancient and medieval history of Black people. This history is as important as the history of the peoples of Asia, Europe, or the Americas. Moreover, the achievements of the early people of Africa are as amazing and inspiring as the achievements of any other people. This history is If you want to learn Early African History START HERE is probably the best introduction to the ancient and medieval history of Black people. This history is as important as the history of the peoples of Asia, Europe, or the Americas. Moreover, the achievements of the early people of Africa are as amazing and inspiring as the achievements of any other people. This history is much older than the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. The author introduces his readers to the early civilizations of Africa that existed long before the coming of the Europeans. Among these were the Songhai Empire, the Benin Empire, the Kanem-Borno Empire, the Monomotapa Empire, the Swahili Confederation, the Medieval Nubian kingdoms and the Axumite Empire. The author also introduces the ancient civilizations of Africa particularly those of the Nile Valley such as Nubia and Ancient Egypt. The book is illustrated with 18 images and maps. Finally, the book recommends other books for more in depth study.


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If you want to learn Early African History START HERE is probably the best introduction to the ancient and medieval history of Black people. This history is as important as the history of the peoples of Asia, Europe, or the Americas. Moreover, the achievements of the early people of Africa are as amazing and inspiring as the achievements of any other people. This history is If you want to learn Early African History START HERE is probably the best introduction to the ancient and medieval history of Black people. This history is as important as the history of the peoples of Asia, Europe, or the Americas. Moreover, the achievements of the early people of Africa are as amazing and inspiring as the achievements of any other people. This history is much older than the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. The author introduces his readers to the early civilizations of Africa that existed long before the coming of the Europeans. Among these were the Songhai Empire, the Benin Empire, the Kanem-Borno Empire, the Monomotapa Empire, the Swahili Confederation, the Medieval Nubian kingdoms and the Axumite Empire. The author also introduces the ancient civilizations of Africa particularly those of the Nile Valley such as Nubia and Ancient Egypt. The book is illustrated with 18 images and maps. Finally, the book recommends other books for more in depth study.

30 review for If you want to learn Early African History START HERE (Reklaw Education Lecture Series)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sazza Ricks

    Really interesting succint view of African history which enables the reader to learn about diverse, rich histories in a digestible way. Sometimes there is alot to take in but if you read the book on different empires at different times its easier to absorb. Would definitely recommend.

  2. 5 out of 5

    SoFrolushes

    A good start or refresher to early African history.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kai Hodge

    Quick and interesting read on ancient african history Perfect intro to african history the author also has recommendations for further reading at the end of this book. Very good

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mikki D

    Learning the extraordinary gifts Africa have given to mankind was truly an eye opener. From the extensive highly populated Timbuktu that in the 5th century had 3 storey houses with indoor toilets, and universities and schools, to the great Kush civilization that offer visa pyramids that scientists still baffle at how they were made. Also the Hypostyle Hall of the Temple of Amen, a great architectural wonder and one of the largest religious complexes ever built. There are ancient civilizations fro Learning the extraordinary gifts Africa have given to mankind was truly an eye opener. From the extensive highly populated Timbuktu that in the 5th century had 3 storey houses with indoor toilets, and universities and schools, to the great Kush civilization that offer visa pyramids that scientists still baffle at how they were made. Also the Hypostyle Hall of the Temple of Amen, a great architectural wonder and one of the largest religious complexes ever built. There are ancient civilizations from West, East and South Africa that traded in salt, leather, gold and books on a scale that would equal to today's standards. Ethiopia has some of the oldest Christian churches in Lalibela carved out from rocks. There are even 12th century knights of Kanem Boru who wore chainmail.. not sure how they managed in all that heat! There is so much to learn about ancient Africa.. Marcus Garvey said "A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots." Since Africa is the cornerstone of humanity, I think it is all our duty to learn more, and this book is good place to start.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    For someone trying to delve into the African jeweled history, this book had be hooked from the start. Robin Walker writes of an Africa so rich in culture and knowledge just as its minerals. Kings ruled with iron fists but were generous and well known across the globe from traders to those who wished to be on their side. The learning about books being one of the highest trades in west Africa filled me with so much joy. As we exported jewels, leather, books, weapons, so was the art that was and is For someone trying to delve into the African jeweled history, this book had be hooked from the start. Robin Walker writes of an Africa so rich in culture and knowledge just as its minerals. Kings ruled with iron fists but were generous and well known across the globe from traders to those who wished to be on their side. The learning about books being one of the highest trades in west Africa filled me with so much joy. As we exported jewels, leather, books, weapons, so was the art that was and is still revered to this days albeit siting begind glass in foreign museums after they were squandered during invasion of our motherland. I loved the roam of my mind as I marvelled at the kingdoms that stretched through the continent, the west, the south to south east, the east, kush and Egyptian rule. We are a continent so filled with everything we need to take back what was stolen from us, and will with the knowledge at the helm. I can't wait to delve into the rest of the books and walk back into an history not so distant but yet so gar from our minds.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Antwine Hurst

    Excellent material Amazing read and excellent source material. Definitely recommend it to anyone else wanting to learn more about our ancestors contributions to history.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bell

    Great Start This is an excellent start for anyone who wants to start a learning journey into African history, but doesn't want to be overwhelmed. Great Start This is an excellent start for anyone who wants to start a learning journey into African history, but doesn't want to be overwhelmed.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Fil Garrison

    Scholars estimate the population of Egypt during this time as 8 million people. Since only the Nile area is habitable, the total area available for habitation was about the size of Belgium. This would make Egypt as urbanised THEN as modern European civilisations are TODAY. One of the tiny little books I decided to read up on for lack of other easily accessible literature about pre-colonial Africa for a story I'm working on. There isn't a whole lot of literature on the subject, and this was the be Scholars estimate the population of Egypt during this time as 8 million people. Since only the Nile area is habitable, the total area available for habitation was about the size of Belgium. This would make Egypt as urbanised THEN as modern European civilisations are TODAY. One of the tiny little books I decided to read up on for lack of other easily accessible literature about pre-colonial Africa for a story I'm working on. There isn't a whole lot of literature on the subject, and this was the best primer I could find. Like the one about World War I spies, this barely glimpses the surface of the information I actually want to get into - but it does provide a pretty decent primer. It's a kind of pamphlet about some very very basic facts that people might not be aware of regarding African history. Mostly, I'm looking for something to inform my story regarding temples, cultures, and ancient ruins, and this book gives tantalizing hints of all of those things. African culture and history is pretty amazing, and I'd love to get information on it that would rival the amount of information on, say, the Egyptian civilization. More about the Congo, West African culture, East African culture - as a setting. There are quite a few interesting facts in this work, somethings I was excited to see - comparisons of ancient African populations to current populations, medieval works and smithing practices, things like that. Exactly what I'm looking for. Unfortunately, it's not nearly enough to be satisfying, and I'll be searching out more and more for my work. As it is, this is definitely a pretty good start. The work does exactly as advertised, giving people a start on Early African history. A great introduction, although ultimately malnourished and needing more.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Mallett

    a giant step in knowing who i am This is a great work of history and should be in every school, especially every school of color. When you do not know who you are or what you came from then its hard to know where you are going; read this book for direction.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Dacres

    Amazing Stunning easy to digest body of work. The information given is just enough and leaves you with a want to relearn your history.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

  12. 4 out of 5

    David Blair-Reid

  13. 4 out of 5

    Donald Wilson

  14. 5 out of 5

    Barry D Blair

  15. 5 out of 5

    Louis Fourie

  16. 4 out of 5

    William Hall

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Ogilvie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rodney Dawson

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lori Black Ogene

  20. 5 out of 5

    Eve Lyons

  21. 5 out of 5

    Theodene hyacinth James

  22. 4 out of 5

    Veronica Dodd

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rlen Jamison

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Merritt

  25. 4 out of 5

    K

  26. 5 out of 5

    MS

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chelle

  28. 5 out of 5

    James Huguley

  29. 5 out of 5

    Antoinette Arkward

  30. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Merrick

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