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Leadership The One Minute Manager [Thorsons Classics edition]

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With a new foreword by Ken Blanchard Adapting One Minute Manager techniques to enable successful leadership to happen. Using different ways to motivate different kinds of people. Leadership and The One Minute Manager goes straight to the heart of management as it describes the effective, adaptive styles of Situational Leadership. In clear and simple terms it teaches how to With a new foreword by Ken Blanchard Adapting One Minute Manager techniques to enable successful leadership to happen. Using different ways to motivate different kinds of people. Leadership and The One Minute Manager goes straight to the heart of management as it describes the effective, adaptive styles of Situational Leadership. In clear and simple terms it teaches how to become a flexible and successful leader, fitting your style to the needs of the individual and to the situation at hand, and using the One Minute Manager techniques to enhance the motivation of others.


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With a new foreword by Ken Blanchard Adapting One Minute Manager techniques to enable successful leadership to happen. Using different ways to motivate different kinds of people. Leadership and The One Minute Manager goes straight to the heart of management as it describes the effective, adaptive styles of Situational Leadership. In clear and simple terms it teaches how to With a new foreword by Ken Blanchard Adapting One Minute Manager techniques to enable successful leadership to happen. Using different ways to motivate different kinds of people. Leadership and The One Minute Manager goes straight to the heart of management as it describes the effective, adaptive styles of Situational Leadership. In clear and simple terms it teaches how to become a flexible and successful leader, fitting your style to the needs of the individual and to the situation at hand, and using the One Minute Manager techniques to enhance the motivation of others.

30 review for Leadership The One Minute Manager [Thorsons Classics edition]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Karpuk

    The only thing worse than being wrong is being useless, and this book is rather useless. Much like "FISH!" this book is a fictional scenario meant to illustrate how their techniques can help you become a successful manager. The story centers around "the Entrepreneur" and "the One Minute Manager." Yes, that's the only way they're referred to in this volume, reminding me of the "Who Moved My Cheese" structure. Might I suggest that writing intended for grown men and women who are supposed to manage The only thing worse than being wrong is being useless, and this book is rather useless. Much like "FISH!" this book is a fictional scenario meant to illustrate how their techniques can help you become a successful manager. The story centers around "the Entrepreneur" and "the One Minute Manager." Yes, that's the only way they're referred to in this volume, reminding me of the "Who Moved My Cheese" structure. Might I suggest that writing intended for grown men and women who are supposed to manage other grown men and women maybe shouldn't have the structure and writing style of "Go, Dog, Go!" or "Green Eggs and Ham"? It just reeks of condescension. Beyond the spoonful of sugar reasoning for the fictional structure, a part of me has much more cynical theories about why it's not just a work of nonfiction. Allow me to number them corporate style. 1. Inflated Length - The actual guidance information could be condensed into a pamphlet. I bookmarked every page with concrete information, and I think I dog-eared maybe 10 pages out of 110. Fiction, especially with wide margins, diagrams, and many pages not completely filled for stylistic reasons, gives you something thick enough to slap an ISBN number on. 2. Avoiding Research - In nonfiction, especially responsible nonfiction, you'd have to bring evidence to back up your claims that this approach is practical and works. Studies and pier-reviewed articles would need to be cited, journals and news articles read, the whole thing might actually need a bibliography for god sakes! Why do all that when you can structure it like it's an Aesop's Fable for the corporate set? 3. Easy Examples - This somewhat ties into research, but the benefit of fiction, as I mentioned with works like Ayn Rand's and "FISH!" is that you can generate a picture-perfect scenario that fits all your theories. Blanchard doesn't give us real cases where his quadrant of methods worked, he gives us the almost hyperbolically successful, nameless Entrepreneur, who by the end of the book is a CEO overseeing multiple companies. The damning problem with this is the fictional scenario doesn't get specific enough to make the advice practical. And that's the part that ultimately breaks Leadership and the One Minute Manager, the advice just isn't that useful. It's theoretical high-level wishful thinking. It doesn't help you when things go wrong, because like a lot of these books, it refuses to acknowledge bad employees, defiant employees, or even thoughtful dissent. You're either working with the program or you don't exist. Real-world success stories with interviews and working how-to data would have gone great lengths to help here. I watched two different TED Talks, one by a former Brigadeer General, and another by a chinese scientist, and in different words they basically said the same thing. The military man outlined that leadership was about feeling for a person, understanding a person, and helping a person. The Chinese scientist was more concerned with it on a level of compassion, but stated the three basic areas: Thinking, Feeling, Doing. The Brigadeer General spent his career learning this, the scientist researched this. They have working data to support their conclusions and cited it even in their brief talks. All these books seem like a lame substitute for being a compassionate, thoughtful human being.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I am trying to cull my large leadership and management library I collected over the years. I left the stars blank because at this point in my life, I would say this short primer on situational leadership was OK, 2.5 stars. If I was a newbie getting into this topic for the first time, I would give it 4 stars as it is clear & to the point in its descriptions of this leadership theory. The story presentation is its real drawback for me. It reminded me of the awful training videos that accompanied m I am trying to cull my large leadership and management library I collected over the years. I left the stars blank because at this point in my life, I would say this short primer on situational leadership was OK, 2.5 stars. If I was a newbie getting into this topic for the first time, I would give it 4 stars as it is clear & to the point in its descriptions of this leadership theory. The story presentation is its real drawback for me. It reminded me of the awful training videos that accompanied many of the leadership and management programs that were required from time to time as I moved through the ranks of the organization.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Cheesy, but makes sense. I still haven't read the book this series is based on (The One Minute Manager). I think I really like reading this group of books backward to forward: first the outrageous gripes of another set of authors in The 59-Second Employee : How to Stay One Second Ahead of Your One Minute Manager (whose attitude I didn't agree with), followed by this book to explain how to go way beyond the cliches that 'goals, praising, and reprimands' are implied to have become. I liked a lot of Cheesy, but makes sense. I still haven't read the book this series is based on (The One Minute Manager). I think I really like reading this group of books backward to forward: first the outrageous gripes of another set of authors in The 59-Second Employee : How to Stay One Second Ahead of Your One Minute Manager (whose attitude I didn't agree with), followed by this book to explain how to go way beyond the cliches that 'goals, praising, and reprimands' are implied to have become. I liked a lot of the more subtle points of this book, such as reprimands being for employees who are in a very specific situation, not ones who are learning or ones for whom there are extenuating circumstances explaining their poor performance. I'm really curious to see whether those points were made in the original book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Armstrong

    Quote from the book: “The golden rule,” said Randall. “The golden rule?” Echoed the entrepreneur. “Whoever owns the gold makes the rules,” laughed Randall. This is a key problem with the world but, so many people celebrate and live their lives this way. Makes me sad. (Reading it for work, case in point)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    As a young university graduate I think I learned a lot from this book. It was short and up to the point, so it was nice to read. I also really liked how the whole book was a conversation between two people. My favourite quote from the book was "There is nothing so unequal as the equal treatment of unequals"!! Taking a moment to analyze this phrase I realized it not only apply to businesses but to everyday life. As a young university graduate I think I learned a lot from this book. It was short and up to the point, so it was nice to read. I also really liked how the whole book was a conversation between two people. My favourite quote from the book was "There is nothing so unequal as the equal treatment of unequals"!! Taking a moment to analyze this phrase I realized it not only apply to businesses but to everyday life.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nichole Smith

    Content fine, stylistically horribly grating

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lucian

    3.90/5.00 Highly impressive that even after all these years, so many of the ideas and guidelines from the book stand the test of time in most of the corporate environments in 2022 and probably beyond. Why only 3.90 then? Not the biggest fan of the chosen mode for narration, dialogue instead of more of an academic style of writing. Still, as I already mentioned, very solid stuff still.

  8. 4 out of 5

    S.Ach

    There is nothing in this book about effective leadership skills that I disagree with. But…. Recommended for the people who love to attend those corporate 'Leadership' trainings. (Sadly, I am not one of them) Pongalswamy asked, "Who asks you to read 'leadership' books, when you dislike those anyway?" "I couldn't resist the offer in the last sales. And, moreover, see - my Goodreads reading challenge is ticking," I replied. There is nothing in this book about effective leadership skills that I disagree with. But…. Recommended for the people who love to attend those corporate 'Leadership' trainings. (Sadly, I am not one of them) Pongalswamy asked, "Who asks you to read 'leadership' books, when you dislike those anyway?" "I couldn't resist the offer in the last sales. And, moreover, see - my Goodreads reading challenge is ticking," I replied.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Graham Hotchkiss

    Obligated to read this for work. Some of the concepts were sound, but the writing was painful. Felt weirdly targeted towards children? With a fairytale ending to boot.

  10. 4 out of 5

    J.T. Wilson

    Pretty interesting idea but, as other commentators have noted, hardly enough to fill a book and the authors use every shortcut available to get to 140 pages. I could have done without the cheesy format as well (it's a fictional framework but apparently nobody could think of better names for the two main characters than The Enterpreneur and The One Minute Manager - even though there's three authors!). Pretty interesting idea but, as other commentators have noted, hardly enough to fill a book and the authors use every shortcut available to get to 140 pages. I could have done without the cheesy format as well (it's a fictional framework but apparently nobody could think of better names for the two main characters than The Enterpreneur and The One Minute Manager - even though there's three authors!).

  11. 5 out of 5

    John Paul

    Not bad. Very practical information. I like the conversational type of the book; it made me imagine like im just having a good conversation with the author. It lacks the importance of data research and the current trends. Still, it is a good primer for lost and confused entrepreneurs. I read the updated edition.

  12. 4 out of 5

    OneForTheBooksBlog

    I like to mix in some self-help and career development books here and there. I tend to not do this too often because I don’t want reading to ever feel like a chore - reading it very much my way of decompressing. This was a quick read with some great insight into situation leadership and management styles. I don’t currently manage any people but I’m a big believer in always preparing for the future. This book also helped me understand situational leadership from my own perspective of being an emp I like to mix in some self-help and career development books here and there. I tend to not do this too often because I don’t want reading to ever feel like a chore - reading it very much my way of decompressing. This was a quick read with some great insight into situation leadership and management styles. I don’t currently manage any people but I’m a big believer in always preparing for the future. This book also helped me understand situational leadership from my own perspective of being an employee. I’ve had 4 managers in the last 1.5 years so this book helped to put some things in perspective for me. 1. “The One Minute Manager’s symbol - a one-minute readout from the face of a modern digital watch - is intended to remind each of us to take a minute out of our day to look into the faces of the people we manage. And to realize that they are our most important resources.” 2. Don’t work harder - work smarter.” 3. “Different strokes for different folks.” 4. “When I slow down, I Go Faster.” 5. “Everyone has peak performance potential - you just need to know where they are coming from and meet them there.” 6. “The more I know, the more I realize I don’t know.” 7. “Leaders need to do what the people they supervise can’t do for themselves at the present moment.” 8. “You can expect more if you inspect more.” 9. “When the best leader’s work is done, the people say, we did it ourselves!” 10. “Reprimands do not teach skills, but are only effective in getting good performers back in line when they’ve developed a poor attitude toward their work.” 11. “Situational leadership is not something you do to people but something you do with people.” 12. “Everyone is a potential high performer. Some people just need a little help along the way.”

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mark Schleier

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Fun book to read with some simple, yet profound wisdom. It’s a simple narrative to express the meaning behind being a situational leader; such a powerful concept. Being a situational leader basically means you adapt your leadership style to meet your people where they’re at. There are 4 leadership styles, which correspond to 4 developmental phases. Phase 1 follower, we have low competency, so we need high direction. Phase 2 follower, we have some competency, so we need a little less direction and Fun book to read with some simple, yet profound wisdom. It’s a simple narrative to express the meaning behind being a situational leader; such a powerful concept. Being a situational leader basically means you adapt your leadership style to meet your people where they’re at. There are 4 leadership styles, which correspond to 4 developmental phases. Phase 1 follower, we have low competency, so we need high direction. Phase 2 follower, we have some competency, so we need a little less direction and lots of support. Phase 3 follower, we have moderate competency, and becoming more autonomous, so we need little direction and lots of support. Phase 4, the follower is running the show, so we need little direction and little support. Bigger takeaway for me was that it’s very very important to discuss this upfront with your subordinate and align on exactly what phase you believe they are currently in. Once done, you need to align on the leadership phase you’ll manage with. Overtime, you follow up on these phases and how progress is being made. As subordinates become more competent and more autonomous, they need less leadership, so we adjust our style accordingly and realign. Only feedback is just that the whole book could be condensed into a few pages, or at least wrapped up at the end with a great summary. The narrative is nice, but kind of trivial at moments. Great read! Definitely putting this into practice!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alice

    This is a simple book about how to become a better manager. It's designed to be read efficiently so the busy working person can read it in-between meetings, at lunch, or during the week before holiday break when the office is mostly dead. Since that is it's goal, it achieves it, and I recommend this book to managers who don't have a lot of time on their hands. While reading it, I found that I already do some of the techniques mentioned in the book, which was a relief, but now there was a fancy na This is a simple book about how to become a better manager. It's designed to be read efficiently so the busy working person can read it in-between meetings, at lunch, or during the week before holiday break when the office is mostly dead. Since that is it's goal, it achieves it, and I recommend this book to managers who don't have a lot of time on their hands. While reading it, I found that I already do some of the techniques mentioned in the book, which was a relief, but now there was a fancy name attached to it. There's an attempt at narrative to keep the reader's interest while others might find it pedantic. A word of advice: don't expect a lot from this book, and you'll come away having learned something. I really do believe the material in here was interesting and valuable, even if I could've done without the imaginary employees. What struck me the most was how Blanchard discusses that different people need different management styles, and sometimes people need a manager who's more encouraging and supportive than authoritarian. Even though this was written in the 80s, the time of big business and gluttonous commercialism, this was insightful. People make fun of millennials for constantly needing praise in the workforce, when this book illustrates that's not true. Everyone needs it at some point in their careers. Take that, grumpy old people. Again, if you're a manager looking to spruce up your skills, I recommend reading this book. It's quick, easy, to the point, and the narrative isn't really that bad. Sure, the stories it presents are idyllic and don't illustrate scenarios with "bad" employees, but I still think managers can take the points raised in this book and apply them to those individuals as well as everyone else.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    I've met the Hersey-Blanchard model about Situational Leadership before and always found it a little bit hard to follow. This book however explains it very clearly straight from the original creators mouth. What I've realised is it isn't the model that's difficult to understand but rather that the previous descriptions haven't managed to explain it very well by starting in the wrong place. This book is clever in that it explains the model through a series of conversations the "entrepreneur" has w I've met the Hersey-Blanchard model about Situational Leadership before and always found it a little bit hard to follow. This book however explains it very clearly straight from the original creators mouth. What I've realised is it isn't the model that's difficult to understand but rather that the previous descriptions haven't managed to explain it very well by starting in the wrong place. This book is clever in that it explains the model through a series of conversations the "entrepreneur" has with "The one minute manager". Those conversations wind back from the model to the individuals being led and it is understanding this secondary part that I now realise is key to understanding how situational leadership really works. The last part of the book looks at how it applies in practice looking at conversations and goal setting within performance management and clearly fits in with some of the other books in this series that I might look out. In the past my experience of reading original explanations is that they are more complex, but on this occasion Blanchard does a great job of communicating his core ideas. Strongly recommended.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Darren Shaw

    It’s not that this book doesn’t have something helpful to share: it does. It’s just that there is so much here that... isn’t. The basic information is summed up in two very clear flow charts: one on leadership styles, and another on the development levels of those you lead. These flow charts are helpful and concise. Unfortunately, they are presented as part of a fiction narrative between two main characters. Most of this book is the “One Minute Manager,” CEO of several fictional companies, leadi It’s not that this book doesn’t have something helpful to share: it does. It’s just that there is so much here that... isn’t. The basic information is summed up in two very clear flow charts: one on leadership styles, and another on the development levels of those you lead. These flow charts are helpful and concise. Unfortunately, they are presented as part of a fiction narrative between two main characters. Most of this book is the “One Minute Manager,” CEO of several fictional companies, leading “The Entrepreneur” through various conversations with fictional employees, who testify to the One Minute Manager’s effectiveness in leading them differently based on their roles, experience, and development levels. Few will need this in order to better understand two flow charts. Instead, it comes across as condescending and frustrating. So, the content itself is probably worth more than two stars, but the presentation brings it right back down.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tony Vynckier

    Not working harder, but working smarter. Sounds great, but where do you start ? The book ‘Leadership and the One Minute Manager’ shows a way to get the best out of your team members by tailoring your own leadership style to the level of development of each team member. Crucial in this model are : together setting clear targets and having clear agreements on form and the level of guidance. An all-round manager helps his team members to reach their agreed targets and helps them grow into competent Not working harder, but working smarter. Sounds great, but where do you start ? The book ‘Leadership and the One Minute Manager’ shows a way to get the best out of your team members by tailoring your own leadership style to the level of development of each team member. Crucial in this model are : together setting clear targets and having clear agreements on form and the level of guidance. An all-round manager helps his team members to reach their agreed targets and helps them grow into competent and dedicated managers. No one in your team is on the same level with all tasks, so you’ll use different leadership styles depending on the task. The challenge as a future situational leader is not so much this new leadership model but rather getting this model introduced into your team. TONY VYNCKIER

  18. 5 out of 5

    Max Tachis

    Building on the concepts described in "The New One Minute Manager", this helpful text provides some rather complex ideas branching off from the very simplistic ideas of its predecessor. The management concepts are terrific, primarily focusing on how to use elements of the first book toward a variety of different people, but the complexity of the processes described do not mesh with the VERY basic storytelling scheme. This time the reader follows an entrepreneur who can't understand how the One Mi Building on the concepts described in "The New One Minute Manager", this helpful text provides some rather complex ideas branching off from the very simplistic ideas of its predecessor. The management concepts are terrific, primarily focusing on how to use elements of the first book toward a variety of different people, but the complexity of the processes described do not mesh with the VERY basic storytelling scheme. This time the reader follows an entrepreneur who can't understand how the One Minute Manager operates. It's a fine entry point, but the narrative gets lost as the management fundamentals grow and returning to the narrative often feels tedious. Again, helpful information for the workplace. Lots of value, here. Unfortunately, the packaging leaves a bit to be desired.

  19. 5 out of 5

    BozCitac

    Before reading this book, I've read on Wikipedia that there were many studies that disproved Blanchard's SLII theory. I am surprised by that, since it seems to me like SLII does have some valid points and that it would work well on the long run, whereas those studies just seem to be nitpicking. Indeed, this book does contain some interesting ideas, but overall it's just so boring and badly written. The main problem is how every single sentence gets repeated over and over again throughout the who Before reading this book, I've read on Wikipedia that there were many studies that disproved Blanchard's SLII theory. I am surprised by that, since it seems to me like SLII does have some valid points and that it would work well on the long run, whereas those studies just seem to be nitpicking. Indeed, this book does contain some interesting ideas, but overall it's just so boring and badly written. The main problem is how every single sentence gets repeated over and over again throughout the whole book – it's like every single page contains the same few sentences merely rearranged into a slightly different order! Also, the example with the school teachers makes no sense and there is no way something like that would happen in real life!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sean Gilmore

    I'm a big fan of leadership books that explain concepts and then give real-world examples to illustrate the manifestation of the concept. One Minute Manager is not one of those books. Instead, the author uses a fictional narrative between the "One Minute Manager" and a leader in another organization to explain all of his concepts. It comes across as clunky story-telling with unrealistic dialogue. That being said, the leadership principles taught in this book are sound. Situational leadership, wh I'm a big fan of leadership books that explain concepts and then give real-world examples to illustrate the manifestation of the concept. One Minute Manager is not one of those books. Instead, the author uses a fictional narrative between the "One Minute Manager" and a leader in another organization to explain all of his concepts. It comes across as clunky story-telling with unrealistic dialogue. That being said, the leadership principles taught in this book are sound. Situational leadership, while difficult to master, is an excellent leadership style to adopt as you manage relationships.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Venkat

    This book focuses on how to treat employees to get the best out of them. Situational leadership is clearly explained with the help of a few diagrams, easy to understand and apply. Specifically, this book is useful to the management graduates who are going to work for any organization or highly recommended for entrepreneurs. One of my favorite lines in this is "There is nothing so unequal as the equal treatment of unequals"!! If one reads the book and analyzes thoroughly one will understand that e This book focuses on how to treat employees to get the best out of them. Situational leadership is clearly explained with the help of a few diagrams, easy to understand and apply. Specifically, this book is useful to the management graduates who are going to work for any organization or highly recommended for entrepreneurs. One of my favorite lines in this is "There is nothing so unequal as the equal treatment of unequals"!! If one reads the book and analyzes thoroughly one will understand that each phrase is not only useful in any organization but also in every possible situation where a group or team is involved.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sachin Winkle

    A good book, Give you a simple algorithm to manage and lead your people to become an accomplished entrepreneurs along with proper examples. Book is good for the person who wants to become a flawless entrepreneur specifically a leader and not a manager. As a leader, we need to create a clone of ours to do achieve the success as a leadership group. The book is about how to polish an individual as a progressive leader according to the qualities of that person.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Staley

    Written for a small child The book was written in a "story style" that felt as though my intelligence was being insulted throughout the book. If you like the "explain it to me like I am a third grader" style of writing, the book is fine. The information contained within is valuable, if you can stomach the condescending and patronizing tone. Written for a small child The book was written in a "story style" that felt as though my intelligence was being insulted throughout the book. If you like the "explain it to me like I am a third grader" style of writing, the book is fine. The information contained within is valuable, if you can stomach the condescending and patronizing tone.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Laura Thompson

    The principle of changing your leadership style to match the needs of your employees is very good; however, the writing style of this book is very distracting to the lessons the book offers. Referring to the main character as the One Minute Manager rather than giving them a name is also very annoying. I would not recommend adding this to your reading list.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Keith Beeson

    Does well what The One Minute Manager series does well = Takes a complex topic and breaks it down into easy to understand and apply steps that can help you be a better leader. Much of what is written, you may have seen in some form or fashion before, but the format and delivery are what makes this (and others in the series) so useful.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Wiebke Kuhn

    Sequel/Complement to the One Minute Manager, this one focusing on providing different leadership or rather management styles for your team, while still using the principles of the one minute manager. Still very relevant, so it should be fascinating to see why this has taken over 30 years to catch on more fully.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michal Paszkiewicz

    A quick and easy read detailing the theory behind situational leadership and how it can be applied. The book is a narrative which makes it easily readable. It can be completed in about an hour. I found the book lacked in evidence (scientific) of it working in practice, but it certainly seems to make sense a priori. Well worth a quick read!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    I really really liked this book. I found the advice in it simple and easy to follow. I enjoyed the way this book is written as well. It's told as a story. It's a quick read but it's packed full of valuable insights into leadership styles and how best to work alongside those you're leading. I'd highly recommend. I really really liked this book. I found the advice in it simple and easy to follow. I enjoyed the way this book is written as well. It's told as a story. It's a quick read but it's packed full of valuable insights into leadership styles and how best to work alongside those you're leading. I'd highly recommend.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shihab Ahmed

    A nice, short, sweet book that can be read in one day. It discusses a different type of management, one that we typically don’t think of when we manage people. I can’t say, however, whether or not these tactics actually work until I have applied them myself. As for now, however, they seem logical and I am excited to try them the next time I find myself in a managerial role!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tom Swanson

    Another refresher read as I plan to share this with my team as I want them to grasp the concepts of situational leadership. It’s a great model I just don’t need the parable, personally. I’ve not read anything else in the collection other than one minute manager but wouldn’t dismiss them as a learning tool

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