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13 Hangmen

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“Some people won’t believe any of this story. You might be one of them. But every single word is true. Tony DiMarco does catch a murderer, solve a mystery, and find a treasure—all in the first few days after he moves, unexpectedly, to 13 Hangmen’s Court in Boston. The fact that he also turns thirteen at the same time is not a coincidence.” So begins the story of Tony “Some people won’t believe any of this story. You might be one of them. But every single word is true. Tony DiMarco does catch a murderer, solve a mystery, and find a treasure—all in the first few days after he moves, unexpectedly, to 13 Hangmen’s Court in Boston. The fact that he also turns thirteen at the same time is not a coincidence.” So begins the story of Tony and his friends—five 13-year-old boys, all of whom are living in the same house in the same attic bedroom but at different times in history! None are ghosts, all are flesh and blood, and somehow all have come together in the attic room, visible only to one another. And all are somehow linked to a murder, a mystery, and a treasure.


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“Some people won’t believe any of this story. You might be one of them. But every single word is true. Tony DiMarco does catch a murderer, solve a mystery, and find a treasure—all in the first few days after he moves, unexpectedly, to 13 Hangmen’s Court in Boston. The fact that he also turns thirteen at the same time is not a coincidence.” So begins the story of Tony “Some people won’t believe any of this story. You might be one of them. But every single word is true. Tony DiMarco does catch a murderer, solve a mystery, and find a treasure—all in the first few days after he moves, unexpectedly, to 13 Hangmen’s Court in Boston. The fact that he also turns thirteen at the same time is not a coincidence.” So begins the story of Tony and his friends—five 13-year-old boys, all of whom are living in the same house in the same attic bedroom but at different times in history! None are ghosts, all are flesh and blood, and somehow all have come together in the attic room, visible only to one another. And all are somehow linked to a murder, a mystery, and a treasure.

30 review for 13 Hangmen

  1. 5 out of 5

    Liviania

    I almost didn't pick 13 HANGMEN up due to the baseball player on the cover. Let's face it, I know almost nothing about sports and don't care to know much more. But while love of the Red Sox plays into 13 HANGMEN's plot, the book is about so much more than that. 13 HANGMEN begins when Tony DiMarco's great-uncle Zío Angelo dies and his family movies into his town home: 13 Hangmen Court. The will stipulates that Tony must live in the creepy attic room, which he reluctantly does. Then he wakes up to I almost didn't pick 13 HANGMEN up due to the baseball player on the cover. Let's face it, I know almost nothing about sports and don't care to know much more. But while love of the Red Sox plays into 13 HANGMEN's plot, the book is about so much more than that. 13 HANGMEN begins when Tony DiMarco's great-uncle Zío Angelo dies and his family movies into his town home: 13 Hangmen Court. The will stipulates that Tony must live in the creepy attic room, which he reluctantly does. Then he wakes up to find Angelo in the room. Pretty soon he figures out that Angelo was actually murdered and this younger version of Angelo is the key to finding the murderer. I absolutely loved ghostly time travel stories like Mary Downing Hahn's TIME FOR ANDREW growing up. 13 HANGMEN has much the same atmosphere, where the apparitions are friendly but other forces are more sinister. But not only would I have loved 13 HANGMEN as a kid, I devoured it as an adult. On top of being a mystery and a time-traveling adventure, 13 HANGMEN is a celebration of Boston. The events and people described within are fictionalized or made up, but they're based on the truth. Most interestingly, 13 HANGMEN explores the history of the Italians, Jews, Irish, and blacks in Boston's North End. The residents of 13 Hangmen Court kept the home and its secrets safe despite prejudice and a very nasty set of neighbors. Art Corriveau doesn't ignore Boston's original inhabitants either. He doesn't sugarcoat that Native Americans were killed and their property destroyed when the colonists came. In fact, it is an artifact of the Algonquins that allows Tony to meet with 13 Hangmen's past residents. (The specific traditions in the book is made up. To quote the author's note, "This is partly to protect Native American privacy. Many tribes prefer to reserve their cultural and religious practices for members of their own community [ARC, 336].") I am so happy that I took a copy of 13 HANGMEN and read it despite the cover. I loved it's blending of mystery, history, and the paranormal. While aimed at middle grade readers, I think more advanced readers will enjoy it as well. It's a rollicking ride to catch the murderer - and find the treasure of 13 HANGMEN.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Had I been forced to review 13 Hangmen after the first third of the book, it would have been terrible. Corriveau tells the reader EVERYTHING. Nothing is shown, nothing is left up to the reader, the characters, setting, and plot all feel stilted, and it was just boring. The most exciting thing going on was the continuous (and often unbelievable) fight between Tony and his mom about his weight loss. However, when it picks up it really picks up. Corriveau has a fascinating idea of history, and I lo Had I been forced to review 13 Hangmen after the first third of the book, it would have been terrible. Corriveau tells the reader EVERYTHING. Nothing is shown, nothing is left up to the reader, the characters, setting, and plot all feel stilted, and it was just boring. The most exciting thing going on was the continuous (and often unbelievable) fight between Tony and his mom about his weight loss. However, when it picks up it really picks up. Corriveau has a fascinating idea of history, and I love what he has done with it. Through a chain of thirteen year old boys who know each other - each meeting the one before him when he is thirteen and the one after him when he is an older man - Corriveau manages to tell the ethnically and culturally rich history of the United States. He does so in snapshots of great events while still showing that, though we mostly remember special dates, history is continuous. We are not isolated from history but a part of it. I won't lie, I had some serious problems with the way he mixed fact and fiction (and science and pseudoscience, for that matter) so seamlessly that they were at times indistinguishable. But, wow, he made history exciting! Once we got rolling on the mystery, I really couldn't wait to find out who the next boy would be or what he would contribute to the, well, history lesson, for lack of a better word. And, much to my peace of mind, Corriveau cleans up the fact/fiction melding at the end. (Not that I wouldn't trust middle grade readers to immediately fact check. Ahem.) Also, I just really wish he wouldn't have perpetuated some persistent myths. Corriveau adds his voice to that of Longfellow in muddying Revere's place in history. Obviously, the exciting exaggerations are a lot easier to remember - we have adults, who really ought to know better, still thinking Revere rode up and down the street ringing a bell! There were some moments in 13 Hangmen that were really trite such as a villainous tell-all monologue a la Murder She Wrote. By the time we got there I was really hoping for better. Also, Sarah has violet eyes, really? (Can we just clear this one up now? Unless your character is albino, it is biologically impossible for her to have violet eyes. Elizabeth Taylor didn't even have violet eyes - she had deep blue eyes that she played up with cosmetics, lighting, and wardrobe. Okay, now we've all got this, stop with the violet eyes already!) I also felt that Angey's assistance to and subsequent friendship with Tony later in the book felt very contrived; it just didn't fit with his character, and I was shown no character growth to account for this change. Plus, a conveniently left behind Ouija board? Again, a plot device that kept the story moving but required suspension of disbelief on my part. Also, the mystery itself was a little predictable - but I'm a twenty-eight year old woman who enjoys reading mysteries. I imagine a middle grade reader new to the genre might not find these things quite as implausible, transparent, or predictable as I do. Overall, 13 Hangmen was fun, interesting, and made me think about some things I know in a new way. (As a student of Geography, I have learned about the rotation of ethnic groups within a neighborhood throughout generations, but I have never really thought about the neighborhood itself as a sort of time capsule as Corriveau does.) I also love the way the boys are linked by objects that they pass on to each other. (I do feel most connected to my grandmother-the-young-mother when wearing her apron, canning or cooking for my children. It is a time travel of sorts that connects us - doing the same thing at the same 'time' of live with the same object.) Corriveau was absolutely at his best when recounting history, or placing the boys within historical settings and events. His handling of Jack as a boy and "Honey Fitz" Fitzgerald were some of the most convincing bits of writing in the book. He manages to write about American history in a compellingly patriotic voice without finding the need to white-wash it - in any sense of the word. He holds no punches when describing the realities that a young African American, Jewish, Italian, Irish, Hispanic, etc., etc., etc. 13 year old boy would face at different points in history; and he acknowledges the very great contributions that each of these communities made to America. Plus, he pulls all that off without appearing nationalistic or nostalgic - a pretty impressive feat. (Truthfully, I would really like to see Corriveau turn his hand to some non-fiction histories or biographies for middle graders.) 13 Hangmen didn't wow me, but I enjoyed it - and I think that nine or ten year old me (she who hid under her blanket with a flashlight and Nancy Drew or Alfred Hitchcock and the Three Investigators) would have enjoyed it even more - if she made it past the first third of the book, that is. ARC provided thanks to Amulet Books. Blogged at Chronicles of a Book Evangelist

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Badgett

    13 Hangmen, an adventure book, follows a 13 year old boy named Tony through solving a mystery and changing as a person. When Tony turned 13, he inherited a house from a distant relative and got more. When the family moved in, they were disappointed in the house, but Tony soon became interested in the powers that were there, such as seeing other 13 year old boys from different time periods. Over the few days after Tony and his family moved in, Tony teamed up with the other boys he was seeing to s 13 Hangmen, an adventure book, follows a 13 year old boy named Tony through solving a mystery and changing as a person. When Tony turned 13, he inherited a house from a distant relative and got more. When the family moved in, they were disappointed in the house, but Tony soon became interested in the powers that were there, such as seeing other 13 year old boys from different time periods. Over the few days after Tony and his family moved in, Tony teamed up with the other boys he was seeing to solve rumors that were going around about a murder. While learning about each other, each of the boys also learned about themselves. As the story progressed, more information was learned of how each boy's story connected to the next and how they needed each boy to solve the mystery. Between following neighbors and tearing down walls, Tony was able to figure out the details of the rumor and clear his fathers name. I would use this book with grades 4-6 because of some vocabulary that is in it. There are some words that would be on frustration level for 3rd grade, much less the meaning of these words. I would use this book as a read aloud in my class because of how interesting it is. The students would be interested and engaged, especially since a mystery is being solved. This would hopefully lead them to do more independent reading of mystery novels if they enjoyed the read aloud. Another way this book could be used would be to talk about history. There are multiple historical references in this book that would teach students a thing or two about events that took place in US history. From Salem Witch Trials to prejudice, the history in this book is diverse and rich. This could be used as a story to take experts out of for certain history lessons or have students read the whole book and see what historical events they recognize. This was a WOW book for me because of how engaging and interesting it is. History is something that I enjoy, so being able to read this book and feel like I was part of solving the mystery was fun. Mysteries are a good way to get people interested in reading.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bibliojunkies

    “Some people won’t believe any of this story. You might be one of them. But every single word is true. Tony DiMarco does catch a murderer, solve a mystery, and find treasure – all in the first few days after he moves, unexpectedly, to 13 Hangmen’s Court in Boston. The fact that he also turns thirteen at the same time is not a coincidence.” So begins the story of Tony and his friends – give 13 year-old boys, all of whom are living in the same house in the same attic bedroom but at different times “Some people won’t believe any of this story. You might be one of them. But every single word is true. Tony DiMarco does catch a murderer, solve a mystery, and find treasure – all in the first few days after he moves, unexpectedly, to 13 Hangmen’s Court in Boston. The fact that he also turns thirteen at the same time is not a coincidence.” So begins the story of Tony and his friends – give 13 year-old boys, all of whom are living in the same house in the same attic bedroom but at different times in history! None are ghosts, all are flesh and blood, and somehow all have come together in the attic room, visible only to one another. And all are somehow linked to a murder, a mystery, and a treasure. Is it too early to claim a favorite for 2012? 13 Hangmen was such fun reading that I can’t wait to share it with my daughter when it finally comes out. This thrilling story combines everything described above – murder, mystery and a treasure hunt. But the author has also added history, mythology and numerology into the mix. All of this is done so impressively that it’s thoroughly engaging reading as soon as it gets under way. On his thirteenth birthday, Tony inherits a house that belonged to his Uncle Angelo – a man he only met once and barely knew. The inheritance comes with some odd stipulations – he must live in the house until he’s twenty-one, his bedroom must be in the attic and he cannot ever sell the house to any member of the Hagmann family who are perennial enemies of his family. This inheritance results in the uprooting of the entire family (his parents and his older twin brothers) from Detroit to Boston. Getting used to his new digs is quite the task especially when he learns about what makes the house special. It all starts with an old Red Sox baseball hat and from there the adventure begins. I won’t go into what happens next because it’s honestly so exciting that I don’t want to risk any spoilers. Suffice it to say that Tony somehow comes into contact with previous occupants of the house and delves into its history, the neighborhood and even a significant time in the country’s past. Since I was a kid, I have always, always loved history and what I love about this book is how imaginatively Corriveau blends historical elements and makes them work in this adventure through time. Even though he admits to tweaking certain details to fit the story, he makes history interactive, a neat reminder that some of the greatest events come about as a result of chance encounters. And Tony, a sensible protagonist who starts out in the shadow of his more outgoing brothers, becomes the hero when he gains confidence in his own abilities to eventually save the day. I highly recommend 13 Hangmen simply for its good writing and inspired storytelling. I was drawn into this book, eager with every turn of the page to discover the next clue in the puzzle. Anyone who's a fan of mystery or the 39 Clues series will enjoy this. ~ Bel

  5. 5 out of 5

    Taryn

    Tony DiMarco is an endearing, empathetic, and totally unlikely hero. He has older twin brothers who are always lost in their own athletic world. His mom wants him to lose weight over the summer. And his dad is working hard to finish a PhD in history, which means the family doesn't have much in the way of disposable income. But then he receives a mysterious gift in the mail for his 13th birthday—a vintage Red Sox baseball cap, sent by his great-uncle Angelo whom he barely knows. Then the DiMarco f Tony DiMarco is an endearing, empathetic, and totally unlikely hero. He has older twin brothers who are always lost in their own athletic world. His mom wants him to lose weight over the summer. And his dad is working hard to finish a PhD in history, which means the family doesn't have much in the way of disposable income. But then he receives a mysterious gift in the mail for his 13th birthday—a vintage Red Sox baseball cap, sent by his great-uncle Angelo whom he barely knows. Then the DiMarco family gets more news—Uncle Angelo has died, and left his house in Boston to Tony and his family. Finally some of their money problems are solved, and Tony is even getting his own room. Once they move into the old house, though, Tony discovers it's hiding more than its fair share of secrets, and he's going to have to travel back through time more than 200 years to solve its mystery. This book is part history, part mystery, and part magic, complete with a murder. It's also a festival of different cultures, with a roster of characters who are Italian, Irish, Jewish, and African-American. I don't want to give away exactly how Tony does it, but he finds a way to communicate with the other kids who lived in his attic bedroom throughout the years, starting with his great-uncle Angelo who sent him the Red Sox cap. I couldn't wait to see who Tony would meet next as he uncovered more of the house's history and encountered the various kids his age who helped shape it. In this book, everything is intertwined—from Paul Revere's famous midnight ride, to a young Frederick Douglass launching his speaking career, to Ted Williams, a left-fielder for the Red Sox, to Tony himself, in 2009, trying to save his family's new home from their nasty neighbor, Mr. Hagmann, who will do anything to get the house for himself. Tony has to find whatever it is the house is hiding, and fast, or his family will lose their home and a hidden treasure will be lost forever. You can find more of my book recommendations for grades 6-12 at www.read-or-die.com.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Glenajo

    Great Fun, Interesting Premise In 13 Hangman, Tony is approaching his thirteenth birthday when his parents receive the news that Tony inherited his uncle's house in Boston. Though Zio Anthony visited the family at Thanksgiving, they have never been close, but the will stipulates that the family must to move to Boston and Tony has to live in the attic bedroom. Since Tonys twin brother drive him crazy, he is thrilled with the promise of his own room. However, when they arrive, immidiately problems Great Fun, Interesting Premise In 13 Hangman, Tony is approaching his thirteenth birthday when his parents receive the news that Tony inherited his uncle's house in Boston. Though Zio Anthony visited the family at Thanksgiving, they have never been close, but the will stipulates that the family must to move to Boston and Tony has to live in the attic bedroom. Since Tonys twin brother drive him crazy, he is thrilled with the promise of his own room. However, when they arrive, immidiately problems pop up beginning with the next-door neighbor accusing Tony's dad, Michael, of murdering Zio Anthony. When long dead thirteen year olds begin showing up in Tony's bedroom, it only takes him a little while to to begin putting the mystery together, and save his family. This book is well thought out, amazingly linked to history, and just great fun to read. The main character is a chunky nerd constantly on the receiving end of his brothers' ridicule. Like many kids today, he lives more in the virtual word, than the real world, but the move pushes him to make decisions and choices that he wouldn't have otherwise made, giving him power that all preteens yearn for and can relate to. The connections to history add depth for the history buff and might hook some others. This is an excellent addition to the middle school crowd that doesn't include vampires or witches. It could even be used as part of a lesson to research the fiction/non-fiction elements of the story. Received Galley from NetGalley.com

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Sharp

    After reading 113 pages of 13 Hangman by Art Corriveau, I chose not to read it for my second book report. I chose not read it for my book report because it's not my most favorite book in the world because I'm not a mystery person and this book is all based around a mystery with the dead boys and the treasure. Another reason I chose not to read this book was because Ms. Curtiss only gave it 4 stars and I know that's kind of good but she usually gives five stars to only the greatest books. Lastly, After reading 113 pages of 13 Hangman by Art Corriveau, I chose not to read it for my second book report. I chose not read it for my book report because it's not my most favorite book in the world because I'm not a mystery person and this book is all based around a mystery with the dead boys and the treasure. Another reason I chose not to read this book was because Ms. Curtiss only gave it 4 stars and I know that's kind of good but she usually gives five stars to only the greatest books. Lastly, I didn't really think the mystery made since with all the boys trying to stop the Hangmans from getting the treasure. Because of these reasons, I rated the book 3 stars. However, this could change if I were to read the book in its entirety.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lia Marcoux

    I bet you think you're pretty cute, huh, Art Corriveau? With your blend of races and ethnicities and important historical events and your little sneaky weight-loss tips? But mister, I knows EDUCATIONAL when I reads it! And yet somehow, not even particularly accurate! Also, a thirteen-year-old hero who's driven to lose twenty-five pounds isn't admirable, it's worrying! It's not like he does it because he wants to get better at sports (or even healthier in general, he's plenty healthy); improving I bet you think you're pretty cute, huh, Art Corriveau? With your blend of races and ethnicities and important historical events and your little sneaky weight-loss tips? But mister, I knows EDUCATIONAL when I reads it! And yet somehow, not even particularly accurate! Also, a thirteen-year-old hero who's driven to lose twenty-five pounds isn't admirable, it's worrying! It's not like he does it because he wants to get better at sports (or even healthier in general, he's plenty healthy); improving at baseball is a side effect of his weight loss regimen, not the other way around. Also, two is a not a lot of slices of pizza! Oh also there's a throwaway scene about elder abuse, what is that supposed to be.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bhavnit

    This book is for people who are interested in history and mystery. This book is captivating and has a very creative plot, setting, and format. Tony is a young boy who inherited his dead great uncle, Zio Angelo's house by his last will. When his father is accused of murdering Angelo Tony sets out on a quest to find the truth. This books shows different perspectives in different times, and he also meets ghost from the past. This book is for people who are interested in history and mystery. This book is captivating and has a very creative plot, setting, and format. Tony is a young boy who inherited his dead great uncle, Zio Angelo's house by his last will. When his father is accused of murdering Angelo Tony sets out on a quest to find the truth. This books shows different perspectives in different times, and he also meets ghost from the past.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    It was hard for me to get into until chapter 12. It was interesting learning about the history of Paul revere though.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Traci

    Cute kids read. Recommend to a boy or history buff.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Symchych

    A good middle grade historical/realistic fantasy. I know, that’s a lot of contradiction. Unlike most time travel, the characters in this book do t travel, but meet when their times overlap. We got to meet characters from many times in American history, and I was really glad to see that the author talked about the true stories of the real people he included in his novel. It was also nice to have a male character trying to lose weight, as most books seem to portray that as a female problem only. I A good middle grade historical/realistic fantasy. I know, that’s a lot of contradiction. Unlike most time travel, the characters in this book do t travel, but meet when their times overlap. We got to meet characters from many times in American history, and I was really glad to see that the author talked about the true stories of the real people he included in his novel. It was also nice to have a male character trying to lose weight, as most books seem to portray that as a female problem only. I was planning to put the book in my Little Free Library, but will save it for my nephew who is about to turn 13. He can always dream, right?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    So-so YA fiction in the Sci-Fi/Fantasy/supernatural vane...I'll be upfront by saying that these genres are amongst my least favorite, but my wife insisted I read it because it was "cute"...But, it wasn't bad...it was an unusual way to explore the history of Boston through many generations...13 year-old is has inherited his great uncle's, old North Boston house. When his father is accused of murdering the uncle, he sets out on a quest to exonerate his Dad and to find out why a "shady" neighbor de So-so YA fiction in the Sci-Fi/Fantasy/supernatural vane...I'll be upfront by saying that these genres are amongst my least favorite, but my wife insisted I read it because it was "cute"...But, it wasn't bad...it was an unusual way to explore the history of Boston through many generations...13 year-old is has inherited his great uncle's, old North Boston house. When his father is accused of murdering the uncle, he sets out on a quest to exonerate his Dad and to find out why a "shady" neighbor desires the home...along the way he meets ghosts from the past that help him solve the mysteries...OK read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Fantasy-history-mystery with some sports thrown in. Slow start, but does pick up and ends well. Author gives true history at end and explains inspiration behind the parts he makes up and/or embellishes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carol Turner

    One of the best time travel books for kids I've seen. I don't believe it is still in print, but I'm looking. More grandkids who would like it. One of the best time travel books for kids I've seen. I don't believe it is still in print, but I'm looking. More grandkids who would like it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Caitlinleah

    Really enjoyed this Boston based historical sci-fi. Did not expect it to be as good as it was. Enjoyed the supporting characters. I’m not left with too many questions at the end.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    What a fun historical mystery centered in Boston, baseball and of coming of age at 13. I can't wait to share it. What a fun historical mystery centered in Boston, baseball and of coming of age at 13. I can't wait to share it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kellie Harvey

    Middle school level time travel story with history real and imagined. Made me want to learn more about the revolutionary war ear. My daughter and I both enjoyed it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Livia Beavis

    this book kept me on my toes throughout the whole thing. Definitely a must-read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bundles of

    Title: 13 Hangmen Author: Art Corriveau Release Date: April 1, 2012 Publisher: Amulet Books (April 1, 2012) Reading Level: 8-12 years old Hardcover: 352 pages Source: Publisher Book Summary: “Some people won’t believe any of this story. You might be one of them. But every single word is true. Tony DiMarco does catch a murderer, solve a mystery, and find a treasure—all in the first few days after he moves, unexpectedly, to 13 Hangmen’s Court in Boston. The fact that he also turns thirteen at the same t Title: 13 Hangmen Author: Art Corriveau Release Date: April 1, 2012 Publisher: Amulet Books (April 1, 2012) Reading Level: 8-12 years old Hardcover: 352 pages Source: Publisher Book Summary: “Some people won’t believe any of this story. You might be one of them. But every single word is true. Tony DiMarco does catch a murderer, solve a mystery, and find a treasure—all in the first few days after he moves, unexpectedly, to 13 Hangmen’s Court in Boston. The fact that he also turns thirteen at the same time is not a coincidence.” So begins the story of Tony and his friends—five 13-year-old boys, all of whom are living in the same house in the same attic bedroom but at different times in history! None are ghosts, all are flesh and blood, and somehow all have come together in the attic room, visible only to one another. And all are somehow linked to a murder, a mystery, and a treasure. Author Information: Art Corriveau holds an MFA in writing from the University of Michigan. His writing has received great reviews from School Library Journal, Booklist, Kirkus, and many others. Booklist praised How I Got a Life and a Dog, his first middle-grade novel, for its “vividly drawn” characters. He lives in Vermont. My First Thoughts...: After I read the synopsis, I thought this was going to be such a thrilling mystery! And it involved my home team, the Boston Red Sox! I am not a huge fan of adventure books though, and the cover isn't my favorite. I went into this books with a so-so expectation, thinking it may be a 3.5 starred book! Story-Line: This book follows a boy named Toni DiMarco, who just turned thirteen years old. For his thirteenth birthday, his great uncle Zio Angelo sent him a package. Toni has not heard from Zio, except for the occasional card sent on his birthday. Until this Thanksgiving. While talking to Uncle Zio practically all day, he was not bored like he expected. They had the same interest- baseball. That Thanksgiving was spent talking about the Boston Red Sox and Ted Williams. Apparently, Toni left an imprint on Zio. For his birthday, he got an antique hat from the 1939, the time of Ted Willaims. When showing it to his dad, his father suddenly burst into tears. Uncle Zio died yesterday. How did Zio know to send it in time? Toni has no idea, but he later finds out that the hat is not the only thing Uncle Zio gifted him for his birthday. He also gave Toni and his family his town house in Boston! Just around the corner from Fenway Park! What could get better than this? When they arrive, strange things start to happen.....like a boy living in the room with Toni that he can only see. Who will he tell to get this kid out of here? Overall Thoughts: This book is an okay book, more generated to middle grade boys. If you are a fan of baseball, you will like this more than those who oppose to them. The mystery sometimes becomes over-whelming and some of the scenes within the book are a little too much. Other than that, I enjoyed this book! I love seeing books more directed to boys because some boys love reading! Just the stories and covers out there are a little too feminine for them. A thrilling debut novel from Art Corriveau that hits a home run in my book! 4 Cupcakes

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    13 Hangmen is a mystery novel about Tony DiMarco and how he tries to figure out why his grandpa gave him a famous baseball player hat and why he is allowed to see him when he was younger in flesh and blood but still be in the same time period. I do recommend this book to anyone that likes a little bit of history, sports, and mystery. This genre of books is among my top 3 of favorites so I favored this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jillian (PidginPea's Book Nook)

    I received this as an ebook from NetGalley. 13 Hangmen kept me up late at night reading about Tony and his four new friends, all working to solve the mystery of 13 Hangmen's Court. Tony, a mystery lover, explores the house and town in search of clues. He meets Sarah Pickles working at Ye Olde Curiosity Shop in town; she's around his age and proves to be a helpful ally. Tony struggles with his suspicious neighbor, Mr. Hagmann, as well as with his own weight and confidence. With the help of his fri I received this as an ebook from NetGalley. 13 Hangmen kept me up late at night reading about Tony and his four new friends, all working to solve the mystery of 13 Hangmen's Court. Tony, a mystery lover, explores the house and town in search of clues. He meets Sarah Pickles working at Ye Olde Curiosity Shop in town; she's around his age and proves to be a helpful ally. Tony struggles with his suspicious neighbor, Mr. Hagmann, as well as with his own weight and confidence. With the help of his friends, he solves the mystery and proves to be more of a leader than he ever thought he could be. I loved the idea that six teenagers from different periods in history could communicate with each other across time. The explanation behind this was very interesting, but very intricate and very scientific as well. I wondered as I read if perhaps it might be a little over some middle grade readers’ heads. I think it would be perfect for readers with a strong interest and knowledge base in math or physics, or Native American spiritualism. But otherwise, it may be a lot to take in and pretty hard to comprehend. It was for me, anyway. Tony made quite a few big steps over the course of the book. The struggle with his weight is something readers could easily relate to, especially with the pressure from his family. Luckily, he has the support of new friends and the dedication to follow the new ways of eating and exercising that he learns. He comes across as a little unsure of himself at the beginning of the book, but as he makes friends and follows clues, his confidence grows. By the time the mystery of 13 Hangmen's Court is solved, Tony is finally able to recognize his own ability to be a strong, loyal leader. Corriveau's writing had a quirk to it when he needed to insert a backstory that I found a little distracting. In the midst of a pretty solid narrative style with good dialogue and nice descriptions, Corriveau would introduce a backstory with a sentence to the effect of "Here's what happened: ... " What followed read more like his own notes for what he would eventually flesh out into a finished version; it was written with a matter-of-fact tone and simple, sometimes choppy sentences, a distinct contrast from the rest of his writing. Even though there were a few aspects of 13 Hangmen that I didn't love, I enjoyed unraveling the mystery with Tony and the others. I can definitely see this being a favorite book for lots of middle grade readers, especially mystery lovers and history lovers. It's one of those books that could be read again and again; I'd like to read it again myself to see what clues I missed or misinterpreted the first time around. Full review originally posted on my blog, PidginPea's Book Nook.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    4.5/5 I did not know anything about this book going in to it although based on the title, I was kind of expecting a creepy read, possibly something fantasy revolving around hangmen. Well, that is not it. In fact, it is something better, weaving together lots of little historical moments into a big mystery. The beginning is a little slow as everything is set up. Tony inherits first an authentic Ted Williams Red Sox cap and then his great-uncle's house on 13 Hangmen's Court in Boston. He, his histor 4.5/5 I did not know anything about this book going in to it although based on the title, I was kind of expecting a creepy read, possibly something fantasy revolving around hangmen. Well, that is not it. In fact, it is something better, weaving together lots of little historical moments into a big mystery. The beginning is a little slow as everything is set up. Tony inherits first an authentic Ted Williams Red Sox cap and then his great-uncle's house on 13 Hangmen's Court in Boston. He, his historian father, mother, and twin older brothers thus move to their new home only to uncover a variety of problems. The house is not in good condition and the father is accused of murdering the uncle by pesky neighbor Hagmann. However Tony uncovers a secret. When he places the cap on a symbol in his room, he can commune with his great-uncle in 1939; both boys are 13 and share the connection of the hat. As they talk, they learn about how the family Hagmann has been trying to get their house for generations and end up talking with other thirteen-year old boys who owned the house under the same unusual circumstances as Tony, revealing every time a little bit more about the mystery of the house as well as a peek into American history through one of its most important cities. While I was a little skeptical of this book, I quickly fell in love and flew through it. There are so many aspects I love: awkward boy struggling with his weight and fitting in with his family, love of mysteries as Tony gets the opportunity to try to solve an actual one, and of course American history as we get to go all the way back to the time of the American Revolution. As a middle-grade novel, I thought the writing was on a simpler level than perhaps a YA novel would be. This is not a bad observation; in fact, I think it helped me to read this as I was just drawn into the world. And I did think the writing had some interesting concepts, particularly in its use of history, showing how different ethnic groups moved through the neighborhoods as well as our connections to others through objects. Throughout I was wondering if all of the history presented was accurate; happily Corriveau presented an engaging look at separating his story from history. Overall: A really fun melding of some of my favorite subjects: mystery, American history, some baseball, and family! Cover: Wow-another cover that matches! Baseball is very relevant as are the spirals.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    More reviews at Rondo of a Possible World: YA Book Reviews History, as the buff I would like to think that I am, interests me in many ways and the past events depicted in 13 Hangmen really did allow me to enjoy the stories of all the boys that Art Corriveau sheds light upon. I will have to admid that while reading the beginning, when Tony was first introduced, after reading his last name, DiMarco, over and over again I couldn't help but think of my gym teacher who shares the same last name. It w More reviews at Rondo of a Possible World: YA Book Reviews History, as the buff I would like to think that I am, interests me in many ways and the past events depicted in 13 Hangmen really did allow me to enjoy the stories of all the boys that Art Corriveau sheds light upon. I will have to admid that while reading the beginning, when Tony was first introduced, after reading his last name, DiMarco, over and over again I couldn't help but think of my gym teacher who shares the same last name. It was unintentional and because of that it was just stuck until I forced myself to diferentiate between the two. And when starting the novel I wasn't very keen on the story itself. It was unintersting with the details, the twins were HORRIBLE, I couldn't even stand hearing when their names were mentioned. The mom and the dad struck me as odd and out of place I couldn't help but wonder when, or if, things were going to pick up. Thank heavens I stuck to the story a little while longer. I finished this in one sitting, all 352 pages thrown at me on my Kindle and they were worth it minus the beginning. When the strange events that begin to take place on 13 Hangmen Court act up I could not put the book down. Each thirteen-year-old boy had a story of their own, a voice of their own, and a time period of their own, something that interested me and was original to read about. The one thing was how the pieces fit too snuggly together, how there were all these 13s and 9s and it tended to get confusing a little while after another. But the way Mr. Corriveau incorperated all this American history from present all the way back until the beginning of the country's dawning, it worked wonderfully even things felt too welldone or tied together. And the mystery behind it, the speedbumps along the road, and the growth of Tony, the twins, it was an interesting story to read and watch them grow. A middle grade novel that is wonderful for those who enjoy history, mystery, or some sports thrown in there, definitely check this out. I also recommend to the male population out there, a great boy book that can also do jusitce for girls as well.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Unabridged Bookshelf

    Tony DiMarco is not sure if it is a blessing or a curse that he inherited number 13 Hangman’s Court. Tony loves solving mysteries, and dreams of growing up to be a detective. When he discovers a mystery, it is up to Tony to solve it. He is not going to be able to do it on his own, because this mystery goes decades in history. He has some help from the girl who works in the Curiosity Shop, but it is going to take more than that. Lucky for Tony, he does not have to solve it alone. Tony has a group Tony DiMarco is not sure if it is a blessing or a curse that he inherited number 13 Hangman’s Court. Tony loves solving mysteries, and dreams of growing up to be a detective. When he discovers a mystery, it is up to Tony to solve it. He is not going to be able to do it on his own, because this mystery goes decades in history. He has some help from the girl who works in the Curiosity Shop, but it is going to take more than that. Lucky for Tony, he does not have to solve it alone. Tony has a group of friends his age to help him decipher events in the past that lead to the mystery in the present. Only Tony can see them, because they are all living in the same bedroom, but at different points in time. Each 13-year-old boy lends a key to the mystery and story surrounding 13 Hangmen’s Court. There is a lot of numerology in this book, with the numbers 9 and 13. Each boy can only see one another after their 13th birthday. In addition, Tony himself inherits his uncle’s house number 13 Hangmen’s Court on his 13th birthday. The book delves into history, and how each historical event is connected to another. It is entertaining, but some of the events and people used are fictional or actual historical events were moved and changed to fit the story. This did not bother me, because I do not know a lot about the history of Boston, where the story takes place. I mean obviously, there are famous historic people and events that stand out in American History, which I liked. For any confusion on what actually happened and what was fictional for the book, the author explains it all at the end of the book. I love history, so this book was a fun read. This book is geared more towards a middle grade or very early teen audience, and it would be more popular with teenagers of the male persuasion. This is simply because the main characters are all 13-year-old boys. The book does feature multiple viewpoints as each of the characters from the past get to tell their own story. It is a fun, quick read and I would defiantly give as a gift to any of the younger male family members. **Unabridged Bookshelf received this book for review from the publisher, in exchange for an honest review**

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    Tony's family is a bit confused, but very grateful, when Tony's great uncle Angelo leaves him his house in Boston, with the stipulation that the family live there until Tony is an adult, and Tony has the attic bedroom. This is great, because Tony's father is working on his PhD thesis on Paul Revere, so the family is strapped for money. There is some suspicious circumstances surrounding Angelo's death, and when a cranky neighbor, Mr. Hagemann, files charges against Tony's father, Tony wants to fi Tony's family is a bit confused, but very grateful, when Tony's great uncle Angelo leaves him his house in Boston, with the stipulation that the family live there until Tony is an adult, and Tony has the attic bedroom. This is great, because Tony's father is working on his PhD thesis on Paul Revere, so the family is strapped for money. There is some suspicious circumstances surrounding Angelo's death, and when a cranky neighbor, Mr. Hagemann, files charges against Tony's father, Tony wants to find out why the old man is so vengeful. This is made a little easier when Tony finds out that the baseball cap Zio Angelo gave him for his 13th birthday can conjure up Angelo as a 13 year old when set on a shelf that was made out of an ancient pawcorance. Not only does it conjure up Angelo (who met Ted Williams during a critical point in the baseball great's career), but a contemporary of Williams, an Irish boy who lived in the house, a freed slave boy... all as their 13 year old selves. It turns out that the Hagemann's have a very long vendetta against Tony's family, going all the way back to the time of Paul Revere. The Hagemanns want desperately to buy the house because of the rumors of treasure being there. The most recent Hagemann almost succeeds when Tony's house starts to fall to pieces and require more work than the family can afford. The only way they can stay is if Tony can consult the generations of 13 year old boys, figure out the secrets, and find the treasure. Strengths: Very strong sense of place, and interesting bits of history. I had no idea that Ted Williams was of Mexican descent and was forbidden to discuss this fact! The time travel element is realistically done, and Tony is a great character. The subplot about him trying to lose weight was a really good one. Weaknesses: As in this author's first book for younger readers, How I, Nicky Flynn, Finally Get a Life (and a Dog), this was a bit long and convoluted for the target audience. There are a lot of details that bog down the narrative, like the information about Tony's dad. And really, I could buy the time travel, but I could NOT believe that Harvard offered his father a position.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Oliveira

    ’13 Hangmen’ tells the story of a thirteen-year-old boy who is left a house, #13 at Hangman Court to be precise, on his thirteenth birthday. Tony, a mystery-obsessed kid, slowly discovers that generations of Hagmanns have tried to come into possession of #13 at one time or another, and the current Hagmann living next door is no different. So Tony is finally given a real-life mystery to solve – not that he wanted one in which he has to prove his father innocence after Michael is accused of murder ’13 Hangmen’ tells the story of a thirteen-year-old boy who is left a house, #13 at Hangman Court to be precise, on his thirteenth birthday. Tony, a mystery-obsessed kid, slowly discovers that generations of Hagmanns have tried to come into possession of #13 at one time or another, and the current Hagmann living next door is no different. So Tony is finally given a real-life mystery to solve – not that he wanted one in which he has to prove his father innocence after Michael is accused of murdering Angelo Di Marco, the previous owner of #13 Hangman Court. Even more surprisingly, for Tony, he is aided in his quest by Angelo di Marco himself, that is, the thirteen-year-old Angelo di Marco. Tony is just a regular, overweight kid, with a regular family, thrown into a not-so-regular situation and he is more than charismatic enough to take the reader with him in his encounters with his ancestor and other former residents of #13 Hangman Court. Each and every one of the kids Tony meets brings his own story with a Hagmann and, together, they unveil the mystery of the house. Combining fantasy and North American history to a bit of adventure, Art Corriveau has composed a compelling book for young adult readers aiming for an escape from paranormal romances and is a breath of fresh air within the category: no orphan boy/girl trying to save the world this time. The insight into American History is particularly appealing, even though Corriveau makes use of this artistic freedom to add a bit of shine here and there. The only drawback was found in the continuity of the plot. The events of the concluding chapters bring some passages that subtly contradict the mechanics of interaction among the kids which was established in the first meetings between Tony and Angelo. All in all, a very fun, quick read, particularly recommended for boys – since girls take such a small part of the narrative.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Harris

    Tony DiMarco is approaching his 13th birthday when his parents receive the news that Tony inherited his uncle's house in Boston. Once settled, Tony discovers a pawcorance in the attic, which incidentally is his new bedroom-as per request from his late great-uncle Zio Anthony. What's a pawcorance? Pick this book up and find out. Anyway, the pawcorance allows Tony to stay in his present time, but he can see other 13-year-olds in their own time. They can all correspond with each other and this is h Tony DiMarco is approaching his 13th birthday when his parents receive the news that Tony inherited his uncle's house in Boston. Once settled, Tony discovers a pawcorance in the attic, which incidentally is his new bedroom-as per request from his late great-uncle Zio Anthony. What's a pawcorance? Pick this book up and find out. Anyway, the pawcorance allows Tony to stay in his present time, but he can see other 13-year-olds in their own time. They can all correspond with each other and this is how Tony is able to "catch a murderer, solve a mystery, and find a treasure - all in the first few days after he moves..." I thought this was an interesting book. If I was a 11-13 yr. old kid, I would have ate this up! Were there problems with the storyline? Yes. Was the book very organic? Not all of it. However, as adults, we need to keep in mind that the intended audience for this book is an adolescent kid. It's imaginative, clever, and adventurous. I love that Corriveau injects this book with a boy who has many different interests like sports & history. I also like that you can categorize this book in mystery, historical fiction, adventure, Sci-Fi, sports, or fantasy. I'd hand this book to a kid in 4th-6th grade or to those who want a little bit of everything all rolled into one. Read-a-likes: The Watcher in the Shadows by Christ Moriarty, because they both involve fantasy, mystery, murder investigation, and teenage boys. The Baseball Card Adventure books by Dan Gutman (ex: Honus and Me), because there's a fair amount of historical fiction, sports, and time travel in both.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    I loved the author's earlier book, How I, Nicky Flynn, Finally Get a Life (and a Dog), and while this one is not about a dog at all, it does explore some of the same territory explored in that one. Once again, the main character is a boy who is struggling with self-esteem and identity issues--he is overweight and his mother keeps hounding him about his food choices while seeming to favor his more athletically-gifted twin brothers--and takes the reader through parts of Boston in a retrospective h I loved the author's earlier book, How I, Nicky Flynn, Finally Get a Life (and a Dog), and while this one is not about a dog at all, it does explore some of the same territory explored in that one. Once again, the main character is a boy who is struggling with self-esteem and identity issues--he is overweight and his mother keeps hounding him about his food choices while seeming to favor his more athletically-gifted twin brothers--and takes the reader through parts of Boston in a retrospective history tour. While I didn't find myself as deeply engaged by this title as the previous one, there were several aspects that kept me interested. I loved the fact that this was a mystery that Tony DiMarco would have to solve and that there were famous folks such as Ted Williams, Frederick Douglass, and Paul Revere moving in and out of the storyline. When Tony inherits his great-uncle's town house, I was sure that there would be more to the story than was on the surface, but I had no idea that the mystery would cover so many years and so much history. After a promising prologue, the action loses steam before picking it up again at the story's halfway point. The book is packed with a lot to think about, and I'm betting it will have strong appeal for boys, baseball fans, and anyone who relishes a mystery.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This mystery that happened around Tony DiMarco got started all by the mysterious death of his uncle Zio Angelo. Before Angelo's death, he had said to leave his house in 13 hangman's court to Tony. This was strange to Tony because Tony wasn't rally close to Angelo, his only memory with his uncle was from the last thanksgiving dinner they had together. Now here comes the interesting part, Tony must be sleeping in his uncles room in the attic and Tony was not allow to sell the house, until he is le This mystery that happened around Tony DiMarco got started all by the mysterious death of his uncle Zio Angelo. Before Angelo's death, he had said to leave his house in 13 hangman's court to Tony. This was strange to Tony because Tony wasn't rally close to Angelo, his only memory with his uncle was from the last thanksgiving dinner they had together. Now here comes the interesting part, Tony must be sleeping in his uncles room in the attic and Tony was not allow to sell the house, until he is legally an adult(he inherited the house when he was 13) or if it's an emergency. He began his adventure by conjuring with 5 different children his age that have slept in his room in the attic in different time history. As he discover more and more things from the 5 children, he was also on the path of finding a valuable treasure. I picked up this book because I liked the cover of the book. It's cover gives me this spooky feeling which match perfectly with the genre of the book. I finished reading the book because I wanted to know the ending of the book. Once I start reading a mystery book I just want to finish it and find out what would happen. I would recommend this book to Thadchkan because I once saw him holding a mystery book called "Ghost in the machine so I am guessing that he would enjoy reading more mystery books.

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