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The Art and Making of The Dark Knight Trilogy

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In 2005, director, writer, and producer Christopher Nolan redefined the Batman legend with Batman Begins, starring Christian Bale as the Caped Crusader. A fresh, dynamic reboot of the franchise, Batman Begins explored Bruce Wayne's evolution from billionaire orphan to Gotham City's dark avenger. The film deconstructed the super-hero genre and put an indelible stamp on it – In 2005, director, writer, and producer Christopher Nolan redefined the Batman legend with Batman Begins, starring Christian Bale as the Caped Crusader. A fresh, dynamic reboot of the franchise, Batman Begins explored Bruce Wayne's evolution from billionaire orphan to Gotham City's dark avenger. The film deconstructed the super-hero genre and put an indelible stamp on it – Nolan's character-driven, hard-edged realism gave Batman a new, "real-world" origin story. A 2008 sequel, The Dark Knight, took those compelling foundations and raised the stakes, pitting Batman against a deranged master criminal, the Joker (Heath Ledger, whose performance won him a posthumous Academy Award® for Best Supporting Actor), in an all-out war for Gotham's soul. At once a sprawling crime epic, a rumination on moral relativism, and a blockbuster action film, The Dark Knight expanded the scope and depth of Batman Begins and broke box-office records. Now, the final film in The Dark Knight Trilogy, The Dark Knight Rises, brings Nolan's Batman saga to an end. An epic disaster movie on a global scale, The Dark Knight Rises blends the tragic, character-driven roots of Batman Begins with the thrilling action and thematic complexity of The Dark Knight. The Art and Making of The Dark Knight Trilogy tells the complete behind-the-scenes story of these three monumental films. Based on in-depth interviews with Nolan and all of the films’ key cast and crew - including cowriters David S. Goyer and Jonathan Nolan, cinematographer Wally Pfister, and composer Hans Zimmer - and supported by lavish art and never-before-seen photography, the book reveals the creative development and design behind The Dark Knight Trilogy. Each chapter is devoted to a separate step of the filmmaking process, highlighting how Nolan's vision and working methods - favoring repertory-style casting, tenets of classicla drama, and practical effects - helped make the definitive Batman for a new generation.


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In 2005, director, writer, and producer Christopher Nolan redefined the Batman legend with Batman Begins, starring Christian Bale as the Caped Crusader. A fresh, dynamic reboot of the franchise, Batman Begins explored Bruce Wayne's evolution from billionaire orphan to Gotham City's dark avenger. The film deconstructed the super-hero genre and put an indelible stamp on it – In 2005, director, writer, and producer Christopher Nolan redefined the Batman legend with Batman Begins, starring Christian Bale as the Caped Crusader. A fresh, dynamic reboot of the franchise, Batman Begins explored Bruce Wayne's evolution from billionaire orphan to Gotham City's dark avenger. The film deconstructed the super-hero genre and put an indelible stamp on it – Nolan's character-driven, hard-edged realism gave Batman a new, "real-world" origin story. A 2008 sequel, The Dark Knight, took those compelling foundations and raised the stakes, pitting Batman against a deranged master criminal, the Joker (Heath Ledger, whose performance won him a posthumous Academy Award® for Best Supporting Actor), in an all-out war for Gotham's soul. At once a sprawling crime epic, a rumination on moral relativism, and a blockbuster action film, The Dark Knight expanded the scope and depth of Batman Begins and broke box-office records. Now, the final film in The Dark Knight Trilogy, The Dark Knight Rises, brings Nolan's Batman saga to an end. An epic disaster movie on a global scale, The Dark Knight Rises blends the tragic, character-driven roots of Batman Begins with the thrilling action and thematic complexity of The Dark Knight. The Art and Making of The Dark Knight Trilogy tells the complete behind-the-scenes story of these three monumental films. Based on in-depth interviews with Nolan and all of the films’ key cast and crew - including cowriters David S. Goyer and Jonathan Nolan, cinematographer Wally Pfister, and composer Hans Zimmer - and supported by lavish art and never-before-seen photography, the book reveals the creative development and design behind The Dark Knight Trilogy. Each chapter is devoted to a separate step of the filmmaking process, highlighting how Nolan's vision and working methods - favoring repertory-style casting, tenets of classicla drama, and practical effects - helped make the definitive Batman for a new generation.

30 review for The Art and Making of The Dark Knight Trilogy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    This is a nice coffee table book about one of the epic series of superhero movies - the Christophe Nolan series featuring Christian Bale as the Batman. The book covers all aspects of how the movie was made, the decors, the preparation of the actors, etc. Personally, I was disappointed with the 3rd one (especially with the horrendous performance (or was it Nolan's fault) of Marion Cotillard) but Batman Begins is an excellent reboot of the Batman story and The Dark Knight perhaps the most morose, This is a nice coffee table book about one of the epic series of superhero movies - the Christophe Nolan series featuring Christian Bale as the Batman. The book covers all aspects of how the movie was made, the decors, the preparation of the actors, etc. Personally, I was disappointed with the 3rd one (especially with the horrendous performance (or was it Nolan's fault) of Marion Cotillard) but Batman Begins is an excellent reboot of the Batman story and The Dark Knight perhaps the most morose, chilling superhero film ever with Heath Ledger's epic swan song appearance as the Joker. For those who loved the series, this is a great companion.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight Trilogy is not only my favorite comic book trilogy of all time, it's easily my favorite movie trilogy of all time. When I heard that a book was being released that chronicled the making of all 3 films, I jumped at the chance to get my hands on it. The book is separated into several sections detailing the stunts, the marketing, visual effects, casting, writing and overall shooting of the films. Hand in hand with the write-ups are beautiful photos showcasing behi Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight Trilogy is not only my favorite comic book trilogy of all time, it's easily my favorite movie trilogy of all time. When I heard that a book was being released that chronicled the making of all 3 films, I jumped at the chance to get my hands on it. The book is separated into several sections detailing the stunts, the marketing, visual effects, casting, writing and overall shooting of the films. Hand in hand with the write-ups are beautiful photos showcasing behind the scenes action as well as choice stills from the movies themselves. The author, Jody Duncan Jesser, really did her research in interviewing a lot of the cast and crew in coming up with more than a few interesting and funny stories. One in particular involving Tom Hardy training and bulking up in an attempt to outshine Christian Bale had me laughing out loud. I'll keep from spoiling it but moments like that are reason enough to pick this up. If you're a fan of the films, I can't recommend this enough. There's so much information contained within here that I wasn't aware of! Granted, there aren't any groundbreaking stories or mind-blowing revelations but the little things like Ledger's routine of getting into character or the creative process regarding set design as well as the viral marketing techniques really satisfied the Batman geek within me. A worthy companion piece for completists or anyone who appreciated the work put in by Nolan and friends to create easily the best feature film adaptation of The Dark Knight yet.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Stewart

    A coffee table book worthy of the trilogy it documents. Stellar product.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Cristiani

    I am a big Batman fan, and a big fan of Christopher Nolan's Batman movies. This book is so chock full of trivia and details that even I was a little overwhelmed. I think it's more for people into film, and less for people into comics, but it appealed to me too. It was well-done, showing glimpses in pictures and words of each step of filming and post-production. I enjoyed reading about the hard-to-film places, the driving of the bat-pod, and the music composition. I love these movies - in my mind I am a big Batman fan, and a big fan of Christopher Nolan's Batman movies. This book is so chock full of trivia and details that even I was a little overwhelmed. I think it's more for people into film, and less for people into comics, but it appealed to me too. It was well-done, showing glimpses in pictures and words of each step of filming and post-production. I enjoyed reading about the hard-to-film places, the driving of the bat-pod, and the music composition. I love these movies - in my mind they're as close to perfect as movies can be. But one thing that struck me while reading is the millions upon millions of dollars necessary to make a film like this. This doesn't surprise me, as like everyone else I hear random facts about film budgets. But when you read about the blow-by-blow, like how often they blew out wheels on the batmobile, or replaced helmets, or flew crews to Iceland or India, it starts to make me a little uncomfortable. The budget for this one film could probably feed an entire small country somewhere. I guess in the end I don't really like seeing how the sausage is made. But I know I won't boycott Hollywood because of it, so I guess I'm complicit. I do look forward to watching the movies again, knowing the tidbits I do now.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Ferrante

    This is not an "art of" book. If you buy this thinking that based on the title you would be upset to see hardly any art at all. There is a lot more to read here than the Batman begins book. This does a lot of the same things that book did. Which is to say this book uses production stills or just movie screen captures as companions to the text. To be fair to this book I didn't really read all the content as I was getting frustrated by the lack of depth. This seems to me to be more like a behind t This is not an "art of" book. If you buy this thinking that based on the title you would be upset to see hardly any art at all. There is a lot more to read here than the Batman begins book. This does a lot of the same things that book did. Which is to say this book uses production stills or just movie screen captures as companions to the text. To be fair to this book I didn't really read all the content as I was getting frustrated by the lack of depth. This seems to me to be more like a behind the scenes feature on a DVD put to text. Better than the Batman Begins book but still not what I was looking for.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Devin Doherty

    A great coffee table book for browsing the artwork and pictures during production of Nolan’s Batman trilogy. At the same time it’s a super interesting read from actors, director, and the production team for any fan of the films. I personally love the Nolan Batman trilogy and the book proved a wonderful companion and a veritable well of interesting facts and anecdotes.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marcus

    For those who don't know, I undertook a 2020 Movie Challenge I called "20for20 in 2020", in which I sought out to watch The Dark Knight (2008) 20 times over the course of 2020. I picked this book up recently to learn more about the film, and my only regret is that I waited so long to do it. Link to my Letterboxd Journal Entries after each viewing If you're a fan of the films, I can't recommend this enough. There's so much information contained within here that I wasn't aware of! Granted, there are For those who don't know, I undertook a 2020 Movie Challenge I called "20for20 in 2020", in which I sought out to watch The Dark Knight (2008) 20 times over the course of 2020. I picked this book up recently to learn more about the film, and my only regret is that I waited so long to do it. Link to my Letterboxd Journal Entries after each viewing If you're a fan of the films, I can't recommend this enough. There's so much information contained within here that I wasn't aware of! Granted, there aren't any groundbreaking stories or mind-blowing revelationsm but the little things like Ledger's routine of getting into character or the creative process regarding set design as well as the viral marketing techniques really satisfied the Batman geek within me. A worthy companion piece for completists or anyone who appreciated the work put in by Nolan and friends to create easily the best feature film adaptation of The Dark Knight yet.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vince

    The authors weave a competent narrative that describes the major elements of how the films were made ranging from screenplay to marketing and covering casting, special effects, music, photography, and more. The scale and visual punch of Christopher Nolan's Batman vision begs for this kind of coffee-table-book treatment. I might have preferred a wider format bound to allow the pages to lay flat. Instead, the authors opted for an oversize book approach. To be fair, at 300 pages I doubt this volume The authors weave a competent narrative that describes the major elements of how the films were made ranging from screenplay to marketing and covering casting, special effects, music, photography, and more. The scale and visual punch of Christopher Nolan's Batman vision begs for this kind of coffee-table-book treatment. I might have preferred a wider format bound to allow the pages to lay flat. Instead, the authors opted for an oversize book approach. To be fair, at 300 pages I doubt this volume would have laid flat in any format, and the large size does facilitate gorgeous 2-pages spreads. The book is printed on high-quality stock and the photos look amazing, though the book is heavy to hold. The writing will mostly hold your interest, and to the extent you read you'll learn all sorts of interesting facts about "how they did it." Favorite pictures: p.81. The Batcave from The Dark Knight Rises p.168. Heath Ledger and Maggie Gyllenhaal (as the Joker and Rachel Dawes) in front of a green-screen during the shooting of the fundraiser holdup in The Dark Knight. p.176. Mid-action photo of the flipping of the tractor-trailer rig on Chicago's LaSalle street during filming of The Dark Knight. p.203. Christopher Nolan and Emma Thomas (husband-wife producer team behind the movies) enjoying a quiet conversational moment backstage p.210. Anne Hathaway (Catwoman) on the Bat-Pod between shots on the set of The Dark Knight Rises p.257. Composer Hans Zimmer's Los Angeles studio p272-273. CGI shot of the monorail from Batman Begins

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

    Disappointed This is a textbook about the making of the Dark Knight trilogy with "some" art and sketches included in it. Not what i was marketed to. Misleading title makes you get your hopes high for a lot of early production concept arts, wardrobe and costumes details, etc. Instead everything is told in quotes and long verses. Didn't enjoy it. Disappointed This is a textbook about the making of the Dark Knight trilogy with "some" art and sketches included in it. Not what i was marketed to. Misleading title makes you get your hopes high for a lot of early production concept arts, wardrobe and costumes details, etc. Instead everything is told in quotes and long verses. Didn't enjoy it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jon Barnhill

    Good but brief overview of making of the films. Complaints are that it refuses to acknowledge spoilers in Rises and also no behind the scenes drama. Reads like it was written by WB publicity department which it probably was.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Boots

    from the opening words penned by michael caine, to the beautiful photos and presentation, to the final notes, this book is a joy and a must-have for fans of Nolan's trilogy. wish it had been twice (three times!) as long, but i'm slowly learning to live with the finiteness of all things. from the opening words penned by michael caine, to the beautiful photos and presentation, to the final notes, this book is a joy and a must-have for fans of Nolan's trilogy. wish it had been twice (three times!) as long, but i'm slowly learning to live with the finiteness of all things.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jayla

    I really love Nolan's Batman trilogy, and I'm so sad it's over. This book was perfect with helping me cope, haha. I really love Nolan's Batman trilogy, and I'm so sad it's over. This book was perfect with helping me cope, haha.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kimball

    One of my most favorite movie trilogies along with one of my favorite movies (The Dark Knight Rises). This was terrific to read and enjoy. I started this book while I was flying to Iceland and got to see some of the filming locations there from Batman Begins. I love all the details. This book is essentially the special features disc that you don't get with the DVDs. I love Christopher Nolan's "let's do it for real!" philosophy. You can really tell he stands out from other directors because of tha One of my most favorite movie trilogies along with one of my favorite movies (The Dark Knight Rises). This was terrific to read and enjoy. I started this book while I was flying to Iceland and got to see some of the filming locations there from Batman Begins. I love all the details. This book is essentially the special features disc that you don't get with the DVDs. I love Christopher Nolan's "let's do it for real!" philosophy. You can really tell he stands out from other directors because of that desire. The organization was a little off for my liking. I would have liked more chronological order of events-which they did for a few chapters but then they'd talk about other subjects, like special effects, props, etc even though they had mentioned some of that in the chronological section. So some just got repetitive. The music section got shafted and was way short, but I guess how much can you talk about it without hearing what they're saying. I love that these films spanned around 8 years in the making. You can see the change over time especially in how people responded to them. Allowed for a natural growth.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Oscar

    Great behind the scenes photos and a few wonderful set anecdotes, but it is all couched by some run of the mill and repetitive text/captions.

  15. 4 out of 5

    M.i.

    I was really impressed by how much went into this trilogy and the minimal use of green screen technology.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ritojeet Basu

    No one makes 'em like Nolan No one makes 'em like Nolan

  17. 4 out of 5

    Art of the Film

    For photos/video of this book, please visit my blog: http://www.movieartbook.com/2015/04/r... As a big fan of what Mr. Nolan has done with the Batman character in his "Dark Knight Trilogy", this book is 300+ pages of pure joy! Every aspect of the filmmaking process is detailed in the book, accompanied by hundreds of photos (many of which I have never seen published before). Here are the Chapters contained in the book: 1. Screenplay - how the concept of the films was born with Nolan & David Goyer, w For photos/video of this book, please visit my blog: http://www.movieartbook.com/2015/04/r... As a big fan of what Mr. Nolan has done with the Batman character in his "Dark Knight Trilogy", this book is 300+ pages of pure joy! Every aspect of the filmmaking process is detailed in the book, accompanied by hundreds of photos (many of which I have never seen published before). Here are the Chapters contained in the book: 1. Screenplay - how the concept of the films was born with Nolan & David Goyer, writing the scripts, and taking inspiration from the comics when crafting the story. 2. Production Design - building the sets, scouting & dressing locations, designing Batman's vehicles. Includes some concept art. 3. Cast - casting the characters, insight into the actors' process. One of the best aspects of the films is that Nolan assembles a very strong cast, even in smaller supporting roles. Obviously, much of the focus is placed on selecting Christian Bale to play Bruce Wayne. 4. Costumes & Makeup - discussion about the costumes of the film, including plenty of costume sketches. Includes detail about the evolution of Batman's suit, the Joker's makeup, Bane's mask, etc. 5. The Shoot: Batman Begins - a chronicle of the 129-day shoot, Nolan's directing style, filming on location, shooting the Tumbler chase, etc 6. The Shoot: The Dark Knight - filming in Chicago, IMAX cameras, the hospital explosion, etc. 7. The Shoot: The Dark Knight Rises - filming in Pittsburgh and India, shooting the opening plane sequence practically, destroying a football stadium, etc. 8. Special Effects & Stunts - insight into the stunt work with effects coordinator Chris Corbould. This covers most of the big fight sequences and stunts in the three films and how they were achieved. 9. Editing, Music, and Sound - Lee Smith on editing the films, and specifically how be cut effectively between parallel story lines and action. Scoring the film, including quotes from composers Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard. Designing the film's sounds and mixing them effectively with the music (they discuss the clarity issue of Bane's voice). 10. Visual Effects - It seems like these films used every method of visual effects available, from models and miniatures to computer-generated effects. Specific topics include creating digital bats and the monorail crash in Batman Begins, the ferry boat sequence from The Dark Knight, and the stadium explosions in The Dark Knight Rises. 11. Marketing - A discussion about the promotion of the films. This includes traditional methods like posters (with over a dozen poster images in the book) to the unique "viral marketing" that emphasized social media to get the audience to participate in the marketing. Other topics include screening the IMAX prologues and San Diego Comic-Con. The book also includes a foreword by Christopher Nolan and an introduction by Michael Caine. Also, printed at the end of the book is a tribute that Nolan wrote about Heath Ledger, titled "Charisma as Natural as Gravity" (originally published in Newsweek in 2008). This is the best book about the Batman films I have ever seen, and it is one of the best "making of" movie books in general. The detail in both the text and the photographs is very impressive, and I am so excited to be able to have this wonderful book in my collection.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Parka

    (More pictures on my blog) This is the making-of rather than an art-and-making-of book. So you're not going to see a lot of art. The only other artbook for the Dark Knight trilogy was The Art of Batman Begins and that wasn't very good in terms of art and content. Having said all that, this is a great movie companion book. It covers in detail all the three films and the complete production process. You get to read about the screenplay, production design, casting, use of visual and special effects, m (More pictures on my blog) This is the making-of rather than an art-and-making-of book. So you're not going to see a lot of art. The only other artbook for the Dark Knight trilogy was The Art of Batman Begins and that wasn't very good in terms of art and content. Having said all that, this is a great movie companion book. It covers in detail all the three films and the complete production process. You get to read about the screenplay, production design, casting, use of visual and special effects, music and marketing. The book is packed with nice photos of the set, actors, props and vehicles, and some art illustrations. There are chapters for the shooting of each film which I thought was short considering the length of the movies. Still, it provides great insight into how the movie was shot, and the little clues were put into each film to tie them together. You get a sense of Christopher Nolan's film making philosophy, and understand how the film was directed. He has done an incredible job portraying on big screen one of the most recognisable comic characters. There are lots of interesting information throughout the book. Like how Anne Hathaway dressed up as Harley Quinn during a casting meeting because she misread the script, or why Nolan even considered using actual bats but ultimately turned to animated ones. Of all the books relating to the Dark Knight trilogy, this is probably the best. Highly recommended for fans of the movies. It's a terrific deal for a 304-page hardcover.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Denis

    I found this to be an interesting read. If you are a fan of little tidbits of information about anything, especially of Batman or Christopher Nolan, you will get into this book. This book is an overview of how the Dark Knight series was created, and at times it goes into details on how the movies were created, more importantly, why they were created, and what the thought process of not only the director but the actors themselves were. You get plenty of pics, many of which are off camera pics and I found this to be an interesting read. If you are a fan of little tidbits of information about anything, especially of Batman or Christopher Nolan, you will get into this book. This book is an overview of how the Dark Knight series was created, and at times it goes into details on how the movies were created, more importantly, why they were created, and what the thought process of not only the director but the actors themselves were. You get plenty of pics, many of which are off camera pics and a lot of behind the scenes pictures as well. It was fascinating to see how Harvey Dent was half normal and half burnt and scarred. The book went into some details about how Heath Ledger approached the Joker, but this was the part of the book that was a bit of a disappointment to me. I honestly got more details online than I got in this book about the Joker. The Author focused a lot on the 3rd film, "The Dark Knight Rises". And really does not explain why the 3rd film overshadows the first two. One of the neat aspects of this book is how it is organized. The author takes you from locations, to what actors were chosen and why to wardrobe and makeup, etc. etc. The Categorization in this book made it easy to read and easy to follow along in the progression of Christopher Nolan's thinking. Is this book worth the read? I believe it is. I would recommend it. It is a good insider's look into the world Christopher Nolan created.

  20. 4 out of 5

    RumBelle

    Christian Bale was, and probably always will be, my favorite Batman, and Christopher Nolan's trilogy was just a masterwork. This book explored all three movies in enjoyable depth. Character, setting, special effects, stunts, it was all talked about. I loved hearing from the actors (and Michael Caine's introduction was wonderful), it really showed how much making these movies meant to them, and how thrilled they were. You got to read about how each of them viewed their characters, and the comic bo Christian Bale was, and probably always will be, my favorite Batman, and Christopher Nolan's trilogy was just a masterwork. This book explored all three movies in enjoyable depth. Character, setting, special effects, stunts, it was all talked about. I loved hearing from the actors (and Michael Caine's introduction was wonderful), it really showed how much making these movies meant to them, and how thrilled they were. You got to read about how each of them viewed their characters, and the comic book mythology surrounding them. Learning about the technical side of making these films was fascinating as well. One thing that really stuck out for me was what the cast and crew had to do for the Christian Bale, Liam Neeson fight on the glacier. How quickly that could have turned to disaster! So much goes into making films like these, and learning the little details was enjoyable. The photography, and movie process drawings were interesting as well. Seeing visuals of what the book discusses, and various types of onset photos was fun. A wonderful book for a true Batman fan, or one that just loved these films.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Annikin

    Incredibly interesting to someone who loved the trilogy and enjoys reading about behind the scenes stuff. Especially the production design, cast and costumes&make-up sections were fascinating. The only problem that I had with it was that the book must have been written while the Dark Knight Rises was still in cinemas so they didn't go that much into detail as with the two previous films, perhaps because they don't want to spoil people. There was plenty of text about the Joker that I liked, but n Incredibly interesting to someone who loved the trilogy and enjoys reading about behind the scenes stuff. Especially the production design, cast and costumes&make-up sections were fascinating. The only problem that I had with it was that the book must have been written while the Dark Knight Rises was still in cinemas so they didn't go that much into detail as with the two previous films, perhaps because they don't want to spoil people. There was plenty of text about the Joker that I liked, but not nearly enough of Catwoman or Miranda Tate. There was also so much praise in the quotes that I got the impression that Christopher Nolan must be some kind of a god. Ok.

  22. 5 out of 5

    A.D. Croucher

    This is full of great insights into the mind of one of the greatest storytellers in movies, Christopher Nolan. It's a deep dive into the three movies, from breaking the story for each one in Nolan's converted garage-office, following each movie all the way through writing the scripts, and into production. The astonishing level of detail makes this a nerdy/geeky goldmine. Luckily, that's exactly my cup of tea. :) This is full of great insights into the mind of one of the greatest storytellers in movies, Christopher Nolan. It's a deep dive into the three movies, from breaking the story for each one in Nolan's converted garage-office, following each movie all the way through writing the scripts, and into production. The astonishing level of detail makes this a nerdy/geeky goldmine. Luckily, that's exactly my cup of tea. :)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brannigan

    The photographs are great and there's some fun and interesting facts. However I still feel like I was kept at arm's length. I never felt like I learned the how's and whys of the film or the creators of the film. There's still so much I'd like to know about what was going on, why they did or didn't do certain things in the film. It's like reading a children's book on lightning. There's cool pictures and you learn some things you didn't know, but you don't learn everything you were hoping for. The photographs are great and there's some fun and interesting facts. However I still feel like I was kept at arm's length. I never felt like I learned the how's and whys of the film or the creators of the film. There's still so much I'd like to know about what was going on, why they did or didn't do certain things in the film. It's like reading a children's book on lightning. There's cool pictures and you learn some things you didn't know, but you don't learn everything you were hoping for.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Monica Williams

    Honestly I thought I would end up treating this book like a coffee table book, something to be flipped through for the picture and then left. I found myself starting to read and I really enjoyed hearing about all the ins and outs and technicalities of filming the Batman trilogy. It was actually pretty cool and interesting. For anyone who enjoyed the movie or likes behind the scenes trivia give it a try.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    Was going to rate this 4 stars, but after reading what Nolan said about Heath Ledger in the Afterword, I got all emotional and shit. Good book, a lot of the material you may have heard already, except some of the stunt stuff, what they did during the writing process, etc. Interesting book for those who love the trilogy.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    If you're a die hard Batman fan. this is the book for You. It gives tons of little details from the filming of the Dark Knight trilogy. The film stills alone are worth checking out in this beautifully constructed book. some details are a bit boring, and can pretty much skipped. but others such as, the cast, the interviews, and etc.. are very interesting. If you're a die hard Batman fan. this is the book for You. It gives tons of little details from the filming of the Dark Knight trilogy. The film stills alone are worth checking out in this beautifully constructed book. some details are a bit boring, and can pretty much skipped. but others such as, the cast, the interviews, and etc.. are very interesting.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Good resource about the trilogy. The photos are incredible and high-quality. That said, the content of how the film-makers went about making and filming the trilogy was a tad generic and superficial. But still worth a read just to get immersed in the Batman universe.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    The essential guide to learn the productive process of making the whole trilogy of Batman with the helm of Christopher Nolan. Impressive photos, detailed info and inspiring writing. A jewel in any collection of Batman's fans and/or Christopher Nolan's work. The essential guide to learn the productive process of making the whole trilogy of Batman with the helm of Christopher Nolan. Impressive photos, detailed info and inspiring writing. A jewel in any collection of Batman's fans and/or Christopher Nolan's work.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Cooke

    I learned a lot about each film in this book, it very detailed and made me respect the trilogy even more than before. My only dilemma is they made The Dark Knight Rises seem many times better than the first two when to me, it was a little bit underwhelming.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Charity U

    I love movie guides! This one was full of pictures and filming details. I enjoyed it quite a bit -- though not as much as I would have if I'd seen the first and third movies. All I've seen thus far is the second. But it was intersting anyway! I love movie guides! This one was full of pictures and filming details. I enjoyed it quite a bit -- though not as much as I would have if I'd seen the first and third movies. All I've seen thus far is the second. But it was intersting anyway!

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