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Wanting Women: An Anthology of Erotic Lesbian Poetry

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36 review for Wanting Women: An Anthology of Erotic Lesbian Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

    this collection showed a range of domesticity and lust and love that tried to finger the pulse of wanting women not as an emotion but as a lifestyle. the quiet portrayals of time in the sheets after laundry day or the jazz of loving someone even more on errand day were, to me, the sweetest parts of all. A snippet from "Next Time You're Bleeding and Convinced I Don't Love You" "Imagine yourself a cat in the sun, nothing to do but feel yourself loved, taken up in a stratosphere of warmth and peace, n this collection showed a range of domesticity and lust and love that tried to finger the pulse of wanting women not as an emotion but as a lifestyle. the quiet portrayals of time in the sheets after laundry day or the jazz of loving someone even more on errand day were, to me, the sweetest parts of all. A snippet from "Next Time You're Bleeding and Convinced I Don't Love You" "Imagine yourself a cat in the sun, nothing to do but feel yourself loved, taken up in a stratosphere of warmth and peace, no sound but the purr in your throat fills the heat and light around you because I love you"

  2. 4 out of 5

    Danah Slade

    3.5 stars. A magnificent anthology of writing from many interesting and successful female poets. This book went out-of-print a good while ago. I would die to get my hands on a physical copy, good luck to anyone who might attempt to. At the moment I keep borrowing it out (digitally) through an online library. I can’t get enough of so many of the poems featured in this collection. But I rated it 3.5 stars because I felt like some poems (even from different poets) seemed quite repetitive in their im 3.5 stars. A magnificent anthology of writing from many interesting and successful female poets. This book went out-of-print a good while ago. I would die to get my hands on a physical copy, good luck to anyone who might attempt to. At the moment I keep borrowing it out (digitally) through an online library. I can’t get enough of so many of the poems featured in this collection. But I rated it 3.5 stars because I felt like some poems (even from different poets) seemed quite repetitive in their imagery and metaphors. There could have been more racial diversity and I would have liked to have seen at least 2 or 3 poems written by Leslea Newman and Darcie. A few poets got featured more than once but sadly not them, they’re my favourites. Although, I did think one part of Newman’s poem, a bit negligent of women who identify as asexual. Even though this book is centred around erotica and obviously targeted at those interested in it, I still felt it wouldn’t have been too much effort to change the wording a little as not to disregard a sexual identity. Overall, this book great at helping me to understand and write about the intimacy between women. I applaud it on being one of very few poetry books I can find on the subject. And I hope that more books like this can be published in the future to help abolish the shame and taboo around experiencing pleasure as a woman, especially in a queer relationship.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stephani

    Out-of-print, early anthology of lesbian poetry. It has work by a lot of poets who've gone on to become great names. For example, it has two poems of Marilyn Hacker from "Love, Death and the Changing of the Seasons"; there's also work from the late Tee Corinne, Lesléa Newman and Joan Nestle. The book is nowhere near the quality of the great collection "My Lover is a Woman," but it predates that one by almost 10 years, so that can be forgiven. However, ethnic diversity in this collection is on a t Out-of-print, early anthology of lesbian poetry. It has work by a lot of poets who've gone on to become great names. For example, it has two poems of Marilyn Hacker from "Love, Death and the Changing of the Seasons"; there's also work from the late Tee Corinne, Lesléa Newman and Joan Nestle. The book is nowhere near the quality of the great collection "My Lover is a Woman," but it predates that one by almost 10 years, so that can be forgiven. However, ethnic diversity in this collection is on a token level, and that's kind of hard to forgive: Only one poet identifies herself as African American in the author bios, and there's only one Latina; no one identifies as Asian American; one woman says she works in the Yukon for "Native rights," so she may be a First Nations member. There are five Jewish women and two women who self-identify as disabled. The fact that there's nothing in here by Audre Lorde (!) or Pat Parker is really unforgivable, even with this early book. In the end, this book is probably most valuable as a historical artifact--I'll bet there were no other books like it published before.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tabi

    Very, ahem..., to the point poetry ;)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lisa M.

    I purchased this during my annual birthday book haul at the used bookstore. Poetry anthologies that revolve around a theme (especially a sociocultural theme) can be hit or miss when it comes to the quality of the writing. The included writing is not always based on merit, but how it represents the group. All voices are important and valuable. That just means that while you read such books and learn about different people's lives, you may read poetry that is not up to your critical standards. I g I purchased this during my annual birthday book haul at the used bookstore. Poetry anthologies that revolve around a theme (especially a sociocultural theme) can be hit or miss when it comes to the quality of the writing. The included writing is not always based on merit, but how it represents the group. All voices are important and valuable. That just means that while you read such books and learn about different people's lives, you may read poetry that is not up to your critical standards. I go back and fourth about the value of these books. Should writing be published based on identity or experience alone? Part of me says yes, another no. But I always like to pick up older queer books. It's like having a piece of history in your hands. The quality of the poetry in this anthology varies drastically. There was some beautiful, moving writing. My favorite poems are about half way through the book and one comes after the other: "Litany" and "Spontaneous Combustion." Other poems are more pedestrian and have beautiful moments. Some are bad in a humorous way; have you ever read a poem that compares a head of lettuce to a vagina? I am sympathetic to the authors because it can be difficult to write about sexuality, sex, and sensuality without coming off as cheesy or stereotypical. Many of the poems, not necessarily bad, struggled to bring anything unique to sex. The fact that there are several such poems in the collection makes it repetitive at times. I found this collection interesting because I went on to look up the authors in it to see who had continued publishing on a book level. It provides an interesting insight as to who professionally succeeded and who didn't. But that brings us back to the "good" vs "expressive" debate about poetry anyway. Perhaps a writer's success is not the quality/professional record but the experience of writing in itself.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nairy Fstukh

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robert Costic

  8. 4 out of 5

    Winnipeg Mosquito

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kaddis

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ted

  11. 4 out of 5

    orchid

  12. 5 out of 5

    Veronika

  13. 4 out of 5

    Johnnie Hayes

  14. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gay City LGBTQ Library

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mellissa Herbin

  17. 4 out of 5

    Motsei

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jasper

  19. 4 out of 5

    K.h.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tori Das

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Stangl

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  24. 5 out of 5

    Despy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kagiso

  26. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Alexandre

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anika

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ceri Bailey

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tera

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  31. 4 out of 5

    Saruta Valentine

  32. 4 out of 5

    Rae

  33. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon

  34. 4 out of 5

    Mack

  35. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

  36. 4 out of 5

    Bhavika

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