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The Transformers Classics, Volume 3

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The historic comic book roots of The Transformers are re-presented for maximum Cybertronian enjoyment. Collecting issues #26-38 from the original run, rejoin Optimus Prime, Megatron, and their competing factions as their war stretches across the cosmos. Freshly re-mastered and re-colored, these stories are accompanied by an in-depth introduction as well as select issue not The historic comic book roots of The Transformers are re-presented for maximum Cybertronian enjoyment. Collecting issues #26-38 from the original run, rejoin Optimus Prime, Megatron, and their competing factions as their war stretches across the cosmos. Freshly re-mastered and re-colored, these stories are accompanied by an in-depth introduction as well as select issue notes by Mark W. Bellomo.


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The historic comic book roots of The Transformers are re-presented for maximum Cybertronian enjoyment. Collecting issues #26-38 from the original run, rejoin Optimus Prime, Megatron, and their competing factions as their war stretches across the cosmos. Freshly re-mastered and re-colored, these stories are accompanied by an in-depth introduction as well as select issue not The historic comic book roots of The Transformers are re-presented for maximum Cybertronian enjoyment. Collecting issues #26-38 from the original run, rejoin Optimus Prime, Megatron, and their competing factions as their war stretches across the cosmos. Freshly re-mastered and re-colored, these stories are accompanied by an in-depth introduction as well as select issue notes by Mark W. Bellomo.

30 review for The Transformers Classics, Volume 3

  1. 4 out of 5

    Fizzgig76

    Reprints The Transformers (Marvel) #26-38 (March 1987-March 1988). Optimus Prime is dead and now the Autobots have a new leader in the Dinobot Grimlock…and not everyone is happy about it. As the Decepticons continue their attacks, the Autobots find themselves fractured and once important team members Goldbug and Blaster set out on their own to battle the Decepticons. As the danger to humans grows, the Autobots must decide if they are there to defend humanity or if humanity has become a distracti Reprints The Transformers (Marvel) #26-38 (March 1987-March 1988). Optimus Prime is dead and now the Autobots have a new leader in the Dinobot Grimlock…and not everyone is happy about it. As the Decepticons continue their attacks, the Autobots find themselves fractured and once important team members Goldbug and Blaster set out on their own to battle the Decepticons. As the danger to humans grows, the Autobots must decide if they are there to defend humanity or if humanity has become a distraction to their battle. Plus, the Autobots go international as a story from London of a Man of Iron finds himself in battle. Written primarily by Bob Budiansky, The Transformers Classics—Volume 3 continues IDW’s reprinting of Marvel Comics classic series The Transformers which began in the ’80s with the arrival of the toys from Japan. The collection also includes The Transformers #33-34 (October 1987-November 1987) which reprinted the UK four part story “Man of Iron” which originally ran in Transformers magazine #9-12 (January 12, 1985-March 8, 1985). This section of The Transformers feels pretty original. Previous issues felt a lot like the popular cartoon that was prevalent in the ’80s, but this volume takes the story a different direction with the death of Optimus Prime in the last collection. The story here finds the unlikely leader in Grimlock…the dense T-Rex Dinobot. The plans of the Autobots shift radically and most of the members find themselves not liking Grimlock’s rule which is closer to Megatron than Optimus Prime. It is an interesting twist on a story, but unfortunately, the story feels pretty shattered and unbalanced due to individual stand-alone issues…this series does better as a serial. Another bright spot in this collection is the two UK issues collecting the “Man of Iron” storyline. It is loose adaptation of Ted Hughes’ The Iron Man which formed the basis for The Iron Giant and has a boy befriending an Autobot. It also has some great art by John Ridgway. Unfortunately, missing from this collection is the four issue The Transformers: Headmasters series which ran from July 1987 to January 1988. The last few issues of the series deals with the Headmasters’ arrival on Earth and without some knowledge of who they are, a bunch of new Autobots and Decepticons show up (along with Buster Witwicky’s older brother Spike). It would have been nice if these issues were included…or at least a short supplement volume. The art in general is pretty strong for what it is. Drawing robots that look like existing toys can’t be easy, and it is awful hard to give robots (sometimes without mouths) personality. The writers and artist for this series struggle with this and it comes off so-so here. The Transformers Classics—Volume 3 is a must for fans of the Transformers. If you think you grew up with the Transformers watching the cartoon, check out these collections for a different spin on the characters that you thought you knew. The Transformers Classics—Volume 3 is followed The Transformer Classics—Volume 4.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sean Chick

    Reading this again I recalled why I gave up on the series back in 2010. There are some good moments. Grimlock as leader is chaotic and psychotic fun and the funeral of Optimus Prime is first rate. However, things seem to be losing focus here. Ratbat is an odd choice for major villain, the headmasters are rather stupid, and there is a random throwback UK story, weird in its tone and out of place. Also, the series is flipping between story arcs, a sign of exhaustion and boredom by the creative tea Reading this again I recalled why I gave up on the series back in 2010. There are some good moments. Grimlock as leader is chaotic and psychotic fun and the funeral of Optimus Prime is first rate. However, things seem to be losing focus here. Ratbat is an odd choice for major villain, the headmasters are rather stupid, and there is a random throwback UK story, weird in its tone and out of place. Also, the series is flipping between story arcs, a sign of exhaustion and boredom by the creative team. There are enough high points to keep me wondering about volume IV, but I can see this is where Budiansky started to get worn out.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jay Gabler

    There’s some absolutely insane new gimmicky group of toys introduced practically every issue, and I am 100% here for it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kavinay

    Car wash of Doom.

  5. 4 out of 5

    James Zanghi

    Optimus Prime and Megatron are dead and now Grimlock rules the Autobots, but not everyone is quite content with his rule. As the Autobots attempt to carry on without Optimus and survive under the stubborn Grimlock's rougher rule and code of conduct, the Decepticons continue to cause troubles by uniting under the rule of Shockwave who is encountering trouble back home on Cybertron with the Decepticon Banker, Rat-Bat. An interesting follow-up to the spectacular Volume One and Two of Transformers Cl Optimus Prime and Megatron are dead and now Grimlock rules the Autobots, but not everyone is quite content with his rule. As the Autobots attempt to carry on without Optimus and survive under the stubborn Grimlock's rougher rule and code of conduct, the Decepticons continue to cause troubles by uniting under the rule of Shockwave who is encountering trouble back home on Cybertron with the Decepticon Banker, Rat-Bat. An interesting follow-up to the spectacular Volume One and Two of Transformers Classics and we continue to see interesting villains appear like the Mechanic, who kidnaps Ratchet while he is out looking for spare parts, and the return of G.B. Blackrock, who is basically the Tony Stark of Marvel Transformers and who is forced to team up with Ratbat to start controlling the Earth. Meanwhile, Buster Witwicky and his older brother Spike return and Spike has a life changing encounter with the Headmasters while Blaster and Goldbug go rogue after being fed up with Grimlock's brutal rule over the Autobots. Like I said, this is an interesting follow-up to Volume Two and it basically covers the aftermath and fallout over Prime and Megatron's deaths. To act as filler, also, they added some of the UK classics which should be basically disregarded as they are a separate franchise. The major thing to notice in the book is Grimlock's descent into madness. He starts off, interestingly, with the ability to talk normally and upon being appointed the new leader of the Autobots, he begins to grow more and more caveman-ish like his cartoon characters incarnation. The book ends with a bunch of cliffhangers like Spike Witwicky becoming the new leader of the Headmasters and Blaster surrendering to Grimlock in order to protect children from his wrath, leaving me hungrier than a Sharkticon for more. Fortunately, I had Volume Four and Five on order when I finished reading this.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    For a comic driven by a toy company's mandate to introduce (and sell) as many action figures as possible, created by professional writers and artists who likely has bigger ambitions that working on a licensed toy comic but were sufficiently pragmatic to accept a paycheck, this is a decent comic. Despite being sometimes cheesy and confusing, a few broad strokes and big ideas shine through - enough to make you realize why kids of a certain age ate this stuff up. I only dabbled in the comics, havin For a comic driven by a toy company's mandate to introduce (and sell) as many action figures as possible, created by professional writers and artists who likely has bigger ambitions that working on a licensed toy comic but were sufficiently pragmatic to accept a paycheck, this is a decent comic. Despite being sometimes cheesy and confusing, a few broad strokes and big ideas shine through - enough to make you realize why kids of a certain age ate this stuff up. I only dabbled in the comics, having been mostly a huge fan of the cartoons as a child, but I would've gone nuts for the dissension in the Autobot ranks in these issues. A pleasant, nostalgia-based read for those of us of that age.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John Robinson

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nickelby Thane

  9. 4 out of 5

    Wes Lowery

  10. 4 out of 5

    David

  11. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sevan Paris

  13. 5 out of 5

    Devi

  14. 4 out of 5

    Will Griffin

  15. 4 out of 5

    Abhi

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tim Hayes

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ayden Kniola

  18. 5 out of 5

    S.A. Hopkins

  19. 5 out of 5

    Faizal

  20. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Goodchild

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  22. 4 out of 5

    Adam Caylor

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  24. 4 out of 5

    Damian Hoeft

  25. 5 out of 5

    Victor

  26. 5 out of 5

    T Icon

  27. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Terracio

  28. 4 out of 5

    Celina Carriere

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tomasz Kowalik

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