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The Eyes Of The Fleet: A Popular History Of Frigates And Frigate Captains, 1793 1815

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Frigates were the fastest warships in the British fleet in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the key to Britain's long dominance over the world's other navies. These scouting cruisers were, according to Nelson, "the eyes of the Fleet." But they were much more than that: true fighting ships, lightly built and heavily armed, ready for every task short of jo Frigates were the fastest warships in the British fleet in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the key to Britain's long dominance over the world's other navies. These scouting cruisers were, according to Nelson, "the eyes of the Fleet." But they were much more than that: true fighting ships, lightly built and heavily armed, ready for every task short of joining the set-piece battles involving the heavier ships-of-the-line. From the bloody 1797 mutiny of the HMS Hermione crew, who murdered Captain Hugh Pigot and tossed him overboard after eight months of brutality, to the 1813 battle between the British frigate Shannon and the American Chesapeake in which the Chesapeake's Captain James Lawrence uttered the famous phrase, "Don't give up the ship!" The Eyes of the Fleet gives us the absorbing story of the men who worked the frigates during their heyday, and recounts with thrilling detail some of the most influential and exciting battles in naval history.


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Frigates were the fastest warships in the British fleet in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the key to Britain's long dominance over the world's other navies. These scouting cruisers were, according to Nelson, "the eyes of the Fleet." But they were much more than that: true fighting ships, lightly built and heavily armed, ready for every task short of jo Frigates were the fastest warships in the British fleet in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the key to Britain's long dominance over the world's other navies. These scouting cruisers were, according to Nelson, "the eyes of the Fleet." But they were much more than that: true fighting ships, lightly built and heavily armed, ready for every task short of joining the set-piece battles involving the heavier ships-of-the-line. From the bloody 1797 mutiny of the HMS Hermione crew, who murdered Captain Hugh Pigot and tossed him overboard after eight months of brutality, to the 1813 battle between the British frigate Shannon and the American Chesapeake in which the Chesapeake's Captain James Lawrence uttered the famous phrase, "Don't give up the ship!" The Eyes of the Fleet gives us the absorbing story of the men who worked the frigates during their heyday, and recounts with thrilling detail some of the most influential and exciting battles in naval history.

31 review for The Eyes Of The Fleet: A Popular History Of Frigates And Frigate Captains, 1793 1815

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    Exceedingly diverting and eminently readable - with both leadership lessons and insights into the notion of "power projection" relevant today. Exceedingly diverting and eminently readable - with both leadership lessons and insights into the notion of "power projection" relevant today.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stefan

  3. 5 out of 5

    John Silbersack

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  5. 5 out of 5

    Charley Walker

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jampa Wangpo

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nick O'doherty

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vendimia

  9. 5 out of 5

    David Dollis

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sam Stauder

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tobias H Cook

  12. 4 out of 5

    Philip

  13. 4 out of 5

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  14. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  15. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rosina Lippi

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jfarley

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ray Berard

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mike Evans

  21. 5 out of 5

    AlegnaB †

  22. 5 out of 5

    Len

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  26. 5 out of 5

    William

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brent Marshall

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ed

  30. 5 out of 5

    Susanne

  31. 5 out of 5

    James Eardley

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