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Snake Oil: The Art of Healing and Truth-Telling

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"In the world of snake oils, you have to see the world a little differently. Where others see poverty, you see riches; where others see weeds, you see flowers; where others see sickness, you see openness." Becca Stevens calls herself a "snake oil seller": She takes natural oils, mixes them with a good story, sells them in an open market and believes they help to heal the "In the world of snake oils, you have to see the world a little differently. Where others see poverty, you see riches; where others see weeds, you see flowers; where others see sickness, you see openness." Becca Stevens calls herself a "snake oil seller": She takes natural oils, mixes them with a good story, sells them in an open market and believes they help to heal the world. Becca is the founder of Thistle Farms, one of the most successful examples in the US of a social enterprise whose mission is the work force. She is also the founder of its residential program, Magdalene. The women of Magdalene/Thistle Farms have survived prostitution, trafficking and addiction, and the natural body care products they manufacture-balms, soaps, and lotions-aid in their own healing as well as that of the people who buy them. The book weaves together the beginnings of the enterprise with individual stories from Becca's own journey as well as 20 women in the community. In Snake Oil, Becca tells how the women she began helping fifteen years ago have been the biggest source of her own healing from sexual abuse and her father's death as a child. Wise and reflective, Snake Oil offers an empowering narrative as well as a selection of recipes for healing remedies that readers can make themselves.


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"In the world of snake oils, you have to see the world a little differently. Where others see poverty, you see riches; where others see weeds, you see flowers; where others see sickness, you see openness." Becca Stevens calls herself a "snake oil seller": She takes natural oils, mixes them with a good story, sells them in an open market and believes they help to heal the "In the world of snake oils, you have to see the world a little differently. Where others see poverty, you see riches; where others see weeds, you see flowers; where others see sickness, you see openness." Becca Stevens calls herself a "snake oil seller": She takes natural oils, mixes them with a good story, sells them in an open market and believes they help to heal the world. Becca is the founder of Thistle Farms, one of the most successful examples in the US of a social enterprise whose mission is the work force. She is also the founder of its residential program, Magdalene. The women of Magdalene/Thistle Farms have survived prostitution, trafficking and addiction, and the natural body care products they manufacture-balms, soaps, and lotions-aid in their own healing as well as that of the people who buy them. The book weaves together the beginnings of the enterprise with individual stories from Becca's own journey as well as 20 women in the community. In Snake Oil, Becca tells how the women she began helping fifteen years ago have been the biggest source of her own healing from sexual abuse and her father's death as a child. Wise and reflective, Snake Oil offers an empowering narrative as well as a selection of recipes for healing remedies that readers can make themselves.

30 review for Snake Oil: The Art of Healing and Truth-Telling

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    First let me say I highly respect the ministry that Stevens is involved in. There's nothing more important than lives being changed for the better. I'm a fiction junkie so I couldn't quite make my self finish the book. Some truly heartwarming testimonies are shared. You can't help feeling moved when she shares the story of the nurse, her miscarriage and her mother getting sick all on the same day. It truly showed how Gods timing is perfect. I really didn't know what this book was about. To be ho First let me say I highly respect the ministry that Stevens is involved in. There's nothing more important than lives being changed for the better. I'm a fiction junkie so I couldn't quite make my self finish the book. Some truly heartwarming testimonies are shared. You can't help feeling moved when she shares the story of the nurse, her miscarriage and her mother getting sick all on the same day. It truly showed how Gods timing is perfect. I really didn't know what this book was about. To be honest I was pulled in by the title and book cover! For some this will be a great read for me it just was so-so.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Marmion

    I really loved this book. I'm not religious but Beccas faith was real, deep-rooted, and inspirational nonetheless. Regardless of being Christian or not. The core value in this book is something everyone should heed - Love heals all. And we should love each other and ourselves as we would love the divine. Each chapter had a recipe which I thought was a nice touch. Becca wove healing lessons with humbling stories from her own experiences. All in all this was a great read that left me feeling inspi I really loved this book. I'm not religious but Beccas faith was real, deep-rooted, and inspirational nonetheless. Regardless of being Christian or not. The core value in this book is something everyone should heed - Love heals all. And we should love each other and ourselves as we would love the divine. Each chapter had a recipe which I thought was a nice touch. Becca wove healing lessons with humbling stories from her own experiences. All in all this was a great read that left me feeling inspired to do what I can as an individual to make the world a better place one person at a time. She mentions how it is easy to despair with tragedies all over the world and in our own lives, but if we can all focus on love for ourselves and each other, collectively we really can make the world a better place on our own individual levels.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alex Parrish

    Mesmerizing. I’ve been one of those people in the past who think essential oils are the tools of people who keep their head in some kind of goofy cloud, and this book certainly shows a far more human side of that industry than I ever imagined. I won’t be abandoning Excedrin totally, but one thing Becca Stevens does that I can’t pull away from: she shows the sacramental moments available in human stories, in suffering, and in the harvesting of weeds. It’s poetic, truly. This book to me is a strik Mesmerizing. I’ve been one of those people in the past who think essential oils are the tools of people who keep their head in some kind of goofy cloud, and this book certainly shows a far more human side of that industry than I ever imagined. I won’t be abandoning Excedrin totally, but one thing Becca Stevens does that I can’t pull away from: she shows the sacramental moments available in human stories, in suffering, and in the harvesting of weeds. It’s poetic, truly. This book to me is a striking testament to the intersection of the human and the divine, woven through stories that celebrate ancient arts, calling us to live fully in the journey of healing as equally as we anticipate be cured.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    If I were rating what I think of the ministry provided through Thistle Farms, this would be a 5 star review. The recipes telling how to make a different oil at the beginning of each chapter and the information about how to best use it, is good. Parts of the story are also interesting but I found a lot of this book to be sort of,,boring.I kept finding myself reading a short story or magazine article and leaving this book on my nightstand.As I said, this is a great ministry and I bet I would like If I were rating what I think of the ministry provided through Thistle Farms, this would be a 5 star review. The recipes telling how to make a different oil at the beginning of each chapter and the information about how to best use it, is good. Parts of the story are also interesting but I found a lot of this book to be sort of,,boring.I kept finding myself reading a short story or magazine article and leaving this book on my nightstand.As I said, this is a great ministry and I bet I would like the author if I met her in person. I wanted to like her book more.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David

    I adored this book. Becca Stevens’ writing is honest and insightful and it is so warm in its presentation. I would love to hear her speak in person or even meet her, if I am ever presented with the opportunity. I am a member of the Jewish clergy, and could often relate to her perspective, and other times, she offered me new outlook from her experience and background. I was particularly taken by the prayer of St. Francis that she shared — one that may be commonplace to many a Christian or Catholi I adored this book. Becca Stevens’ writing is honest and insightful and it is so warm in its presentation. I would love to hear her speak in person or even meet her, if I am ever presented with the opportunity. I am a member of the Jewish clergy, and could often relate to her perspective, and other times, she offered me new outlook from her experience and background. I was particularly taken by the prayer of St. Francis that she shared — one that may be commonplace to many a Christian or Catholic, but its universal message spoke to me just as much. I made note of it and will come back to it again. This book was moving and the perfect length — it kept me engaged the entire time.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    “Poverty doesn’t end imagination.” This is an amazing, inspirational book. I’ve never marked in a book that I’m reading yet there were such poignant lines in this book that I had to underline them for myself for the future to reflect on. There are so many lines that I’ve underlined that I can’t include them all. I appreciated the spirituality connected with reality that Becca weaved for the readers. “Love’s path is never straight and it is never easy.” I highly recommend this book to anyone look “Poverty doesn’t end imagination.” This is an amazing, inspirational book. I’ve never marked in a book that I’m reading yet there were such poignant lines in this book that I had to underline them for myself for the future to reflect on. There are so many lines that I’ve underlined that I can’t include them all. I appreciated the spirituality connected with reality that Becca weaved for the readers. “Love’s path is never straight and it is never easy.” I highly recommend this book to anyone looking for an encouraging, loving testament of Grace.

  7. 5 out of 5

    MARY JANE CLARK

    Uplifting! The honesty, the painful truths and the hopes for the future are all to be found here. Becca Stevens must surely be on the road to sainthood . The good works this woman managed, with God's grace and help, are an inspiration to me. Not only will I buy Thistle Farms products, but I will share this book and the stories with many. God bless. Uplifting! The honesty, the painful truths and the hopes for the future are all to be found here. Becca Stevens must surely be on the road to sainthood . The good works this woman managed, with God's grace and help, are an inspiration to me. Not only will I buy Thistle Farms products, but I will share this book and the stories with many. God bless.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gwen Bentley

    I recommend this book highly! For anyone who uses essential oils, there is a great deal of information. Even for those who aren’t oilers, the story is moving and beautifully written. I rarely use this term, but the author is truly a word artist.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Shurden

    Very thought provoking

  10. 4 out of 5

    Noel

    A therapeutic read! I have so much respect for this woman.

  11. 4 out of 5

    George Miller

    Great read

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ginger

    Becca Stevens has started a program for women to escape prostitution. This is her story

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jen Bradbury

    I first heard Becca Stevens speak several years ago at the ELCA's Youth Ministry Extravaganza. That year, she also spoke at the ELCA's triennial Youth Gathering. I was intrigued by her work. She's an Episcopal priest who founded a non-profit, Thistle Farms, dedicated to giving women a second chance. At Thistle Farms, women, many of whom have been on the streets, use thistles – a plant typically despised by farmers – to create beautiful hand lotions and soaps. They redeem the thistles and in the I first heard Becca Stevens speak several years ago at the ELCA's Youth Ministry Extravaganza. That year, she also spoke at the ELCA's triennial Youth Gathering. I was intrigued by her work. She's an Episcopal priest who founded a non-profit, Thistle Farms, dedicated to giving women a second chance. At Thistle Farms, women, many of whom have been on the streets, use thistles – a plant typically despised by farmers – to create beautiful hand lotions and soaps. They redeem the thistles and in the process, their work and community redeems them, bringing them healing and giving them dignity and value, often for the first time in their lives. Since I was a little familiar with Becca's work, I was excited to read her book, Snake Oil: The Art of Healing and Truth Telling. Snake Oil blends Becca's own story with the story of Thistle Farms. Among other things, Snake Oil explains Becca's understanding of healing. According to her, “Healing is grounded in four of love's basic axioms: love is eternal, love is sufficient, love is God unfolding in our lives, and love is not concerned with dogma so much as it is a dogged determination to bloom and speak... The axioms of love are written into the fabric of creation, so it is right that in the fabric we find the gifts we need to heal one another.” The last part of that quote demonstrates one of the many things I love and respect about Becca's work: She deeply values all of creation, even the thistle. For Becca, there's a deep link between healing and faith. In her words, “The suffering of the innocent in the world is not a question to be answered but a space of deep relationship, where God comes out of the whirlwind and you are with God, addressing the deepest issues of life itself... While there may never be an adequate answer to the question of why there's suffering in the world, faith asks us to engage the question deeply and with our whole hearts.” Even so, it can be tempting to devalue our own suffering in comparison to that of others. To that end, Becca says, “I used to wonder if I could ever complain about the suffering I have known in my own life given that it pales in comparison to others' suffering... Now I try to honor the suffering I have known and respect the suffering of others. I try to remember that when I encounter the suffering of others, I am encountering God.” Lest you think that Becca's form of healing is all spiritual, she's also clear that “Healing isn't just physical, emotional, and spiritual, but also economic.” To this end, her description of her ministry at Thistle Farms is fascinating, as she shares countless stories of helping the women there to “find jobs and develop marketable skills.” Though Becca's book isn't a practical how-to guide, she's clear that healing isn't limited to the work she does as a priest nor is it limited to the work non-profits do. Instead, we're all meant to participate in healing rituals. As Becca reminds us, casseroles are “sacraments and tools of healing – an outward and visible sign of the inward and spiritual grace of friendship” and “bonds deepen whenever people share stories with one another.” Without a doubt, Snake Oil is a beautiful read. It's a story of healing, hope, and love that will inspire you to seek healing in your own life and find ways to participate in healing the world around you.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Brazeal

    I am a big fan of Thistle Farms and Becca Stevens. I think the work they do with the women of Nashville is phenomenal. They serve as a such a model of so many elements that we have tried to build at New Friends New Life. This wasn’t exactly what I was thinking and was far more focused on faith-focused theory than the work of TF. Still, I appreciate understanding more about Becca and her background.

  15. 5 out of 5

    CH

    I had the good fortune to meet Episcopal Priest Rev. Becca Stevens recently when she was in town to talk about her work and ministry with Thistle Farms. She has an amazing vision for healing women who have suffered with addiction, abuse and sex trafficking, and she is actually doing the work and changing the world through Thistle Farms. The embodiment of radical love is the foundation of her work: "the most radical love we can know in the world is love without judgment." Snake Oil is part memoir I had the good fortune to meet Episcopal Priest Rev. Becca Stevens recently when she was in town to talk about her work and ministry with Thistle Farms. She has an amazing vision for healing women who have suffered with addiction, abuse and sex trafficking, and she is actually doing the work and changing the world through Thistle Farms. The embodiment of radical love is the foundation of her work: "the most radical love we can know in the world is love without judgment." Snake Oil is part memoir and part call to action to embody love in the world. She begins with her own story of sexual abuse and how she has used her own story and the power of love help other women heal. It's a remarkable story. One of my favorite parts of the book is that every chapter begins with a recipe to make a healing oil, along with suggestions for its use. She reflects, with the heart of a pastor and theologian, upon the meaning of love, the meaning of suffering, the lasting effects of abuse, healing in its myriad embodiments and the promise of healing she has found in the wilderness. On our responsibility to be a healing presence in the world, she writes: "The idea that we are charged with the responsibility to go out to heal the world is an old truth. Most of us are appointed over and over in our lives as we learn more about what the gift of healing looks like for us. We are sent out repeatedly with God's blessing to love. It is a holy journey, and in all faiths we have to make the pilgrimage with practically nothing....We are anointed to go out again and again to try to love the world until we get it right." For Becca Stevens, love will always have the last word. Snake Oil is inspiring. Don't miss it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Quick read. Snake Oil is a a sort of memoir about Becca Stevens and her company Thistle Farms and Magdalene, a residential community she founded. The book is refreshing - Stevens is able to use her negative experiences and turn them into good. Although I understand why Stevens chose the title, I feel as if it could be a little off putting if just looking at the title. There is an overly religious tone to the story as Stevens happens to be an Episcopal priest. Much of it is okay, but sometimes the Quick read. Snake Oil is a a sort of memoir about Becca Stevens and her company Thistle Farms and Magdalene, a residential community she founded. The book is refreshing - Stevens is able to use her negative experiences and turn them into good. Although I understand why Stevens chose the title, I feel as if it could be a little off putting if just looking at the title. There is an overly religious tone to the story as Stevens happens to be an Episcopal priest. Much of it is okay, but sometimes the religious explanations take away from her overall point in the chapter. I am not religious, so it made parts mundane. Some of the chapters could have been more to the point and the book could have been organized better if it was put in a timeline of sorts, it seemed a bit all over the place. Overall, Stevens gives us an explanation of how and why she started her company and community. She explains why and how to use the products that they make. I agree with her that oils can be powerful and used to heal. Although, she focuses more on the spiritual side to oils (oils can be relaxing and I am sure that administered in a certain fashion can aid in healing), I believe she could have focused also on the physical/literal healing that oils can provide. It is without a doubt that Becca Stevens has done an amazing job with her organizations and working to save women in need. It was nice to read such a positive story about actually fixing one of our nation's problems - rehabilitation of those at risk. Page 139. "I believe through love, healing is always possible. I believe healing is possible because love never fails."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    "In the world of snake oils, you have to see the world a little differently. Where others see poverty, you see riches; where others see weeds, you see flowers; where others see sickness, you see openness. • Love has no beginning or ending. • Love is the story of God unfolding in our lives. • Love has no dogma or doctrine, but has a dogged determination to bloom. • Love is sufficient even when I am not.” I had the privilege of hearing Stevens preach at Womankind, a biennial retreat that happens in Ric "In the world of snake oils, you have to see the world a little differently. Where others see poverty, you see riches; where others see weeds, you see flowers; where others see sickness, you see openness. • Love has no beginning or ending. • Love is the story of God unfolding in our lives. • Love has no dogma or doctrine, but has a dogged determination to bloom. • Love is sufficient even when I am not.” I had the privilege of hearing Stevens preach at Womankind, a biennial retreat that happens in Richmond, Virginia. There have been many wonderful women speakers at this event and Stevens was as good as the rest. I find her to be admirable and her call to serve broken and abused women should be emulated in more places. Unfortunately, her book does not do justice to her ministries. I am not sure what Stevens was trying to accomplish with this epistle. Is she trying to teach people how to create healing oils? Does she want her readers to know more about the Thistle Farm and how it serves others? Is this a memoir? It is all of that, but it feels a bit jumbled. I am not sorry to have read Snake Oil, but I wish it had been more focused. To draw attention to the well run ministries of Thistle Farm, Stevens could have been clearer and concentrated on exactly what those ministries do.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meagan

    This book. I loved it. In Snake Oil, Becca Stevens poetically weaves her own story of tragedy, heartbreak, abuse, and healing in with the stories of the women who came to live at Magdalene and work at Thistle Farms. This book is about her own journey of healing, which lead to her to love the women who were being trafficked and abused on the streets of Nashville, to her collaborative work to found Thistle Farms and Magdalene. Throughout this beautiful book, Stevens inserts memories from her past, This book. I loved it. In Snake Oil, Becca Stevens poetically weaves her own story of tragedy, heartbreak, abuse, and healing in with the stories of the women who came to live at Magdalene and work at Thistle Farms. This book is about her own journey of healing, which lead to her to love the women who were being trafficked and abused on the streets of Nashville, to her collaborative work to found Thistle Farms and Magdalene. Throughout this beautiful book, Stevens inserts memories from her past, shared alongside both tragic and heart-warming stories about the women she's come to know along the way, and lessons learned from her travels, with hope interspersed, in each chapter, on every page. Like a good Southerner, Stevens illustrates her insights with a story. While Snake Oil is memorable because of the content, its true power lies in the down-to-earth way she writes: with great care, compassion, reverence, and love for the stories she tells and the women, people, and places to whom they belong. Stevens is a natural wordsmith. It is apparent that every word used and turn of phrase selected was chosen with love and care. This seems consistent with her approach to her vocation and service in love to the world. I can't recommend this book highly enough. Enjoy!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christie Hagerman

    At a time when the fashionable stance in Christian circles is away from tradition and rituals, Becca Stevens is leaning into the past to share the comfort of these familiar things, the value of the tried-and-true. The book blends recipes for natural balms and oils with stories of the author's life and those touched through the ministries she operates. She pulls from the pain of her childhood in order to minister to others, drawing from generations of wisdom in the areas of herbal remedies, touch At a time when the fashionable stance in Christian circles is away from tradition and rituals, Becca Stevens is leaning into the past to share the comfort of these familiar things, the value of the tried-and-true. The book blends recipes for natural balms and oils with stories of the author's life and those touched through the ministries she operates. She pulls from the pain of her childhood in order to minister to others, drawing from generations of wisdom in the areas of herbal remedies, touch, and prayer. I found it refreshing how honestly she speaks about pain and grief and sickness, all the while sharing ideas for finding peace, healing, and wholeness. (COMPLETE REVIEW IS FOUND AT Hammock Librarian.)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    I stumbled upon Becca Stevens quite by accident and over the course of about 2 weeks seemed to collide with her name numerous times. As I researched who she was and what she does I became fascinated by the ministry she runs, the Magdelene, in Nashvile, TN and all the women she has helped. Becca realized quickly that these women needed employment and started Thistle Farms to provide them with gainful employment and a purpose in life which added immensely to their recovery. "Snake Oil" describes h I stumbled upon Becca Stevens quite by accident and over the course of about 2 weeks seemed to collide with her name numerous times. As I researched who she was and what she does I became fascinated by the ministry she runs, the Magdelene, in Nashvile, TN and all the women she has helped. Becca realized quickly that these women needed employment and started Thistle Farms to provide them with gainful employment and a purpose in life which added immensely to their recovery. "Snake Oil" describes her ministry, how it came to be and how it has grown. (I was also very pleasantly surprised to find she is an Episcopal Priest) I will be visiting Nashville in March and very much look forward to making a trip out to Thistle Farms to see Becca's work in action.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sundi

    I wasn't sure what to expect from this book, so I tried to go in with an open mind. However, I'm not sure I can agree with some of Mrs. Steven's theology. She seems to give herself and others the credit for being healers, when it's only God who can heal. He uses us to do His work, but we are not the healers. With that said, I love what she's doing to help these women, and for loving them right where they are, but not allowing them to stay stuck. That takes a big heart and a lot of prayer. Read t I wasn't sure what to expect from this book, so I tried to go in with an open mind. However, I'm not sure I can agree with some of Mrs. Steven's theology. She seems to give herself and others the credit for being healers, when it's only God who can heal. He uses us to do His work, but we are not the healers. With that said, I love what she's doing to help these women, and for loving them right where they are, but not allowing them to stay stuck. That takes a big heart and a lot of prayer. Read the book carefully and take everything written back to Scripture.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Annalaura

    As someone who began using essential oils for my own healing about 4 years ago and who has been able to stop all allergy drugs and asthma inahlers, I found her story as well as her recipes interesting and quite inspiring. It's refreshing as well to hear from someone who has a lot of faith as well talk about oils. The story of who she created Thistle Farms and her mission to help these women is really motivational. I highly recommend this book. As someone who began using essential oils for my own healing about 4 years ago and who has been able to stop all allergy drugs and asthma inahlers, I found her story as well as her recipes interesting and quite inspiring. It's refreshing as well to hear from someone who has a lot of faith as well talk about oils. The story of who she created Thistle Farms and her mission to help these women is really motivational. I highly recommend this book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    I bought this book after touring Thistle Farms and having the pleasure of meeting some of the women that had overcome their pasts. The book is a beautiful story of forgiveness and redemption. Stephens tells the truth in such a way that many times I had to stop reading so I could just absorb. Also a good beginning guide for anyone looking to begin allowing herbs and oils assist in their own healing.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maria Longley

    I loved Becca Stevens' descriptions of using oil in healing in her life and how she uses them in the social enterprises she's started up. (After reading this I'm even more sad that I can't buy Thistle Farm products in the UK.) And the little recipes at the beginning of each chapter are fun. I was lucky enough to hear her speak this summer and was really impressed with her integrity which is something that comes through in this book too. I loved Becca Stevens' descriptions of using oil in healing in her life and how she uses them in the social enterprises she's started up. (After reading this I'm even more sad that I can't buy Thistle Farm products in the UK.) And the little recipes at the beginning of each chapter are fun. I was lucky enough to hear her speak this summer and was really impressed with her integrity which is something that comes through in this book too.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    If you're looking for a chronological history of Thistle Farms/Magdalene, this is not for you. If, however, you enjoy contemplative, quiet spiritual books about the joys and struggles of service, social justice, and progressive/feminist Christianity, you're in the right place. I read this book slowly, almost as a meditation. I love Becca Stevens and her work, and it was a pleasure to see into her brain a little. If you're looking for a chronological history of Thistle Farms/Magdalene, this is not for you. If, however, you enjoy contemplative, quiet spiritual books about the joys and struggles of service, social justice, and progressive/feminist Christianity, you're in the right place. I read this book slowly, almost as a meditation. I love Becca Stevens and her work, and it was a pleasure to see into her brain a little.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alexys

    I've had people.tell.me they use essential oils for different things and i never really got it. i was one of those people who thought, "yeah okay, how much placebo effect is here?" but after reading this, I'm intrigued. i appreciate that, though the author is a Christian priest, she doesn't proselytize. she uses stories from the bible not as reasons to convert but as illuminating examples. as a non-Christian reading this, it helped me relax into her narrative. I've had people.tell.me they use essential oils for different things and i never really got it. i was one of those people who thought, "yeah okay, how much placebo effect is here?" but after reading this, I'm intrigued. i appreciate that, though the author is a Christian priest, she doesn't proselytize. she uses stories from the bible not as reasons to convert but as illuminating examples. as a non-Christian reading this, it helped me relax into her narrative.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joy Matteson

    This book had an interesting premise that intrigued me--healing oils meant to soothe the body and soul, sold by those who've come from halfway houses, lived in abusive homes, and find redemption through Thistle Farms, the organization that the author of this book owns and runs. An intriguing read, but not one that captured my attention from start to finish. This book had an interesting premise that intrigued me--healing oils meant to soothe the body and soul, sold by those who've come from halfway houses, lived in abusive homes, and find redemption through Thistle Farms, the organization that the author of this book owns and runs. An intriguing read, but not one that captured my attention from start to finish.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    It was an interesting book but I had difficulty picking it up everyday. I found it to be inspiring but then sometimes I felt some negativity or dark places that made me sad. I really like the idea that aroma's can do your mind and body good. I would like to try some of the recipes that she provided in the book. I am glad I finished the book so sorry that it took so long. It was an interesting book but I had difficulty picking it up everyday. I found it to be inspiring but then sometimes I felt some negativity or dark places that made me sad. I really like the idea that aroma's can do your mind and body good. I would like to try some of the recipes that she provided in the book. I am glad I finished the book so sorry that it took so long.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessi

    Why I Want to Read This: Becca Stevens writes about enacting truth and justice in a beautiful, poetic, cozy way. Sometimes it's hard to hear truth, especially if it's not exactly in your favor at the moment, so the fact that she very adeptly and coherently describes her own goals makes her writing some of the most powerful that I have ever read. Why I Want to Read This: Becca Stevens writes about enacting truth and justice in a beautiful, poetic, cozy way. Sometimes it's hard to hear truth, especially if it's not exactly in your favor at the moment, so the fact that she very adeptly and coherently describes her own goals makes her writing some of the most powerful that I have ever read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I had hoped to learn a lot more about the Thistle Farms: the women it has helped, it's operation, successes and failures. This book provides some glimpses of this, and some recipes for herbal oils, but is mainly a very high level theological piece. Not quite what I had hoped for in choosing the book. Best of luck with Thistle Farms - it is a wonderful concept. I had hoped to learn a lot more about the Thistle Farms: the women it has helped, it's operation, successes and failures. This book provides some glimpses of this, and some recipes for herbal oils, but is mainly a very high level theological piece. Not quite what I had hoped for in choosing the book. Best of luck with Thistle Farms - it is a wonderful concept.

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