Hot Best Seller

The Silver Age of DC Comics

Availability: Ready to download

Flash forward.  The Super Hero in the Space Age   With Super Heroes nearly extinct at the start of the 1950s, DC Comicsreignited the fire that would make them central to modern popular culture by infusing them with science fiction elements. To circumvent the limitations of the self-censoring Comics Code Authority, DC Comics’ writers and editors spun ever-more fantastic tal Flash forward.  The Super Hero in the Space Age   With Super Heroes nearly extinct at the start of the 1950s, DC Comicsreignited the fire that would make them central to modern popular culture by infusing them with science fiction elements. To circumvent the limitations of the self-censoring Comics Code Authority, DC Comics’ writers and editors spun ever-more fantastic tales, bringing Super Heroes and Bob Hope alike into the realm of sci-fi. The results were transformative, delivering the first-ever “reboot” of Golden Age greats with the Flash, Green Lantern, andHawkman as well as the hit TV show Batman. The Silver Age of DC Comicschronicles it all, right down to the wacky shenanigans of television’s Batman, which made him the embodiment for the camp sensibility of the ’60s and further immortalized the Dark Knight as a pop culture icon for generations to come. Plus a new exclusive interview with Green Lantern/Batmanartist Neal Adams! About the series: TASCHEN’s series on DC Comics explores the origins of comics’ most enduring legends and the behind-the-scenes stories of the men and women who created them, era by era. Expanded from the Eisner Award–winning XL book, 75 Years of DC Comics, this new series hits the shelf at a reader-friendly size with essays updated by author Paul Levitz and more than 1,000 new images across five volumes. Thousands of covers and interiors, original illustrations, photographs, film stills, and collectibles have been reproduced to bring the story lines, the characters, and their creators to vibrant life, making this an invaluable reference for comics fans. DC Comics characters and all related elements are trademarks of and © DC Comics. (s13)


Compare

Flash forward.  The Super Hero in the Space Age   With Super Heroes nearly extinct at the start of the 1950s, DC Comicsreignited the fire that would make them central to modern popular culture by infusing them with science fiction elements. To circumvent the limitations of the self-censoring Comics Code Authority, DC Comics’ writers and editors spun ever-more fantastic tal Flash forward.  The Super Hero in the Space Age   With Super Heroes nearly extinct at the start of the 1950s, DC Comicsreignited the fire that would make them central to modern popular culture by infusing them with science fiction elements. To circumvent the limitations of the self-censoring Comics Code Authority, DC Comics’ writers and editors spun ever-more fantastic tales, bringing Super Heroes and Bob Hope alike into the realm of sci-fi. The results were transformative, delivering the first-ever “reboot” of Golden Age greats with the Flash, Green Lantern, andHawkman as well as the hit TV show Batman. The Silver Age of DC Comicschronicles it all, right down to the wacky shenanigans of television’s Batman, which made him the embodiment for the camp sensibility of the ’60s and further immortalized the Dark Knight as a pop culture icon for generations to come. Plus a new exclusive interview with Green Lantern/Batmanartist Neal Adams! About the series: TASCHEN’s series on DC Comics explores the origins of comics’ most enduring legends and the behind-the-scenes stories of the men and women who created them, era by era. Expanded from the Eisner Award–winning XL book, 75 Years of DC Comics, this new series hits the shelf at a reader-friendly size with essays updated by author Paul Levitz and more than 1,000 new images across five volumes. Thousands of covers and interiors, original illustrations, photographs, film stills, and collectibles have been reproduced to bring the story lines, the characters, and their creators to vibrant life, making this an invaluable reference for comics fans. DC Comics characters and all related elements are trademarks of and © DC Comics. (s13)

30 review for The Silver Age of DC Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    This fine selection, mostly cover images, but featuring some great context from former DC publisher Paul Levitz, rocked my world, as it ends as I become a habitual customer circa 1970. Recommended.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Part two of the expansion of DC's 75-Year History tombstone-sized book from several years ago. A stroll down memory lane and we finally get to the era where I own some of the books. Part two of the expansion of DC's 75-Year History tombstone-sized book from several years ago. A stroll down memory lane and we finally get to the era where I own some of the books.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    Paul Levitz turns his archivist eye to the Silver Age of DC, beginning in the mid 1950s to 1970. Centering mostly on reproductions of covers, interior art, merchandising, pop culture, and of course thr Batman tv show, this book is a wonderful trip down memory lane. The book is not arranged chronologically or by topic, but meanders through the Silver Age, stopping to touch upon the very diverse DC line of the time. There is an interesting interview with Neal Adams and snippets from other DC creato Paul Levitz turns his archivist eye to the Silver Age of DC, beginning in the mid 1950s to 1970. Centering mostly on reproductions of covers, interior art, merchandising, pop culture, and of course thr Batman tv show, this book is a wonderful trip down memory lane. The book is not arranged chronologically or by topic, but meanders through the Silver Age, stopping to touch upon the very diverse DC line of the time. There is an interesting interview with Neal Adams and snippets from other DC creators. Each photograph comes with a small caption explaining its significance and there is plenty to learn. This is a big book that every DC fan should have.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Richard Zaric

    This coffee-table hardcover is better than the golden age edition. Perhaps it's because the material is closer in time and the comics in question are easier to locate. In any case, the organization of this volume is better. Every few pages covers a different theme, whether it's a character, an artist or gorillas. Beautiful, glossy pages. Hard to put down. This coffee-table hardcover is better than the golden age edition. Perhaps it's because the material is closer in time and the comics in question are easier to locate. In any case, the organization of this volume is better. Every few pages covers a different theme, whether it's a character, an artist or gorillas. Beautiful, glossy pages. Hard to put down.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Lewonczyk

    Just a lot of really fun, comforting stuff to look at. Good captions and context on some of the greatest DC Comics visuals.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Steven Kuehn

    Very detailed summary of the Silver Age of DC comics; brought back many happy memories...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Luke Goldstein

    I grew up reading comics from the mid-1980s through early 94 and for much of that time it the only reading I did outside of Stephen King novels. I would shake with excitement each week as I walked into my local comic shop where I had standing orders for a number of titles. I could just walk through the door, up to the front desk and the clerk would hand me a stack of varying size each week. It was beautiful, and only made more so by my mother paying for it. Even though I eventually moved on to o I grew up reading comics from the mid-1980s through early 94 and for much of that time it the only reading I did outside of Stephen King novels. I would shake with excitement each week as I walked into my local comic shop where I had standing orders for a number of titles. I could just walk through the door, up to the front desk and the clerk would hand me a stack of varying size each week. It was beautiful, and only made more so by my mother paying for it. Even though I eventually moved on to other obsessions and other sources of reading material, I never lost my love and admiration for comics and this review was a perfect chance for me to do something I should have done long ago; learn about the history of comics. The Silver Age of DC Comics by Paul Levitz is an exquisitely produced and beautifully printed tome of comic book history through the lens of DC Comics. The first forty pages or so are mainly text with covers and comic panels placed alongside for contextual support. You read about the writers, editors and artists of the time period and what contributions they made to the continuation of comics. In this particular volume you also follow along as DC begins to experiment more and shake things up to compete with Marvel. There is a great quote early on from legend Neal Adams talking about the main difference at the time between the two powerhouse publishers: "Marvel had laid down the challenge. What Kirby was doing was taking Stan Lee’s six-page horror stories and extending them out to full books. In fact, that’s the difference between DC and Marvel comics: All the characters at DC, because of their history, were all sparkly-tooth Americans; they smiled, they had good jobs, they had secret identities. At Marvel, Jack convinced Stan that four characters who would go off into space, be bombarded by cosmic rays, and come back as monsters – let’s make the monsters heroes." Factoids like that made each page of this a treasure hunt through the annals of comic book history. Even better were the truly unexpected nuggets, humorous asides about how sales would spike at DC anytime there was a gorilla on the cover, which caused them to create a rule stating only one comic was allowed to have a gorilla per month. After the historical text-based pages were through, the rest of this massive archive is filled with covers and comic panels spanning decade and a half known as the Silver Age of Comics. You can visually follow the changes in artistry, comic production and subject matter as society evolved inside and outside these colorful pages. You also get to understand that the people behind the desks, those with ink covered hands and color stained fingers, they were the real superheroes. They created some of the most iconic characters and helped evolve older ones that might have faded into the background of history without their fresh takes. These people inspired a generation of children, and some adults as well, and this volume from Taschen truly gives them the respect they are due.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Armando Wyoming

    Have you ever felt the urge to know every single exact nugget of a fact that relates to DC Superheroes in the sixties?!! …No? Welp, this book doesn’t care. It force-feeds everything you didn’t need to know in your mouth and makes you chew thoughtfully. And somehow not only can you tolerate it, but you feel grateful that the writer did this. Gorgeous covers and interesting tidbits await anyone who will read this great tome of comic knowledge. Bon Appetit!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Aylott

    I enjoyed the artwork of Taschen's previous collection of Golden Age DC, but it's the Silver Age that has my heart. Barry Allen on the front cover, Hal Jordan on the back, and lots of Legion of Superheroes and Superboy pages in between -- what a wonderful book! I enjoyed the artwork of Taschen's previous collection of Golden Age DC, but it's the Silver Age that has my heart. Barry Allen on the front cover, Hal Jordan on the back, and lots of Legion of Superheroes and Superboy pages in between -- what a wonderful book!

  10. 4 out of 5

    TYLER QXBEAR

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gary Sassaman

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michiel Offerman

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chris Oliveria

  14. 5 out of 5

    Peter Sanderson

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shakti Raj

  16. 4 out of 5

    Graham Bc

  17. 4 out of 5

    Asoo

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark Short

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adriano Barone

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mat

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  24. 5 out of 5

    Francisco Nascimento

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cee Jackson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hunter

  27. 4 out of 5

    alan olshansky

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sticks Phillips

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leigh Lamb

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tim Schneider

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...