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Aunt Dimity and the Lost Prince

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Cozy mystery lovers’ favorite paranormal sleuth is back with her eighteenth otherworldly adventure When a finely wrought silver sleigh figurine turns up in her thrift shop, Lori Shepherd recognizes it instantly.  It was the object that mesmerized the sweet but very poor nine-year-old Daisy Pickering at Skeaping Manor, the bizarre Jacobean house-turned-museum Lori recently Cozy mystery lovers’ favorite paranormal sleuth is back with her eighteenth otherworldly adventure When a finely wrought silver sleigh figurine turns up in her thrift shop, Lori Shepherd recognizes it instantly.  It was the object that mesmerized the sweet but very poor nine-year-old Daisy Pickering at Skeaping Manor, the bizarre Jacobean house-turned-museum Lori recently visited with her twin sons.   Hoping to avoid any real commotion, Lori decides to speak with the museum curator, who turns out to be oddly uninterested in the theft. But there’s not much that could be done anyway for the Pickerings seem to have come into some money and moved to Australia. With Aunt Dimity’s otherworldly guidance, Lori’s search for the sleigh’s true owner leads her to a tangled web of secrets stretching from the finest English country estates back to the blood-drenched soil of the Russian Revolution.


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Cozy mystery lovers’ favorite paranormal sleuth is back with her eighteenth otherworldly adventure When a finely wrought silver sleigh figurine turns up in her thrift shop, Lori Shepherd recognizes it instantly.  It was the object that mesmerized the sweet but very poor nine-year-old Daisy Pickering at Skeaping Manor, the bizarre Jacobean house-turned-museum Lori recently Cozy mystery lovers’ favorite paranormal sleuth is back with her eighteenth otherworldly adventure When a finely wrought silver sleigh figurine turns up in her thrift shop, Lori Shepherd recognizes it instantly.  It was the object that mesmerized the sweet but very poor nine-year-old Daisy Pickering at Skeaping Manor, the bizarre Jacobean house-turned-museum Lori recently visited with her twin sons.   Hoping to avoid any real commotion, Lori decides to speak with the museum curator, who turns out to be oddly uninterested in the theft. But there’s not much that could be done anyway for the Pickerings seem to have come into some money and moved to Australia. With Aunt Dimity’s otherworldly guidance, Lori’s search for the sleigh’s true owner leads her to a tangled web of secrets stretching from the finest English country estates back to the blood-drenched soil of the Russian Revolution.

30 review for Aunt Dimity and the Lost Prince

  1. 5 out of 5

    ❂ Murder by Death

    The books in this series are truly fairy tales for adults. No murder mystery, but always a mystery of some kind, meant to provide an opportunity for growth for the protagonist, right down to a "moral of the story" of sorts at the end. Because, or in spite of, this, these stories are always entertaining with fantastic, colourful, characters and really no villains to speak of. My only complaint about the books - well, two really: I wish the author could figure out a way for Aunt Dimity to pass on The books in this series are truly fairy tales for adults. No murder mystery, but always a mystery of some kind, meant to provide an opportunity for growth for the protagonist, right down to a "moral of the story" of sorts at the end. Because, or in spite of, this, these stories are always entertaining with fantastic, colourful, characters and really no villains to speak of. My only complaint about the books - well, two really: I wish the author could figure out a way for Aunt Dimity to pass on her wisdom without making Lori impulsive to the point of childish and make Aunt Dimity less condescending while passing on her wisdom. Secondly, if Lori could not jump to so many ridiculous conclusions, that would be great. Although I will say, she was much more rational in this book. Aunt Dimity and the Lost Price centers around the fantastical tales told by a child, and the reality that lies at the heart of them. The child herself makes exactly one appearance in the story, but she makes quite an impression with everyone she meets and Lori and her neighbor Bree follow a string of clues to find the "Lost Price". With an ending not quite what you'd expect, but a happy one, this was a fast, entertaining read. If you don't try to make these books something they are not (murder mysteries with suspects, etc.), and enjoy them for what they are, they'll never let you down.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    I never, never get tired of the Aunt Dimity series - these books are like slipping on your very favourite old sweater. It may be stretched out and a little tatty but nothing feels more comfortable and loved, and nothing else make you feel so happy and cozy. This is how I feel about the Aunt Dimity books! In this adventure, we meet a whole new cast of characters for Lori to busybody her way through. And while my favourites of this series always tend to be the ones that take place in Finch, with it I never, never get tired of the Aunt Dimity series - these books are like slipping on your very favourite old sweater. It may be stretched out and a little tatty but nothing feels more comfortable and loved, and nothing else make you feel so happy and cozy. This is how I feel about the Aunt Dimity books! In this adventure, we meet a whole new cast of characters for Lori to busybody her way through. And while my favourites of this series always tend to be the ones that take place in Finch, with its town of nosy, but lovable oddballs, I very much enjoyed this story too. As always, Nancy Atherton has a wonderful way of creating characters who seem initially to be one thing, but eventually turn out to be something altogether different, though almost always wonderful and quirky, and this book is no exception to that. The motley cast of characters who people the grand quest Lori embarks on based on a story told by a little girl called Daisy are simply a delight! And Lori, well Lori remains Lori, which is to say kind-hearted and well-meaning busybody, who tries to right every wrong she comes across, and fix the life of everyone in her universe, even if said fixing is unrequested. Because Lori is such a good person with honourable intentions, her interference always comes across as charming. And, since she has Dimity and Reginald, and [although not in this book] Bill to keep her sleuthing and fixing from going off the deep end, Lori's efforts always end reasonably well. This is one of my go-to series for when I just want to read a book that will not only tell me a fun story, but will let me dive into a happy place filled with kind people, good intentions and happy endings. The Aunt Dimity series never lets me down on any of those and I will keep reading them for as long as the author is willing to write them!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies

    The Aunt Dimity mysteries is one of those sweet little cozy cottage mysteries I've followed and read throughout. Most cozies are a light, easy read, and I dare say this series is even lighter than most. Unlike the Agatha Raisin or Hamish MacBeth series, which can sometimes turn unexpectedly serious, oftentimes, the "mystery" involving intrepid American expat Lori are quite benign, as they are in this latest installment. It is a terrible, blustery, freezing February, and Lori is grouchy and upset. The Aunt Dimity mysteries is one of those sweet little cozy cottage mysteries I've followed and read throughout. Most cozies are a light, easy read, and I dare say this series is even lighter than most. Unlike the Agatha Raisin or Hamish MacBeth series, which can sometimes turn unexpectedly serious, oftentimes, the "mystery" involving intrepid American expat Lori are quite benign, as they are in this latest installment. It is a terrible, blustery, freezing February, and Lori is grouchy and upset. Her twin sons are home and in sore lack of entertainment due to the inclement weather and her husband is involved in a case in a sunny and warm location. To her relief, teenaged neighbor Bree needs a place to stay, and in return for a room, Bree acts as playmate and babysitter to the two boisterous boys. They visit a macabre museum where Lori meets a precocious and malnourished little girl, who speaks mysteriously of a Russian artifact. The little girl, Daisy, and her mother soon vanishes after seemingly stealing the artifact, and Lori and Bree are soon on their trail to trace a mysterious Russian prince. With the help of Aunt Dimity's levelheadedness and the intrinsic approval of Reginald the stuffed bunny (I want one for my own, actually), Lori and Bree slowly unwinds the case of the missing prince. The blurb makes this story to be a lot more macabre and mysterious than it actually is. There is not much mention or connection to a bloody Russian past; there is mention of it, but it never goes into so much detail as to make this more than a PG rating. There is no more than a mere brush with Russian Bolshevik history; Russian tea cakes are mentioned more than any allusion to historical events (I'm not kidding, you will be sick of hearing about the freaking tea cake recipe by the time the book ends). The other item mentioned in the blurb "...but there’s not much that could be done anyway for the Pickerings seem to have come into some money and moved to Australia" is actually a spoiler. Lori does find out that this is indeed what happened to Daisy and her mother, but not til the very end of the book. There is very little characterization in the book, and nothing more is to be gleaned into any existing character's personality besides the sure fact that Lori is an interfering busybody, more so than any of the local village ladies with whom she is so exasperated. There is no mystery here, no major problem to be solved at all, as we will learn. All that aside, it is entertaining, light, and an easy read. I give this 3 stars, more than my typical rating for the usual light fluffy read because unlike some books, this series has no pretense and lays no claim to the extraordinary. One does not go into a book like this expecting a revelation, it is a sweet little read for a rainy evening, and not much else.

  4. 4 out of 5

    The Flooze

    Another successful mystery by Atherton. Being that Lori has such an over-active imagination of her own, it's only fitting that this particular quest be sparked by the story-telling of a mysterious little girl. Lori and Bree's hunt for clues takes them to various estates throughout the countryside. They encounter a bevy of intriguing characters, any of whom I'd be glad to revisit in the future. Atherton has a marvelous knack for creating memorable, entertaining personalities - a gift which allows h Another successful mystery by Atherton. Being that Lori has such an over-active imagination of her own, it's only fitting that this particular quest be sparked by the story-telling of a mysterious little girl. Lori and Bree's hunt for clues takes them to various estates throughout the countryside. They encounter a bevy of intriguing characters, any of whom I'd be glad to revisit in the future. Atherton has a marvelous knack for creating memorable, entertaining personalities - a gift which allows her to constantly widen Lori's circle and keep readers engaged eighteen books in. This book also delves into Bree's adjustment to life in England. We've seen her as a brazen, big-hearted girl who's always ready to speak her mind. I've enjoyed her sly remarks. It's nice, however, to see another side of her. She makes for an able and balancing sidekick for Lori and they're quite good at reining each other in when necessary. There's a sweetness to Atherton's books, as one might expect from the cozy mystery genre. However, they're never too cloying. Lori often uncovers deeply sad histories, getting us quickly invested in strangers' lives. I find myself actively rooting for busybody neighbours, smirking cooks, well-meaning con men, and abrasive eccentrics. It's plain that everyone has suffered some degree of tragedy. Instead of crafting a silly, grandiose happy ever after for these folks, Atherton's skill is in bringing about a lovely turn-of-events for the here and now. Old hurts are not forgotten. They're merely overshadowed by the realistically heart-warming delights of the present.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    I really do enjoy the Aunt Dimity books! It's like spending time with an old friend. This one was no disappointment. It was interesting, comfortable and sweet, as usual. A mystery without a dead body - imagine that! I really do enjoy the Aunt Dimity books! It's like spending time with an old friend. This one was no disappointment. It was interesting, comfortable and sweet, as usual. A mystery without a dead body - imagine that!

  6. 4 out of 5

    ✨ Gramy ✨

    . This series offers cozy mysteries with amusing and quirky characters, in the life of Lori and her Aunt Dimity. Each one has been a fun and entertaining read to be sure. It is appreciated that each book is able to stand on its own and usually concludes with an HEA.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    Lori Shepard and Aunt Dimity have grown on me. I liked Bree Pym, too. This book was wonderful, in the no-dead-bodies sense; the mystery revolved around a silver troika and some missing persons. I love cozy mysteries, even the ones with the dead people 'off-screen', but in this tale, there were none (except Aunt Dimity, of course)! The way Lori communicates with the spirit of Aunt Dimity is rather clever, and for Dimity to carry an intelligent conversation (albeit for a dead woman) with Lori is d Lori Shepard and Aunt Dimity have grown on me. I liked Bree Pym, too. This book was wonderful, in the no-dead-bodies sense; the mystery revolved around a silver troika and some missing persons. I love cozy mysteries, even the ones with the dead people 'off-screen', but in this tale, there were none (except Aunt Dimity, of course)! The way Lori communicates with the spirit of Aunt Dimity is rather clever, and for Dimity to carry an intelligent conversation (albeit for a dead woman) with Lori is different (in a good way). I'd like to read more in this series; it took me 24 hours or so to read, and being involved in its light mystery was a perfect way to spend that time. There's no sex, no foul language, no gore in this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I know that I have been quite difficult on books recently, but Aunt Dimity and the Lost Prince is going to change that. From the very first chapter I was drawn into this book, Lori does not come across nearly as scatterbrained or man deprived as her previous books and though she is still an overbearing mother, it appears that she just might be letting her eight-year-old boys out of their car seats and allowing them to enjoy being kids. Bree Prym is bored and restless in the big house that her au I know that I have been quite difficult on books recently, but Aunt Dimity and the Lost Prince is going to change that. From the very first chapter I was drawn into this book, Lori does not come across nearly as scatterbrained or man deprived as her previous books and though she is still an overbearing mother, it appears that she just might be letting her eight-year-old boys out of their car seats and allowing them to enjoy being kids. Bree Prym is bored and restless in the big house that her aunts have left for her so she finds a reason to knock on Lori’s door and ask if she could spend a couple of days. Due broken pipe issues and the inability to ride their horses, the boys jump at the chance to visit Skeaping Manor with Bree. This macabre place has just the things that boys like to see, but shrunken heads and bugs are not on Lori’s agenda. She is fascinated by the silver collection. What is more interesting is the little girl, Daisy Pickering, in the dirty coat that seems to know more than she should about a lost prince. When the little girl’s coat shows up at the charity shop with a silver treasure shaped like an ornate Russian sleigh in the pocket, Lori’s interest is piqued and with the help of Bree, they set off to finder her, only to discover that she and her mother have disappeared. What they do find is a very fascinating story involving an old prince being held captive. Of course, Lori cannot let this go and by following the clues in the story, Lori and Bree take the reader on a very interesting journey into many of the finer homes in the area. This is still one of my favorite series; there is an easy simplicity to the life in Finch, one that I enjoy returning to year after year. Aunt Dimity is not playing as much of a vital role has she has in the earlier books, I am not sure if this is good or bad, but there is a gentle change taking place.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Ravey

    Lori Shepherd is in mom hell. Her husband is in sunny Majorca, and she's stuck inside with eight-year-old twin boys. Bad weather has shut down school, and the only thing keeping her sane is her neighbor, Bree Pym. Seeking refuge from paint fumes at her own home, Bree helps keep the boys entertained by suggesting a trip to Skeaping Manor. Full of ghoulish exhibits, Skeaping Manor is...unique, and Lori leaves the boys to ogle shrunken heads with Bree and heads up to visit the silver only to find an Lori Shepherd is in mom hell. Her husband is in sunny Majorca, and she's stuck inside with eight-year-old twin boys. Bad weather has shut down school, and the only thing keeping her sane is her neighbor, Bree Pym. Seeking refuge from paint fumes at her own home, Bree helps keep the boys entertained by suggesting a trip to Skeaping Manor. Full of ghoulish exhibits, Skeaping Manor is...unique, and Lori leaves the boys to ogle shrunken heads with Bree and heads up to visit the silver only to find an enigmatic little girl in a pink puffy coat looking at a silver salt cellar. When the little girl, Daisy, tells Lori about the origin of the salt cellar and a lost Russian prince, Lori is struck by the little girl's poise and sadness. So when she finds a pink coat like the little girl was wearing with a silver salt cellar in the pocket the next day at a charity shop, Lori thinks maybe Daisy was telling the truth. She's even more curious when she finds out Daisy and her mother have left town without a trace. With Aunt Dimity's supernatural wisdom comforting her, Lori strikes out with Bree by her side, learning a little something about herself and the "lost prince" they seek. This is my first go round with Aunt Dimity, and it certainly won't be my last. I had no idea Aunt Dimity was otherworldly - she doesn't quite seem to be a ghost - but I was a bit skeptical. No fear! Aunt Dimity & the Lost Prince was absolutely one of the most fun cozy mysteries I've read in a while, and I've already scoped out the ebook prices to see how many I can buy on payday. :)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Lori Shepherd hates February. It is so cold and being home bound is not a good thing when you have two young boys. Luckily Bree Pym, a friend stops by. She comes up with a brilliant idea to go to the Skeaping Manor. The manor is a museum. There Lori and Bree meet Daisy Pickering. Daisy’s mother works as a cleaning lady at the museum. Daisy tells Lori and Bree about Prince Mikhail. The prince is trapped locked away in a dungeon by an evil man. Daisy shows the ladies a stolen artifact from the pri Lori Shepherd hates February. It is so cold and being home bound is not a good thing when you have two young boys. Luckily Bree Pym, a friend stops by. She comes up with a brilliant idea to go to the Skeaping Manor. The manor is a museum. There Lori and Bree meet Daisy Pickering. Daisy’s mother works as a cleaning lady at the museum. Daisy tells Lori and Bree about Prince Mikhail. The prince is trapped locked away in a dungeon by an evil man. Daisy shows the ladies a stolen artifact from the prince that the evil man took. Before Lori and Bree can ask Daisy anymore questions she and her mother disappear. Now it is up to Lori and Bree to find the lost prince and save him. Aunt Dimity and the Lost Prince is the first Aunt Dimity book I have read. What a fun, charming, great, entertaining book. After being introduced to this series, I will go back and read more of these books. Lori and Bree make a good duo. Lori is the more level headed of the two whereas Bree just like her red fiery hair jumps in with two feet full force. All the other people that Lori and Bree were intriguing. They are what helped to make this book so much fun to read. Lori and Bree are like the new Nancy Drew and friend. The ending left a smile on my face. Aunt Dimity and the Lost Prince receives two crowns. It is a gem.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jeannie and Louis Rigod

    This series is always a joy to read. A real British cozy mystery novel. Not any murder victims but other real mysteries. This eighteenth novel has Lori Shepard, and friend, Bree Pym searching for a missing family and trying to rescue a Russian Prince. A wee child tells Lori about the holding of this Prince, against his will, in a dungeon in a manor house near Finch. Lori thought it was a dream story until she finds physical evidence that the imaginative child bases her stories upon reality. Off w This series is always a joy to read. A real British cozy mystery novel. Not any murder victims but other real mysteries. This eighteenth novel has Lori Shepard, and friend, Bree Pym searching for a missing family and trying to rescue a Russian Prince. A wee child tells Lori about the holding of this Prince, against his will, in a dungeon in a manor house near Finch. Lori thought it was a dream story until she finds physical evidence that the imaginative child bases her stories upon reality. Off we go with Lori and Bree as they travel from astounding house to house to seek and save the Prince. A common thread throughout was following a Russian Tea Cake recipe which is shared with us at the ending of the book. This book is a cozy. Pure fun reading and took me about four hours to devour it. Now to wait for the next story. It is like reading a bedtime story to yourself. I adore this series. Thank You, Ms. Atherton.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine

    "Maybe there's no such thing as a fruitless search"..."You may not always find what you're looking for, but you always find something worth finding." Lori says this to Aunt Dimity at the end of the story. And I discovered something as well. This book and very possibly the rest of the books in this series, one needs to read it straight through and not read it along with other books. I had read about the first third while reading a couple of other books. I read the rest of the book yesterday and t "Maybe there's no such thing as a fruitless search"..."You may not always find what you're looking for, but you always find something worth finding." Lori says this to Aunt Dimity at the end of the story. And I discovered something as well. This book and very possibly the rest of the books in this series, one needs to read it straight through and not read it along with other books. I had read about the first third while reading a couple of other books. I read the rest of the book yesterday and today. In the beginning, I did not think this book was keeping my attention because of the story. Well, it was not, but it was not the story. It was that I was reading 3 or 4 other books at the same time. In order to get the most out of this book, please read it right through to the end. All is pulled together much better, and I enjoyed much more.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    Another interesting look into the life of Lori Shepherd, this time with her teen-age sidekick, Bree Pym. If we had to lose the Pym sisters, Bree is an excellent replacement, funny and outside of many reader's comfort zone but a wonderful insight into the outlook of teenagers today. What I like most about these Dimity books is that wherever Lori goes, people are better off for having met her. She almost always finds a way to fix things. In this book, it is more Bree who is fixing things as she fe Another interesting look into the life of Lori Shepherd, this time with her teen-age sidekick, Bree Pym. If we had to lose the Pym sisters, Bree is an excellent replacement, funny and outside of many reader's comfort zone but a wonderful insight into the outlook of teenagers today. What I like most about these Dimity books is that wherever Lori goes, people are better off for having met her. She almost always finds a way to fix things. In this book, it is more Bree who is fixing things as she feels her way into finding a vocational drive, a reason to get up in the mornings, so-to-speak. Lori and Bree don't see things in quite the same way, so it was fascinating to watch each other adjust to their partner's perspective as they look for the "lost prince".

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alice Liu

    I kept waiting for a dead body. And waiting. And waiting. It's always fun visiting and revisiting Lori Shepherd. This book was a bit different, focusing on communication and connections: Sometimes our most daunting personal problems can be remedied just by virtue of someone knowing about it...a big problem among the isolated wealthy. On the other hand, when we (and by "we" I mean "Lori") assume we make one big ass out of u and me (and by "u" and "me" I mean "Lori"). It's a fun, mild mystery, but I kept waiting for a dead body. And waiting. And waiting. It's always fun visiting and revisiting Lori Shepherd. This book was a bit different, focusing on communication and connections: Sometimes our most daunting personal problems can be remedied just by virtue of someone knowing about it...a big problem among the isolated wealthy. On the other hand, when we (and by "we" I mean "Lori") assume we make one big ass out of u and me (and by "u" and "me" I mean "Lori"). It's a fun, mild mystery, but without the dead body, the only real sense of suspenseful danger is not from a suspected murderer but from a social faux pas.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Darlene Ferland

    As Lori sits with Reginald looking at her and as she opens the blank journal, I felt like I was visiting an old friend. The writing appearing on the pages in response to Lori's remarks and questions is as familiar to me as opening a letter from a relative or friend. Please get your hands on the first Aunt Dimity book and start your own journey. It's fun and easy to read. In this world filled with the horror of bombings, war, hatred and evil everyone needs something light and fun as well as inter As Lori sits with Reginald looking at her and as she opens the blank journal, I felt like I was visiting an old friend. The writing appearing on the pages in response to Lori's remarks and questions is as familiar to me as opening a letter from a relative or friend. Please get your hands on the first Aunt Dimity book and start your own journey. It's fun and easy to read. In this world filled with the horror of bombings, war, hatred and evil everyone needs something light and fun as well as interesting to read. . .

  16. 5 out of 5

    Margie

    I love the Aunt Dimity books and hope Nancy Atherton keeps writing them! I am always impatient for the next one. Cozy, fun, entertaining and always a great read! I love the recipes at the end as well. Here is Nancy Atherton's web site for her "Aunt Dimity" books. http://www.aunt-dimity.com/ You can find her wonderful recipes here too! I love the Aunt Dimity books and hope Nancy Atherton keeps writing them! I am always impatient for the next one. Cozy, fun, entertaining and always a great read! I love the recipes at the end as well. Here is Nancy Atherton's web site for her "Aunt Dimity" books. http://www.aunt-dimity.com/ You can find her wonderful recipes here too!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sharla

    These truly are "cozy" books. I've read most of them and they are usually dependable three-star books. Once in a while one will be more appealing to me, the characters or the plot or both exactly to my taste. This was one of those. I really enjoyed reading this perfectly lovely British cozy. These truly are "cozy" books. I've read most of them and they are usually dependable three-star books. Once in a while one will be more appealing to me, the characters or the plot or both exactly to my taste. This was one of those. I really enjoyed reading this perfectly lovely British cozy.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    Lori Shepherd follows crumbs from Russian Tea Cakes to a surprising conclusion in this story that shines like polished silver. (Full review submitted to Suspense Magazine)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    What a totally delightful story. On a wintry day the main character, Lori Shepherd, comes across a young girl admiring an exquisite silver sled in a strange and unique little museum. We only meet this young girl, Daisy, in one scene but she is the catalyst for the entire book after Lori finds her coat in a thrift shop with the tiny silver sled in the pocket. This sends Lori, and her very capable side-kick Bree, on a quest to find Daisy and see if her fascinating story of the true owner of the tr What a totally delightful story. On a wintry day the main character, Lori Shepherd, comes across a young girl admiring an exquisite silver sled in a strange and unique little museum. We only meet this young girl, Daisy, in one scene but she is the catalyst for the entire book after Lori finds her coat in a thrift shop with the tiny silver sled in the pocket. This sends Lori, and her very capable side-kick Bree, on a quest to find Daisy and see if her fascinating story of the true owner of the troika sled is indeed a captured Russian prince in need of rescue. Following the weekly schedule of Daisy’s mother, who cleans in six different houses on different days of the week, Lori and Bree discover various households, each with its own story of how they each came to know and admire Daisy. Daisy has left a trail of stories, like breadcrumbs, about each houses’ occupants. If her stories of those people are true, maybe the story of a captured lost prince is true too? As Lori and Bree visit each house, we are treated to vignettes of exquisite writing, capturing the details of each house and its occupants. Like all good side-kicks, Bree both compliments and contrasts Lori in their adventures and discoveries. It was such a joy to accompany Lori and Bree on their step-by-step reveal of the basis behind all of Daisy’s stories, each house leading to the next. The combined stories are like a string of jewels on a necklace drawn together by an amazing and imaginative child and two persistent and curious adults. I always save Nancy Atherton’s books for times of anxiety as they are always written with such goodness, humor, and kindness each novel is a sweet and natural de-stressor. They are the ultimate of cozy mysteries where no one is murdered and with wonderful characters you want to discover living next door to you, with Lori and Bree just down the street. As Bree says about a book in this story: “You know right from the start that each story will have a happy ending, but you can’t imagine how the characters will ever get there.” The Aunt Dimity books have helped me through the death of my father, cancer, and other troubles, providing an oasis of calm that helps me escape any concerns. In these books I know that eventually all will end well, in a nice neat package that lightly slips away, like Aunt Dimity’s handwriting, as I close the book. Thank you Ms. Atherton!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Lori Shepherd is not a fan of February. When broken pipes keep her sons away from their beloved ponies, she and Bree Pym, who is staying with Lori to avoid paint fumes, take the twins to a local manor that is full of dark items. But Lori meets Daisy, a young girl whose mother works at the museum. When the youth's coat, complete with what can only be a stolen salt cellar in the pocket, comes into the local thrift shop the next Monday, Lori is not sure what to do. But a visit with the ghostly Aunt Lori Shepherd is not a fan of February. When broken pipes keep her sons away from their beloved ponies, she and Bree Pym, who is staying with Lori to avoid paint fumes, take the twins to a local manor that is full of dark items. But Lori meets Daisy, a young girl whose mother works at the museum. When the youth's coat, complete with what can only be a stolen salt cellar in the pocket, comes into the local thrift shop the next Monday, Lori is not sure what to do. But a visit with the ghostly Aunt Dimity sends Lori and Bree on a trip around the English countryside in search of Daisy, and the lost Russian prince Daisy talked to Lori about. This is the 18th installment in the Aunt Dimity series, and when I need a cozy that is a cozy in the true sense of the word, I look to an Aunt Dimity novel. This one was good, and introduced a great number of fun characters as Lori and Bree search for the real story behind the Russian prince. The Aunt Dimity books are escapism at its best, and I don't like the idea that there are only a few left before I'm caught up with the author. That means I'll have to find another series that is as entertaining.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    During a cold February, Lori, an American who has long lived in an English village with her family, takes her young boys to visit a museum of curiosities at Skeaping Manor. While there, Lori encounters a little girl named Daisy with a vivid imagination, who tells the story of a lost prince who has been imprisoned and his valuables stolen--including a gorgeous silver troika salt cellar now on display at the manor. The next day, Lori is sorting through donations to a local thrift store and finds t During a cold February, Lori, an American who has long lived in an English village with her family, takes her young boys to visit a museum of curiosities at Skeaping Manor. While there, Lori encounters a little girl named Daisy with a vivid imagination, who tells the story of a lost prince who has been imprisoned and his valuables stolen--including a gorgeous silver troika salt cellar now on display at the manor. The next day, Lori is sorting through donations to a local thrift store and finds the troika in the pocket of a coat she had last seen on Daisy, and begins to wonder if maybe Daisy was telling the truth. But both Daisy and her mother have disappeared. With her young Kiwi neighbor Bree, Lori sets off to find the lost prince Mikhail, and hopefully to discover what became of Daisy. Meh. I've really enjoyed others in this very gentle series of cozies, in which the mysteries (so far as I can recall) are never murders, and there are never any real villains. This one, though, just seemed kind of pointless, especially since the denouement was pretty much a damp squib. I don't think the series has jumped the shark, yet, but this one felt a little phoned in.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Coller

    Anyone who reads my Aunt Dimity reviews is probably wondering why I keep reading them if I always gripe about them...they're just such a great mix of really great and really lousy---it's mesmerizing! Ha! This one was a lesser favorite---very far-fetched and very contrived. (I should add here that I understand that's pretty much a given with most cozies...but it bugs me...which makes me wonder why I enjoy them so much.) I did, however, come to really like the character of Bree. I'm usually really Anyone who reads my Aunt Dimity reviews is probably wondering why I keep reading them if I always gripe about them...they're just such a great mix of really great and really lousy---it's mesmerizing! Ha! This one was a lesser favorite---very far-fetched and very contrived. (I should add here that I understand that's pretty much a given with most cozies...but it bugs me...which makes me wonder why I enjoy them so much.) I did, however, come to really like the character of Bree. I'm usually really annoyed by the angsty teen sidekick trope but I think I like Bree better than Lori. Can Bree be the heroine from here on out? I'm beginning to wonder if Mrs. Atherton makes Lori unlikable on purpose... Bree is level-headed, smart, interesting, and real. She doesn't let her past get her down. I've got one or two more of these here to read this week and then I'll need to go back to the library and trade for more. For months now, I've been reading deep, educational, thoughtful, historical material. I think I got burnt out---that and I just need a little escapist literature for the present time as we're chomping at the bit to go back home after a VERRRRRY long summer vacation in Oregon.

  23. 4 out of 5

    George

    #18 in the Aunt Dimity mystery series. Lori Shepard lives with her husband and family in the Cotswold village of Finch and becomes involved in yet another mystery which she solves with the help of her Aunt Dimity who passed away several years ago. It is now 10 years since American Lori has been living in Finch in a house and estate inherited from Dimity. Lori is mesmerized by sweet but very poor 9 year Daisy Pickering's sad story about a Russian prince who barely escaped with his life from Russia #18 in the Aunt Dimity mystery series. Lori Shepard lives with her husband and family in the Cotswold village of Finch and becomes involved in yet another mystery which she solves with the help of her Aunt Dimity who passed away several years ago. It is now 10 years since American Lori has been living in Finch in a house and estate inherited from Dimity. Lori is mesmerized by sweet but very poor 9 year Daisy Pickering's sad story about a Russian prince who barely escaped with his life from Russia some 80 years earlier who is now being held by people who are selling off his estate. Daisy and her mother suddenly disappear and Lori seeks to discover why that happened as well as to rescue the elderly hostage prince. As is usual in this series, Lori rapidly jumps from one hasty conclusion to another building up elaborate scenarios to explain what is going on.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    Another lovely read in the Aunt Dimity series. It is best to read them in order because they build on previous books if only in small but satisfying details. The later books in the electronic publications have fewer typos than the earlier ones, and that is to the credit of the publisher, in this instance, Viking/Penguin. Author Nancy Atherton may have been referring to this series when her young character Bree says about a fictional series of books: "They're not...silly. You know right from the Another lovely read in the Aunt Dimity series. It is best to read them in order because they build on previous books if only in small but satisfying details. The later books in the electronic publications have fewer typos than the earlier ones, and that is to the credit of the publisher, in this instance, Viking/Penguin. Author Nancy Atherton may have been referring to this series when her young character Bree says about a fictional series of books: "They're not...silly. You know right from the start that each story will have a happy ending, but you can't imagine how the characters will ever get there...the books made it seem possible." And from Aunt Dimity: "A well-written book is a well-written book, regardless of the label a publisher slaps on it." The Aunt Dimity books indeed are well-written.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dina Tanners

    This is the 18th book in the Aunt Dimity series. I had stopped reading the series for a while because the newer books didn't have the charm of previous books. This one again brings that charm back. I really enjoyed it and enjoyed the story of the little girl being involved and helping her to find her "lost prince." There is a little bit about the protagonists twin boys but the main focus is on solving the mystery of the valuable antique silver sleigh salt celler missing from a private museum and This is the 18th book in the Aunt Dimity series. I had stopped reading the series for a while because the newer books didn't have the charm of previous books. This one again brings that charm back. I really enjoyed it and enjoyed the story of the little girl being involved and helping her to find her "lost prince." There is a little bit about the protagonists twin boys but the main focus is on solving the mystery of the valuable antique silver sleigh salt celler missing from a private museum and found in a little's girl's donated coat and who the little girl's 'prince' is....and why she has disappeared. I agree that this could be a good starting place for those unfamiliar with the series and may enjoy a light touch of the paranormal. It is delightful...a mystery but not about murder or anything evil.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Toby

    Very satisfyingly cozy and relaxing to read. Honestly, though, plot-wise the best descriptor I can give is: “yet another wild goose chase.” Lori sees threats that aren’t really there, and because she’s essentially a very kind-hearted person, off she goes to chase after imagined threats. But all’s well that ends well, and this book is no exception. The ending made my whole self smile, from my head to my toes. So what if there wasn’t ever a huge mystery to solve? Making people happy is worth the tro Very satisfyingly cozy and relaxing to read. Honestly, though, plot-wise the best descriptor I can give is: “yet another wild goose chase.” Lori sees threats that aren’t really there, and because she’s essentially a very kind-hearted person, off she goes to chase after imagined threats. But all’s well that ends well, and this book is no exception. The ending made my whole self smile, from my head to my toes. So what if there wasn’t ever a huge mystery to solve? Making people happy is worth the trouble that Lori gets into, I suppose. So mystery-wise, I’d give this a 2/5 stars. However, satisfaction-wise and happiness-wise, I’d give this a 5/5. Take that how you will. 😊

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Gunier

    Another winner in the cozy mystery series with Aunt Dimity. An enjoyable read for the less than serious mystery hound. Aunt Dimity is a deceased honorary aunt of Lori Shepard, an American who inherited an English cottage from Dimity. Through means of the paranormal, Lori and Dimity communicate through a blue journal to solve village and area mysteries. This time it involves a little girl who disappears after telling the story of a lost prince locked away. An old estate made into a museum, and a Another winner in the cozy mystery series with Aunt Dimity. An enjoyable read for the less than serious mystery hound. Aunt Dimity is a deceased honorary aunt of Lori Shepard, an American who inherited an English cottage from Dimity. Through means of the paranormal, Lori and Dimity communicate through a blue journal to solve village and area mysteries. This time it involves a little girl who disappears after telling the story of a lost prince locked away. An old estate made into a museum, and a silver saltcellar add to the tale. Follow Lori and her friend Bree as they try to find all the answers. An enchanting tale.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

    Grabbed at random from the stacks and very readable, but...why? Goodreads tells me this is book EIGHTEEN in the series, gadzooks, I cannot imagine. Maybe if you've already read an astonishing SEVENTEEN BOOKS about Lori Shepherd you don't mind that there's not really any plot? Spoilers, but I don't think you'll mind: I spent the entire book doubting the "mystery" being investigated was actually an extant mystery, and then it turned out I was right, and everything was pretty anticlimactic, and...w Grabbed at random from the stacks and very readable, but...why? Goodreads tells me this is book EIGHTEEN in the series, gadzooks, I cannot imagine. Maybe if you've already read an astonishing SEVENTEEN BOOKS about Lori Shepherd you don't mind that there's not really any plot? Spoilers, but I don't think you'll mind: I spent the entire book doubting the "mystery" being investigated was actually an extant mystery, and then it turned out I was right, and everything was pretty anticlimactic, and...why.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Incredibly repetitive, tedious, twee non-mystery with shallow, idiotic characters and a permeating miasma of saccharine American-abroad, theme-park-foreign-cultures. Boring, drippingly condescending lectures and repeatedly summarising what just happened in the razor thin plot make up the majority of the word count. It's shocking how mundane a novel can be when it features a mystery solving ghost. The author's bio is also hilarious. As if the book didn't make it clear enough that she thinks her re Incredibly repetitive, tedious, twee non-mystery with shallow, idiotic characters and a permeating miasma of saccharine American-abroad, theme-park-foreign-cultures. Boring, drippingly condescending lectures and repeatedly summarising what just happened in the razor thin plot make up the majority of the word count. It's shocking how mundane a novel can be when it features a mystery solving ghost. The author's bio is also hilarious. As if the book didn't make it clear enough that she thinks her readers are morons.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Peter Barr

    Aunt Dimity and the Lost Prince is not only the coziest of mysteries, it is almost a child's tale. And, it is the a fine example of the journey being better than the destiny. The premise of these stories is Lori Shepherd, an American living in a village cottage with her husband and children solves mysteries with the help of a deceased woman who communicates through a journal. In this episode, Lori and her friend are looking to return a piece of silver based on the tall tales of a child who has d Aunt Dimity and the Lost Prince is not only the coziest of mysteries, it is almost a child's tale. And, it is the a fine example of the journey being better than the destiny. The premise of these stories is Lori Shepherd, an American living in a village cottage with her husband and children solves mysteries with the help of a deceased woman who communicates through a journal. In this episode, Lori and her friend are looking to return a piece of silver based on the tall tales of a child who has disappeared. I hope I haven't given up too much.

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