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The Amazing Spider-Man: Kraven's Last Hunt

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Kraven the Hunter has stalked and killed every animal known to man. But there is one beast that has eluded him. One quarry that has not only eluded him, but has mocked him at every turn. His prey: the wall-crawling vigilante known as Spider-Man. And to prove that he is the web-slinger's master, he will pull on his costume and become him... after he shoots and buries him si Kraven the Hunter has stalked and killed every animal known to man. But there is one beast that has eluded him. One quarry that has not only eluded him, but has mocked him at every turn. His prey: the wall-crawling vigilante known as Spider-Man. And to prove that he is the web-slinger's master, he will pull on his costume and become him... after he shoots and buries him six feet under.


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Kraven the Hunter has stalked and killed every animal known to man. But there is one beast that has eluded him. One quarry that has not only eluded him, but has mocked him at every turn. His prey: the wall-crawling vigilante known as Spider-Man. And to prove that he is the web-slinger's master, he will pull on his costume and become him... after he shoots and buries him si Kraven the Hunter has stalked and killed every animal known to man. But there is one beast that has eluded him. One quarry that has not only eluded him, but has mocked him at every turn. His prey: the wall-crawling vigilante known as Spider-Man. And to prove that he is the web-slinger's master, he will pull on his costume and become him... after he shoots and buries him six feet under.

30 review for The Amazing Spider-Man: Kraven's Last Hunt

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Definitely one of the strongest stories involving Spider-Man This edition collects the storyline formally known as “Fearful Symmetry: Kraven’s Last Hunt”, originally published in “Web of Spider-Man #31 & 32, Amazing Spider-Man #293 & 294 and Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man #131 & 132. Writer: J.M. DeMatteis Illustrator: Mike Zeck Letterer: Rick Parker (I wanted to highlight him too, since his work in lettering on this particular storyline was superb.) READER-SENSE TINGLING! I WANTED T Definitely one of the strongest stories involving Spider-Man This edition collects the storyline formally known as “Fearful Symmetry: Kraven’s Last Hunt”, originally published in “Web of Spider-Man #31 & 32, Amazing Spider-Man #293 & 294 and Peter Parker, The Spectacular Spider-Man #131 & 132. Writer: J.M. DeMatteis Illustrator: Mike Zeck Letterer: Rick Parker (I wanted to highlight him too, since his work in lettering on this particular storyline was superb.) READER-SENSE TINGLING! I WANTED TO READ THIS! Spyder! Spyder! Burning bright, in the forests of the night, what immortal hand or eye, could frame thy fearful… symmetry? I knew about the existence of this particular storyline since many years ago, even I read in some guide book about Spider-Man where it was featured in the Top10 of the best stories about the character, but honestly I got really impressed (and my curiosity exploded) when I read a promotional magazine about the 75 years of Marvel (obviously counting since its days as Timely Comics) where in a poll list where fans voted for the Marvel’s 75 favorites storylines and/or single issues and Kraven’s Last Hunt got the #3 spot!!! It was a list featuring material from all Marvel universe and Kraven’s Last Hunt was surpassed only by Civil War and The Death of Gwen Stacy. So, until then, I was aware about its importance of this story, inside of the titles of Spider-Man but I was amazed (pun intended but with respect) when this tale got a so high position in that poll involving the entire Marvel universe. I wanted to read that story! Of course, any voted list or any published list will be polemic and questioned until Ragnarok, but still, it was clear that Kraven´s Last Hunt was something worthy to read and curiously enough I found a TPB on the local comic book store so I decided that it was time to meet this story. STOP!... AND READ THE INTRODUCTION! Stories have lives of their own (quoted from the TPB’s Introduction written by J.M. DeMatteis, the author of the story) I don’t know if you use to read the introduction on the TPB’s editions. I do it and not always they are something any of value, but if you ever decide to read this story and you get this same edition, please, read the introduction. You will realize that it’s worthy of your time. Besides informing the many times that DeMatteis tried that editors (from Marvel and even DC) would pick the premise of his story to be used on several characters like Wonder Man and Batman, finally to land with your friendly neighborhood web-crawler, also the introduction is a beautiful tribute to the life that any good story has, a life so vivid that in many times the writers hardly have any control over them but only barely able to put them in paper just like they wanted to exist. THE SPIDER, THE HUNTER AND THE VERMIN My triumph frightens you, doesn’t it? Since I read the run of The Saga of Swamp Thing by Alan Moore, I have kept saying: “There aren’t bad characters, only bad writers.” Nowadays anybody can say how cool is Swamp Thing, but back then, like more than 30 years ago, nobody was giving a damn about Swamp Thing. Sure, even Len Wein did a fair job (Hey! This guy created Wolverine!) but it was clear that Swamp Thing wasn’t anything that readers were running to buy at the newsstands, but when Alan Moore got control of the title... and BAM!... Swamp Thing became the founding stone of what would be Vertigo Comics later. J.M. DeMatteis planned to use a whole new villain for this story, which wasn’t so odd if you think in similar storylines where a new villain is able to beat a relevant superhero like Doomsday and Bane were able to do against Superman and Batman. It’s clear why is easier to use a whole new villain to avoid the raging fans questioning why the heck certain known villain was able to beat the hero if that villain isn’t as cool or powerful than their favorite ones. You never will please the masses. So, I celebrate the “balls” of J.M. DeMatteis of choosing of a kinda minor villain like Kraven, the Hunter as the focus of this powerful story. Sure, Kraven, the Hunter is known member of the rogues’ gallery of Spidey, but I am sure that anybody doing their own Top10 of favorite villains or merely mentioning the most powerful criminals of Spider-Man’s titles, when you have heavy weights like Green Goblin, Doctor Octopus, Venom, Mysterio, Lizard, Scorpion, etc… before the publication of this story, it would be likely that many fans would omit to Kraven. Not anymore. And if you think that in the mix, DeMatteis include Vermin to the formula, you could be sure that something unique will be done. Anybody can write something entertained even great if you use Venom... ...but Kraven and Vermin? You need to be a writer, a good writer to build something like this here. Even I think that the story is a statement why the super-heroes are always able to win (and survive) in the comic book reality, since over there, the super-villains didn’t work or react like the real life criminals. The super-villains tend to overwork their plans along with their tactics to trap or to kill the heroes. When a simple bullet can do the job. And if you think, “well sure, Spider-Man isn’t bulletproof but there are other super-heroes invulnerable to bullets”. Another mistake. Not always you have to point the bullet to the primary target to do the wished damage. Nobody is an island. Always there is someone close. A simple bullet can do the job. And that’s the most frightening thing of real life. Force-fielded jails mounted on rockets into the sun, giant hourglasses full of quicksand, moving cutting blades over platforms above of erupting volcanoes, etc... Nothing of the sort is so effective, so deadly and so frightening like a simple bullet. A bullet, a coffin and a corpse. A simple formula to put fear into the heart of even the bravest hero. And when it’s done by a villain like Kraven, an experienced trained hunter, but still a man without any metahuman powers, the whole concept got even more frightening. That’s the beauty of Kraven’s Last Hunt. That’s the power of this story.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Kraven the Hunter, aware that he's getting too old for this shit, decides to go out with a bang. He drugs Spider-Man, beats the shit out of him, and buries him alive. Kraven, dressed as Spidey, goes on a rampage to prove he's better than Spider-Man, until Spider-Man digs his way out of the grave... The great thing about Marvel Unlimited is that you can finally catch up on some of the epic stories you missed when you were a kid. This one was pretty bad ass. In some ways, Kraven's Last Hunt is the p Kraven the Hunter, aware that he's getting too old for this shit, decides to go out with a bang. He drugs Spider-Man, beats the shit out of him, and buries him alive. Kraven, dressed as Spidey, goes on a rampage to prove he's better than Spider-Man, until Spider-Man digs his way out of the grave... The great thing about Marvel Unlimited is that you can finally catch up on some of the epic stories you missed when you were a kid. This one was pretty bad ass. In some ways, Kraven's Last Hunt is the precursor for Superior Spider-Man. Kraven gets Spidey out of the way and goes on to show what kind of Spider-Man he'd make and then Peter gets to clean up the mess, such as dealing with Vermin and explaining why it looks like Spidey murdered some people. Also, there's Peter dealing with exhaustion and claustrophobia for being buried alive for two weeks... Kraven's Last Hunt actually holds up fairly well. The art is better than most of the art from the time period and the writing is actually some of the best Marvel had in the 1980's. Kraven has his finest hour and then Spider-Man has one of his. There are a couple moments in this storyline that remind me of Spider-Man lifting that giant hunk of machinery off of himself during the Ditko run. It shows what Spider-Man is all about. There are some quintessential Spider-Man tales everyone Spider-Fan should read. This is one of them. Four out of five stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    "There is no Spider-Man. He's a mask, a myth, a lie. Oh, sure - it'd be great if just putting on a costume could miraculously change the man underneath, but it can't. I'm not Spider-Man. I'm just . . . Peter Parker." -- the thoughts of Peter Parker, a.k.a Spider-Man, on pages 13-14 A nostalgia re-read, I remember being shocked and then rocked back on my psychic heels when first encountering this storyline in the summer of '87. (I was only twelve years old at the time, and it was far more graphic "There is no Spider-Man. He's a mask, a myth, a lie. Oh, sure - it'd be great if just putting on a costume could miraculously change the man underneath, but it can't. I'm not Spider-Man. I'm just . . . Peter Parker." -- the thoughts of Peter Parker, a.k.a Spider-Man, on pages 13-14 A nostalgia re-read, I remember being shocked and then rocked back on my psychic heels when first encountering this storyline in the summer of '87. (I was only twelve years old at the time, and it was far more graphic in nature than any previous superhero-involved tale that I can remember reading.) A brief synopsis - Spider-Man's longtime nemesis Kraven the Hunter appears to experience a severe psychotic break and resorts to some truly disturbing actions to smear and then vanquish our friendly neighborhood web-slinger. And I'm not joking when I say disturbing - readers with arachnophobia or murophobia (fear of spiders and rats, respectively) will likely want to flee to the hills after witnessing certain disgusting moments, and the tone of the plot pinballs between mostly psychological but also a bit of splatterific horror. Thankfully, there is that indelible scene of Spider-Man triumphantly rising from a would-be grave - on a requisite dark and stormy night, with a perfectly-timed thunder strike - to save his sullied reputation and make things right again. This was a wily and exceptional way to mark (at the time of publication) the silver anniversary of Marvel Comics' flagship character.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Kraven, a long-time Spidey villain, decides that he will hunt Spider-man as apparently Spider-man is the last creature he's been looking to defeat. But he also wants to prove that he’s a better Spider-man than Spider-man – for some reason. That's pretty much the set-up but with a title like "Kraven's Last Hunt", something decisive is likely to happen like a death of sorts and seeing as the cover has Spidey climbing out of a grave, I'm guessing it's not him who pops it. So here follows a review w Kraven, a long-time Spidey villain, decides that he will hunt Spider-man as apparently Spider-man is the last creature he's been looking to defeat. But he also wants to prove that he’s a better Spider-man than Spider-man – for some reason. That's pretty much the set-up but with a title like "Kraven's Last Hunt", something decisive is likely to happen like a death of sorts and seeing as the cover has Spidey climbing out of a grave, I'm guessing it's not him who pops it. So here follows a review with some 25 year old spoilers: How familiar are you with Kraven? If the answer is "who?" chances are you won't be exactly impressed by his introduction in this book as J. M. DeMatteis doesn't spend much time on his character except for a brief backstory at the start where we find out he's a Russian nobleman exiled from his homeland who likes hunting a lot. Because there's very little of Spider-man in the book, this is the character we're left with who we're supposed to relate to, empathise with, etc. Except Kraven's a loony who eats spiders "to gain their strength!", is obsessed with "honour" for his family and sees him accomplishing this honour by killing a guy who dresses in a black Spider-man outfit (in this book Spidey's outfit is trés emo-black!). We're supposed to care about this guy? It's a very shallow character portrait. After "killing" Spidey, Kraven becomes Spider-man for a while(!) by killing criminals instead of stringing them up with web fluid which in his mind makes him a better man because...? Also he doesn't have web shooters or can climb on walls so I don't see how he's Spider-man at all, he just has the outfit. Then there's the third main character, Vermin, who's an obscure villain that's a rat/human experiment gone wrong who murders/eats women at night. In a previous story arc Spidey and Cap spent an entire book taking down this character; his inclusion in this book is simply for Kraven to defeat him as easily as he did Spidey thus making him “better” than Spider-man (what a dumb character!). But really Kraven defeats both characters far too easily to convincingly claim that he’s a “better” anything, it’s just plotted in this contrived fashion to give the character some validation before getting rid of him. Spider-man's barely in this book so be prepared for a lot of boring Kraven and Vermin stuff before getting to Spidey's appearances. But when he does appear, it doesn't seem to be the real Spider-man. For instance, the first issue where Kraven defeats him? No way would Spider-man be defeated by a D-list villain so easily! And when he punches Kraven in the face? Kraven's head should've come off. How many times have we seen Spidey do incredible things because of his super-strength? Punching Kraven, an ordinary human with no powers, full force in the face like he does should've killed him. In the end it didn't feel like a very substantial story and everything that lead Kraven to book his place on the bullet train felt very contrived. It's like wish-fulfilment for the villain before rubbing him out of the Marvel U. I was even hoping for a "and it was all a dream" kind of ending. We did see Kraven doing a load of hallucinatory drugs at the start, and it would explain how he was able to defeat Spidey and Vermin so easily. "Kraven's Last Hunt" isn't nearly as brilliant as others would suggest. It's not a very good Spider-man book and feels more like a bonkers acid trip. Definitely not something I would single out as a "classic".

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    This is one of those iconic Spider-Man stories, every Spidey fan should check out. Long-time Spider-Man villain Kraven the Hunter is going off the deep-end. He drugs Spider-Man and dresses up as him, brutally beating up muggers and capturing Vermin, a rat-man coming up from the sewers to eat people. Did I mention this story is twisted and dark? It's got people being eaten by swarms of rats and people covered in spiders, so if you have musophobia or arachnophopia, you may want to skip this. I sti This is one of those iconic Spider-Man stories, every Spidey fan should check out. Long-time Spider-Man villain Kraven the Hunter is going off the deep-end. He drugs Spider-Man and dresses up as him, brutally beating up muggers and capturing Vermin, a rat-man coming up from the sewers to eat people. Did I mention this story is twisted and dark? It's got people being eaten by swarms of rats and people covered in spiders, so if you have musophobia or arachnophopia, you may want to skip this. I still find the culmination of this story shocking. The story is really powered by the art. Mick Zeck's art is fantastic, really setting the macabre, horror tone of the story. He was one of the best artists working at Marvel in the 80's and this story showcases why.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Molly™☺

    The moral conflict between being a villain but acting as the hero protagonist brings about an interesting introspection into Kraven's character. It's this inner fight that tries to carry the whole story on its back, and it does an okay job at illustrating the struggle. Unfortunately, this is one of those stories that suffers somewhat if the reader has a pre-existing expetation due to the books status as a 'must read'. It didn't quite reach the levels I was expecting, and I didn't find myself too The moral conflict between being a villain but acting as the hero protagonist brings about an interesting introspection into Kraven's character. It's this inner fight that tries to carry the whole story on its back, and it does an okay job at illustrating the struggle. Unfortunately, this is one of those stories that suffers somewhat if the reader has a pre-existing expetation due to the books status as a 'must read'. It didn't quite reach the levels I was expecting, and I didn't find myself too invested in the story or the characters. Interesting, but something that could have been executed in a far more engaging way. Sorry, Spidey fans!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    I only inked and embellished this book over pencil art by Mike Zeck, but it's one of my best jobs, and the story is very good as well. I only inked and embellished this book over pencil art by Mike Zeck, but it's one of my best jobs, and the story is very good as well.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo

    That creepy image of Spider-Man in his black costume rising from his own grave is enough to tell you that this won’t be your typical Spider-Man story. On its cover alone, this makes it an easy choice for my Halloween read number 2. This is a perfect melding of story and art, all beautifully done, from J. M. DeMatteis dark, psychological script, to Mike Zeck’s lush pencils and colors and Bob McLeod’s bold inks. What results is something sublime that I am at a loss for words. Multiple readings woul That creepy image of Spider-Man in his black costume rising from his own grave is enough to tell you that this won’t be your typical Spider-Man story. On its cover alone, this makes it an easy choice for my Halloween read number 2. This is a perfect melding of story and art, all beautifully done, from J. M. DeMatteis dark, psychological script, to Mike Zeck’s lush pencils and colors and Bob McLeod’s bold inks. What results is something sublime that I am at a loss for words. Multiple readings would not doubt help this work reveal its secrets to me in time. This is an essential comics read. You don’t have to be a Spider-Man fan to appreciate it. It stands on its own merits. This is a tale that has aged gracefully, although the character mythos has seen a lot changes since the initial publication of this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    This is a story were one of Spider-man villains drugs him, buries him alive for two weeks and then takes it upon himself to dress up as Spider-man and fight crime while he is high as a kite. It's as awesome as it sounds and it's one of the greatest Spider-man stories ever. Kraven is a well established rogue for Spider-man. I wouldn't say he is A-list like Green Goblin and Doctor Octopus, but he's middle B-list material. I think his problem was that no writer had really done anything interesting w This is a story were one of Spider-man villains drugs him, buries him alive for two weeks and then takes it upon himself to dress up as Spider-man and fight crime while he is high as a kite. It's as awesome as it sounds and it's one of the greatest Spider-man stories ever. Kraven is a well established rogue for Spider-man. I wouldn't say he is A-list like Green Goblin and Doctor Octopus, but he's middle B-list material. I think his problem was that no writer had really done anything interesting with him before this point. He has hunted and killed creatures of all kinds all over the world, but he has never defeated Spider-man up to this point. Instead of killing Spider-man, which he reveals later in the story he could have easily done, he drugs him to the point of unconsciousness and buries him alive. You have to remember that this is decades before Kill Bill, so this was a new and, perhaps, even more terrifying concept. Whilst Spider-man is in the ground, Kraven then decides to take a lot of drugs himself, dress up as Spider-man and go out into the streets of New York and beat up thugs. It's also interesting that this was at a time were Spider-man was donning his black costume, which is now regarded as a darker period in his life. The art is pretty great and holds up really well against modern comics. Mike Zeck uses panels in a unique way for building suspense and adding to the creepiness throughout this story, especially in the Vermin scenes. He's also great at drawing facial expressions, which helps show the anger of the characters throughout the third act. It's definitely worth a read, even if you're not a die-hard Spider-man fan.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rattoni

    Why is Kraven so tortured by the spider figure? Everything in here revolves around that, but it is never explained, and how does he come in terms with it? and why did he wear the Spiderman suit? This is usually listed as one of spider-man´s best stories, and it has a couple of interesting things, but in the end it seems to be a lot about nothing. The small flashbacks make this story interesting, and in general it has a fast pace, but there are many gaps in the whole thing. I had seen Kraven in o Why is Kraven so tortured by the spider figure? Everything in here revolves around that, but it is never explained, and how does he come in terms with it? and why did he wear the Spiderman suit? This is usually listed as one of spider-man´s best stories, and it has a couple of interesting things, but in the end it seems to be a lot about nothing. The small flashbacks make this story interesting, and in general it has a fast pace, but there are many gaps in the whole thing. I had seen Kraven in one of spider-man´s cartoons, and more recently in the video game Shattered Dimensions (cool videogame by the way). There, he is an OK character, but here he just seems to be on drugs the whole time with no real explanaition of what he´s doing or why he is doing it. Another thing I found interesting is that the whole story is told though the reflections of Kraven, Vermin, Spider-man and Mary Jane. There isn´t much dialog between characters, these inner thoughts lead the whole thing and in general seem well written. The thoughts that MJ has when Peter goes missing show a lot of frustration I really liked that. Then, Mary Jane goes out looking for him, when she finds him, she realizes it`s not really him but someone disguised as him. I think this would`ve turned her insane, this could`ve been an interesting part of the story, about someone trying to be strong when the one she loves goes missing on his quest for justice. After that, a really strange hallucination awakes Peter (really, what was all that for?) after two weeks, TWO WEEKS! When they finally meet again MJ does not seem to be worried at all, and she accepts him like if nothing had happened! They are both in such a good that they decide to get the party started (come on! he was buried for two weeks, he is weak, he hasn´t had a bath, the guy must smell like a corpse! yet, they continued their romance), that was lame. They don´t talk at all about what MJ has just gone through. Meh. After the showdown with Kraven and Vermin, Kraven decides to take his own life, I like how that scene got portrayed, but there doesn´t seem to be a real explanation on how he found that peace. In the end, thanks to a nice confession that Kraven left, everything goes back to normal, just as it was when we started. I recently read that this story was intended for batman and the joker ( and Killer Croc or Man-Bat I guess). I don´t know how that cuod´ve worked, but this is full of gaps and I don`t know how it has reached such a high spot in spider-man´s top stories. I still belive that Spider-man is a GREAT character, but I want to find the stories where it shows. Any suggestions?

  11. 4 out of 5

    JB

    Great Spider-Man story. A dark Spider-Man story. Spider-Man gets defeated and tormented by Kraven the Hunter. He burries him alive and steals his identity, giving Spider-Man a bad name by being far more violent than ol' Webhead is. He also sets Vermin loose on the world. This all is part of Kraven's plan to die happily after defeating and replacing Spider-Man, becoming his superior in everything. I liked the art, it made me bump the Secret Wars omnibi to the top of my omnibus wishlist, because of Great Spider-Man story. A dark Spider-Man story. Spider-Man gets defeated and tormented by Kraven the Hunter. He burries him alive and steals his identity, giving Spider-Man a bad name by being far more violent than ol' Webhead is. He also sets Vermin loose on the world. This all is part of Kraven's plan to die happily after defeating and replacing Spider-Man, becoming his superior in everything. I liked the art, it made me bump the Secret Wars omnibi to the top of my omnibus wishlist, because of Mike Zeck being the artist on Kraven's Last Hunt as well as on the first Secret Wars story. Seeing the spiders gathering on Spider-Man's grave, with the climax being Spider-Man bursting out of his grave. It's a powerful image. If you're a Spider-Man fan and haven't read this one yet. You're missing out. It's considered one of the greatest Spider-Man stories ever written. And with good reason.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    3.0 stars. One of the best Spider-man story arcs of all time. Kraven the Hunter is portrayed very well as a gifted, talented individual whose personal demons and psychological problems have led him to focus on Spidey as the cause of everything that has gone wrong in his life. A very good story-line and one I remember liking very much. Recommended!!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Danger

    Kraven is tripping out on ayahuasca-type shit and still one-up Spiderman at every turn. This is a nightmarish version of Spiderman's world, for sure, and almost unpredictable in how it will play out. Well written. Action oriented. Very good. Kraven is tripping out on ayahuasca-type shit and still one-up Spiderman at every turn. This is a nightmarish version of Spiderman's world, for sure, and almost unpredictable in how it will play out. Well written. Action oriented. Very good.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Carlex

    Three and a half stars. It had been a long time since I had read a good Spidey story : )

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    Incredible. Absolutely incredible. So far, this may be the best comic I have ever read (although, after finishing this I began reading "Marvels," and that may become my favorite due to how stellar it has been thus far). If you are a Spider-Man fan, this is an absolute necessity. If you like Marvel in general, you owe it to yourself to check out "Kraven's Last Hunt." Without giving anything away that isn't told in the blurb on the Amazon page, Kraven the Hunter kills Spider-Man, buries him, and t Incredible. Absolutely incredible. So far, this may be the best comic I have ever read (although, after finishing this I began reading "Marvels," and that may become my favorite due to how stellar it has been thus far). If you are a Spider-Man fan, this is an absolute necessity. If you like Marvel in general, you owe it to yourself to check out "Kraven's Last Hunt." Without giving anything away that isn't told in the blurb on the Amazon page, Kraven the Hunter kills Spider-Man, buries him, and takes the mantle of being Spider-Man up for himself. Strange that this is not a spoiler, yes? Well, it isn't. Not at all. There is a reason that is essentially the same as all the other short descriptions for this book: So much more happens. In fact, while that is the inciting event, the story itself feels as if it has little to do with it, taking that plot (which, I imagine, Superior Spider-Man--a run I have not read hitherto, but have heard great things about--owes its basic idea to, if nothing else) and weaving a spectacular and psychological tale of self-hatred, love, and overcoming that which is feared. Both Peter Parker and Sergei Kravinoff are wonderfully complex characters, and this is one of the best examples of that. Not only that, Mary Jane Watson is given more than a few moments to show just how wonderful a character she is. The more I think about "Kraven's Last Hunt," the more I love it. I tend not to reread anything but my favorite stories, but I have a feeling I will reread this at least a few more times throughout my lifetime. If you haven't already, read "Kraven's Last Hunt!"

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lono

    Spidey was a hero of my youth. His naïve optimism and freewheeling attitude appealed to me before real life had a chance to stuff it's bitter little realities down my throat. I will always have a soft spot for him, but I typically don't read much Amazing these days. Kraven's Last Hunt was a surprise for me. Bought it at a discount because I had never read the story and many have recommended it. It was certainly more to my tastes. Somber and dark, it's unique in the Spider-Man stories I've read. Spidey was a hero of my youth. His naïve optimism and freewheeling attitude appealed to me before real life had a chance to stuff it's bitter little realities down my throat. I will always have a soft spot for him, but I typically don't read much Amazing these days. Kraven's Last Hunt was a surprise for me. Bought it at a discount because I had never read the story and many have recommended it. It was certainly more to my tastes. Somber and dark, it's unique in the Spider-Man stories I've read. Dated, but not unbearably so. Gave a little more depth to a Kraven. Historically he's sort of a tool that got his ass kicked on the regular and always seemed a little to one dimensional to me. This story added some much needed depth to him as a villain. Turns out he's a certifiable nut. The art is probably the best I've seen from Zeck. His stuff doesn't typically do much for me so that's saying something. Probably worth a read if your a Spidey fan.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jared Millet

    A classic Spidey tale from the true Golden Age of comics - the late 80's. All the best-remembered Spider-Man stories revolve around the death of a major character (Gwen Stacy, etc) and this is no exception. Kraven was a minor Marvel villain for years. In this final Kraven story, DeMatteis reveals him to be a tortured soul battling his own personal demons, which he projected onto his hapless foe: our friendly neighborhood Spider-Man. In the end, Kraven wins the battle he was truly fighting and fi A classic Spidey tale from the true Golden Age of comics - the late 80's. All the best-remembered Spider-Man stories revolve around the death of a major character (Gwen Stacy, etc) and this is no exception. Kraven was a minor Marvel villain for years. In this final Kraven story, DeMatteis reveals him to be a tortured soul battling his own personal demons, which he projected onto his hapless foe: our friendly neighborhood Spider-Man. In the end, Kraven wins the battle he was truly fighting and finds a measure of personal peace and redemption (in one of the most grisly and shocking scenes ever to appear in a mainstream, family-friendly comic book). As I expect them to churn out ever more Spider-Man movies, I sincerely hope that they use this graphic novel as a basis for one.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    OH MY GOOGLE THIS IS GOOD!!! Sorry had a bit of a geek seizure there, but i can't describe how good this is! So this book features Kraven, he's done it all, seen it all, all his life dreams fulfilled except for one thing, Spider-man... So Kraven decides that the only way to beat spider-man is to become Spider-man, that's all I'll say for lack of spoilers. The Artwork was so good, there were panels so well down that you didn't need dialogue to explain what's happening or what transformation a cha OH MY GOOGLE THIS IS GOOD!!! Sorry had a bit of a geek seizure there, but i can't describe how good this is! So this book features Kraven, he's done it all, seen it all, all his life dreams fulfilled except for one thing, Spider-man... So Kraven decides that the only way to beat spider-man is to become Spider-man, that's all I'll say for lack of spoilers. The Artwork was so good, there were panels so well down that you didn't need dialogue to explain what's happening or what transformation a character is going through! The Story is very good even though it lacks dialogue its storytelling is just so perfectly executed; the story is very dark and gritty though, not the usual happy fun-time spider-man! But overall a must read for spider-man fans!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dimitris Papastergiou

    This was like poetry in comic book form. Kraven is at his best here, and honestly I haven't read a better version of him by any other writer. Not that Kraven was ever written in any way that would excite anyone or interest that much besides a typical villain, but here, he's taking the role of the protagonist and just by the way he talks and the decisions he makes, he's clearly a depressed man who he only wants to prove something to himself and then be done with everything in his life. This one is This was like poetry in comic book form. Kraven is at his best here, and honestly I haven't read a better version of him by any other writer. Not that Kraven was ever written in any way that would excite anyone or interest that much besides a typical villain, but here, he's taking the role of the protagonist and just by the way he talks and the decisions he makes, he's clearly a depressed man who he only wants to prove something to himself and then be done with everything in his life. This one is one of the comics that I knew it was a "big deal" and a must for Spider-Man reads, but I had no idea that I'd like it that much. Highly recommended for Spidey fans!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    This is an amazing storyline of the friendly neighbourhood superhero. The art works so well with the environment set up by the writer. They both are so immersive that I felt like I was reading a motion comics. And another spectacular thing the writer has done is given us the thoughts going on in the characters' heads and especially that of Kraven. A must read book for Spider-Man fans This is an amazing storyline of the friendly neighbourhood superhero. The art works so well with the environment set up by the writer. They both are so immersive that I felt like I was reading a motion comics. And another spectacular thing the writer has done is given us the thoughts going on in the characters' heads and especially that of Kraven. A must read book for Spider-Man fans

  21. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    One of those comics that elevates the genre. It's like an epic poem or Shakespearean tragedy in comic form. One of those comics that elevates the genre. It's like an epic poem or Shakespearean tragedy in comic form.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

    Wow this was quite a story. I loved the characterization and poetic narrative of Kraven the Hunter. Excellent dialogue, beautiful art and a hell of a depressing ending. Great story throughout.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Max's Comic Reviews and Lists

    Jungle Jitters with Spida Mayn So this is probably one of the most well known and beloved Spider-Man stories of all time. In fact, one of the most well known and beloved Marvel stories of all time. And I can see why. I knew the big thing that happens in this book a long time ago, so it was all just a matter of seeing what came after. And I gotta say. This book did impress me. Not just because it is a great tale of revenge, but because it is an unconventional character study that spans a very Jungle Jitters with Spida Mayn So this is probably one of the most well known and beloved Spider-Man stories of all time. In fact, one of the most well known and beloved Marvel stories of all time. And I can see why. I knew the big thing that happens in this book a long time ago, so it was all just a matter of seeing what came after. And I gotta say. This book did impress me. Not just because it is a great tale of revenge, but because it is an unconventional character study that spans a very dark, rainy, and badass 6 issues. The first issue is geerrrrate. The whole book is like a nightmarish dream-like sequence and this first issue shows that best. And I mean that. The whole issue is very trippy and feels like a bad dream. The inner dialogue is fantastic throughout this entire book. Especially Peter's racing thoughts before his "death" or him bashing himself for using the same tired catchphrases against villains or him questioning himself for doing something small and stupid. The short version is: I LOVED the way the inner dialogue was written. Loved it. Just before I get into Kraven I just want to say I also really enjoyed Mary Jane's part in the book. Sure she was nothing but your typical damsel in distress but this book was written 87' so whatever. She was the human side of all the crazy shit that goes on in the story. Her thoughts and mental breakdown are very entertaining. (Damn that sounds messed up) Kraven, Spider-Man, and Vermin are as J.M. DeMatteis are the perfect trifecta that make the story work and makes it what it is. This story is quite an excellent character study that pretty much laughs in the face of your typical hero vs villain revenge dynamic. This is truly a very unique hero and villain relationship that I have NEVER seen before. And I am very happy I experienced it. (Now I can become even more critical of hero vs villain writing. Brilliant.) I won't spoil anything but Kraven while not one of my favourite villains is definitely the most interesting in the way he looks at the fight with himself, reality, and Spider-Man. It really does go a lot deeper than that guys. Kraven sees himself above everyone because they are living in a broken society unlike the society of the wild. He also sees everyone as beasts or creatures that have to be hunted or bested. Like Spider-Man. Kraven seeks out to be Peter Parker's superior in every way. And when I read the amazing finale to this book I started to realize, Holy Shit! Kraven is a Superior Spider in a lot of ways. And he's proving it! Vermin is a pivotal character. And I loved his inclusion in this book because of 2 main reasons. 1: Kraven's and Peter Parker's perception of Vermin is very different. Kraven sees the beast that has to be hunted and Peter sees the man that was broken by Baron Zemo. Vermin provides a way for both of Kraven and Spider-Man to achieve their victory. 2: I actually started to empathize with this human eating rat scum. And to be honest I think most readers did but I still found that impressive. I have 2 things I didn't like about this story. And one of them I have totally NEVER said EVER. NOPE NEVER EVER. The book was too short. Ya okay fine. I have said that about a trillion books. But I can't help it. I wish there was more fever dreams from Peter, or Kraven besting the role of Spider-Man, or more of Mary Jane and her struggles. I don't just mean "aw man I wish there was more!" No, I mean a longer story would I think it would have strengthened the pacing and overall impact of the ending. And my last problem with the book is that at times it was a bit too acid trippy. "Spider! I love you! Kill you over and over and over and over and over! Dead! I am Dead! I! I am!" A lot of pages are filled with weird lines of inner thoughts that just go on and on exactly like that. And if I'm being honest I didn't like it. I wish there was more coherent and understandable dialogue. It certainly would have made the reading experience easier to follow and just more enjoyable. The art by Mike Zeck is Bee-yu-tiful. This is some of the best art I have ever seen in a Marvel book. Just the dark colours and gorgeous penciling really bring the story and especially the combat to life. Couldn't be happier with the art. SO. In the end, I thought this was a GREAT story that told a very unconventional and compelling type of story that I had never seen before. Once again Kraven and Spider-Man's dynamic is infinitely more interesting than your generic hero vs villain relationship. A dark-ass tone is present throughout the entirety of story that is never betrayed, and the "symmetry" at the beginning and end of the story made me go "OOOHH DAMN!" A few problems with the dialogue and length of the story, but regardless if you are a Spider-Man fan and haven't read this................fucking do that, and if you aren't an avid reader of the character like me, you can still love it. I am living proof of that. Letter Grade: (A)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris Gordon

    What can I say? This has to be one of the best Spider-Man graphic novel around! Definitely not a typical Spidey comic in the least; this one is far more dark and serious. Kraven's Last Hunt had such a deep storyline following Kraven's psychotic obsession to prove himself to be better than Spider-Man, going to some of the most extreme lengths a villain can possibly go to accomplish this feat. I always thought of Kraven as a transparent villain, one that just wanted to go after Spidey for the thri What can I say? This has to be one of the best Spider-Man graphic novel around! Definitely not a typical Spidey comic in the least; this one is far more dark and serious. Kraven's Last Hunt had such a deep storyline following Kraven's psychotic obsession to prove himself to be better than Spider-Man, going to some of the most extreme lengths a villain can possibly go to accomplish this feat. I always thought of Kraven as a transparent villain, one that just wanted to go after Spidey for the thrill of the hunt with little else motivating him beyond that. However, Kraven's Last Hunt portrayed Kraven in a whole new light, one that illuminates his vital role in Spider-Man's storied history – up there with the likes of the Green Goblin and Venom in terms of importance. If he wasn't before, this graphic novel placed Kraven the Hunter amongst Spider-Man's greatest foes of all-time. The chilling rainy atmosphere and eerie narration added to its gritty vibe, whereas most other Spidey comics are lighthearted and barely touch upon such dark subject matter. This was, without a doubt, one of the darkest Spider-Man stories told for its time – still one the darkest to this date. To pile on some additional praise, I would be remiss if I didn't mention how incredible the artwork was; this has been my favorite artistic rendition of the Spider-Man comics to date. Virtually everything works in this graphic novel; nothing seems out of place to me to warrant any criticism. There are definitely other five star Spidey graphic novels out there – The Death of Jean DeWolff, Maximum Carnage – but none have ever come close to the grandeur of this brilliant comic book masterpiece, for never before has Spider-Man found himself to be so vulnerable and exposed as in this story. With all the praise I can muster, I wholeheartedly recommend this phenomenal graphic novel to any Spidey fan or fan of great comic book stories in general. With the oversaturation of superhero movies having plagued the theaters for the past ten years, why hasn't one of them been an adaptation of Kraven's Last Hunt? If any Spider-Man story deserved to be honored with a big-screen release, this would have to be that story. With any luck, we will one day see this marvel portrayed in film where I believe it can truly shine.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Berk

    Kraven's Last Hunt is a legendary story among Spider-Man stories and considered one of the classic comic book stories and an anchor point in continuity. I've read stories that came because of this. Notably the story from the Brand New Day era where Kraven is resurrected. And because of Hunted the current event going on in the Amazing Spider-Man title which I really enjoy even if the art leaves a lot to be desired. Notable stories that have come from this one. It's one of the beloved stories in Spi Kraven's Last Hunt is a legendary story among Spider-Man stories and considered one of the classic comic book stories and an anchor point in continuity. I've read stories that came because of this. Notably the story from the Brand New Day era where Kraven is resurrected. And because of Hunted the current event going on in the Amazing Spider-Man title which I really enjoy even if the art leaves a lot to be desired. Notable stories that have come from this one. It's one of the beloved stories in Spider-man canon so it's almost shameful how long it took me to get around to this. And it's really good. The pencils by Mike Zeck are an outstanding example of the in house style of Marvel. There's something special about that style that connects with me, partly because there was a standard and that had to be up kept and it gave those comics and heroes a distinctive look thatwill forever remind me of those comics. I think these panels are a great example of that and merging with the movement that came after where individual artists had distinctive styles. The shadows, colors, and panel to panel sense of flow was outstanding and might be the thing I enjoyed most. Another thing I loved was the author knew when to let the art take it away, to allow breathing room from narration. To use the visual instead of telling us. Most of the time I think comics can overuse narration and it felt like this title knew exactly how much to use. I haven't gotten to the plot have I? Well Kraven is back for one last hunt and he shoots Spidey in the head to take his place, while Vermin is murking about in the sewers. That's a very stripped down plot but I'm not getting into anymore because the symbolism and everything coming at you is a really good read. It wasn't as game changing as expected because I hear this compared to Watchmen or the Dark Knight Returns but I really enjoyed it and think if you like the wallcrawler you should check it out. 4 stars.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This is some creepy shit. Voices in heads, messages from drug-addled hallucinations, undercurrents of rage and other dark thoughts. Kraven decides(?) to off Spider-man, goes and does it, doesn't do it right. Even despite the Wikipedia article documenting that this story was in DeMatteis' head long before Dark Knight and Watchmen, it's hard not to see the parallels - parallel light and dark inner monologues are the obvious stylistic choice that seems to have emerged spontaneously across creators This is some creepy shit. Voices in heads, messages from drug-addled hallucinations, undercurrents of rage and other dark thoughts. Kraven decides(?) to off Spider-man, goes and does it, doesn't do it right. Even despite the Wikipedia article documenting that this story was in DeMatteis' head long before Dark Knight and Watchmen, it's hard not to see the parallels - parallel light and dark inner monologues are the obvious stylistic choice that seems to have emerged spontaneously across creators in this era (or maybe JMD did crib that layout from his heir). Creepy. Sewer-dwelling rat-man? Shambling spider-beast made of spiders? Insanity bubbling at the surface of a trained mind? Kraven takes the journey of a lifetime, from hating his opponent to understanding him to respecting him, and finally to (view spoiler)[offing himself (hide spoiler)] . The natural progression, amirite? The inner monologue for either Spidey or Kraven is nuts in a kinda forced way, and when both of them suffer from it, it takes the form of affectation - or at least, forced experiment on the writer's part. I can't say I loved it, but it sure is a monumental story from the 80's, and it definitely left a mark on the Marvel universe. I hated everything about the vermin story though, and devoting the final issue of this mini to the final confrontation between Spidey and Vermin was...ugh. The constant whining from Vermin, the allusions to Gollum (muttering, outbursts, lives in dark most underground, feeds on live animals), I don't need any more reminders of work life man, I just don't.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tiamatty

    In terms of Marvel's best writers of the '80s, I feel like DeMatteis often gets overlooked. Claremont and Miller were the biggest names of the time, overshadowing pretty much everyone else. DeMatteis had been a reliably excellent writer for years, doing brilliant runs on books like Captain America, Defenders, Dr. Strange and more. And then, there was this. A six-part story that ran in Spider-Man's three main books (Amazing, Spectacular, Web of). This was DeMatteis' opus at Marvel. His best work, In terms of Marvel's best writers of the '80s, I feel like DeMatteis often gets overlooked. Claremont and Miller were the biggest names of the time, overshadowing pretty much everyone else. DeMatteis had been a reliably excellent writer for years, doing brilliant runs on books like Captain America, Defenders, Dr. Strange and more. And then, there was this. A six-part story that ran in Spider-Man's three main books (Amazing, Spectacular, Web of). This was DeMatteis' opus at Marvel. His best work, and the one that's best-remembered. This is heralded as one of the greatest comic stories of all time, and for good reason. It's a haunting, disturbing and exciting story. There are four main characters - Spider-Man and Kraven, obviously, along with Vermin and MJ, who had just married Peter Parker. DeMatteis gives each character a distinct and unique voice, and a deep and often frightening insight into their mindsets over the course of the story. Mike Zeck does an excellent job on the art, making it match the tone of the story perfectly. It's dark, creepy and moody. This is up there with Frank Miller's Daredevil work as a masterpiece in superhero comic storytelling. Brilliant, incredible work.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Gary Butler

    26th book read in 2016. Number 14 out of 519 on my all time book list. Review Pending:

  29. 5 out of 5

    Wakizashi

    I first read this many years ago when it was released in six parts over three monthly Spider-Man titles: Amazing Spider-Man, Peter Parker the Spectacular Spider-Man, and Web of Spider-Man. (Wow, I remembered the comics without having to google them:-) I used to collect the main Spidey title as well as Batman. This is one of the only Spider-Man stories that I still remember all these years later. It's surprisingly dark for a Spider-Man tale. I also remember being blown away by Mike Zeck's stunnin I first read this many years ago when it was released in six parts over three monthly Spider-Man titles: Amazing Spider-Man, Peter Parker the Spectacular Spider-Man, and Web of Spider-Man. (Wow, I remembered the comics without having to google them:-) I used to collect the main Spidey title as well as Batman. This is one of the only Spider-Man stories that I still remember all these years later. It's surprisingly dark for a Spider-Man tale. I also remember being blown away by Mike Zeck's stunning covers and interior art at the time of reading it. I wish I still had those issues. Ah well. Does it hold up? I believe it does. I recommend it if you are looking for a darker, more mature Spider-Man story. And for Mike Zeck's art!

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Tovar

    How calm I feel; how peaceful. As if something inside me- some knot, some tangle of fear and anger and so much more, has been finally untied.

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