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Dracula's Brood: Neglected Vampire Classics

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The most famous vampire of all is Bram Stoker's Dracula, published in 1897. But it was neither the first nor the last. This anthology presents 23 rare vampire stories written between 1867 & 1940. B&W illus. The most famous vampire of all is Bram Stoker's Dracula, published in 1897. But it was neither the first nor the last. This anthology presents 23 rare vampire stories written between 1867 & 1940. B&W illus.


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The most famous vampire of all is Bram Stoker's Dracula, published in 1897. But it was neither the first nor the last. This anthology presents 23 rare vampire stories written between 1867 & 1940. B&W illus. The most famous vampire of all is Bram Stoker's Dracula, published in 1897. But it was neither the first nor the last. This anthology presents 23 rare vampire stories written between 1867 & 1940. B&W illus.

59 review for Dracula's Brood: Neglected Vampire Classics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dfordoom

    Some of the many great vampire tales that pre-date Dracula. Terrific stuff.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ash Hartwell

    Enjoyable series of vampire tales from the past. A few maybe have not aged as well as others but if you like your vampire lore then you will find a few great tales in here.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    A mixed bag with a few gems that completely outclass the others. Princess of Darkness, the final story in this anthology was phenomenal, some of the best vampire fiction I’ve ever read next to Dracula, Carmilla and The Vampire of Kaldenstein. I thoroughly enjoyed most of the tales with the exception of only two. The final story was worth the entire book alone.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bailey

    There are 24 short stories in here, stemming from 1867 to 1940. Each story will get a small description, and then I will try to condense my ideas on the stories as a whole at the end. Stars beside the story indicate stories I enjoyed or loved: 1. "The Last Lords of Gardonal" William Gilbert (1867)- Very wordy, vampire as metaphor for peasants revenge against a rich abusing lord, vampire is a deceiving woman who disguised herself as the lord's nice wife. *2. "The Fate of Madame Cabanel" Eliza Lynn There are 24 short stories in here, stemming from 1867 to 1940. Each story will get a small description, and then I will try to condense my ideas on the stories as a whole at the end. Stars beside the story indicate stories I enjoyed or loved: 1. "The Last Lords of Gardonal" William Gilbert (1867)- Very wordy, vampire as metaphor for peasants revenge against a rich abusing lord, vampire is a deceiving woman who disguised herself as the lord's nice wife. *2. "The Fate of Madame Cabanel" Eliza Lynn Linton (1872)- This one was very good, you don't know if the vampire in question is actually one, or if it is just the paranoia of the protagonist and the town. The "vampire" metaphor is for foreigners, as an Englishwoman in a French town. The accused vampire is a woman. It's very ambiguous, and framed as a witch hunt, which was very interesting. 3. "The Man Eating Tree" Phil Robinson (1881)- The first of the "vampire tree" stories in this book. It was too....horny. The descriptions were gross and I didn't enjoy it. Luckily it was short. 4. "The Vampyre" Vasile Alecsandri (1886)- A simple poem, I'm not too fond of poetry but this was nice enough. 5. "A Mystery of the Campagna" Anne Crawford (1887)- I thought this may be the first entry with a male vampire but I was sadly disappointed, he was merely a slowly dying victim of yet another temptress woman. And of course, the male protagonist kills her by stabbing a stake between her hot tits. Yawn. 6. "Ken's Mystery" Julian Hawthorne (1888)- "Dude, let me tell you about when I hooked up with this hot vampire chick in Ireland!" (There was one cool detail about the vampire causing decay to objects she touches i.e the characters banjo, but the rest was nothing special) 7. "Let Loose" Mary Cholmondeley (1890)- "Why do you wear such high collars?" "Oh, a vampire fed from me." (HALLELUJAH, A MALE VAMPIRE FINALLY APPEARS!) 8. "The Parasite" Arthur Conan Doyle (1894)- As expected of the author, Conan has it framed as a mystery in the form of a doctors diary and records of hypnotism being inflicted by a female vampiric force. It shows the Victorian eras anxieties over new technologies such as shock therapy and hypnotism to afflict the mind. Very cool premise, unfortunately contains a lot of racist and ableist mentality in describing the story's villain, so I was disappointed. **9. "Good Lady Ducayne" Mary E Bradden (1896)- Very cool premise, a woman is hired as a professional companion for the titular character, a rich elderly woman whose lost other companions before, and characters she meets when travelling begin to notice her slow decline in health and save her. I love the idea of the vampire being an old woman clinging to life and youth with the help of a doctor. The main character is naive to the point of frustration though, but I suppose she'd have to to not notice bite marks on her. **10. "A Dead Finger" Sabine Baring-Gould (1897)- Loved this one! Though the end had a long political rant that I couldn't really understand, the rest was a creepy tale of a man trying to escape a phantom finger that crawls up his pant leg, manifesting in a ghost like vampire force that drinks his blood when he sleeps. The story exhibits new technology and has a Van Helsing style vampire hunter. I enjoyed this one! ***11. "Will" Vincent O' Sullivan (1899)- I loved this one so much. It was only five pages, but the style of writing was fantastic, I was in awe of the descriptions. It tells the tale of a woman's revenge over a husband that kills her with his hatred (literally his will). Try and seek this one out its amazing. 12. "The Store Chamber" H. B Marriott Watson (1899)- Takes place in a spooky castle where vampire chew on you if you sleep in a certain room above their tomb. It was alright, nothing special. 13. "The Vampire Maid" + "The Old Portrait" Hume Nisbet (1900)- "Wait....that hot girl was a VAMPIRE?!?!?" + "Wait...That hot girl who came out of the painting is a.....VAMPIRE!?!!?" (barf) 14. "Marsyas in Flanders" Vernon Lee (1900)- Evil vampire boy in spooky church. 15. "An Unscientific Story" Louise J Strong (1903)- This story must have influenced the 1931 film version of Frankenstein, because it reads just like it only with vampiric animalistic creatures. ***16. "The Feather Pillow" Haracio Quiroga (1907)- The only story that legitimately TERRIFIED me. It was disgusting, a husband watches his wife mysteriously die slowly in bed, and when they strip the bed after, they find a disgusting vampiric parasite had sucked all her blood out and grew to a large size inside her pillow. Made me too nervous to lay back down. Gross! Read it! 17. "The Singular Death of Morton" Algernon Blackwood (1910)- Ooooooh~ Spooooky girl gives you miiiiilk~ 18. "Aylmer Vance and the Vampire" Alice + Claude Askew (1914)- A story from an established serial, basically a Sherlock Holmes, vampire hunter story. 19. "The Sumach" Ulric Daubeny (1919)- The second story about "vampire trees", but this one was pretty cool because it grew from the wooden stake that had previously killed a vampire. 20. "Wailing Well" M. R. James (1927)- Moral of the story: Be a good Boy Scout or else a vampire in a well will EAT YOU! 21. "The Tree of Death" Barry Pain (1928)- "Vampire tree" part three. Racist character, didn't like it. 22. "Another Squaw?" E. Heron Allen (1934)- Half a critique on a Bram Stoker short story that the author didn't like ("The Squaw") and half a story about a female marine biologist studying vampiric fish that kill her. Fucking weird but, points for being unique I suppose? 23. "The Living Stone" E. R Punshon (1939)- Vampire rock! It crushes you and sucks your blood! more points for creativity here! 24. "Princess of Darkness" Frederick Cowles (1940)- Basically a gender swapped Dracula. All in all, I didn't like very many stories in this book. But I am glad I own this book. It shows how popular vampire stories were before, during and after Bram Stoker, how he influenced others to write on them. I also liked seeing the many anxieties of society in the late 19th/early 20th century, from typical fears such as temptress women and foreigners to more creative fears such as technology, trees, bad behaviour, rocks, fish and more scaaary women! Try to seek out the ones I recommend and if there are any others that piqued your interest from utter weird concepts alone go and find them! They aren't long reads so they aren't a chore!!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Givens

    An excellent anthology of post-Dracula vampire stories, in which there were no stories I disliked, and only a few that disappointed. There was a lot more variety than I expected, and I enjoy the 1890s style.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    This is a great collection. It's "vampire" stories written between the years of 1867 and 1940, with the idea being stories contemporary with Dracula. What's interesting about the stories is they aren't all classic vampire stories, as we have stories dealing with everything from vampiric trees and plants to a vampiric rock (!) Overall the stories were all well written and enjoyable. If you enjoy gothic style vampire stories you should read this one. This is a great collection. It's "vampire" stories written between the years of 1867 and 1940, with the idea being stories contemporary with Dracula. What's interesting about the stories is they aren't all classic vampire stories, as we have stories dealing with everything from vampiric trees and plants to a vampiric rock (!) Overall the stories were all well written and enjoyable. If you enjoy gothic style vampire stories you should read this one.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

    This is a wonderful anthology and it includes some of my all now all time favorite vampire short stories.

  8. 4 out of 5

    The rockabilly werewolf from Mars

    As someone who absolutely despises the Twilight books and their various imitators, it was rather pleasing to find a book of proper vampire stories; I.e. the type where the main goal is to frighten the reader, rather than bore them with descriptions of teenagers in love. Of particular note is the superb story Let Loose, which seems to be a predecessor of the works of M. R. James, one of my favourite writers. Notes on the stories to come.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kim Selegean

    It was a nice collection which showed off different meanings of vampirism that are typically lost on today's media radar but aside from some really good stories, most of these were very dry. Still worth a read if you are in want or need of some vampiric themed inspiration! It was a nice collection which showed off different meanings of vampirism that are typically lost on today's media radar but aside from some really good stories, most of these were very dry. Still worth a read if you are in want or need of some vampiric themed inspiration!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Samia Schiller

    Tem vampiro homem, mulher, psíquico, animal, planta e até rocha. Uma coleção completa de contos muito bem escolhidos e alguns dão medo mesmo. Achei divertido, intrigante e temeroso.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Oscar

    4½, por causa do dedo. Tirando esse, ótimos contos.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sabina Sasu

    It was an enjoyable book to read. The stories do get redundant at some point as the structures are extremely similar, but they were still very interesting to read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amanda R.N. Rockwell

    Dracula's Brood is a collection of 24 short stories about vampires and vampire-like beings spanning from 1867 to 1940. The book was edited by the late Richard Dalby, a literary researcher who also edited other similar collections on vampires and the paranormal. It features stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, Algernon Blackwood, and M.R.James, just to same a few. A nice little thing about this book is the small paragraph right after the title of each story. This blurb delves a bit into the author of th Dracula's Brood is a collection of 24 short stories about vampires and vampire-like beings spanning from 1867 to 1940. The book was edited by the late Richard Dalby, a literary researcher who also edited other similar collections on vampires and the paranormal. It features stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, Algernon Blackwood, and M.R.James, just to same a few. A nice little thing about this book is the small paragraph right after the title of each story. This blurb delves a bit into the author of the story and some of their works, as well as some additional background on the story you're about to read. The book is not biased toward blood-sucking vampires. There are many stories of psychic vampirism, those that consume energy for sustenance, within these pages. Also, not all vampires here are undead. Many are actually living, breathing people. Others are ghosts. And there are even parasitic plants. Yes, plants. As you may expect from a short story collection with multiple authors, the book is a mixed bag. There weren't any stories I disliked. Rather, there were some that just weren't up to the same standard as others. There are four stories in particular that stood out to me, which I'll summarize here. A little teaser for what to expect, should you decide to pick this book up yourself. The Man-Eating Tree by Phil Robinson (1881) This story is one of three stories in the collection with parasitic trees. The narrator tells the story of his uncle, an adventurer who came across the titular tree while in Nubia, a region in south Sudan. He witnessed the tree attack and kill an animal and then his guide, before being forced to fight off and kill the tree in self-defense. Robinson's writing style was fairly digestible as far as Victorian English goes. Descriptive enough to paint a picture without going overboard. The Parasite by Arthur Conan Doyle (1894) It may be no surprise that this story of psychic vampirism by the creator of Sherlock Holmes is one of, if not the best, story in the book. The protagonist is a man who is highly logical, not believing in anything that can't be proven by science or witnessed with his won eyes. A female psychic proves her abilities to him and he becomes curious, offering himself as a test subject. For science, of course. When he learns that shady things are going on and he can't remember his sessions with the psychic, he accuses her and things start getting much worse for him. I did not expect the ending, and was genuinely surprised. Doyle's writing style was so good and so easy to grab onto, that I'm actually considering reading Sherlock Holmes, despite it being in a genre I'm normally not interested in. Aylmer Vance and the Vampire by Alice and Claude Askew (1914) Alice and Claude and a husband and wife author duo best known for their novels The Shulamite and The Etonian. Aylmer Vance is a paranormal detective and the story is told from the perspective of his assistant, Dexter. They are hired by a young man whose wife in cursed to become a vampire. It was descent story, and the only one in the book a detective story with the paranormal. It made my mildly curious about the other stories, but not enough to actively seek them out. Princess of Darkness by Frederick Cowles (1940) Cowles was best known for his short story collections The Horror of Abbot's Grange and The Night Wind Howls, which are rare and highly sought after. The story follows a man, a spy, who goes undercover in Budapest to get close to a mysterious woman named Gizella Bessenyei, who is believed to be behind the murders of several men. Out of all the stories in the collection, this one is the most like Dracula. It was improved in several ways, most notably a stronger presence of the vampire in question as well as a different ending. Overall, this collection is worth the money and shelf space. There seems to be something in here for everyone. Not just for aficionados of vampire literature, but horror and paranormal literature in general. And at only $15.00 US, can't complain.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    This is an utterly superb collection of vampire tales, tales that have been forgotten or lost over time and that deserve to be brought back to the public eye. These stories were written both before and after that most famous of vampire stories and show that there is so much more to the genre than what popular culture has made mainstream. Each story has its own style and approach, some are subtle and chilling, some only hint at the horrors beneath while others are outright terrifying sending goos This is an utterly superb collection of vampire tales, tales that have been forgotten or lost over time and that deserve to be brought back to the public eye. These stories were written both before and after that most famous of vampire stories and show that there is so much more to the genre than what popular culture has made mainstream. Each story has its own style and approach, some are subtle and chilling, some only hint at the horrors beneath while others are outright terrifying sending goosebumps across your skin and shivers up your spine. There are so many here tht my advice is to just give it a read. Each story also has a small introduction about the author, their other works and the writing of the story itself. This gives an interesting historical background and context to each one so the differences in style and approach are better understood and the story made all the more enjoyable because of it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Frank McAdam

    An excellent anthology of little known vampire tales from the years 1867 (i.e., before Dracula was published) to 1940. All the stories are well written and most are truly original. The best by far is Conan Doyle's The Parasite. A fun read for anyone with a love of the horror genre. An excellent anthology of little known vampire tales from the years 1867 (i.e., before Dracula was published) to 1940. All the stories are well written and most are truly original. The best by far is Conan Doyle's The Parasite. A fun read for anyone with a love of the horror genre.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Gray

    An enjoyable and enlightening journey through the lesser-known vampire tales. From femme fatale, psychic vampire and trees with blood lust it covers all aspects of vampirism. The stories themselves are of differing quality but still have their place in the history of the vampire. it has been a worthwhile foundation in my research to create my own vampire tale.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tim Petersik

    Collection of enjoyable short stories on the vampire theme.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    I was at about 100+ pages and I know that I have to stop. Although some of the stories are interesting. I think that I am just not a fan of short stories. I will try and read again some other time.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    Good collection of stories, some not so famous, however are interesting and engaging in what is proposed.

  20. 4 out of 5

    R H

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vitória

  22. 5 out of 5

    Henrico Coetzee

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mari Anne mcmaken

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diniz Bortolotto

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

  26. 5 out of 5

    Obisesan olanrewaju benjamin

  27. 4 out of 5

    janice K Hurlburt

  28. 5 out of 5

    sabarish

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tom English

  30. 4 out of 5

    Qwill / The Qwillery

  31. 4 out of 5

    Julia Hughes

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  33. 5 out of 5

    Linda Todd

  34. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

  35. 4 out of 5

    Tilly ~ was successfully manipulated by a wizard

  36. 5 out of 5

    BookDB

  37. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  38. 4 out of 5

    Kara

  39. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Rozali

  40. 4 out of 5

    Nia

  41. 5 out of 5

    Cybele

  42. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  43. 4 out of 5

    Charles Schneider

  44. 5 out of 5

    Pandapeepers

  45. 5 out of 5

    PurplyCookie

  46. 4 out of 5

    Addison

  47. 5 out of 5

    David

  48. 5 out of 5

    Frank Thanhtike

  49. 4 out of 5

    Kira-Lyn

  50. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  51. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  52. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  53. 4 out of 5

    Elke

  54. 5 out of 5

    Joolz

  55. 4 out of 5

    Keeley

  56. 4 out of 5

    Cybele

  57. 4 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Wants to Read More)

  58. 4 out of 5

    Rachele

  59. 5 out of 5

    Laura Barnes

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