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Performance Modeling and Design of Computer Systems: Queueing Theory in Action

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Computer systems design is full of conundrums: -Given a choice between a single machine with speed s, or n machines each with speed s/n, which should we choose? -If both the arrival rate and service rate double, will the mean response time stay the same? -Should systems really aim to balance load, or is this a convenient myth? -If a scheduling policy favors one set of jobs Computer systems design is full of conundrums: -Given a choice between a single machine with speed s, or n machines each with speed s/n, which should we choose? -If both the arrival rate and service rate double, will the mean response time stay the same? -Should systems really aim to balance load, or is this a convenient myth? -If a scheduling policy favors one set of jobs, does it necessarily hurt some other jobs, or are these "conservation laws" being misinterpreted? -Do greedy, shortest-delay, routing strategies make sense in a server farm, or is what's good for the individual disastrous for the system as a whole? -How do high job size variability and heavy-tailed workloads affect the choice of a scheduling policy? -How should one trade off energy and delay in designing a computer system? -If 12 servers are needed to meet delay guarantees when the arrival rate is 9 jobs/sec, will we need 12,000 servers when the arrival rate is 9,000 jobs/sec? Tackling the questions that systems designers care about, this book brings queueing theory decisively back to computer science. The book is written with computer scientists and engineers in mind and is full of examples from computer systems, as well as manufacturing and operations research. Fun and readable, the book is highly approachable, even for undergraduates, while still being thoroughly rigorous and also covering a much wider span of topics than many queueing books. Readers benefit from a lively mix of motivation and intuition, with illustrations, examples, and more than 300 exercises - all while acquiring the skills needed to model, analyze, and design large-scale systems with good performance and low cost. The exercises are an important feature, teaching research-level counterintuitive lessons in the design of computer systems. The goal is to train readers not only to customize existing analyses but also to invent their own.


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Computer systems design is full of conundrums: -Given a choice between a single machine with speed s, or n machines each with speed s/n, which should we choose? -If both the arrival rate and service rate double, will the mean response time stay the same? -Should systems really aim to balance load, or is this a convenient myth? -If a scheduling policy favors one set of jobs Computer systems design is full of conundrums: -Given a choice between a single machine with speed s, or n machines each with speed s/n, which should we choose? -If both the arrival rate and service rate double, will the mean response time stay the same? -Should systems really aim to balance load, or is this a convenient myth? -If a scheduling policy favors one set of jobs, does it necessarily hurt some other jobs, or are these "conservation laws" being misinterpreted? -Do greedy, shortest-delay, routing strategies make sense in a server farm, or is what's good for the individual disastrous for the system as a whole? -How do high job size variability and heavy-tailed workloads affect the choice of a scheduling policy? -How should one trade off energy and delay in designing a computer system? -If 12 servers are needed to meet delay guarantees when the arrival rate is 9 jobs/sec, will we need 12,000 servers when the arrival rate is 9,000 jobs/sec? Tackling the questions that systems designers care about, this book brings queueing theory decisively back to computer science. The book is written with computer scientists and engineers in mind and is full of examples from computer systems, as well as manufacturing and operations research. Fun and readable, the book is highly approachable, even for undergraduates, while still being thoroughly rigorous and also covering a much wider span of topics than many queueing books. Readers benefit from a lively mix of motivation and intuition, with illustrations, examples, and more than 300 exercises - all while acquiring the skills needed to model, analyze, and design large-scale systems with good performance and low cost. The exercises are an important feature, teaching research-level counterintuitive lessons in the design of computer systems. The goal is to train readers not only to customize existing analyses but also to invent their own.

47 review for Performance Modeling and Design of Computer Systems: Queueing Theory in Action

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

    Loved it! Applied mathematics at its best! If only all queueing theory books were like this one. Looking forward to the continuation with more analysis from the field.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Illayarajaa

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. respected sir, Myself A.Illayarajaa, working as a Associate Professor from Annai Mathammal Sheela Engineering College,Namakkal. i take this paper “Performance Modeling and Design of Computer Systems – Queuing Theory in Action”, for First year M.E Computer Science and engg. but i didn't have any reference for this book so i will refer that book with your permission. thanking you. with thanks & regards A.Illayarajaa Associate Professor, Annai Mathammal Sheela Engg. Colleg,Namakkal,Tamilnadu Mobile:090995 respected sir, Myself A.Illayarajaa, working as a Associate Professor from Annai Mathammal Sheela Engineering College,Namakkal. i take this paper “Performance Modeling and Design of Computer Systems – Queuing Theory in Action”, for First year M.E Computer Science and engg. but i didn't have any reference for this book so i will refer that book with your permission. thanking you. with thanks & regards A.Illayarajaa Associate Professor, Annai Mathammal Sheela Engg. Colleg,Namakkal,Tamilnadu Mobile:090995032874

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mahdi Dolati

  4. 4 out of 5

    Igor

  5. 5 out of 5

    Uday

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marcel van der Werf

  7. 4 out of 5

    John

  8. 4 out of 5

    Christian

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nivedita

  10. 5 out of 5

    Priyatham Bollimpalli

  11. 5 out of 5

    Yu

  12. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

  13. 4 out of 5

    秋日思雨

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ammar Bandukwala

  15. 4 out of 5

    Max Ng

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bill de hÓra

  17. 5 out of 5

    Richard Woodruff

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ankit Goel

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rajapriyan

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kavya

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Way

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bugzmanov

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alexandros Mavrogiannis

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jared Davis

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Kleid

  26. 4 out of 5

    Araam Borhanian

  27. 4 out of 5

    Yoav Freund

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tor

  29. 4 out of 5

    Eloi Poch

  30. 4 out of 5

    Manikandaprabhu

  31. 4 out of 5

    Rathi Deva

  32. 4 out of 5

    Gokul

  33. 5 out of 5

    Darko Fabijan

  34. 4 out of 5

    Ján Jablonský

  35. 5 out of 5

    Tony Mao

  36. 4 out of 5

    Thiru

  37. 5 out of 5

    Graham Hay

  38. 4 out of 5

    Raghavendra Suvvari

  39. 5 out of 5

    Nadera De Hougsia

  40. 5 out of 5

    Jared Davis

  41. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Silva

  42. 4 out of 5

    Yury Antonov

  43. 5 out of 5

    Kirill

  44. 4 out of 5

    Edvinas

  45. 5 out of 5

    Povilas Balzaravičius

  46. 4 out of 5

    Josep-Angel Herrero Bajo

  47. 5 out of 5

    Ashwani Kaura

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