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War Stories: Short Fiction

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"[A] promising short fiction debut." — The Washingtonian "There’s a clarity and honesty here and in many of the other pieces in War Stories which will no doubt appeal to fans of American minimalism." — Philadelphia Review of Books We all carry our own battle scars. This is the premise of "War Stories," a rich collection of short fiction that draws upon both the literal and f "[A] promising short fiction debut." — The Washingtonian "There’s a clarity and honesty here and in many of the other pieces in War Stories which will no doubt appeal to fans of American minimalism." — Philadelphia Review of Books We all carry our own battle scars. This is the premise of "War Stories," a rich collection of short fiction that draws upon both the literal and figurative meaning of its title. Through a diverse array of characters, settings, and circumstances, "War Stories" delivers a series of powerful tales from the home front of war: the stories of parents, siblings, and spouses of those who have fought, as well as those who have returned from battle. Set against the backdrop of contemporary conflicts, "War Stories"’s compelling nine narratives tell of a wounded veteran who seeks renewal through an imagined relationship with a neighborhood girl, a grieving father who finds peace and reconciliation at the site of a disastrous bus crash, a young woman who searches for identity and meaning in the wake of her husband’s injury, and an urban teenager engaged in a fateful standoff with local recruiters. Interspersed with these tales are powerful, non-traditional “war stories” – of youth, unexpected loss, and heartbreaking love. "War Stories"’s thoughtful, beautifully crafted tales, which range in style from deceptively simple to rich and complex, tell of people young and old, male and female, who share two things: humanity and resilience. These diverse and deftly written stories are joined through Elisabeth Doyle’s remarkable style and ease in creating a universe full of despair, hope, and dreams. At turns tender and harsh, tragic and yearning, War Stories will leave the reader wanting more.


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"[A] promising short fiction debut." — The Washingtonian "There’s a clarity and honesty here and in many of the other pieces in War Stories which will no doubt appeal to fans of American minimalism." — Philadelphia Review of Books We all carry our own battle scars. This is the premise of "War Stories," a rich collection of short fiction that draws upon both the literal and f "[A] promising short fiction debut." — The Washingtonian "There’s a clarity and honesty here and in many of the other pieces in War Stories which will no doubt appeal to fans of American minimalism." — Philadelphia Review of Books We all carry our own battle scars. This is the premise of "War Stories," a rich collection of short fiction that draws upon both the literal and figurative meaning of its title. Through a diverse array of characters, settings, and circumstances, "War Stories" delivers a series of powerful tales from the home front of war: the stories of parents, siblings, and spouses of those who have fought, as well as those who have returned from battle. Set against the backdrop of contemporary conflicts, "War Stories"’s compelling nine narratives tell of a wounded veteran who seeks renewal through an imagined relationship with a neighborhood girl, a grieving father who finds peace and reconciliation at the site of a disastrous bus crash, a young woman who searches for identity and meaning in the wake of her husband’s injury, and an urban teenager engaged in a fateful standoff with local recruiters. Interspersed with these tales are powerful, non-traditional “war stories” – of youth, unexpected loss, and heartbreaking love. "War Stories"’s thoughtful, beautifully crafted tales, which range in style from deceptively simple to rich and complex, tell of people young and old, male and female, who share two things: humanity and resilience. These diverse and deftly written stories are joined through Elisabeth Doyle’s remarkable style and ease in creating a universe full of despair, hope, and dreams. At turns tender and harsh, tragic and yearning, War Stories will leave the reader wanting more.

41 review for War Stories: Short Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayvee Buenavista

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. 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  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    http://philadelphiareviewofbooks.com/... Corey Stoll’s portrayal of Ernest Hemingway in Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris as a boorish dolt might not be too far off base if Hemingway’s letters are any indication. In a late night bistro, Stoll’s Hemingway mopes over a glass of cassis and tells Owen Wilson’s Gil Pender his thoughts on writing and manhood. “Yes. It was a good book, because it was an honest book. That’s what war does to men. And there’s nothing fine and noble about dying in the mud, unl http://philadelphiareviewofbooks.com/... Corey Stoll’s portrayal of Ernest Hemingway in Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris as a boorish dolt might not be too far off base if Hemingway’s letters are any indication. In a late night bistro, Stoll’s Hemingway mopes over a glass of cassis and tells Owen Wilson’s Gil Pender his thoughts on writing and manhood. “Yes. It was a good book, because it was an honest book. That’s what war does to men. And there’s nothing fine and noble about dying in the mud, unless you die gracefully. Then it’s not only noble but brave.” Stoll’s Hemingway speaks the way the real Hemingway wrote fiction and it turns out the real Hemingway wrote personal letters the way he wrote his fiction – stilted and condescending and far too serious for his own good. In a letter from May 1934, responding to F. Scott Fitzgerald’s request for thoughts on his recent novel Tender is the Night, Hemingway comes off as particularly pedantic. “Forget your personal tragedy. We are all bitched from the start and you especially have to hurt like hell before you can write seriously. But when you get the damned hurt use it—don’t cheat with it. Be as faithful to it as a scientist—but don’t think anything is of any importance because it happens to you or anyone belonging to you.” When Pender seeks advice on his novel, Stoll’s Hemingway tells him, “No subject is terrible if the story is true, if the prose is clean and honest, and if it affirms courage and grace under pressure.” There’s no drollery in the fictional or the historical Hemingway. He continues in his letter to Fitzgerald, “For Christ sake write and don’t worry about what the boys will say nor whether it will be a masterpiece nor what. I write one page of masterpiece to ninety one pages of shit. I try to put the shit in the wastebasket.” Ever the competitor, he tells F. Scott, “You know I never thought so much of Gatsby at the time. You can write twice as well now as you ever could. All you need to do is write truly and not care about what the fate of it is.” Four years later, Fitzgerald wrote to an aspiring author from Radcliffe named Frances Turnbull. His advice stays grounded in reality and emotion, less in a stripped and arrogant teenage modernism – even though he cites Hemingway as an example of truth in fiction. “This is the experience of all writers. It was necessary for Dickens to put into Oliver Twist the child’s passionate resentment at being abused and starved that had haunted his whole childhood. Ernest Hemingway’s first stories In Our Time went right down to the bottom of all that he had ever felt and known. In This Side of Paradise I wrote about a love affair that was still bleeding as fresh as the skin wound on a haemophile.” The expression of uncompromised emotional truth, not just verisimilitude, has run a strange course through the most minimal of American fiction, starting with Hemingway and continuing through the work of Raymond Carver, Breece Pancake, Ann Beattie, Richard Ford and too many others to mention. By stripping down their prose and focusing on subtle denouements as opposed to involved plots, these and other writers have furnished a barren and stark literary landscape with a rich emotional resonance. In War Stories, a new collection of short fiction, Elisabeth Doyle continues this tradition in nine clipped stories. The first seven pieces, about life in small towns and inner cities in and around southern New Jersey, hew close to the emotional truth and carefulness of Hemingway’s approach. “Recruiters,” the first story, tells of kids locked in a dangerous ghetto existence, so numb to their own fates that war looks better than their everyday lives. The recruiters of the title drive around in the shadows just beyond the reach of the streetlamps in Manny’s urban neighborhood, looking for lost causes to ship off to Vietnam. Manny’s experience of the car wreck, the feeling of the girl on his lap and the sight of Ernie crushed in the truck resonate perfectly, but when the cops arrive to survey the scene, Doyle’s grasp falters, if only momentarily. One of the beauties of minimalism, as opposed to the maximalism of say, John Updike, is that heightened sensitivities or erudition are never given erroneously to common people. Doyle’s cops are just a little too thoughtful and reverent upon finding the accident. But for the most part, Doyle stays on point and her characters ring true. In “One of These Days It Will All Be Over” Doyle paints Diego so vividly with just a few key details, that we regret that we can only walk with him for a morning, though on this one morning we learn about heroism and post-traumatic stress and the dysfunction of urban communities. In “Pistolesi” Doyle is virtuosic in her evocation of Raymond Carver’s direness, the bleak browns and grays of working class homes devoid of hope or light. She returns to this milieu later in “Median” where Wendall, an emergency worker, and the father of a slain soldier, surveys the wreckage of a bus crash. Wendall sees that even if he avoids utter miserable tragedy, he must face the even starker reality of being left alone in the end. Bobby in “The Deepest, Darkest Part of the Woods” plays out an atonement in his head for the things he did in Vietnam, by being the only person to care, even from afar, for an Asian-American girl in bland white suburbia. In these two stories, Doyle evokes the best work of Russell Banks, particularly The Sweet Hereafter and Affliction. Two of the shorter stories, “Driving” and “Graduation” impart the same jaded wisdom – youth is hopeless. “Love Spell,” the first story to not mention the Vietnam War, veers off into the territory of drug addiction and young people running from their pasts. I had the fortune of reading “Passengers” on September 11 of this year, without knowing the subject of the story before sitting down with it. Even eleven years after the real-life events, maybe even especially after this long, Doyle’s story allows the enormity of the attacks and the hijacking to draw inward and become personal instead of epochal, by following a particular passenger who does not know her fate, until the buildings fill the windows of her plane with black glass and steel. There’s a clarity and honesty here and in many of the other pieces in War Stories which will no doubt appeal to fans of American minimalism.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Grady

    `We carry our own battle scars' Wars are assaults on countries that threaten the survival of the invading forces' country. Wars are memories of hostile encounters recorded in history books or in the brain damaged minds of soldiers who have returned from battle. Wars are the daily encounters with imbalanced forces of negativity that befuddle normal living. Wars are those rages that rise up out of situations perceived to destroy self or others connected to self. Wars divide. Wars ache. Wars destroy `We carry our own battle scars' Wars are assaults on countries that threaten the survival of the invading forces' country. Wars are memories of hostile encounters recorded in history books or in the brain damaged minds of soldiers who have returned from battle. Wars are the daily encounters with imbalanced forces of negativity that befuddle normal living. Wars are those rages that rise up out of situations perceived to destroy self or others connected to self. Wars divide. Wars ache. Wars destroy. Wars kill, or injure, or exsanguinate until little is left except lifeless memories. Elisabeth Doyle understands the seemingly endless definitions of war, and in her brilliant and excruciating selection WAR STORIES: Short Fiction she visits some of them. She leads off her collection with one of the most brutal - `Recruiters' - that lets us meet Manny who works the gas station of his father killed by junkies and mourns the death of his brother, who after their mutual best friend had been killed in Vietnam, was `recruited' only to be killed in an accident. Manny, also injured, alone manages the gas station and is ripped off by two young girls. In the distance Manny can see the recruiters eyeing him as a potential recruit.... In another story a man returns from war having killed many of the enemy, begins to drink heavily, and in a freakish incident he manages to save the life of a child who strayed onto train tracks, an incident that leaves the man severely physically as injured as his mental injuries. In "Pistolesi' a husband comes home from war without on eye and missing the right side of his head. The wife with no skills must go to work to support them, happens onto a job taking pictures for family gatherings and special events, and discovers a plane of hope for a life of light that doesn't exist as she takes care of her wounded husband; hope. In `Driving' two young teenagers with homes broken because of similar events spend a summer driving in an old VW looking for work: their degree of isolation is nurtured only buy their concern for each other. In the fall the girl goes away to school and the boy enlists, yet both are so broken they fail even these goals. Some examples of the power of Doyle's writing should be shared here: `When Wendell was a child, he'd been told that people who did that [suicide] went to hell, but he didn't believe that. God wasn't like that, he thought. In fact, God would love them best of all - the lost, the abandoned, the irretrievable. The people for whom life had been a process of coming apart, rather than coming together.' Or even more poignant, `Bobby thought of another time, too, when he'd watched as some men dragged a pretty young girl with black hair into a shack. He'd heard her screams, he pathetic pleading; they were sounds he could have never imagined, that tore something inside of him in a way that was violent and jagged, and something in his head broke away and went someplace else forever.' Each of the nine stories takes the reader into that place where pain originates, where emotions are stretched beyond their elastic limit, where the ability to cope may not be conceivable - until something happens that turns on the strength to survive. Doyle manages to keep us with her because of her indomitable faith in humanity and the resilience of the human spirit. For those of us who have survived battlefields of wars the stories ring sharply true: for those tangential to like episodes as drawn by Doyle the indelible scent of memory will haunt. This is a brilliant achievement in the hands of a writer who somehow understands war - in all its permutations. Grady Harp

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hillary

    I received a free copy of this book in a Goodreads First Reads giveaway. I'm not normally a fan of short stories (these stories are very short at less than 10 pages a pop) because it's hard to get emotionally invested in the characters. There also always seems to be a lesson involved at the end of short stories and I'm not normally big on that sort of thing (there aren't lessons at the end of these short stories, thankfully). Given that I typically like to stay away from short stories, I have to I received a free copy of this book in a Goodreads First Reads giveaway. I'm not normally a fan of short stories (these stories are very short at less than 10 pages a pop) because it's hard to get emotionally invested in the characters. There also always seems to be a lesson involved at the end of short stories and I'm not normally big on that sort of thing (there aren't lessons at the end of these short stories, thankfully). Given that I typically like to stay away from short stories, I have to say that the short stories in War Stories are well-written and most of them are interesting, so it was a quick, entertaining read. I like the simple cover. Would I buy this book in a book store because of the cover? No. It's not some gorgeous cover that draws you in, but it works and you're left wondering who that kid is (and what his story is) in the photograph on the cover. A few of the stories left me saying, "What did I just read? What was the point?," but the majority of the stories were worth the read. I'd be interested in reading a full-length novel by Elisabeth Doyle because I thoroughly enjoyed her simplistic, punchy writing style. Her writing style is reminiscent of Ernest Hemingway, as that quote on the front of the book states. This was a quick read and I got through the entirety of this book in a matter of hours. I found myself stopping after each short story to reflect, but, in truth, none of the stories really affected me emotionally. They were all slightly depressing and the characters were all "messed up" in one way or another. I was expecting the stories to deal with actual war, but most of them weren't about the sort of war with guns and bombs and soldiers. Instead, the stories in this book were about the internal struggles that people face and how they deal with those struggles. It was an interesting read, but I wouldn't read these stories again, so I'm only giving this collection of short stories three stars.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Hill

    When I began this book, I honestly figured it would be a pretty easy read--after all, it is a book of short stories. And, yes, you can sit down and read it in a very short period of time. But what you may not be prepared for is the raw stories that all surround the Vietnam War era. I think this is a time that still haunts us. I know that there has been some healing that has occurred from that time period, but I know that those who served our country in Vietnam saw horrors that we still probably When I began this book, I honestly figured it would be a pretty easy read--after all, it is a book of short stories. And, yes, you can sit down and read it in a very short period of time. But what you may not be prepared for is the raw stories that all surround the Vietnam War era. I think this is a time that still haunts us. I know that there has been some healing that has occurred from that time period, but I know that those who served our country in Vietnam saw horrors that we still probably don't fully understand. As I read these stories, there was something about the writing style that was a little "dry" (for lack of a better term). I couldn't put my finger on it, but it was not the kind of writing style to which I normally gravitate. When I read that the author's writing style was reminiscent of Ernest Hemingway, everything made sense! Yes, that is exactly what the writing style is like, and that explains why I was not a fan. You see, even though I know Hemingway was a gifted author, I never cared for his writing style, and it was all I could do to read the required Hemingway stories each year in high school. It is uncanny how similar his and Doyle's styles are, but I will say hers is much more pleasant than his. Be warned that there is profanity, drugs, and alcohol. There are some gruesome scenes as well, and those stick with me even now. Sometimes having a writing style like this is exactly what is needed to convey messages about war and violence. There were times I shuddered at the descriptions and was horrified at the stories. And just so you know, not all stories are happy endings. In fact, most stories are unfinished. I was sent a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I was not financially compensated, and all opinions are 100 percent mine.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tia Bach

    The first line of the back cover description says it all: we all carry our own battle scars. If the eyes are windows to the soul, then pain is the window to the heart as so expertly described by Elisabeth Doyle in this series of emotionally intense stories about suffering, loss, fear, and need. When a character crys out, "How can God love me?", your heart aches for his wounds and pain only to be torn apart again as another character mentions, "I'm not the same." Amazing how so few words can conv The first line of the back cover description says it all: we all carry our own battle scars. If the eyes are windows to the soul, then pain is the window to the heart as so expertly described by Elisabeth Doyle in this series of emotionally intense stories about suffering, loss, fear, and need. When a character crys out, "How can God love me?", your heart aches for his wounds and pain only to be torn apart again as another character mentions, "I'm not the same." Amazing how so few words can convey such intense pain and suffering. While each story is compelling in its own right, I found myself most drawn to Recruiters, and the eerieness of the grey car stalking its victims, and the slow build of realization and horror in Passengers. I don't want to give too much away about the individual stories, because each one deserves to be read and digested by readers from their own perspective. Instead, I'll share a line from Passengers that seemed to describe each character in some way: she had momentarily dreamt that such a moment would come; that it would save her soul from obscurity and bring about the emergence of her true self, and that her life would thereby be made exceptional. Each soul on display in War Stories is struggling, desperate to make sense of their own battle scars and place in the world. I was amazed how connected I felt to each character within a few short sentences. Although only 119 pages, each story has its own novel-length depth and memorable characters. Highly recommended. Note: I received a complimentary copy for review purposes. A positive review was not requested or guaranteed; the opinions expressed are my own.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sandi Widner

    5 out of 5 stars for "WAR STORIES" by Elisabeth Doyle Set against the backdrop of recent wars, War Stories' compelling nine narratives tell of a wounded veteran who seeks renewal through an imagined relationship with a neighborhood girl, a grieving father who finds peace and reconciliation at the site of a disastrous bus crash, and a young woman who searches for identity and meaning in the wake of her husband's injury. Interspersed with these tales are powerful, non-traditional ''war stories'' - 5 out of 5 stars for "WAR STORIES" by Elisabeth Doyle Set against the backdrop of recent wars, War Stories' compelling nine narratives tell of a wounded veteran who seeks renewal through an imagined relationship with a neighborhood girl, a grieving father who finds peace and reconciliation at the site of a disastrous bus crash, and a young woman who searches for identity and meaning in the wake of her husband's injury. Interspersed with these tales are powerful, non-traditional ''war stories'' - of youth, unexpected loss, and heartbreaking love. War Stories' thoughtful and beautifully crafted tales, which range in style from deceptively simple to rich and complex, tell of people young and old, male and female, who share two things: humanity and resilience. These diverse and deftly written stories are joined through Elisabeth Doyle's remarkable style and ease in creating a universe full of despair, hope, and dreams. At turns tender and harsh, tragic and yearning, these stories will leave you wanting more. Dear Readers: Ms. Doyle writes in a spare style reminiscent of Hemingway, but her stories pack the wallop of Raymond Carver. Her characters are ordinary people coping with pain, disappointment, loss and yearning simply because there is no other way to keep going. Although these stories are short, the characters within them a memorable and richly developed within just a few pages!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy (The Every Free Chance Reader)

    Did I enjoy this book: I had a hard time after finishing this book collecting my thoughts. I finished this book in a few hours...although the stories are short, they make you think. This collection of short stories is very emotional. The stories were sad but, as the book synopsis says, they leave you wanting more. Each of the nine stories are about 10 pages long - give or take some. They all were tragic yet some you could find a positive outcome. My favorite story that you could imagine and see Did I enjoy this book: I had a hard time after finishing this book collecting my thoughts. I finished this book in a few hours...although the stories are short, they make you think. This collection of short stories is very emotional. The stories were sad but, as the book synopsis says, they leave you wanting more. Each of the nine stories are about 10 pages long - give or take some. They all were tragic yet some you could find a positive outcome. My favorite story that you could imagine and see the change to a positive was "One of These Days It Will All Be Over." This story touched me and showed that Diego was a true hero despite his struggles. The ending was great and I hope that the children see a new side to their dad. I imagine that they do...but that is part of the "leave you wanting more" that the book blurb promises. "Median" and "Love Spell" were two other stories that left me with a good feeling despite the tragedy and sadness within them. Would I recommend it: I would recommend this book to those people who enjoy short stories that really make you think and that stay with you after you have finished reading them. Will I read it again: I will not read this book again. http://everyfreechancebookreviews.blo...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristi

    I am usually not a fan of short stories, but I couldn't put this little book down. In each of these stories, there is something so real about the characters that you can't help but connect with them. The initial impression, and as the title implies, is that these are going to be tragic stories, and yet in each of them, there is a glimmer that there is something more - something not yet seen just waiting to happen. The stories leave you with that impression, so while being tragic, they are also h I am usually not a fan of short stories, but I couldn't put this little book down. In each of these stories, there is something so real about the characters that you can't help but connect with them. The initial impression, and as the title implies, is that these are going to be tragic stories, and yet in each of them, there is a glimmer that there is something more - something not yet seen just waiting to happen. The stories leave you with that impression, so while being tragic, they are also hopeful. I think the reason that I generally don't like short stories is that I can't get vested in them - the characters seem shallow to me - Not so with this book. She does a great job of giving you enough information about the characters so that you feel you really know something about them, or how they were feeling in the sliver of their life that you are seeing. The stories in this book are going to stay with me for a long time.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Kelly

    War Stories is a thoughtful emotional book, a series of short fiction stories that is wonderfully written and very compelling to read. The book is short but packs a powerful punch. I feel that these stories are character driven in that we get to "feel" what these people are going through. I generally do not read short stories, I like to get immersed in a novel and sometimes feel that a short story does not give enough. I did not feel that way with this one though and I do look forward to reading War Stories is a thoughtful emotional book, a series of short fiction stories that is wonderfully written and very compelling to read. The book is short but packs a powerful punch. I feel that these stories are character driven in that we get to "feel" what these people are going through. I generally do not read short stories, I like to get immersed in a novel and sometimes feel that a short story does not give enough. I did not feel that way with this one though and I do look forward to reading more by this author. I received a copy of this book for review and was not monetarily compensated for my review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Kitter

    I have received a free copy of this book through a GoodReads First Reads giveaway. Never judge a book by it's cover, nor its title. You see the words "War Stories" and you think of strong, noble men with a chest full of medals, glory, honor, patriotism and so on. This book peels back those nice, safe images to reveal the nightmare underneath. Not just for those who were in battle, but those left behind to pick up the pieces. Surprisingly deep, this book is also about hope and redemption. I have received a free copy of this book through a GoodReads First Reads giveaway. Never judge a book by it's cover, nor its title. You see the words "War Stories" and you think of strong, noble men with a chest full of medals, glory, honor, patriotism and so on. This book peels back those nice, safe images to reveal the nightmare underneath. Not just for those who were in battle, but those left behind to pick up the pieces. Surprisingly deep, this book is also about hope and redemption.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Destiny Rodriguez

    This book carried short fiction stories of different situations and tragic consequences thought out life. From the first stories of teenagers enjoying them selves at a party ,a homeless girl rapped into shelter. Sad tragic stories of every day struggling people. I enjoyed the short stories. I was sadden by most. But in reality it's real life. This book carried short fiction stories of different situations and tragic consequences thought out life. From the first stories of teenagers enjoying them selves at a party ,a homeless girl rapped into shelter. Sad tragic stories of every day struggling people. I enjoyed the short stories. I was sadden by most. But in reality it's real life.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Olson

    This book resonates. It delves into war in all its permutations, from soldiers who have fought, to those targeted for recruitment, to people who face mental, physical, or emotional battles in other ways besides behind the lines. The characters are just ordinary people, but their thoughts are so relatable. It's timeless. This book resonates. It delves into war in all its permutations, from soldiers who have fought, to those targeted for recruitment, to people who face mental, physical, or emotional battles in other ways besides behind the lines. The characters are just ordinary people, but their thoughts are so relatable. It's timeless.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    A well-written, well-received collection of mercifully brief stories, all coping with loss, past or imminent. Don't mistake me, they're really good, but in a terse and oppressive kind of way – fair warning for good literature, I guess. A well-written, well-received collection of mercifully brief stories, all coping with loss, past or imminent. Don't mistake me, they're really good, but in a terse and oppressive kind of way – fair warning for good literature, I guess.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Grossman

    Very moving series of stories. Wide variety of characters, who have been affected by wars of various kinds. Some of the characters you'll really feel for, and the longing/suffering they've gone through. A collection I could describe as modern American gothic. Hard to put down. Very moving series of stories. Wide variety of characters, who have been affected by wars of various kinds. Some of the characters you'll really feel for, and the longing/suffering they've gone through. A collection I could describe as modern American gothic. Hard to put down.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Personal accounts of war are always important and should be remembered by all. This is a great read for just about anyone.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Leesa

    TWO STARS SEEMS SO LOW FOR "IT WAS OK!" But that's exactly how I felt abt this collection, yes. It was ok. TWO STARS SEEMS SO LOW FOR "IT WAS OK!" But that's exactly how I felt abt this collection, yes. It was ok.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jamie White

  20. 5 out of 5

    Justa Reeder

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    I would give this book 3.5 stars. It was very interesting, and a pleasant read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hussein

  23. 4 out of 5

    Aryo

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ricki

  25. 5 out of 5

    Roy Huff

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mira

  27. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  28. 4 out of 5

    Heather Ford

  29. 5 out of 5

    Julie Dargis

  30. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

  31. 4 out of 5

    Rasmi Bacon

  32. 5 out of 5

    Kim Friant

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jack

  34. 4 out of 5

    Leann

  35. 5 out of 5

    Violet

  36. 4 out of 5

    Gary Green

  37. 4 out of 5

    Janet

  38. 4 out of 5

    Beth Olson

  39. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Gates

  40. 5 out of 5

    Kim Coomey

  41. 5 out of 5

    Dixie

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