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Co-Mix: A Retrospective of Comics, Graphics, and Scraps

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"Designed with Mr. Spiegelman’s help, [Co-Mix] has the tall, narrow proportions of Raw...its images form a chronological sampling of Mr. Spiegelman’s extraordinary imagination, including his precocious early work, underground comics, preparatory notes and sketches for Maus, indelible covers for The New Yorker, lithographic efforts and much else."—New York Times In an art ca "Designed with Mr. Spiegelman’s help, [Co-Mix] has the tall, narrow proportions of Raw...its images form a chronological sampling of Mr. Spiegelman’s extraordinary imagination, including his precocious early work, underground comics, preparatory notes and sketches for Maus, indelible covers for The New Yorker, lithographic efforts and much else."—New York Times In an art career that now spans six decades, Art Spiegelman has been a groundbreaking and influential figure with a global impact. His Pulitzer Prize-winning holocaust memoir Maus established the graphic novel as a legitimate form and inspired countless cartoonists while his shorter works have enormously expanded the expressive range of comics.      Co-Mix: A Retrospective of Comics, Graphics, and Scraps is a comprehensive career overview of the output of this legendary cartoonist, showing for the first time the full range of a half-century of relentless experimentation. Starting from Spiegelman's earliest self-published comics and lavishly reproducing graphics from a host of publications both obscure and famous, Co-Mix provides a guided tour of an artist who has continually reinvented not just comics but also made a mark in book and magazine design, bubble gum cards, lithography, modern dance, and most recently stained glass. By showing all facets of Spiegelman's career, the book demonstrates how he has persistently cross-pollinated the worlds of comics, commercial design, and fine arts. Essays by acclaimed film critic J. Hoberman and MoMA curator and Dean of the Yale University School of Art Robert Storr bookend Co-Mix, offering eloquent meditations on an artist whose work has been genre-defining.


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"Designed with Mr. Spiegelman’s help, [Co-Mix] has the tall, narrow proportions of Raw...its images form a chronological sampling of Mr. Spiegelman’s extraordinary imagination, including his precocious early work, underground comics, preparatory notes and sketches for Maus, indelible covers for The New Yorker, lithographic efforts and much else."—New York Times In an art ca "Designed with Mr. Spiegelman’s help, [Co-Mix] has the tall, narrow proportions of Raw...its images form a chronological sampling of Mr. Spiegelman’s extraordinary imagination, including his precocious early work, underground comics, preparatory notes and sketches for Maus, indelible covers for The New Yorker, lithographic efforts and much else."—New York Times In an art career that now spans six decades, Art Spiegelman has been a groundbreaking and influential figure with a global impact. His Pulitzer Prize-winning holocaust memoir Maus established the graphic novel as a legitimate form and inspired countless cartoonists while his shorter works have enormously expanded the expressive range of comics.      Co-Mix: A Retrospective of Comics, Graphics, and Scraps is a comprehensive career overview of the output of this legendary cartoonist, showing for the first time the full range of a half-century of relentless experimentation. Starting from Spiegelman's earliest self-published comics and lavishly reproducing graphics from a host of publications both obscure and famous, Co-Mix provides a guided tour of an artist who has continually reinvented not just comics but also made a mark in book and magazine design, bubble gum cards, lithography, modern dance, and most recently stained glass. By showing all facets of Spiegelman's career, the book demonstrates how he has persistently cross-pollinated the worlds of comics, commercial design, and fine arts. Essays by acclaimed film critic J. Hoberman and MoMA curator and Dean of the Yale University School of Art Robert Storr bookend Co-Mix, offering eloquent meditations on an artist whose work has been genre-defining.

30 review for Co-Mix: A Retrospective of Comics, Graphics, and Scraps

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dominick

    Quite thorough retrospective on the overrated but nevertheless ingenious Art Spiegelman. Among the bits I liked best are the generous sampling of materials related to Wacky Packages and The Garbage Pail Kids, Spiegelman's New Yorker covers, and the comics supplement, which avoids obvious things like excerpts form Maus but instead offers entire short strips that can be otherwise a tad hard to find, such as Speigelman's tributes to Charles Schulz and Harvey Kurtzman. My one complaint is that some Quite thorough retrospective on the overrated but nevertheless ingenious Art Spiegelman. Among the bits I liked best are the generous sampling of materials related to Wacky Packages and The Garbage Pail Kids, Spiegelman's New Yorker covers, and the comics supplement, which avoids obvious things like excerpts form Maus but instead offers entire short strips that can be otherwise a tad hard to find, such as Speigelman's tributes to Charles Schulz and Harvey Kurtzman. My one complaint is that some images and fonts are a trifle small for my eyes--but then, without such reduction, less stuff could have been included, so that's a quibble, really. Also includes some foldouts and inserts, which add scope. Worthwhile for Spiegelman fans, for sure, but ought to b eof interest to anyone with an interest in comics art and history.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jamil

    As career surveys go, this contains some gems, my personal favorites including the facsimile insert of Two-Fisted Painters, "Abstract Thought is a Warm Puppy", Spiegelman's tribute to Charles Schulz from the New Yorker, and design sketches for his edition of Joseph Moncure's The Wild Party. As career surveys go, this contains some gems, my personal favorites including the facsimile insert of Two-Fisted Painters, "Abstract Thought is a Warm Puppy", Spiegelman's tribute to Charles Schulz from the New Yorker, and design sketches for his edition of Joseph Moncure's The Wild Party.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    This works better as a 'coffee table' book than a book to sit and read through front to back. There's lots of cool strips, images, and informational/biographical tidbits. I enjoyed flipping through it over the last couple weeks. The physical copy is also very beautiful, it'll be a shame to stick it on a bookshelf; it deserves to be left out. This works better as a 'coffee table' book than a book to sit and read through front to back. There's lots of cool strips, images, and informational/biographical tidbits. I enjoyed flipping through it over the last couple weeks. The physical copy is also very beautiful, it'll be a shame to stick it on a bookshelf; it deserves to be left out.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    I really love Spiegelman's art, but not particularly reading about Art Spiegelman. I really love Spiegelman's art, but not particularly reading about Art Spiegelman.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Richard Magahiz

    Art Spiegelman has been back in the news because of schools banning his book Maus I: A Survivor's Tale: My Father Bleeds Historyfor political reasons. This book covers his work up through 2013 starting with his artistic influences, then to his early work with unerground comix in the 1960s and 1970s, his major works Maus and In the Shadow of No Towers, plus his collaborations with other artists. I was moved seeing his cover for The New Yorker magazine right after 9/11 which had the World Trade Ce Art Spiegelman has been back in the news because of schools banning his book Maus I: A Survivor's Tale: My Father Bleeds Historyfor political reasons. This book covers his work up through 2013 starting with his artistic influences, then to his early work with unerground comix in the 1960s and 1970s, his major works Maus and In the Shadow of No Towers, plus his collaborations with other artists. I was moved seeing his cover for The New Yorker magazine right after 9/11 which had the World Trade Center towers in glossy black against a matte black background. There can only be a selection of some o his work but the variety and energy comes through with every new project featured. The sequences showing the early sketches through more developed drafts to the final work were the most interesting features. There are a few large gatefolds and a mini-comic bound in which enhance the reader's enjoyment. There are also reactions from critics and fellow comic artists influenced by him which help point out what were the most significant advancements he made. I like looking at the samples of art to understand how he transformed the initial idea to work within the framework of the graphic panel. When he made an artistic choice such as using anthropomorphic animal characters in Maus the consequences were often far reaching hard to know in advance. As for the controversies, while there are sexual depictions in his art, I think it is probably much less unsettling to a young person than the depiction of historical events such as genocide, race hatred, and rapacious greed, which have an edifying influence on a child trying to form their view of the world. For the rest of us, this retrospective is something worth studying as we try to make sense of our times.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Duncan

    I was so attracted to Spiegelman's intellectualism of comics when I was younger in the late 80's. Nowadays that intellectualism does not hold the same allure for me. His art is still and always as fine as can be. On the other hand his reflexive left-wing political stances of his New Yorker covers and later work are to be expected I guess but a conservative reader (dare I whisper even a Trump voter!) can see that through his portrayals of GWBush as Satan and a Skull and bones stylized death merch I was so attracted to Spiegelman's intellectualism of comics when I was younger in the late 80's. Nowadays that intellectualism does not hold the same allure for me. His art is still and always as fine as can be. On the other hand his reflexive left-wing political stances of his New Yorker covers and later work are to be expected I guess but a conservative reader (dare I whisper even a Trump voter!) can see that through his portrayals of GWBush as Satan and a Skull and bones stylized death merchant that the hatred of any GOP pol by the establishment media has always been de riguer. High irony indeed now that we live in dark days where an life-long Dem is our President and he stumbles his and the planet's way into WW3. Ha, ha, ha. What a good & dark joke . . . I know I've prattled on too much about the politics in the book which is only a small part of the book, really, so onto other thoughts . . . I'll always love Maus (something that isn't brought up in the book or by anyone writing about Spiegelman is how influenced the art of Maus is by the Belgian, Herge, it seems obvious to me but no-one mentions it - am I crazy? No, it's the world that's nuts.) and Spiegelman's underground stuff from the 70's is awesome but he really hit his stride as an editor of the New Wave RAW anthology from the 80's. Funnily enough I was reading RAW before I read Weirdo, but over the years that latter R Crumb compendium is what has stuck w/my underground comics reading tastes. (For some reason many pages are spent on the painted glass art work he did for his old high school in Manhattan, perhaps because it was recent to when this book was published? 2013?) As you can see I've given it four stars, it's great fun and very informational (although would've liked to know more about Spiegelman's "psychotic episode" from '68 - possibly acid-inspired?) and for the most part a quick read: I checked it out yesterday and am returning it today at my local library. I gotta go, before I lose all this nonsensical baloney to the whims of my text-killing computer. Take care, Art, you influenced me a lot over the years weirdly. Now where's that Skip Williamson book I want to read . . .

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    A talented graphic artist.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    A career retrospective of Spiegelman's work. There's an incredible amount of material crammed into this book, from childhood drawings all the way to the recent stained glass windows he did for his school. If his comics work has been somewhat sporadic over the years, it's apparently because he works on so many other projects at the same time. Some of this material will be familiar to longtime Spiegelman fans (yes, you get to read Two-Fisted Painters again. And the two page collaboration with Maur A career retrospective of Spiegelman's work. There's an incredible amount of material crammed into this book, from childhood drawings all the way to the recent stained glass windows he did for his school. If his comics work has been somewhat sporadic over the years, it's apparently because he works on so many other projects at the same time. Some of this material will be familiar to longtime Spiegelman fans (yes, you get to read Two-Fisted Painters again. And the two page collaboration with Maurice Sendak), but quite a bit of this has never been reprinted. Spiegelman excels at dancing along the borderline between comics and fine art. As always, it will be interesting to see what he does next.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Basically bringing in a lot of Spiegelman's earlier and therefore harder to find stuff. Amazing. Insane. Chocked full of mature material and themes here. You get to somehow take into account that this is the guy that put a lot of the brain power behind Garbage Pail kids and yet meanwhile also Maus and yet also serious abstract comics. Don't write this off as trash but don't be surprised when you feel almost slightly embarrassed to be reading parts of it. Basically bringing in a lot of Spiegelman's earlier and therefore harder to find stuff. Amazing. Insane. Chocked full of mature material and themes here. You get to somehow take into account that this is the guy that put a lot of the brain power behind Garbage Pail kids and yet meanwhile also Maus and yet also serious abstract comics. Don't write this off as trash but don't be surprised when you feel almost slightly embarrassed to be reading parts of it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    World Literature Today

    "This large-format book, brilliantly produced on high-quality stock, invites the reader to linger over each page. It is a testament to the fact that Spiegelman has indeed redefined what comic book artistry is all about." - Rita D. Jacobs, Montclair State University This book was reviewed in the May 2014 issue of World Literature Today. Read the full review by visiting our website: http://bit.ly/1zkjoIM "This large-format book, brilliantly produced on high-quality stock, invites the reader to linger over each page. It is a testament to the fact that Spiegelman has indeed redefined what comic book artistry is all about." - Rita D. Jacobs, Montclair State University This book was reviewed in the May 2014 issue of World Literature Today. Read the full review by visiting our website: http://bit.ly/1zkjoIM

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Spiegelman is more of an artist than I realized/

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    NPR interview with Art at http://www.npr.org/2013/09/14/2221161... NPR interview with Art at http://www.npr.org/2013/09/14/2221161...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    via NYPL - a well-assembled curation of Spiegelman's ephemera. via NYPL - a well-assembled curation of Spiegelman's ephemera.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    summary of a surprisingly varied, important, and often hilarious career. i guess it's possible to dislike his work, but i can't see how. summary of a surprisingly varied, important, and often hilarious career. i guess it's possible to dislike his work, but i can't see how.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Blair

    A brilliant collection of various bits of work that provide a retrospective look at the career of a brilliant man. Totally absorbing.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Colin

  17. 4 out of 5

    Corbin

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jack

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joey Alison Sayers

  20. 4 out of 5

    M.L.D.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Libby Hays

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chloe A-L

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Mellor

  24. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Donovan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Philip

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen O'Grady

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Monk

  30. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

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