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The Mystery Woman

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Beatrice Lockwood, one of the intrepid ladies of Lantern Street, is in the middle of a case when her past comes back to haunt her.  Joshua North, a former spy for the Crown, has come out of a self-imposed retirement after a disastrous case that left him scarred and forced to use a cane.  He is hunting the villain who is blackmailing his sister.  The trail leads him to Beat Beatrice Lockwood, one of the intrepid ladies of Lantern Street, is in the middle of a case when her past comes back to haunt her.  Joshua North, a former spy for the Crown, has come out of a self-imposed retirement after a disastrous case that left him scarred and forced to use a cane.  He is hunting the villain who is blackmailing his sister.  The trail leads him to Beatrice who is his chief suspect.  But when he realizes that she is not the blackmailer they set out to find the real extortionist.  Passion flares between them as they dodge a professional assassin.  Meanwhile a mysterious scientist intent on resurrecting his dead lover using an ancient Egyptian formula for preserving the bodies of the dead is also hunting Beatrice. He is keeping his dead love perfectly preserved in a special, crystal-topped sarcophagus filled with the special fluid.   But he needs Beatrice's paranormal talent to activate the reviving properties of the preservative in the coffin.  Time is running out for everyone involved. The two cases collide at a mysterious country-house filled with artifacts from ancient Egyptian tombs.  The drama concludes in the mad scientist's laboratory where Joshua discovers that the past he thought was dead is still very much alive -- sort of.


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Beatrice Lockwood, one of the intrepid ladies of Lantern Street, is in the middle of a case when her past comes back to haunt her.  Joshua North, a former spy for the Crown, has come out of a self-imposed retirement after a disastrous case that left him scarred and forced to use a cane.  He is hunting the villain who is blackmailing his sister.  The trail leads him to Beat Beatrice Lockwood, one of the intrepid ladies of Lantern Street, is in the middle of a case when her past comes back to haunt her.  Joshua North, a former spy for the Crown, has come out of a self-imposed retirement after a disastrous case that left him scarred and forced to use a cane.  He is hunting the villain who is blackmailing his sister.  The trail leads him to Beatrice who is his chief suspect.  But when he realizes that she is not the blackmailer they set out to find the real extortionist.  Passion flares between them as they dodge a professional assassin.  Meanwhile a mysterious scientist intent on resurrecting his dead lover using an ancient Egyptian formula for preserving the bodies of the dead is also hunting Beatrice. He is keeping his dead love perfectly preserved in a special, crystal-topped sarcophagus filled with the special fluid.   But he needs Beatrice's paranormal talent to activate the reviving properties of the preservative in the coffin.  Time is running out for everyone involved. The two cases collide at a mysterious country-house filled with artifacts from ancient Egyptian tombs.  The drama concludes in the mad scientist's laboratory where Joshua discovers that the past he thought was dead is still very much alive -- sort of.

30 review for The Mystery Woman

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    I like Jayne Ann Krentz/Amanda Quick/Jayne Castle A LOT. I have been reading these books for years, and I frequently purchase them as soon as they are released. Even I can admit, though, that they're all starting to bleed together, and that I am having a harder time remembering which hero/heroine did what in the increasingly blended universe that connect all of this author's books written in the last ten years. This being said, I do like how the "Arcane" universe has been created to connect past I like Jayne Ann Krentz/Amanda Quick/Jayne Castle A LOT. I have been reading these books for years, and I frequently purchase them as soon as they are released. Even I can admit, though, that they're all starting to bleed together, and that I am having a harder time remembering which hero/heroine did what in the increasingly blended universe that connect all of this author's books written in the last ten years. This being said, I do like how the "Arcane" universe has been created to connect past, present, and future. This is my fluff, cotton candy literature, and I like that she has created opportunities to tell a variety of stories that are new, but allow the reader to see how these families evolve over a period of time. I liked the relationship between Beatrice and Joshua: They're both strong personalities, but they're both able to see the other's perspective and get things done. But on the downside, for people who are supposed to be able to keep secrets, they sure don't do a good job of it! They're always explaining themselves to the other in detailed prose, and it makes the dialogue feel forced. I started mentally editing the dialogue; as one of my English professors once told me, why would you use ten words when you can accomplish the same with three simple ones? The extended conversations also feel somewhat condescending--it's like they're spelling out in minute detail the elements of the whodunit. This could be accomplished just as effectively in short conversations or through interior dialogue, and that it wasn't made me feel talked down to. Is it going to keep me from reading more romances in the Arcane series? Nope. I'm a hopeless addict. They're fun to read, a bit uncomplicated, and a (not so) guilty pleasure.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mojca

    This came completely out of the left field for me. The story simply didn't suck me in as Ms. Quick's novels usually do. Let's start with the title—The Mystery Woman. That was supposed to be the heroine. To me, she was no mystery. I would've preferred her secrets to be revealed more slowly, not giving it all up front (to the reader, that is). She was also the usual Quick-heroine that often annoy me with their behavior, notions and convictions. The hero also wasn't of much help to make me enjoy the This came completely out of the left field for me. The story simply didn't suck me in as Ms. Quick's novels usually do. Let's start with the title—The Mystery Woman. That was supposed to be the heroine. To me, she was no mystery. I would've preferred her secrets to be revealed more slowly, not giving it all up front (to the reader, that is). She was also the usual Quick-heroine that often annoy me with their behavior, notions and convictions. The hero also wasn't of much help to make me enjoy the story. Though he was (at least in appearance) the usual Quick-hero, the rest simply fizzled. Though the new approach Ms. Quick chose with him not believing in the paranormal was indeed refreshing, it quickly turned annoying. Also, I didn't feel the connection between them, not the attraction, not the affection, not the love, not the sex. Nothing. It just didn't work. The suspense part of the story was also incomparable with Ms. Quick's other novels. Maybe it was the fact the main reason the villain wanted to kidnap Beatrice (the heroine) was utterly out there—yes, the guy was completely nuts, but still. Maybe it was the fact I didn't much care what happens to the heroine (or hero), but I had a really hard time getting though the book. Kudos for the other villain, yet it took me way too long to finish this one. Still, the writing was good, the plot also (despite everything I've listed), so I decided to give it three stars. I'm quite disappointed, though. I expected more.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    3.5 bumped up for the audiobook. Justine Eyre performed the narration. Nice job. I particularly liked the spooky scene with the coffin, the dead-but-pristine body, and the eyes of Anubis. Halloween, anyone? And that dramatic rescue. Hah! For historical romantic-suspense, Amanda Quick is gold standard. Her formula may not be every readers' cuppa, but it has stood the test of time — and I'm talking decades. She likes her heroines intelligent, kind-hearted, and spirited (but not annoyingly "fiesty" 3.5 bumped up for the audiobook. Justine Eyre performed the narration. Nice job. I particularly liked the spooky scene with the coffin, the dead-but-pristine body, and the eyes of Anubis. Halloween, anyone? And that dramatic rescue. Hah! For historical romantic-suspense, Amanda Quick is gold standard. Her formula may not be every readers' cuppa, but it has stood the test of time — and I'm talking decades. She likes her heroines intelligent, kind-hearted, and spirited (but not annoyingly "fiesty"). Her heroes are unexceptional: smart, tough, rich, fairly cynical — what's not to love? This book follows some of the same tropes as her earlier publications, including 'Til Death Do Us Part. We have a virginal heroine living on the fringes of society and a hero with a scarred face and tormented past. The plot twists along until the hero realizes at the 11th hour that he was barking up the wrong tree for his murderer. No complaints from me. I knew precisely what I was getting. I still pick up a novel by Quick / Krentz / Castle when I want something fairly formulaic and reliable. Years ago, I eagerly bought everything she published as soon as it hit the stores, but with the broad availability through e-books I have become more expansive in my reading choices. Lately I've gotten into sci-fi, space opera, and fantasy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    The Mystery Woman 4 Stars A significant improvement on the first book in the series. Unlike the previous installment, the plot is more focused, and the paranormal aspects are woven more successfully into the storyline. Moreover, the underlying premise involving the villain's desire to (view spoiler)[resurrect his lover using an ancient Egyptian artifact (hide spoiler)] is reminiscent of one of my favorite movies, The Mummy with Rachel Weisz and Brendan Frasier. Beatrice and Joshua's romance has the The Mystery Woman 4 Stars A significant improvement on the first book in the series. Unlike the previous installment, the plot is more focused, and the paranormal aspects are woven more successfully into the storyline. Moreover, the underlying premise involving the villain's desire to (view spoiler)[resurrect his lover using an ancient Egyptian artifact (hide spoiler)] is reminiscent of one of my favorite movies, The Mummy with Rachel Weisz and Brendan Frasier. Beatrice and Joshua's romance has the chemistry and intimacy missing from Lucius and Evangeline's relationship. As is expected from Quick, the hero and heroine share numerous traits with characters from her earlier works. In this case, Joshua, a covert operative with physical impairments, is a more traumatized version of Tobias March while Beatrice with her psychic powers and investigative skills is akin to some of the Arcane heroines. The references to innovations from the Victorian Age as well as elements of Egyptology are an added bonus. Overall, a satisfying read, but it is unfortunate that Quick did not complete the series with the third last of Lantern Street. Perhaps she will in the future.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    3.5 stars just because Ms. Quick dialed back her over-use of her most formulaic words and phrases (i.e. heat, heated, jacked up, raised senses, running hot, psychical, para-senses, etc.) and for a change included a hero who didn't believe in the paranormal at all, despite his own talent for finding things. While the sex scenes (I hesitate to call them love scenes because there still isn't a lot of foundation for the romance) remain eye-rollingly silly, at least there was no stock description of 3.5 stars just because Ms. Quick dialed back her over-use of her most formulaic words and phrases (i.e. heat, heated, jacked up, raised senses, running hot, psychical, para-senses, etc.) and for a change included a hero who didn't believe in the paranormal at all, despite his own talent for finding things. While the sex scenes (I hesitate to call them love scenes because there still isn't a lot of foundation for the romance) remain eye-rollingly silly, at least there was no stock description of mind-blowing aura merging and whatnot. Hooray for small favors! In book two of the "Ladies of Lantern Street" series, we follow Flint & Marsh agent Beatrice Lockwood as she masquerades in her role as a virtually invisible paid companion to wealthy ladies in need of assistance foiling dastardly plots. Beatrice came to the agency some months earlier when her previous employer was murdered by someone seeking to kidnap her. She manages to create a new life for herself in a new career, until during the course of an investigation she is located by Joshua Gage, former spy for the Crown, who needs her assistance in trapping the man blackmailing his sister, a client from Beatrice's old life. The blackmail scheme turns out to be just the tip of the iceberg, so Joshua and Beatrice team up to stop a madman before they become the next victims. My favorite thing about this novel is that Beatrice is so strong and well-prepared. She carries a small pistol strapped to her thigh, she has a vial of specially-prepared smelling salts to ward off unwanted sexual advances, and she thinks quickly in emergency situations. She is no wilting wallflower. I appreciated that very much. For readers' advisors: story and setting doorways (i.e. Victorian England). A couple of sex scenes.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carvanz

    It’s been years since I’ve read anything by this author and I was curious if I would still enjoy her writing as much as I did in the past. I can sincerely say I do. This was surprisingly a very fast paced read with so much mystery and suspense sprinkled with romance that I consumed it in one sitting. What a great reminder why I loved this writer and her work. Dual POV Safe No apparent triggers

  7. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    This should have been a much shorter book, but with the two main characters stopping to explain the obvious every five minutes it does tend to drag on. A few questions, isn't Beatrice an investigator? Why then is she astonished and sooo impressed at deductive reasoning when applied. I feel like she's this moon-eyed neophyte when she was introduced as someone a bit more capable. I don't even want to talk about the love scene, because they talked it to death...if they had really been that chatty t This should have been a much shorter book, but with the two main characters stopping to explain the obvious every five minutes it does tend to drag on. A few questions, isn't Beatrice an investigator? Why then is she astonished and sooo impressed at deductive reasoning when applied. I feel like she's this moon-eyed neophyte when she was introduced as someone a bit more capable. I don't even want to talk about the love scene, because they talked it to death...if they had really been that chatty the mood would have gotten bored and gone for a walk I know I did. And when Joshua went to fight the bone man, he really says the bone man didn't expect him to use his cane as a weapon...then the Bone Man is a moron and will be easily defeated when he also thinks that the kitchen knife you pick up is just a utensil. Also can someone explain this sentence on 281 "The black ties they wore around their necks [where the hell else would you wear it?] were well known througout the criminal world." The ties were well-known? They are black ties...huh? Oh and I am getting tired of Beatrice constantly harping on her whole psychical powers being real to Joshua - he would truly be sick of her by this point because it's annoying me. Who cares if he believes it as long as he is respectful of her beliefs and he seems to be mainly.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mara

    Same plot, same story, all her books get blended together after a while. I understand formulaic, but this seems a bit too much. I had the stong deja vu of having already read this book (no, I haven't) Same plot, same story, all her books get blended together after a while. I understand formulaic, but this seems a bit too much. I had the stong deja vu of having already read this book (no, I haven't)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Susan Amper

    I was thoroughly tired of the Arcane Series. They started to read alike as though written by a machine with names and places plugged in where necessary. I am happy to say that Amanda Quick has returned to a spunky, brave, and adventurous heroine in The Mystery Woman, Book 2 of the Ladies of Lantern Street series. The novel has less paranormal aspects than the Arcane novels, and I am grateful for that. Beatrice meets Joshua who thinks she is blackmailing his sister over some information Beatrice m I was thoroughly tired of the Arcane Series. They started to read alike as though written by a machine with names and places plugged in where necessary. I am happy to say that Amanda Quick has returned to a spunky, brave, and adventurous heroine in The Mystery Woman, Book 2 of the Ladies of Lantern Street series. The novel has less paranormal aspects than the Arcane novels, and I am grateful for that. Beatrice meets Joshua who thinks she is blackmailing his sister over some information Beatrice might have gained in her work as a psychic. There are more sinister happenings afoot with people trying to raise the dead, The Bone Man searching for Beatrice, and the Messenger on her trail. A nice read from Amanda Quick.

  10. 4 out of 5

    BiblioJen

    Really, really enjoyed this one! Amanda Quick is reliably good, but sometimes a bit too formulaic. "The Mystery Woman" delivered the usually good AQ experience, but felt a bit fresher that her last couple of books. That quality might be attributed to this being the second book in this series, so the story felt more focused - we weren't distracted with setting up the next three books or introducing a bunch of characters that we won't see again until the next book. A fast, enjoyable read, and audi Really, really enjoyed this one! Amanda Quick is reliably good, but sometimes a bit too formulaic. "The Mystery Woman" delivered the usually good AQ experience, but felt a bit fresher that her last couple of books. That quality might be attributed to this being the second book in this series, so the story felt more focused - we weren't distracted with setting up the next three books or introducing a bunch of characters that we won't see again until the next book. A fast, enjoyable read, and audiobook narrator Justine Eyre is totally in her element here with a spot-on performance. Definitely recommended!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    Second in the Ladies of Lantern Street series - I liked this one much more than the previous one in the series. It's probably more 3.5 stars, but Quick delivers a satisfying genre novel that is well-written and satisfying, even if it uses pretty well-worn tropes. Rounded it up because it was exactly the book-break I needed. Fast read and enjoyable. It has science fiction aspects but it is not pervasive. I think it had just enough paranormal for it to be interesting. It also has a much better plo Second in the Ladies of Lantern Street series - I liked this one much more than the previous one in the series. It's probably more 3.5 stars, but Quick delivers a satisfying genre novel that is well-written and satisfying, even if it uses pretty well-worn tropes. Rounded it up because it was exactly the book-break I needed. Fast read and enjoyable. It has science fiction aspects but it is not pervasive. I think it had just enough paranormal for it to be interesting. It also has a much better plot line and character development than the first book. The story moves quickly and is very enjoyable. The characters are lifelike and likable. The villains are treacherous. I confess I don't enjoy Quick's latest paranormal books as much as her earlier romances, but they are still a good read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Olga Godim

    A mediocre novel. The writing is professional enough, clean and laconic, what I've come to expect from this writer, but the heroes are rather formulaic: he – a brooding 19th century knight (aka former British spy) in a slightly tarnished armor; she – a soft but mysterious damsel who can take care of herself. What is worse: the author used several plot devices I’ve already read in some of her earlier novels. Of course, plagiarizing herself is hardly a literary crime but it is rather disappointing A mediocre novel. The writing is professional enough, clean and laconic, what I've come to expect from this writer, but the heroes are rather formulaic: he – a brooding 19th century knight (aka former British spy) in a slightly tarnished armor; she – a soft but mysterious damsel who can take care of herself. What is worse: the author used several plot devices I’ve already read in some of her earlier novels. Of course, plagiarizing herself is hardly a literary crime but it is rather disappointing. I guess, after penning several dozens of bestselling novels under her various noms de plume, the writer has trouble coming up with original plot twists.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Talia

    I wanted to enjoy Quick's latest book, but I couldn't. Usually, I breeze through her books, enjoying the fluff and mystery, but I had to force myself to finish this novel. Her characters had no chemistry. I felt like they were thrown together and were attracted to each other only because Quick wrote it that way. Although these types of books tend to be somewhat formulaic, this was one more so than usual. The paranormal romance has been beaten to death and I think Quick needs to find a new angle. I wanted to enjoy Quick's latest book, but I couldn't. Usually, I breeze through her books, enjoying the fluff and mystery, but I had to force myself to finish this novel. Her characters had no chemistry. I felt like they were thrown together and were attracted to each other only because Quick wrote it that way. Although these types of books tend to be somewhat formulaic, this was one more so than usual. The paranormal romance has been beaten to death and I think Quick needs to find a new angle. I'm really hoping her next one is awesome, and I can enjoy it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marybelle

    I love the book, and especially the characters. These two protagonists certainly deserved each other. However, I was slightly disappointed in the ending. I would have liked a little more of a scuffle.before Victor was forced to kill his son-in-law. That said, it was a very good read, and I very much enjoyed it. However, I am very disappointed that JAK did not finish the trilogy. It would have been nice to find out what happened to the third lady of Lantern Street.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jess the Romanceaholic

    One of the best Amanda Quick novels I've read in a long time -- it had much more "substance" so to speak than many of her books, with a greater focus on the relationship and the action than on the "psychical" elements (though they were certainly present too). 4/5 Stars One of the best Amanda Quick novels I've read in a long time -- it had much more "substance" so to speak than many of her books, with a greater focus on the relationship and the action than on the "psychical" elements (though they were certainly present too). 4/5 Stars

  16. 4 out of 5

    CatBookMom

    Did Victorian-era women really have garter holsters for their derringers? No matter, this is a good story. Wish there were more in this series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    fleurette

    It was ok. The heroine is less naive than usual and the hero is less possessive. Paranormal aspect is typical for AQ.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    Another enjoyable Amanda Quick novel!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Linniegayl

    I listened to this in audio and liked the narration quite a bit. At times I was thoroughly engaged with the story, but other times I found it very easy to put down and a bit boring. I'm giving this a C; pleasant enough, but not remarkable. I listened to this in audio and liked the narration quite a bit. At times I was thoroughly engaged with the story, but other times I found it very easy to put down and a bit boring. I'm giving this a C; pleasant enough, but not remarkable.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I’m a fan of Amanda Quick (aka Jayne Ann Krentz) and auto-buy her books. I admit I lost interest in her Arcane series once we reached the conclusion of how Jones & Jones agency came together and she started expanding the Arcane series to include outside associates. I wanted to prep for this review by reading the last 3 books I missed, but decided it would be best to read from a new reader’s perspective without any previous knowledge as most new readers. Amanda Quick’s The Mystery Woman is the sec I’m a fan of Amanda Quick (aka Jayne Ann Krentz) and auto-buy her books. I admit I lost interest in her Arcane series once we reached the conclusion of how Jones & Jones agency came together and she started expanding the Arcane series to include outside associates. I wanted to prep for this review by reading the last 3 books I missed, but decided it would be best to read from a new reader’s perspective without any previous knowledge as most new readers. Amanda Quick’s The Mystery Woman is the second book in her Ladies of Lantern Street series. If you haven’t read the first book, Crystal Gardens, it’s not necessary to do so. Quick does a good job giving you an overview of what exactly the agency Flint & Marsh specializes in and a brief history of how it was established. On the night her mentor, Roland Fleming, is found murdered, Beatrice Lockwood is forced to change her identity to hide from the killer. She finds employment at Flint & Marsh, a private agency that specializes in discreet inquiries. Undercover as a paid companion, Beatrice meets Joshua Gage, former messenger to the mysterious Mr. Smith, and helps her foil a kidnapping attempt on her employer. Joshua informs Beatrice that he has been looking for her and needs her assistance in finding his sister’s blackmailer. Little do they know, someone with a more sinister plan is also looking for Beatrice. Will they be able to uncover the identity of the blackmailer or will Beatrice become the killer’s next victim? The writing is very typical Quick especially with the use of paranormal elements she’s been fond of using these past couple of years. It doesn’t distract a reader and it goes hand in hand with the time period of late Victorian England. The paranormal became popular during the era and there was a demand for people who had the ability to conjure spirits or speak with the dead. It makes sense that she would have a character with some type of extrasensory ability. In this case, Beatrice is a clairvoyant and Ronald Fleming recognized her talent. Joshua doesn’t believe in the paranormal and several times Beatrice reminds him how his intuition has been spot on and therefore is an extension of the psychic realm. Quick once again does thorough research and it shines throughout The Mystery Woman. She incorporates aspects of Egyptology in her plot and again it makes sense, since the Victorians were obsessed with Egypt. As the use of electricity emerged in the 19th century, so did the question of raising the dead. Quick takes advantage of this experimentation and incorporates into the plot. I won’t say exactly what it is, but it goes hand in hand with Egyptian mythology and paranormal ability. In terms of characterization, one thing that stood out immediately is how much Joshua resembles a previous Quick character. Joshua reminded me of a lot of Tobias March (from the Lake/March series) and both share the same characteristics in terms of an injured leg and having a nephew under his wing. What I really like about Quick is that she gives us strong heroines who aren’t afraid to make a life for themselves. These are no shrinking violets and The Mystery Woman reminded me once again why I’m a fan of Amanda Quick. She also makes you think about the possibilities of science. The whole idea of reviving someone who is dead will leave most readers fascinated and yet horrified. I’m still thinking about it a few weeks later. If you’re a fan of historical romance mixed with a bit of mystery, I recommend Amanda Quick’s The Mystery Woman. Just be advised, there a few plot holes regarding the mystery, but nothing you’ll lose sleep over. Review originally posted at Literary, etc.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    One of the best that Quick has written in years! So many of the books in the Arcane series have been the same formula with different names, interesting enough to make it through but not anything to get excited about. So I am very happy to have Quick back with this one! The story centers around former stage performer/paranormal investigator Beatrice and retired spy Joshua Gage. Gage is logical, not a beleiver in the paranormal and always finds what he's looking for while Beatrice uses her paranor One of the best that Quick has written in years! So many of the books in the Arcane series have been the same formula with different names, interesting enough to make it through but not anything to get excited about. So I am very happy to have Quick back with this one! The story centers around former stage performer/paranormal investigator Beatrice and retired spy Joshua Gage. Gage is logical, not a beleiver in the paranormal and always finds what he's looking for while Beatrice uses her paranormal abilities to solve cases where she poses as a paid companion (this takes place in the Victorian era). When a blackmail case brings them together, they must unravel the secrets before an assassin catches up to Beatrice. The humor between Beatrice, who regularly uses her paranormal abilities and Joshua, who constantly denies them, was well done and entertaining. Best of all though were the interesting quirks of the characters. So much of the time in romance novels, a hero who is scarred and lame will be a surly jerk who we're supposed to forgive for saying messed up stuff because he's been through trauma. Not this time thankfully. Joshua is irritated by his limitations but quite good at adapting to them and I really liked that he didn't use his limitations as a crutch. And Beatrice consistently had a way to save herself, even if she sometimes worked with Joshua to do it. None of this crap about constantly having to be saved by the hero. The villain was easy enough to predict but the assassin was forbidding enough to keep the murder mystery interesting and for the first time in a long time, I had a Quick novel that I just didn't want to put down. Definitely recommend it for Quick fans and any other romance fans who don't mind the slightly silly paranormal aspects. :P

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mary Buckham

    I love Jayne Ann Krentz whether she's writing historical, contemporary or futuristic. She writes on that finally balanced edge between suspense, historical and romance; never forgetting that the story is ultimately about the romance. There was so much to enjoy in this novel. The heroine who is consistent and level-headed as well as being well-motivated. The hero who is complex, wounded but not to the level you can't believe he'll ever recover, and strong secondary characters. The only reason thi I love Jayne Ann Krentz whether she's writing historical, contemporary or futuristic. She writes on that finally balanced edge between suspense, historical and romance; never forgetting that the story is ultimately about the romance. There was so much to enjoy in this novel. The heroine who is consistent and level-headed as well as being well-motivated. The hero who is complex, wounded but not to the level you can't believe he'll ever recover, and strong secondary characters. The only reason this earned a four instead of five star were some details that took me out of the story and suspend my belief in what was happening on the page. The first is the length of time it takes for a secondary character dying in the opening scene and yet he can chat in long, evolved manner, more appropriate to two people sitting in chairs, discussing problems they are facing. Later, when it's reveal he died of a knife stab to the heart it's even harder to believe he can talk for two pages. So the story starts off rough. Then later, the build up to the sex scene seems non-existant. One moment she's sleeping and he's guarding her; the next insert sex scene because one is expected in the novel. There is a strong love story being built but not necessarily sexual tension being raised. A few other small details with phrases being used several times in a row or throughout the story indicated the author might not be on her game as much as one expects. Even off her game she's an amazing writer and crafts an enjoyable read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kelley Blanks

    I've been reading Jayne Ann Krentz/Amanda Quick longer than I really want to admit. And you can almost always count on her for at least a good read. And that is all this one is: a good read, not a great one. I think the problem that I had with this one is that there didn't seem to be a great deal of character development, much less a lot of reason for the protagonists to fall in love. They simply WERE in love at the end of the book. The book is a let down in that department. Not anywhere near th I've been reading Jayne Ann Krentz/Amanda Quick longer than I really want to admit. And you can almost always count on her for at least a good read. And that is all this one is: a good read, not a great one. I think the problem that I had with this one is that there didn't seem to be a great deal of character development, much less a lot of reason for the protagonists to fall in love. They simply WERE in love at the end of the book. The book is a let down in that department. Not anywhere near the caliber of earlier book. And certainly not what you are looking for when you decide to read a romance. In other genres, the romance can be secondary, but not in the romance genre! I think part of it too is the emphasis on the paranormal that she has going on lately in ALL of her books. I don't mind paranormal (obviously, or I wouldn't be reading this), but the paranormal seems to be stuck in this one just to say it is there. It doesn't really serve a purpose; the mystery could have certainly been solved without it. And it seems to me to be getting in the way of some of that character development. I think we need less woo-woo and more talking and getting to know one another! Furthermore, the mystery element to this was weaker than normal. I'm usually a die-hard fan, but not so much with this one. One note: I listened to this as an audiobook. I don't remember the narrator's name but she did an adequate job; that wasn't the problem.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Willow Brook

    Maybe 3 1/2 stars. I am too biased a Krentz/Quick/Castle fan to offer truly honest reviews of her work. Her books are like comfort food to me. I am glad she is finishing up in her PNR books and returning to straight romances. I always enjoyed those best though I grew to like her PNR's. This entry is very typical with an outlandish but interesting mystery. Maybe 3 1/2 stars. I am too biased a Krentz/Quick/Castle fan to offer truly honest reviews of her work. Her books are like comfort food to me. I am glad she is finishing up in her PNR books and returning to straight romances. I always enjoyed those best though I grew to like her PNR's. This entry is very typical with an outlandish but interesting mystery.

  25. 4 out of 5

    SB*needs low angst books*

    So got this audiobook from the library but it was a book that just didn't work for me. The narrator wasn't bad but she didn't sell me on the romance and the way it was written with their interaction with each other didn't either. The mystery aspect didn't do anything much for me either. I really enjoyed many of the Arcane series books and this followed some of that line in how it came across but it felt like it was missing that initial real attraction that binds the couple. It was a lot like The So got this audiobook from the library but it was a book that just didn't work for me. The narrator wasn't bad but she didn't sell me on the romance and the way it was written with their interaction with each other didn't either. The mystery aspect didn't do anything much for me either. I really enjoyed many of the Arcane series books and this followed some of that line in how it came across but it felt like it was missing that initial real attraction that binds the couple. It was a lot like The Paid Companion but that one was not one I liked much either and I think for the same reason. The heroine in this one to me was so busy trying to compete with him that I didn't buy any true feelings for me. In The Paid Companion the heroine to me was so busy trying to be right about everything to everyone that I didn't buy her feelings. So different but the same and both began to really irritate. The heroes were better but then so reserved that you felt nothing from them either. So it just was a overall fail and no characters really stood out to make it better and the story didn't keep me super involved to care either.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Addie BookCrazyBlogger

    One of my guilty pleasure genres is paranormal romance or regency romance. The Mystery Woman manages to be both, so it’s obviously a big favorite of mine. Beatrice works for a female-owned women’s detective agency while hiding a shady past of her own. Joshua Gage is a peer of the realm, who has hidden psychic powers (or so that’s what equally psychic Beatrice is role) that he denies he has but low-key uses them to be a spy for the Crown. The two clash, our walkers have struck out for their 5K an One of my guilty pleasure genres is paranormal romance or regency romance. The Mystery Woman manages to be both, so it’s obviously a big favorite of mine. Beatrice works for a female-owned women’s detective agency while hiding a shady past of her own. Joshua Gage is a peer of the realm, who has hidden psychic powers (or so that’s what equally psychic Beatrice is role) that he denies he has but low-key uses them to be a spy for the Crown. The two clash, our walkers have struck out for their 5K and the movie is rolling people! There’s blackmail, there’s psychic sex talk and there’s a lot stuff surrounding Egyptian mythology. It’s definitely got some really steamy scenes and cheesy dramatic decelerations. It’s like watching a soap opera but I’m reading it instead. If you’re on the hunt for something soap opera-y, then you’ll love to read this one.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Srivalli Rekha

    I like these paranormal abilities stuff written by Jayne/Amanda Q. This book was okay. I could easily keep guessing the next parts of the story, which meant it wasn't that gripping. One good thing was that the hero had a scar on his face and an injured leg, so at least he wasn't perfect. I'm coming hate perfect heroes and heroines. Urgh! The female lead, definitely sensible, and strong. Her decision-making skills were decent. I liked her, but I'm not sure if I want to reread this book. It's a tad I like these paranormal abilities stuff written by Jayne/Amanda Q. This book was okay. I could easily keep guessing the next parts of the story, which meant it wasn't that gripping. One good thing was that the hero had a scar on his face and an injured leg, so at least he wasn't perfect. I'm coming hate perfect heroes and heroines. Urgh! The female lead, definitely sensible, and strong. Her decision-making skills were decent. I liked her, but I'm not sure if I want to reread this book. It's a tad boring compared to the other works of hers.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Leigh

    I enioyed this story. It was a recommendation and I would have never picked it myself. A good mystery with just a little romance thrown in.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Norah Gibbons

    Excellent Story. Murders, Mystery, ancient Egyptian relics, a dash of the paranormal,brooding grumpy hero, plucky resourceful heroine.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality There was both a mystery woman and a mystery man in this second installment of Amanda Quick’s Ladies of Lantern Street trilogy. I wouldn't mind a bit if the owners of the Flint & Marsh Agency on Lantern Street found a few more operatives and kept this series going! Beatrice Lockwood is very much the mystery woman. She starts out as Miranda the Clairvoyant of Dr. Fleming’s Academy of the Occult and ends by attempting to raise the dead. Needless to say, there Originally published at Reading Reality There was both a mystery woman and a mystery man in this second installment of Amanda Quick’s Ladies of Lantern Street trilogy. I wouldn't mind a bit if the owners of the Flint & Marsh Agency on Lantern Street found a few more operatives and kept this series going! Beatrice Lockwood is very much the mystery woman. She starts out as Miranda the Clairvoyant of Dr. Fleming’s Academy of the Occult and ends by attempting to raise the dead. Needless to say, there is a LOT of story in the middle! And even though Beatrice believes in the paranormal, and definitely has talent, she knows perfectly well that raising the dead is beyond anyone’s ability. But the madman pursuing her is convinced otherwise, and doesn't care how many other corpses he has to make in order to reach her. Yes, he’s a bit illogical about it. After all, he’s insane. Meanwhile, Beatrice is in a bind. The madman is after her for her power. Joshua Gage is after her for much more mundane reasons. He starts out convinced that she’s blackmailing his sister over secrets she learned while posing as Miranda the Clairvoyant. First, Bea is no blackmailer. Second, she learned no secrets. Third, Joshua has been misled into this case for all the wrong reasons. But someone made a mistake. Because Joshua realizes that while Bea may not be the blackmailer, she is the center of the case, and that they are stronger if they join forces. Even though Joshua emphatically does not believe in the paranormal, their forces are very considerable. Especially once they realize that the most important thing they have discovered in this case is their need for each other. But can they discover who is behind the madness before it is too late? Escape Rating B+: The Mystery Woman was even better than Crystal Gardens. It didn't have the weight of needing to explain the set up of the story, and the plot was stronger. There were more twists and turns to the mystery. It was much eerier and more diabolical. Joshua’s story had a lot of depth. He underwent much more of a transformation. He starts the story having been in kind of retreat after a case went badly. This turns out to be the real heart of the story in The Mystery Woman. Joshua was an espionage agent for the government, and his mentor’s daughter as well as a fellow agent died on his last case. Joshua blames himself. He also injured his leg and uses a cane as a result. Of course, it’s not that simple. The complications are what we learn in the story. The Egyptology trappings are fascinating. There really was an Egyptology craze in England in the 19th century, so this part really works well! That Bea not only has a paranormal talent but believes in the paranormal, where Josh has a talent but refuses to believe in anything remotely psychic provides for endless but entertaining banter. He represents the skeptic’s point of view marvelously. But they not only fall in love, they accept each other. Which helps Josh to accept himself as he is now; injuries, scars and all. They each let go of their past identities so they can build a future together. Bea does not raise the dead. But she and Josh do rise from the ashes of the past.

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