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Introduction to Spanish Poetry: A Dual-Language Book

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From the 12th-century Cantar de Mío Cid to the 20th-century poetry of García Lorca, Salinas, and Alberti, this book contains 37 poems by Spain's greatest poets. Selected by Professor Eugenio Florit, the poems are presented in the full original Spanish text, with expert literal English translations on the facing pages. Enjoy the poetic inspiration, imagery, insight, and wis From the 12th-century Cantar de Mío Cid to the 20th-century poetry of García Lorca, Salinas, and Alberti, this book contains 37 poems by Spain's greatest poets. Selected by Professor Eugenio Florit, the poems are presented in the full original Spanish text, with expert literal English translations on the facing pages. Enjoy the poetic inspiration, imagery, insight, and wisdom of such masters as Lope de Vega, Miguel de Unamuno, Federico García Lorca, Margués de Santillana, Jorge Manrique, Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz, Francisco de Quevedo y Villegas, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Antonio Machado, Rafael Alberti, Pedro Salinas, and many more. In addition to the poetic texts, Professor Florit has also provided a wealth of biographical and critical commentary, outlining the significance of the poets and their works in the long tradition of Spanish literature. Portraits of the poets are included where available.


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From the 12th-century Cantar de Mío Cid to the 20th-century poetry of García Lorca, Salinas, and Alberti, this book contains 37 poems by Spain's greatest poets. Selected by Professor Eugenio Florit, the poems are presented in the full original Spanish text, with expert literal English translations on the facing pages. Enjoy the poetic inspiration, imagery, insight, and wis From the 12th-century Cantar de Mío Cid to the 20th-century poetry of García Lorca, Salinas, and Alberti, this book contains 37 poems by Spain's greatest poets. Selected by Professor Eugenio Florit, the poems are presented in the full original Spanish text, with expert literal English translations on the facing pages. Enjoy the poetic inspiration, imagery, insight, and wisdom of such masters as Lope de Vega, Miguel de Unamuno, Federico García Lorca, Margués de Santillana, Jorge Manrique, Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, San Juan de la Cruz, Francisco de Quevedo y Villegas, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Antonio Machado, Rafael Alberti, Pedro Salinas, and many more. In addition to the poetic texts, Professor Florit has also provided a wealth of biographical and critical commentary, outlining the significance of the poets and their works in the long tradition of Spanish literature. Portraits of the poets are included where available.

30 review for Introduction to Spanish Poetry: A Dual-Language Book

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mohammadreza

    ناقوس (view spoiler)[دوستش دارم، می‌شنومش، همان‌گونه که باد را می‌شنوم، زمزمۀ چشمه را، یا بع‌بع بره را. با طنین صدایش به پیشواز صبح می‌رود، همچون پرندگانی که با اولین پرتو بامداد در آسمان پدیدار می‌شوند. در طنینش، که بر دشت‌ها و تپه‌ها می‌پیچد، معصومیتی است آرامش‌بخش و نوازشگر. اگر صدایش دیگر برنخیزد !آه، چه حزنی در هوا و آسمان !چه سکوتی در کلیسا !چه بهتی میان مردگان روسالیا کاسترو (hide spoiler)] ستاره‌شمارها (view spoiler)[.من خسته‌ام نگاه می‌کنم به این شهر -که مثل همۀ شهرهاست- و بیست سال در آن زندگی کرده‌ام. .هیچ‌ ناقوس (view spoiler)[دوستش دارم، می‌شنومش، همان‌گونه که باد را می‌شنوم، زمزمۀ چشمه را، یا بع‌بع بره را. با طنین صدایش به پیشواز صبح می‌رود، همچون پرندگانی که با اولین پرتو بامداد در آسمان پدیدار می‌شوند. در طنینش، که بر دشت‌ها و تپه‌ها می‌پیچد، معصومیتی است آرامش‌بخش و نوازشگر. اگر صدایش دیگر برنخیزد !آه، چه حزنی در هوا و آسمان !چه سکوتی در کلیسا !چه بهتی میان مردگان روسالیا کاسترو (hide spoiler)] ستاره‌شمارها (view spoiler)[.من خسته‌ام نگاه می‌کنم به این شهر -که مثل همۀ شهرهاست- و بیست سال در آن زندگی کرده‌ام. .هیچ‌چیز عوض نشده است پسرکی در بالکن کناری .بی‌هدف دارد ستاره‌ها را می‌شمارد ...من هم شروع می‌کنم :ولی او تندتر می‌شمارد :من به او نمی‌رسم ،یک، دو، سه، چهار ...پنج :نمیتوانم برسم ...یک...، دو ...سه ...چهار ...پنج داماسو آلونسو (hide spoiler)]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Boxhuman

    Since my husband was taking Spanish for school, I was designated his study-buddy. Knowing as much Spanish as a kitten, I decided to get a few Spanish books to make it fun and help with sentence structure. Unfortunately, after weeks of hard work (and one –in my opinion- bad teacher), he dropped the class with an aversion to all things Spanish. For me, as a language, I never had fun with it and more often than not was wary of it since there was always so much homework dumped on us and watching Spa Since my husband was taking Spanish for school, I was designated his study-buddy. Knowing as much Spanish as a kitten, I decided to get a few Spanish books to make it fun and help with sentence structure. Unfortunately, after weeks of hard work (and one –in my opinion- bad teacher), he dropped the class with an aversion to all things Spanish. For me, as a language, I never had fun with it and more often than not was wary of it since there was always so much homework dumped on us and watching Spanish movies, it was always spoken too fast for us to understand. However, left over were the Spanish books and not wanting them to go to waste, I picked up a few to read before time to return. This was one of them and I was pleasantly surprised to find an accompanying CD inside the book. It was a very quick read, but that’s not to say the collection was wrongly paced. The poets chosen provided a wide example of Spanish poetry, which was perfect as an “introduction”. I knew as soon as I saw it that Lorca would be involved, which he was, but in as much moderation as the rest of the poets and giving everyone their due credit without favoritism. It’s a book worth reading to get a taste of Spanish writing and I grow fonder and fonder of Spanish poets. It’s bilingual, which is necessary for me even if I was not studying the language (even if I don’t understand it, I feel the poems should be also shown in their original language). The last poem trailed off the book to a somber silence with Miguel Herna*ndez’s “The Trail of the Wounded”, which was an exceptional poem, but an interesting place to leave off. Just a few side notes: I was a bit unsettled by “Noche oscura del alma” by San Juan de la Cruz. I understand what it was shooting for but it just reminded me of the South Park episode of Faith +1. Example (and this is about God): “On my flowering breast/that kept itself entirely for Him alone,/He fell into deep slumber,/and I caressed Him,/cooled by the breeze from the cedars” and “my face rested against my Lover;/all ceased and I was left,/leaving all my cares/forgotten among the lilies.” That’s…pretty intense God-love. I loved “Magrigal” by Luis de Go*ngora y Argote and “Soneto a Lisi” by Francisco de Quevedo y Villegas. I want to check out more poems by Gustavo Aldolfo Be*cquer and Miguel Herna*ndez. Some examples: “A aquel a*rbol que mueve la hoja/algo se le antoja.” “That tree whose leaves are trembling/is yearning for something.” By Diego Hurtado de Mendoza “No tardes, Muerte, que muero;/ven porque viva contigo;/quie* reme, pues que te quiro, que con tu venida espero/no tener guerra conmingo.” “Do not linger, Death, for I am dying;/come, so I may live with you;/love me, because I love you, for with your coming I hope/not to struggle with myself.” Jorge Manrique Bottomline: A good taste of Spanish poetry. It does its job and is a good introduction.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Pyjov

    Enjoyed it and discovered some amazing poets! "Spanish poetry is distinguished by three predominant traits: its energy, its idealism, and its universality." p. 1 DOS CANCIONES by Jorge Manrique No tardes, Muerte, que muero; ven, porque viva contigo; quiéreme, pues que te quiero, que con tu venida espero no tener guerra conmigo. Remedio de alegre vida no lo hay por ningún medio, porque mi grave herida es de tal parte venida, que eres tú sola remedio. Ven aquí, pues, ya que muero; búscame, pues que te sigo quié Enjoyed it and discovered some amazing poets! "Spanish poetry is distinguished by three predominant traits: its energy, its idealism, and its universality." p. 1 DOS CANCIONES by Jorge Manrique No tardes, Muerte, que muero; ven, porque viva contigo; quiéreme, pues que te quiero, que con tu venida espero no tener guerra conmigo. Remedio de alegre vida no lo hay por ningún medio, porque mi grave herida es de tal parte venida, que eres tú sola remedio. Ven aquí, pues, ya que muero; búscame, pues que te sigo quiéreme, pues que te quiero, e con tu venida espero no tener vida conmigo. NOCHE OSCURA DEL ALMA by San Juan de la Cruz En la noche dichosa, en secreto, que nadie me veía, ni yo miraba cosa, sin otra luz ni guía sino la que en el corazón ardía. ¡Oh noche que me guiaste!, ¡oh noche amable más que el alborada!, ¡oh noche que juntaste amado con amada, amada en el amado transformada! ROMANCILLO by San Juan de la Cruz Las flores del romero, Niña Isabel, hoy son flores azules, mañana serán miel Celosa estás, la niña, Celosa estás de aquel Dichoso, pues le buscas, Ciego, pues no te ve, Ingrato, pues te enoja, Y confiado, pues No se disculpa hoy De lo que hizo ayer. Enjuguen esperanzas Lo que lloras por él, Que celos entre aquéllos Que se han querido bien, hoy son flores azules, mañana serán miel. Aurora de ti misma, Que cuando a amanecer A tu placer empiezas, Te eclipsan tu placer, Serénense tus ojos, Y más perlas no des, Porque al Sol le está mal Lo que a la Aurora bien. Desata como nieblas Todo lo que no ves, Que sospechas de amantes Y querellas después, hoy son flores azules, mañana serán miel. VARIOS EFECTORS DEL AMOR by Lope de Vega Desmayarse, atreverse, estar furioso, áspero, tierno, liberal, esquivo, alentado, mortal, difunto, vivo, leal, traidor, cobarde y animoso; no hallar fuera del bien centro y reposo, mostrarse alegre, triste, humilde, altivo, enojado, valiente, fugitivo, satisfecho, ofendido, receloso; huir el rostro al claro desengaño, beber veneno por licor süave, olvidar el provecho, amar el daño; creer que un cielo en un infierno cabe, dar la vida y el alma a un desengaño; esto es amor, quien lo probó lo sabe. RIMA X by Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer Los invisibles átomos del aire en derredor palpitan y se inflaman, el cielo se deshace en rayos de oro, la tierra se estremece alborozada, oigo flotando en olas de armonías rumor de besos y batir de alas, mis párpados se cierran... ¿Qué sucede? —¡Es el amor que pasa! LAS CAMPANAS by Rosalía de Castro Yo las amo, yo las oigo cual oigo el rumor del viento, el murmurar de la fuente o el balido del cordero. Como los pájaros, ellas, tan pronto asoma en los cielos el primer rayo del alba, le saludan con sus ecos. Y en sus notas, que van repitiéndose por los llanos y los cerros, hay algo de candoroso, de apacible y de halagüeño. Si por siempre enmudecieran, ¡qué tristeza en el aire y el cielo!, ¡qué silencio en las iglesias!, ¡qué extrañeza entre los muertos! "to build its future by discovering its own spiritual and material resources." p. 87 PRMAVERA AMARILLA by Juan Ramón Jiménez Abril venía, lleno todo de flores amarillas: amarillo el arroyo, amarillo el vallado, la colina, el cementerio de los niños, el huerto aquel donde el amor vivía. El sol unjía de amarillo el mundo, con sus luces caídas; ¡ay, por los lirios áureos, el agua de oro, tibia; las amarillas mariposas sobre las rosas amarillas! Guirnaldas amarillas escalaban los árboles; el día era una gracia perfumada de oro, en un dorado despertar de vida. Entre los huesos de los muertos, abría Dios sus manos amarillas. COMO TU by Leon Felipe Así es mi vida, piedra, como tú. Como tú, piedra pequeña; como tú, piedra ligera; como tú, canto que ruedas por las calzadas y por las veredas; como tú, guijarro humilde de las carreteras; como tú, que en días de tormenta te hundes en el cieno de la tierra y luego centelleas bajo los cascos y bajo las ruedas; como tú, que no has servido para ser ni piedra de una lonja, ni piedra de una audiencia, ni piedra de un palacio, ni piedra de una iglesia; como tú, piedra aventurera; como tú, que tal vez estás hecha sólo para una honda, piedra pequeña y ligera... [about Jorge Guillen]: "His poetry is for the most part full of wonder and joy, as if the poet were being born each day to the marvels of the world" (p. 107) We live too quickly and, in our haste, see names instead of seeing roses. LOS NOMBRES by Jorge Guillen Albor. El horizonte entreabre sus pestañas, y empieza a ver. ¿Qué? Nombres. Están sobre la pátina de las cosas. La rosa se llama todavía hoy rosa, y la memoria de su tránsito, prisa. Prisa de vivir más. A lo largo amor nos alce esa pujanza agraz del Instante, tan ágil que en llegando a su meta corre a imponer Después. Alerta, alerta, alerta, yo seré, yo seré. ¿Y las rosas? Pestañas cerradas: horizonte final. ¿Acaso nada? Pero quedan los nombres. [about Emilio Prados] "an objective contemplation of what is eternal" (p.121) EL ÁNGEL BUENO by Rafael Alberti Vino el que yo quería el que yo llamaba. No aquel que barre cielos sin defensas. luceros sin cabañas, lunas sin patria, nieves. Nieves de esas caídas de una mano, un nombre, un sueño, una frente. No aquel que a sus cabellos ató la muerte. El que yo quería. Sin arañar los aires, sin herir hojas ni mover cristales. Aquel que a sus cabellos ató el silencio. Para sin lastimarme, cavar una ribera de luz dulce en mi pecho y hacerme el alma navegable.

  4. 4 out of 5

    libraryfacts

    "Spain itself has been called the “land of the Romancero.” A delightful selection of poetry, and though the poetry is translated into English in a literal way and not in a literary way, I didn't mind because they are good translations. Another aspect to this collection that I appreciated was the short introduction to each poet. "En una noche oscura, con ansias en amores inflamada, ¡oh dichosa ventura!" ~ San Juan de la Cruz (1542–1591) "Spain itself has been called the “land of the Romancero.” A delightful selection of poetry, and though the poetry is translated into English in a literal way and not in a literary way, I didn't mind because they are good translations. Another aspect to this collection that I appreciated was the short introduction to each poet. "En una noche oscura, con ansias en amores inflamada, ¡oh dichosa ventura!" ~ San Juan de la Cruz (1542–1591)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Beck

    3.5 stars rounded up. Certainly good information and some gems in here.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Hirsch

    I knew less than nothing about Spanish poetry prior to opening this book. Okay, that's slight hyperbole, but I spent my academic years learning German and immersing myself in German poems, especially the expressionists and the much earlier Romantics. I'm at home with Hölderlin or Gottfried Benn, preferably in the original German. Say "Spanish Poetry" and I can only conjure up a few lines of Lorca (and those will be in the English language, cribbed from a bad biopic starring Andy Garcia as the il I knew less than nothing about Spanish poetry prior to opening this book. Okay, that's slight hyperbole, but I spent my academic years learning German and immersing myself in German poems, especially the expressionists and the much earlier Romantics. I'm at home with Hölderlin or Gottfried Benn, preferably in the original German. Say "Spanish Poetry" and I can only conjure up a few lines of Lorca (and those will be in the English language, cribbed from a bad biopic starring Andy Garcia as the ill-fated poet who died at the hands of the Falangists). "Introduction to Spanish Poetry" is a beautifully curated corrective to the ignorance I described. Spanish and English versions are presented side-by-side in the text, and thumbnail biographies with pictures of the poets precede each entry. "Keep it simple," as Van Morrison once said. In keeping with the straightforward presentation, the book is sequential, starting with the court poetry of wigged men who speak of love in euphemism or nonesuch riddles ("Tandaradei") and the works of earnest, tonsured men in cilice habits who gaze off into the middle distance while pondering their reverence of God and nature. The book culminates at the end in what for me were the best poems (though I have a bias toward the 20th century, since I spent most of my life there), in works that deal with the horrors of modern warfare and the encroaching repression of the Franco regime. The themes of the poems are, like most of the best poetry, universal. They deal with love and death, unmitigated joy and deep troughs of despair. Spanish poetry seems to maintain formalist trappings even at its more experimental (at least, as represented here). Having had my fill of free verse (for now), I found the adherence to meter, rhyme, and scansion a refreshing change. It helps, of course, to read the poems aloud in the original Spanish, even if one's language skills are lacking, since the sound of the poems only amplifies and emphasizes how capable these poets were, building word worlds that become even more perfect in the reciting. Since I'm trying to learn Spanish anyway (pero es muy lento) the book also had some utility as well as a lot of aesthetic beauty to impart. Highest recommendation for those coming blind to the subject. I can't speak for how the well-seasoned might receive it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Hunt

    I'll Only Speak My Song for You Who Sail With Me "'In God's name, I pray you, sailor, tell me now the song you sing.' But the sailor answered him, and the answer was this: 'I will only tell this song to him who sails with me.'" "-Por Dios te ruego, marinero digasme ora ese cantar- Respondiole el marinero, tal respuesta le fue a dar: -Yo no digo esta cancion sino a quien conmigo va." From Count Arnaldos Poetry so well loved that I need to buy the book again just to get a new companion cd. This bilingual b I'll Only Speak My Song for You Who Sail With Me "'In God's name, I pray you, sailor, tell me now the song you sing.' But the sailor answered him, and the answer was this: 'I will only tell this song to him who sails with me.'" "-Por Dios te ruego, marinero digasme ora ese cantar- Respondiole el marinero, tal respuesta le fue a dar: -Yo no digo esta cancion sino a quien conmigo va." From Count Arnaldos Poetry so well loved that I need to buy the book again just to get a new companion cd. This bilingual book of Spanish poetry is a collection of almost forty of the best loved. The rhymes themselves are more than classic. The book includes Spanish & English translations on facing pages for each poem, along with an introductory description of each poet. It came with an audio cd on which each poem was read aloud by native Spanish speakers. The poems are of a variety of simple and more complex arrangements. The cd disk was so badly worn by the time I got it onto pc that about half the poems didn't copy. I will eventually have to buy it again. It will be well worth another 100 plays. I highly recommend this treasure, as it is full of poems you are sure to enjoy. Remember to stop and count the stars sailors. And, here is my favorite poem from the book: The Star Counters "I am tired. I contemplate this town -a town like any other- where I have lived for twenty years. Nothing has changed. A child is uselessly counting the stars on the next balcony. I also try... But, he is faster: I cannot catch up with him: One, two three, four, five... I cannot catch up with him: One,...two... three... four... five... Los contadores de estrellas Yo estoy consado, Miro esta ciudad -una ciudad cualquiera- donde ha veinte anos vivo. Todo esta igual. Una nino inutilmente cuenta las estrellas en el balcon vecino. Yo me pongo tambien... Pero el va mas de prisa: no consigo alcanzarle: Una, dos, tres, cuatro, cinco... No consigo alcanzarle: Una,... dos... tres... cuatro... cinco...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karl Hallbjörnsson

    It's a nice intro. It's a nice intro.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Una de mis favoritas, por Rafael Alberti: El ángel bueno Vino el que yo quería, el que yo llamaba. No aquel que barre cielos sin defensas, luceros sin cabañas, lunas sin patria, nieves. Nieves de esas caídas de una mano, un nombre, un sueño, una frente. No aquel que a sus cabellos ató la muerte. El que yo quería. Sin arañar los aires, sin herir hojas ni mover cristales. Aquel que a sus cabellos ató el silencio. Para sin lastimarme, cavar una ribera de luz dulce en mi pecho y hacarme el alma navegable.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dolphin Doc

    I love that this book contains history and additional information that brings the era and meaning alive. I love that I read the book in the bar called Mio Cid in Sax, Alicante, Valencia beneath the poets portrait!!!! Love this book! The fact it is a dual reader is even more thrilling.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marion

    P.37

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Just the right selection of talented Spanish poets. I really got alot out of this book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Fasching-Gray

    Hooray for Dover dual language poetry books! Hooray for Dover thrift editions!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mckinley

    Nice collection of poets; can read Spanish words then look to English for meaning.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Charlie Bray

  16. 4 out of 5

    Fred

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lindy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  19. 4 out of 5

    Wes Gladd

  20. 4 out of 5

    Linda R,

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cece Cain

  23. 5 out of 5

    armin

    Got to know some really good poets through it. It’s great it’s written in two languages. Really suggested to those into Spanish poetry or to those who want to get into it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Agustin Arizti

  25. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Ades

  26. 4 out of 5

    jean

  27. 5 out of 5

    Birdy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Khosro Raul Soleimani

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

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