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The Global War on Christians: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Anti-Christian Persecution

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One of the most respected journalists in the United States and the bestselling author of The Future Church uses his unparalleled knowledge of world affairs and religious insight to investigate the troubling worldwide persecution of Christians.   From Iraq and Egypt to Sudan and Nigeria, from Indonesia to the Indian subcontinent, Christians in the early 21st century are the w One of the most respected journalists in the United States and the bestselling author of The Future Church uses his unparalleled knowledge of world affairs and religious insight to investigate the troubling worldwide persecution of Christians.   From Iraq and Egypt to Sudan and Nigeria, from Indonesia to the Indian subcontinent, Christians in the early 21st century are the world's most persecuted religious group. According to the secular International Society for Human Rights, 80 percent of violations of religious freedom in the world today are directed against Christians. In effect, our era is witnessing the rise of a new generation of martyrs. Underlying the global war on Christians is the demographic reality that more than two-thirds of the world's 2.3 billion Christians now live outside the West, often as a beleaguered minority up against a hostile majority-- whether it's Islamic fundamentalism in the Middle East and parts of Africa and Asia, Hindu radicalism in India, or state-imposed atheism in China and North Korea. In Europe and North America, Christians face political and legal challenges to religious freedom. Allen exposes the deadly threats and offers investigative insight into what is and can be done to stop these atrocities.   “This book is about the most dramatic religion story of the early 21st century, yet one that most people in the West have little idea is even happening: The global war on Christians,” writes John Allen. “We’re not talking about a metaphorical ‘war on religion’ in Europe and the United States, fought on symbolic terrain such as whether it’s okay to erect a nativity set on the courthouse steps, but a rising tide of legal oppression, social harassment and direct physical violence, with Christians as its leading victims. However counter-intuitive it may seem in light of popular stereotypes of Christianity as a powerful and sometimes oppressive social force, Christians today indisputably form the most persecuted religious body on the planet, and too often its new martyrs suffer in silence.”   This book looks to shatter that silence.


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One of the most respected journalists in the United States and the bestselling author of The Future Church uses his unparalleled knowledge of world affairs and religious insight to investigate the troubling worldwide persecution of Christians.   From Iraq and Egypt to Sudan and Nigeria, from Indonesia to the Indian subcontinent, Christians in the early 21st century are the w One of the most respected journalists in the United States and the bestselling author of The Future Church uses his unparalleled knowledge of world affairs and religious insight to investigate the troubling worldwide persecution of Christians.   From Iraq and Egypt to Sudan and Nigeria, from Indonesia to the Indian subcontinent, Christians in the early 21st century are the world's most persecuted religious group. According to the secular International Society for Human Rights, 80 percent of violations of religious freedom in the world today are directed against Christians. In effect, our era is witnessing the rise of a new generation of martyrs. Underlying the global war on Christians is the demographic reality that more than two-thirds of the world's 2.3 billion Christians now live outside the West, often as a beleaguered minority up against a hostile majority-- whether it's Islamic fundamentalism in the Middle East and parts of Africa and Asia, Hindu radicalism in India, or state-imposed atheism in China and North Korea. In Europe and North America, Christians face political and legal challenges to religious freedom. Allen exposes the deadly threats and offers investigative insight into what is and can be done to stop these atrocities.   “This book is about the most dramatic religion story of the early 21st century, yet one that most people in the West have little idea is even happening: The global war on Christians,” writes John Allen. “We’re not talking about a metaphorical ‘war on religion’ in Europe and the United States, fought on symbolic terrain such as whether it’s okay to erect a nativity set on the courthouse steps, but a rising tide of legal oppression, social harassment and direct physical violence, with Christians as its leading victims. However counter-intuitive it may seem in light of popular stereotypes of Christianity as a powerful and sometimes oppressive social force, Christians today indisputably form the most persecuted religious body on the planet, and too often its new martyrs suffer in silence.”   This book looks to shatter that silence.

30 review for The Global War on Christians: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Anti-Christian Persecution

  1. 5 out of 5

    booklady

    Cardinal François-Xavier Nguyễn Văn Thuận’s biography drew my attention to the plight of suffering Christians all over the world. Somehow the situation has managed to remain on my periphery as a ‘Middle Eastern problem’. I mean, after all, isn’t the Church strong in Africa and India? In some places American Catholic churches are being held together thanks to an influx of priests from these Third World nations where vocations are plentiful. And yet, it is actually the persecutions daily endured b Cardinal François-Xavier Nguyễn Văn Thuận’s biography drew my attention to the plight of suffering Christians all over the world. Somehow the situation has managed to remain on my periphery as a ‘Middle Eastern problem’. I mean, after all, isn’t the Church strong in Africa and India? In some places American Catholic churches are being held together thanks to an influx of priests from these Third World nations where vocations are plentiful. And yet, it is actually the persecutions daily endured by Christians for many years in these countries which have—at least in part—produced an abundance of religious vocations. And this phenomenon isn’t limited to any one Christian denomination. One of the things I liked most about John Allen’s The Global War on Christians: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Anti-Christian Persecution was his ecumenical approach to this war on Christianity. Although a Catholic, Allen does not (IMHO) focus on Catholics. His book is truly about the war on all branches of those who follow Jesus Christ. I happened to glance at another reviewer here on GRs who takes issue with Allen for this very point and I disagree with him most vehemently. Allen not only presents martyrs from all Christian faith traditions (numerous Protestant denominations, Greek and Russian Orthodox, Roman and Byzantine Catholic as well as other branches of Christianity unique to Third World nations), he is careful to delineate which faith tradition was persecuted, where each martyr comes from, provides a broad spectrum of case examples from across all Christian denominations and doesn’t even hesitate to describe a case where Catholic traditionalists in Mexico attack Protestant converts. As a friend here on GRs wrote recently, that is my litmus paper test of a trustworthy writer—one who is willing to admit the faults of own faith tradition and also not afraid to praise that which is good in other faith traditions. Those are authors I will listen to and believe in. One of my favorite sections is in Part 2, Persecution from Around the World, where Allen makes one of his most important points about Christians learning from each other: ‘In the course of history, a “high” Christology has been associated with a muscular and triumphal version of Christianity, while the “low” approach has tended to produce a Christianity that’s more humble, oriented to service, and keen on solidarity with the poor and oppressed. For obvious reasons, contact with martyrdom and suffering tend to nudge the church in the direction of a theology “from below.” The great German Protestant thinker and martyr Dietrich Bonhoeffer presents a classic example. In 1930, Bonhoeffer traveled to the United States for postgraduate study and a teaching fellowship at New York’s famed Union Theological Seminary. Ever the German academic, he found Union not quite up to snuff; his famous quip was, “There is no theology there!” Yet Bonhoeffer’s life was profoundly changed by the experience, largely through his friendship with Frank Fisher, a black seminarian at Union who introduced Bonhoeffer to the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem. Bonhoeffer ended up teaching Sunday school in Harlem, and developed a deep love for African American spirituals. He saw firsthand the racial and economic oppression suffered by black Americans, he witnessed how the Christian faith of the people in Harlem sustained them in the teeth of the hardships of their lives, and he also saw how the institutional church, in his eyes, was failing to make a sufficiently strong stand against prejudice and in favor of racial justice. Bonhoeffer would later write about his experience in Harlem: “Here one can truly speak and hear about sin and grace and the love of God…the Black Christ is preached with rapturous passion and vision.” He would later add of those Harlem years, “I turned from phraseology to reality.” Most experts who have studied Bonhoeffer’s life believe it’s not too much to say that the path that led him to a martyr’s death at the Flossenbürg concentration camp on April 9, 1945, in some ways began in the black churches of Harlem.’ Allen’s point being that Christians need each other, now more than ever. It isn’t about being this or that denomination. We are stronger together. Christ wanted us to ‘be one as He and His Father were one.’ In conclusion, Allen offered these suggestions to the current global persecution of Christians: 1.) any response to the global war on Christians ought to be worked out in conversation with the victims themselves; 2.) for believers, the first and most natural response to a situation of suffering is prayer; 3.) the victims of this persecution are begging us not to forget them; let us work to raise consciousness—keep alive the stories of our suffering brothers and sisters; 4.) think about the Church in global terms, rather than simply local or national; 5.) micro-charities are very do-able; and also 6.) institutional humanitarian relief is a must. An excellent book!!! Please all Christians, read this book or something about the persecution/war of/on Christians. <><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><><> July 28, 2017: Allen makes the point in his intro that Christians of all branches have to put their intra- and inter-denominational squabbles aside for now for something higher—to help our brothers and sisters-in-faith. As St. Paul tells us in Galatians 6:10, we have the moral obligation to help those who follow Christ as we do. If nothing else, we can remain informed, let others know, and we can pray. ‘The problem in the global war on Christians is not that no one is reporting what’s happening. It’s rather that far too few people are paying attention.’ Allen used multiple sources to verify the extent of the problem. Here are the main ones: 1.) International Society for Human Rights, Martin Lessenthin, estimated that 80 percent of all acts of religious discrimination in the world today are directed against Christians. 2.) 2012 Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life report concluded that Christians faced harassment, in a higher number of countries than the followers of any other religion. Between 2006 and 2010, Christians harassed in 139 nations, almost 3/4 of all countries on earth. 3.) National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) under U.S. Department of Homeland Security concluded Christians in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, outpaced all other groups in terms of the frequency with which they faced terrorist attacks. 4.) Open Doors, an evangelical advocacy and relief organization providing aid to persecuted Christians since founded in 1955 by Andrew van der Bijl, better known as “Brother Andrew,” issues an annual watch list each January of the top fifty countries in which Christians are at risk. The Open Doors estimate, based on decades of tracking is that roughly one hundred million Christians today suffer interrogation, arrest, and even death for their faith, with the bulk located in Asia and the Middle East. The overall total makes Christians the most at-risk group for violations of religious freedom. Then Allen answered the question, ‘Why Christians?’ Size, missionary activity, growth in areas which threaten traditionally dominant groups/state, advocacy for human rights, democracy, or against illegal/powerful groups which upsets status quo, Christians often identified with the West, even though inaccurate. Christianity’s origins are in the Middle East, not the West and today’s Christians in Africa, Asia, or Latin America are almost entirely indigenous and autonomous, meaning they have no real ties to Christianity in the global North. I am less than a third done with this book and it is riveting. I was disappointed to see how few here on GRs had read it. I am buying a copy, maybe two and sharing it with everyone. This is a 5 star already.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Danusha Goska

    John L. Allen Jr.'s book "The Global War on Christians: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Anti-Christian Persecution" is required reading for all serious Christians, as well as anyone who cares about world peace and human rights. Christians are the most numerous among victims of those persecuted for their religious beliefs; "80 percent of all acts of religious discrimination in the world today are directed at Christians" (9). Christians face persecution in more countries than the followers of a John L. Allen Jr.'s book "The Global War on Christians: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Anti-Christian Persecution" is required reading for all serious Christians, as well as anyone who cares about world peace and human rights. Christians are the most numerous among victims of those persecuted for their religious beliefs; "80 percent of all acts of religious discrimination in the world today are directed at Christians" (9). Christians face persecution in more countries than the followers of any other religion (34). One estimate: every hour, every day, for the past decade, eleven Christians have been killed. Christianity in the Middle East is experiencing a genuine genocide. Persecution includes harassment, second class status, denial of employment, individual exile, mass expulsion, imprisonment, torture, rape, crucifixion, and death. "Does anybody hear our cry? How many atrocities must we endure before somebody, somewhere" pays any attention at all, asks the Catholic Patriarch of Jerusalem (15). "The world remains totally silent. It's as if we've been swallowed up by the night," says a Christian in Iraq (138). "The failure of Christian leaders in the West, and especially in the United States, to speak our more forcefully in defense of beleaguered Christians" is nothing short of scandalous (212). John L. Allen works for CNN, the National Catholic Reporter, and National Public Radio. He is a superb writer and "Global War" is an excellent read. You may hesitate to read this book because you cringe from accounts of torture and other human rights abuses. Jettison that hesitation. I cried only once while reading this book. For the most part, Allen writes drily, e.g., "So and so was beaten, raped, and killed." He does not linger over the kind of poignant detail that would make this book a very difficult read exactly for the kind of compassionate person who needs to read it. You will be able to get through this important book. There are no graphic scenes of upsetting material. Read properly, this book won't depress you; it will inspire you. The people in these pages are heroes of unimpeachable courage and faith. They prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that the light shines in the darkness, and the darkness could not overcome it. There is no finer example than the Burundi seminarians. In 1997, African seminarians had taken an Easter retreat on the theme of Christian brotherhood. Shortly thereafter, murderous rebels invaded their seminary and demanded to know who was a member of the Hutu tribe, and who was Tutsi, with the intention of massacring the Tutsi. The seminarians and staff refused to say. They knew full well they all faced death for their refusal to give in to ethnic hatred. They were martyred. Christians are the most persecuted persons of faith on the planet for a few simple, easy to grasp reasons. First, Christianity is the largest religion on the planet. Second, Christians live on all continents in significant numbers. Third, the ideologies most likely to oppress persons of faith, Islam and the Left, include overt, foundational doctrines opposed to Christianity in particular (Allen does not state this). Fourth, Christian doctrine itself, given its elevation of conscience and compassion over raw power, turns Christians into targets for oppressors. Fifth, the Christian practice of "turning the other cheek" encourages some to conclude that Christians will not cause any trouble to those who harm them. Sixth, Christianity suggests a supra-national identity as a Christian as something greater than ethnic or party affiliation; this threatens nationalists and totalitarians. Allen amply documents the assertion that there is a global war on Christians with material from easily accessible and respected sources, including secular ones like the Pew Forum, the US Commission on International Religious Freedom, and the US Department of Homeland Security. He uses statistics and case studies. Allen cautions: there is no single enemy or remedy; concerned persons must not respond with sensationalism or violence. Allen thoroughly rejects scapegoating of any group, including Muslims; he honors Muslims who themselves have been martyred in defense of Christians. Members of any or no religion can persecute Christians, including Buddhists. Buddhist monks have participated in acts of violent persecution of Christians. Allen acknowledges that Christians can and do persecute other Christians. He tells the story of Maria Elizabeth Macias Castro, who exposed drug cartel activity in Mexico. In a very Catholic country, drug dealers killed her. The stories Allen tells, without any hint of sensationalism or sentimentality, are extreme. In Egypt, Muslims pour sulfuric acid on Coptic Christians' cross tattoos in order to remove them. In Orissa, India, mobs carry out a pogrom of Christian homes. In Pakistan, a Christian faces death for drinking from a "Muslim" well. In Ivory Coast, two Christian brothers are crucified. In Afghanistan, a Christian is imprisoned for handing a Bible to someone. Allen argues that in considering whether or not a victim can be counted as a victim of Christian persecution, one must consider the motives of the victim as well as that of the victimizer. Sister Dorothy Stang was murdered in the Amazon for helping poor farmers to resist land grabs by rich, powerful ranchers, and for raising awareness of the environmental price of deforestation. She read the Beatitudes, "Blessed are the peacemakers" to her killers. Christophobes will inevitably argue that the persecuted deserved their fates. Nonsense. Christian martyr Shahbaz Bhatti "defended the rights of Hindus, Sikhs, and Muslims." He opened a free school with an entirely Muslim student body (91). Allen's book ends with suggestions for action. Those concerned for persecuted Christians, Allen recommends, should pray, they should get the word out about persecution, they should come to realize that the Christian church is a global phenomenon, they should donate to existing charitable organizations and create their own innovative charities, they should involve their own political leaders, and they should aid resettled refugees. They should do all this in partnership and consultation with those being persecuted.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Brown

    Perhaps less shocking now than when it was first written - this book was published in October 2013 and, consequently, contains a total of zero references to ISIS and their atrocities. But this book contains much that's still horrifying and difficult to stomach. John L. Allen Jr., an experienced Roman Catholic journalist, offers a robust and well-rounded assessment of anti-Christian persecution in the world today. Numerous studies by both religious and secular groups have found that at least 80% Perhaps less shocking now than when it was first written - this book was published in October 2013 and, consequently, contains a total of zero references to ISIS and their atrocities. But this book contains much that's still horrifying and difficult to stomach. John L. Allen Jr., an experienced Roman Catholic journalist, offers a robust and well-rounded assessment of anti-Christian persecution in the world today. Numerous studies by both religious and secular groups have found that at least 80% of all religious persecution today is directed against Christians, with over 100,000 martyrs killed annually and many times that number harassed, beaten, or intimidated by a variety of forces - Islamist rule or 'jihadism' among them, but also Hindu radicalism (esp. in India), Buddhist radicalism (esp. in Laos), drug cartels (esp. in Central/South America), the Mafia, secular totalitarian states (e.g., North Korea), and others. Allen recounts incidents from five world regions (Africa, Asia, Latin America, Middle East, and Eastern Europe), and some of the stories he tells range from the truly disquieting (e.g., Hindu extremists forcibly installing an idol during the dedication of a new Christian prayer hall, or "Jesus is an ape" spray-painted on a monastery wall in Israel) to the highly concerning (e.g., the routine beating of pastors) to the the utterly ghastly (e.g., the gang-rape of young Christian girls, or the remains of Sudanese Christians whom Joseph Kony's "Lord's Resistance Army" kidnapped from a church service and then crucified and left to die). Allen hints (rightly) that religious freedom trends in Europe and North America may be troubling portents - but his focus is on the undeniable experiences of Christians in the five world stages mentioned previously. And Allen brings to this material a marvelous balance - he sticks to the facts, never suggests that only Christians are victimized, never suggests that professing Christians are never the ones doing the victimizing, etc. And he makes a strong case that all people - Christian and non-Christian alike, whether on the political Left or Right - should consider this one of the preeminent human rights issues of our day. And yet he also finds much inspiration from the faith and courage of the Christians who, knowing the risks, yet continue their divine work amidst heavy trials.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Haas

    On the back cover it says: "It's time to wake up." Okay, I respond, I've never paid to much attention to modern day martyrs, so please wake me up. A few pages in the author includes all fallen Soldiers of WWI and WWII in his count of "persecuted Christians". Well, you lost me there. On the back cover it says: "It's time to wake up." Okay, I respond, I've never paid to much attention to modern day martyrs, so please wake me up. A few pages in the author includes all fallen Soldiers of WWI and WWII in his count of "persecuted Christians". Well, you lost me there.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jon Kenney

    About the Book I've often found books on religious martyrdom and persecution sobering and humbling. Living in the west, in the most free country in the world has its benefits, but also its downfalls. I do not know of the type of persecution that John Allen Jr. writes about in this book, The Global War On Christians. There are few christians here in America if faced with the type of persecution talked about in this book would withstand it at first encounter, much less endure through it regardless About the Book I've often found books on religious martyrdom and persecution sobering and humbling. Living in the west, in the most free country in the world has its benefits, but also its downfalls. I do not know of the type of persecution that John Allen Jr. writes about in this book, The Global War On Christians. There are few christians here in America if faced with the type of persecution talked about in this book would withstand it at first encounter, much less endure through it regardless of the cost. Allen relates to that view citing that most christians have, "no personal experience of persecution" (p17). As a Vatican correspondent, Allen has a firsthand view of much of the persecution he writes about. Fortunately for the readers this book is not merely focused on the persecution facing the catholic church. Instead, Allen tells the story of a much broader stroke of religious persecution around the world that is facing christians (I use that term loosely). This book has not been without controversy and rightly so, but more on that later. It took a while to read, and I found myself having to put it down and walk away for a bit after the recounts of some of the persecution stories that Mr. Allen describes through out this book. The book has three parts to it, each section addressing a different focus on christian persecution around the world. The first section is a basic overview of anti-christian persecution around the world and more often than not funneled through cries of outrage and statistics over the lack of upfront reporting of these executions and persecutions. One thing that sets this book apart from most other books on persecution and the church is that the vast majority of the stories are recent. This section is very balanced and well written while covering the persecution against christians in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and Eastern Europe. The second section of this book focuses on what Allen states are myths about this "global war". Allen suggests that these myths again further his case of the downplaying in the media reporting these horrific events. He writes about myth #1 that christians are only at risk for persecution when they are the minority. In myth #2 he claims most media and governments make the claim there's no rhyme or reason for these persecutions and because they are random, so no one sees them coming. The third myth, and the one I most appreciated, spent time making a case that most persecutions have nothing to do with Islam which is how majority of these occurrences are spoken about in America. The final two myths center around the fact that these attacks aren't always religiously motivated, nor a political statement. In the third and final section of this book Allen takes a lighter, almost optimistic tone talking through the social and political fall out, the consequences, and our response. He mentions this is an ongoing issue that holds significant concern for not just the areas he geographically talks about in this book, but also those of us here in the west. My Thoughts I mentioned in the beginning that this book hasn't gone without controversy to say the least. If you read almost any book review on this you'll see the vast majority of them, most notably the Wall Street Journal, largely pan this book for being too eccentric or over the top. I would say that there are parts to this book where some of Allen's statistics seem pretty incredible and did give me pause. I'm not saying they weren't factual, but if they were completely on target then I would validate Allen's claim to this being a "global war" without question. Also, you might recall I acknowledged above that the term ‘christian' should be held loosely here. That's due to the fact Allen collectively considers Catholics and other religious denominations as christian. Noting the stark theological differences, I'd have to use that term very liberally and Allen does just that. Regardless of those few analytical crutches, I found this book to be very informative and eye-opening to the crisis of religious persecution around the world in recent years. I would without a doubt recommend it to those interested in this topic or looking for a firsthand perspective. I really appreciated Allen's detailed accounts and honesty about his own feelings on this subject.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cliff

    The Good The book is a veritable encyclopedia of information on the persecution of Christians. Chapters 2 through 6 detail the persecution in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe. These stories are enough to make you cringe. The repetition of abuse and violence detailed in the book is enough to make you want to skip pages because it’s more of the same. More of the same harassment, torture, and execution of Christians. No rose colored glasses here. Allen isn’t trying to The Good The book is a veritable encyclopedia of information on the persecution of Christians. Chapters 2 through 6 detail the persecution in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe. These stories are enough to make you cringe. The repetition of abuse and violence detailed in the book is enough to make you want to skip pages because it’s more of the same. More of the same harassment, torture, and execution of Christians. No rose colored glasses here. Allen isn’t trying to start a political war between conservatives and liberals, or even religions. He is well aware that politicians of many persuasions have tried to take up the fight, but too often the situation is too religious for liberals and too foreign for conservatives. At the same time the author notes that this persecution is sometimes Christians attacking other Christians. In Ireland the fight rages on between Catholics and Protestants. In Africa, groups claiming to be Christian are attacking other Christians. Allen covers many of the myths regarding persecution. The Minority Myth says that persecution only happens where Christians are a minority. This isn’t true, but even if it were, Allen shows that if you add up the population of Christians from different countries where they are a minority it totals over 200 million people. That’s a lot of people at risk. It’s a myth that persecution is all about Islam. It’s a myth that motives are always religious. It’s a myth that it’s a political issue. Persecution is real and happens for many different reasons and in many different places. The Bad While the book is not theological the author is Catholic and so some of the theological statements are based on a purely Roman Catholic view of the Church. While there are parts of Roman Catholic theology that I disagree with this actually goes to the author’s point. He says that aiding those facing persecution shouldn’t take second place to our theological differences. In other words, all Christians of every denomination can come together to aid those in danger without agreeing theologically. We all agree that life is sacred and we need to help those who are in trouble. The Wrap Up This is a difficult book to review because it’s a facts and figures kind of book. In part one we get an overview of persecution around the world. In part two we learn about the myths related to persecution. In part three the author gives us some perspective on the potential fallout, what can be done and even the possible positives of persecution. Is persecution ever positive? No, it’s not and the Allen’s point with the book is to show that persecution is leading to the deaths of millions. However, even as we see in the Book of Acts, the Church thrives under persecution. Which makes you wonder if the American Church wouldn’t be better off if it faced some of the persecution that the rest of the world faces. We might stop worrying about bands and buildings and start putting more effort into spreading the Gospel. If you are unaware of Christian persecution, or believe that it’s a myth, you need to read this book. - See more at: http://cliffymania.com/blog/2014/03/t...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Reet Champion

    All over the world Christians are being persecuted. In John L. Allen Jr.'s latest release readers are taken on a trip around the world to be at the side of Christians who are experiencing brutalities beyond the imagination. Located in a sweltering desert shipping containers housing prisoners stand as ominous witnesses to brutality. Inmates are shoved into the containers to such the extent that it is impossible to lay down; there is standing room only. When they are given no water prisoners resort All over the world Christians are being persecuted. In John L. Allen Jr.'s latest release readers are taken on a trip around the world to be at the side of Christians who are experiencing brutalities beyond the imagination. Located in a sweltering desert shipping containers housing prisoners stand as ominous witnesses to brutality. Inmates are shoved into the containers to such the extent that it is impossible to lay down; there is standing room only. When they are given no water prisoners resort to drinking their own urine and sweat. Hygiene facilities? Out of the question. Time spent outside of the containers is not much better as prisoners count grains of sand that are scattered over the ground. One woman was beaten so badly her uterus fell out of her body. Another inmate tried to push it back inside but without good results. The injured woman died without medical care. This is just one of the many horrors recounted in this stirring account of Christian persecution. I knew when I seen The Global War on Christians it wasn't going to be a pleasant read, but it is in my opinion one that we have needed for a long time. A blind eye has been turned to countries where persecution and violation of human rights is an everyday issue. It's true that it is very upsetting to read and hear about, but we need to be aware of what is happening. If you are the type of person that does not care for vivid descriptions you should still be able to read this book without suffering horrendous nightmares. Mr. Allen states things as they are without going into heartrending detail (although truth be known the statistics are enough to make one sick). His research is meticulous and I would go so far as to say, unbiased. He pays tribute to both Protestants and Catholics while making sure to show a distinction between persecution that arises due to religious and non-religious stances (e.g. "unappealing" ethnic groups, reformers, or victims who were at the wrong place at the wrong time). Mr. Allen is not a sensationalist. What we have here is a must read that gives a stark account of events that are happening every day, on several continents. I find the back cover of the book very appropriate..."It's Time to Wake Up". DISCLAIMER: In accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising” we would like to note that we received an electronic copy of “The Global War on Christians” from Blogging for Books in exchange for our honest review. reetchampionbookreviews.wordpress.com

  8. 4 out of 5

    William

    The Global War on Christians by John L. Allen is a 2013 addition to the body of works addressing persecution. So why should you read this one and not one or more of the others? I believe it is because Allen’s treatment of the ongoing crisis of persecution is both traditional and unique. As do many of the other authors of books on persecution, Allen presents a world-wide, extensive, view of what has been happening. For his purposes, Allen’s focus is on the past twenty years. What is different abo The Global War on Christians by John L. Allen is a 2013 addition to the body of works addressing persecution. So why should you read this one and not one or more of the others? I believe it is because Allen’s treatment of the ongoing crisis of persecution is both traditional and unique. As do many of the other authors of books on persecution, Allen presents a world-wide, extensive, view of what has been happening. For his purposes, Allen’s focus is on the past twenty years. What is different about Allen’s work is quite compelling. He differentiates the political “war on Christians” from the worldwide phenomenon he calls “the global war on Christians.” Persecution is defined by the author, not in the typical, logical sense but in a more comprehensive and perhaps somewhat more controversial sense. Unlike other works, Allen dives into the historical and political backgrounds to the persecution in each region and country profiled. Bucking the trend of other works on persecution, Allen also addresses myths or misconceptions about persecution. These include the notion that Christians have to be in the minority to be persecuted, that persecution is both random and unpredictable, that all martyrs are victims of Islamic radicals. The author presents his views as to why these misconceptions are so popular. One final deviation in the typical volume on persecution is that the author asks and seeks to answer the “What can we do?” question. A set of suggestions, as he puts it, are placed on the table. I’ll let you read the book to find out what they are. Otherwise, this review would not function as such but as cliff notes. My assessment of The Global War on Christians is that it is an excellent choice for those concerned about the issue of Christian persecution. I can say this because it offers everything the other works offer plus a historical and political backdrop, a unique yet compelling definition of persecution and some suggestions as to how to help when you are on the outside looking in wondering what you can do. My only negative comment is that he includes killings/persecution surrounding activities under what is known as social justice or liberation theology. Read more at: http://beacon2light.blogspot.com/2013... including author bio, first chapter free, note to Protestant readers, etc.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mazzou B

    The Global War on Christians by John L. Allen, Jr. More Info Read Chapter One Author Bio As I only discovered after receiving this book and beginning it, the author is a well-known news reporter for CNN and a devout Catholic. He 'generously' includes Protestants, Catholics and I don't know what else in the term ''Christian'' and then proceeds to describe instances where these groups were persecuted. Although I most definitely sympathize with all persecuted people especially murdered and otherwise The Global War on Christians by John L. Allen, Jr. More Info Read Chapter One Author Bio As I only discovered after receiving this book and beginning it, the author is a well-known news reporter for CNN and a devout Catholic. He 'generously' includes Protestants, Catholics and I don't know what else in the term ''Christian'' and then proceeds to describe instances where these groups were persecuted. Although I most definitely sympathize with all persecuted people especially murdered and otherwise ill-used human beings, I can hardly agree with the author that all these groups mentioned suffer for the true faith. Obviously, my idea of true faith and his differ greatly, so I don't feel like I can really carry on a worthwhile argument on this book. Quite simply, the author includes accounts of many Catholic martyrs of recent times and none of true Christians...he doesn't mention the worthy organization ''Voice of the Martyrs'' or any other truly Christian groups or missionaries. In short, the author is Catholic and likes to imagine that he is tolerant of all who follow Christ so includes 'Protestants' in his book. This subject is a very important one to cover and I do hope some other author will tackle it! The thought has often been on my heart that we really do live in luxury here in America. We have never experienced persecution or trials such as the believers in China, India, Pakistan and many more countries have triumphed through. And you can see the difference. We have such weak faith. Such selfish lives, often. We need to examine our hearts and lives and not be a shame to our brothers and sisters around the world. I received this book for free through the "Water Brook/Multnomah Publishing Group" for this review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    E.josiah Luebben

    The whole "citations would be too cumbersome" is ridiculous and his particular world view is obvious (not a bad thing as long as you read aware of it), but aside from that it's a good read with a lot of good information and perspective. Activates the passions of this lazy American Christian. Getting me to, at the very least, check out some of the organizations he lists in lieu of citations and also to remember our brothers and sisters regularly in prayer again. The whole "citations would be too cumbersome" is ridiculous and his particular world view is obvious (not a bad thing as long as you read aware of it), but aside from that it's a good read with a lot of good information and perspective. Activates the passions of this lazy American Christian. Getting me to, at the very least, check out some of the organizations he lists in lieu of citations and also to remember our brothers and sisters regularly in prayer again.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Allen, in almost grinding detail, tells of persecution and violence against Christians across the globe. He does so for four primary reasons. First, he simply documents the depth of injury to the Christian community. There is extensive research describing the murder, incarceration and communal violence toward people of faith (usually making them refugees) from many nations. Bluntly, for a wide variety of reasons, Allen makes a superlative case for seeing the larger Christian community facing atta Allen, in almost grinding detail, tells of persecution and violence against Christians across the globe. He does so for four primary reasons. First, he simply documents the depth of injury to the Christian community. There is extensive research describing the murder, incarceration and communal violence toward people of faith (usually making them refugees) from many nations. Bluntly, for a wide variety of reasons, Allen makes a superlative case for seeing the larger Christian community facing attack. Second, as a progressive Christians, Allen hopes to help Western Christians (Americans particularly) see Christianity across the globe looks different. American Christians represent only 10% of the faith world wide and much of it is in worship traditions Americans would not generally recognize (ie Copts and Orthodox). Simply, Christianity overall does not look "American." Third, when Americans make a big deal of our "persecution" in saying "Happy Holidays" or in having to issue a marriage license, in comparison to those having their homes burned down or church building blown up, we look like whiners. Add on, the West appears to ignore the pain of those in other places. Finally, Allen makes clear the solution is not a militant response but a direct support for human rights and the dignity of all people - regardless of faith. In holding up loving and moral ideas along with raising the public awareness of persecution, Christians are more likely to change the world. While excellent research and exceptionally well presented, much of the work is overdone. When one story makes his point, he uses three. He could have made his point in half the pages. Still, for a Christian of any background, it's a good volume to raise awareness of the global situation of Christianity.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Frank Kelly

    A provocative and highly disturbing report on the explosive growth of anti-Christian violence and discrimination around the world. Allen offers a clear-eyed assessment of where, what and why this is happening along with an excellent section which pushes aside many of the myths that immediately pop up when this issue is discussed (i.e. it is not simply Muslims doing it to Christians, that it is simply a religious motivation that causes it, etc.). Written in 2013, the book would, unfortunately, be A provocative and highly disturbing report on the explosive growth of anti-Christian violence and discrimination around the world. Allen offers a clear-eyed assessment of where, what and why this is happening along with an excellent section which pushes aside many of the myths that immediately pop up when this issue is discussed (i.e. it is not simply Muslims doing it to Christians, that it is simply a religious motivation that causes it, etc.). Written in 2013, the book would, unfortunately, be even more depressing if updated to today's standards of violence (especially in the wake of the ISIS occupational nightmare of Syria and Iraq). Allen, in describing the horror of what is happening in these third world nations, quotes French leftist intellectual Regis Debray "who observes that anti-Christian persecution falls squarely into the political blind spot of the West. The victims, derby argues, are 'too Christian' to excite the left, 'too foreign' to interest the right." Sadly, this is more correct now than when Allen wrote the book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gayle Pace

    REVIEW Very often we as American Christians don't stop to think of the many blessing we have. We just assume they will always be there. Often we turn our ears in the off position when it comes to what others are facing. We just go on and say, it's not about me. But, THINK, it is about you. It's not just Christians who are persecuted day by day, but others also. If you can't or don't want to face the reality of the persecution that is taking place, don't read this book. If you have an open mind an REVIEW Very often we as American Christians don't stop to think of the many blessing we have. We just assume they will always be there. Often we turn our ears in the off position when it comes to what others are facing. We just go on and say, it's not about me. But, THINK, it is about you. It's not just Christians who are persecuted day by day, but others also. If you can't or don't want to face the reality of the persecution that is taking place, don't read this book. If you have an open mind and want to find out what the author has to say, read on. Mr. Allen has written an open view of what Christians go through daily. It's not pretty, but persecution never is. I believe that anyone that goes against the grain and disagrees with the majority is out front to be persecuted. I do believe this is some serious reading for everyone, not just Christians. Everyone should be concerned about world peace and people in general. This persecution happens all over, especially in the Middle East right now. Persecution is just not words, it's being denied employment, being a second class citizen, constant harassment, being imprisoned and much, much worse. Christians may feel no body hears their cries, but I don't believe this is true. Christians believe God is all knowing and he hears you. Persecution happens not only to Christians, but I believe everyone at one time or another feels that nobody hears their cries. They feel singled out, ostracized. But why? Because they believe different, look different, come from a different culture? We all think everyone should believe, think, act and look like we do? We're a melting pot. People have a right to whatever religion they believe in. They shouldn't be shunned because of it. Everyone is different. Just because you believe, doesn't mean everyone else does. I believe that some suffer in silence. They are hurting and assume there is no answer. God is the answer or let's say the higher being you believe in is the answer. I do believe everyone should take responsibility in seeing that there are freedoms being taken away from us everyday. Not just Christians, but everyone. Christians may be the biggest religious group to be persecuted but what about the others? They count too. For some reason there will always be those people who do not want certain people to be helped or aided in anyway. Our freedoms here in American are becoming fewer and fewer. This is affecting everyone, not just Christians. It will continue in the years to come. You are taught as you grow up that if someone does something bad to you, turn the other cheek. The thing is, when do you have enough and turning the cheek isn't the answer anymore? Others may see Christians as people you can do or say anything to and they will do nothing. They'll just turn the other cheek. Is that the answer? I think not. There is nothing wrong with disagreeing. We all do at some time or another. But just because there is disagreement, violence is not the answer. It's just adding to the problem. Didn't Jesus warn us, that "all that will live Godly in Christ Jesus will suffer persecution."? We were warned. The author uses case studies and much research in writing his book. He brings out that Christians are also persecuting other Christians. Do they have the right to be called Christians? There is one constant that no one can take away from you and that is what you think and that includes prayers. Talk to God and listen. He has a plan in all that happens, we just don't see it. Regardless of being a Christian or just a believer of a higher being, we should try our best to be good and help those less fortunate; that is if they want to be helped. Mr.Allen wrote a very thought invoking book. It is food for thought. You may not believe all he says or you may. No matter, you may be entirely surprised by what goes on when you are turning the other cheek or closing your ears. You don't have to be a Christian to read this book, anyone may benefit from it. I would give this book 3 CROSSES. I was given a complimentary copy of GLOBAL WAR ON CHRISTIANS by John L. Allen, Jr. from Waterbrook Multnomah Blogging for Books for my honest opinion. I received no other compensation.

  14. 4 out of 5

    A.C. Cuddy

    The Global War On Christians – Dispatches from the Front Lines of Anti-Christian Persecution. As a Christian living in the United States of America, the title of this book caught my eye. We’ve all known for some time that Christians around the world have been, and continue to be, persecuted for their beliefs. We read from time to time their stories, and hear about the tragedy’s that befall them in their mission work. It is through my own naïveté, that I assumed that this was because these folks The Global War On Christians – Dispatches from the Front Lines of Anti-Christian Persecution. As a Christian living in the United States of America, the title of this book caught my eye. We’ve all known for some time that Christians around the world have been, and continue to be, persecuted for their beliefs. We read from time to time their stories, and hear about the tragedy’s that befall them in their mission work. It is through my own naïveté, that I assumed that this was because these folks were “going into the mouth of the lion” when they headed to areas of the globe that were clearly anti-Christian. Little did I realize that so much of the Christian persecution that occurs is not just in those areas of the globe that we might deem hostile to Christians. This book, a raw as it is in its descriptions of the horrors, clearly opened my eyes to what is going on around the world. While we here in the US are battling with legal challenges for our nativity’s and religious freedoms, more than two-thirds of the world’s 2.3 billion Christians who live outside the West, and are the minority of most regions, are battling far more persecution than any of us could ever imagine. This book does contain graphic retelling of the stories of these martyrs. If you are sensitive to this, this might not be the book for you. Otherwise, I highly recommend this book as a must read. About the Author: JOHN L. ALLEN JR. is the senior correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter and the senior Vatican analyst for CNN, and writes for other national and international publications. He speaks at nearly fifty engagements a year and is the author of seven previous books, including his most recent A People of Hope: The Challenges Facing the Catholic Church and the Faith That Can Save It. For more information about the author, go to: http://ncronline.org/authors/john-l-a... Click here to read Chapter One of The Global War On Christians - http://www.imagecatholicbooks.com/sne... Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/wa... : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” *Reviews of this book were posted at the following locations: Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Deeper Shopping, and to be featured on my blog at http://titus3.wordpress.com

  15. 5 out of 5

    Liz Terek

    With all the liberties American Christians have, it’s easy to take them for granted. Most of us are well aware of the suffering faced overseas. But, perhaps, we’ve not heard in depth stories of what exactly goes on there. John Allen, Jr. has compiled a work in which we can get a full view of what these Christians endure daily. None of the factual stories are pretty, but suffering never is, is it? Mr. Allen’s purpose is clear: Don’t forget those on the front lines. Each account is relayed with t With all the liberties American Christians have, it’s easy to take them for granted. Most of us are well aware of the suffering faced overseas. But, perhaps, we’ve not heard in depth stories of what exactly goes on there. John Allen, Jr. has compiled a work in which we can get a full view of what these Christians endure daily. None of the factual stories are pretty, but suffering never is, is it? Mr. Allen’s purpose is clear: Don’t forget those on the front lines. Each account is relayed with this sentiment in mind. What you may find alarming is the frequency of anti-Christian attacks & that the attacks aren’t just on one specific denomination. Catholics & Christians of all denominations are in danger in their home countries. If the word ‘War’ in the title seems a bit extreme, consider the attacks themselves & how one would only here of these circumstances from war correspondents & survivors. Using statistical data & reputable news sources, details from a number of countries are retold. Books like this are necessitous to believers & non-believing readers alike. Atrocities taking place in other countries are a reality there & but, by the grace of God, are not a reality here. Instead of reading it for entertainment purposes, this needs to be read for its educational value. Missions-minded churches need to be aware of what their missionaries will & are facing as well as the people they’re ministering to there. More information on ‘The Global War on Christians’ is available through the publisher www.waterbrookmultnomah.com. I received a copy in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are mine.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dan Curnutt

    Living in the Western World Culture most of my readers will have never felt religious persecution. Sure you may have people who think you are crazy for believing in God, or they might be a bit antagonistic if you talk about religion, but they aren't going to pull out a gun and shoot you or grab a sword and chop off your head because of your beliefs. But that is not true through much of the world. Religious persecution is still alive and well in most of the world. Christians are dying regularly at Living in the Western World Culture most of my readers will have never felt religious persecution. Sure you may have people who think you are crazy for believing in God, or they might be a bit antagonistic if you talk about religion, but they aren't going to pull out a gun and shoot you or grab a sword and chop off your head because of your beliefs. But that is not true through much of the world. Religious persecution is still alive and well in most of the world. Christians are dying regularly at the hands of people who hate their religion and hate their God. While we as Christians are being asked to be tolerant with other religions they are not being tolerant at all with us. John Allen's book will detail the problem, detail the myths that have been propagated and share his view as a journalist as to what is going on. He will not just focus on one nation and one set of abuses. He will give details and accounts from many nations, from many continents and from many different types of persecution. This book will inform and educate you on what is happening in our world today. We in the West need to wake up and understand that persecution is happening and it is not going to be long before it may show up on our shores. With all the news about ISIS and what is happening in the Middle East we should be concerned. This book will give you an unbiased journalists view of the threat and the violence. Please read prayerfully and ask the Lord what He would like you to do about this issue.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Yonasan Aryeh

    There is a war going on right now against Christians. At least, that is what this book wants you to know. This book examines how Christians are the most persecuted religious group in the world. Written by a respected journalist, this book travels the world in the early twenty-first century to see how devastating the damage is. Stats show that 80% of the persecution and human rights violations are against Christians for their faith. We live in a world that has greatly dismissed the notion of persec There is a war going on right now against Christians. At least, that is what this book wants you to know. This book examines how Christians are the most persecuted religious group in the world. Written by a respected journalist, this book travels the world in the early twenty-first century to see how devastating the damage is. Stats show that 80% of the persecution and human rights violations are against Christians for their faith. We live in a world that has greatly dismissed the notion of persecution and believes that world peace is already a reality. Unfortunately, this is far from the truth. Allen presents an argument against the modern beliefs of complacent America and challenges the reader to recognize the dangers that are growing against Christians. This book is not without hope, though, providing a way for readers to complete their call to action. Allen writes the title with language, facts, and figures that matches a journalistic endeavor. Complete with detailed reports and harrowing accounts from individuals directly connected to the torture and persecution, this book is an addicting read that prevents readers from being inactive. Disclosure: I was contracted to write an honest review in exchange for a reviewer copy of the product. The opinions stated in this review are solely my own.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Angie Jones

    I am finding this a difficult book to read. There are scores of gruesome stories of unimaginable human rights abuses and the book is dragging on and not very engaging, but in fairness, it is a very difficult topic. One thing that is particularly troubling to me is the way the author deals with footnoting his facts. He doesn't. He says that it would be too cumbersome to do so and instead gives some organizations, mainly Catholic, that have collected the data that he has relied on. On a positive n I am finding this a difficult book to read. There are scores of gruesome stories of unimaginable human rights abuses and the book is dragging on and not very engaging, but in fairness, it is a very difficult topic. One thing that is particularly troubling to me is the way the author deals with footnoting his facts. He doesn't. He says that it would be too cumbersome to do so and instead gives some organizations, mainly Catholic, that have collected the data that he has relied on. On a positive note, things he does well are that he differentiates between true persecution of Christians globally from what American Christians are tempted to describe as "war" on themselves that is often just a clash of cultures or rejection of Christian bigotry. He also acknowledges that all religious groups face horrific persecution, not just Christians. He gives many examples of persecution of Christians from sources other than the go to group, Muslims and doesn't simply profess a simplistic "the world hated me, so the world will hate you too" reason, but digs into the root causes that create and sustain hatred of one group to another.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kasey Cocoa

    While I will say the author made some valid and important points, he also made a few errors and clearly comes from a very conservative Catholic viewpoint and needs lessons in how to write an engaging novel. There are several reasons, as I read over this book, that I couldn't help but doubt his "facts". The whole thing is poorly presented, shifts in mid paragraph, sections misplaced and entirely too rambling in parts. The third chapter was the only interesting one to read. I agree this is a topic While I will say the author made some valid and important points, he also made a few errors and clearly comes from a very conservative Catholic viewpoint and needs lessons in how to write an engaging novel. There are several reasons, as I read over this book, that I couldn't help but doubt his "facts". The whole thing is poorly presented, shifts in mid paragraph, sections misplaced and entirely too rambling in parts. The third chapter was the only interesting one to read. I agree this is a topic that needs more attention, but this is not the book to pick up to broaden your understanding of what goes on in this world of ours. I received an evaluation copy from Blogging for Books in exchange for my honest opinion and review. In no way has this influenced my opinion. Read more reviews, author interviews and enter giveaways on my blog.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    This is a hard hitting, eye opening book that I highly recommend to anyone who thinks that the persecution of Christians is a thing of the past. This is no a good, comfortable read, but is rather a great, eye opening, make-you-feel-uncomfortable kind of book. Too many people think that persecution of Christians is something that is not our world today, but as author John Allen points out that is a misnomer and there is a whole lot more persecution going on than just in Muslim countries but it af This is a hard hitting, eye opening book that I highly recommend to anyone who thinks that the persecution of Christians is a thing of the past. This is no a good, comfortable read, but is rather a great, eye opening, make-you-feel-uncomfortable kind of book. Too many people think that persecution of Christians is something that is not our world today, but as author John Allen points out that is a misnomer and there is a whole lot more persecution going on than just in Muslim countries but it affecting places in Europe, Africa, Asia,etc. So if you are looking for a great book to wake you up and realize what is really happening to Christians today I highly recommend this book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jacob O'connor

    Wake-up call. Every five minutes a Christian dies in the Middle East. Every hour 11 Christians are martyred somewhere in the world. Every year, 100,000 Christians die for their faith. These are staggering statistics, and I'm sure they're vulnerable to challenge. Even if they're only half true, this is alarming. Allen admonishes a more global outlook. This is an indictment on the American church, and it's an indictment on me. Paul teaches the church is one body. This is a very intimate analogy, b Wake-up call. Every five minutes a Christian dies in the Middle East. Every hour 11 Christians are martyred somewhere in the world. Every year, 100,000 Christians die for their faith. These are staggering statistics, and I'm sure they're vulnerable to challenge. Even if they're only half true, this is alarming. Allen admonishes a more global outlook. This is an indictment on the American church, and it's an indictment on me. Paul teaches the church is one body. This is a very intimate analogy, but my worldview has not reflected it. "The night is far spent, and the day is at hand". Time for me to wake up.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jason Lewis

    A tough book but it goes into plenty of examples defending the notion that Christianity is not always the religion that has pulled away injury-free in many cases. He takes the argument on by showcasing its many troughs that it has to go through in much of the world where it is the minority against mainly the public or governmental sector, sometimes taking the beliefs to the death. Can be difficult to read because of how depressing and the number of stories and examples used to defend the notion, A tough book but it goes into plenty of examples defending the notion that Christianity is not always the religion that has pulled away injury-free in many cases. He takes the argument on by showcasing its many troughs that it has to go through in much of the world where it is the minority against mainly the public or governmental sector, sometimes taking the beliefs to the death. Can be difficult to read because of how depressing and the number of stories and examples used to defend the notion, but very informative nonetheless.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    We Christians here in the U. S. tend to ignore what is happening to Christians across the globe because we have not experienced that kind of persecution here. Allen goes through territory by territory telling stories of those persecuted. He ends his book with practical ideas for us to share in our responsibility to other Christians - from prayer to advocacy. This is a hard book to read but one every Christian should. See my full review at http://bit.ly/1fWZ2LA. We Christians here in the U. S. tend to ignore what is happening to Christians across the globe because we have not experienced that kind of persecution here. Allen goes through territory by territory telling stories of those persecuted. He ends his book with practical ideas for us to share in our responsibility to other Christians - from prayer to advocacy. This is a hard book to read but one every Christian should. See my full review at http://bit.ly/1fWZ2LA.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mike Lutz

    Excellent book on an important (if depressing) issue. It's all too easy to get worked up over Western culture wars - and certainly there's a place for that - while missing the big picture of the persecution of Christians world wide. And while Africa and the Middle East receive due attention, Allen shows the problem extends way beyond the well-known hot spots. Strongly recommended. Excellent book on an important (if depressing) issue. It's all too easy to get worked up over Western culture wars - and certainly there's a place for that - while missing the big picture of the persecution of Christians world wide. And while Africa and the Middle East receive due attention, Allen shows the problem extends way beyond the well-known hot spots. Strongly recommended.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Beth A

    Shocking, disturbing, enlightening and informative. John Allen is a great writer....and I've heard him speak too. I could hear him as I read this book. Highly recommended. Now I have to figure out what I can do to stop persecution of Christians. Imagine no Christians left in the Holy Land? That is not outside the realm of possibilities. Shocking, disturbing, enlightening and informative. John Allen is a great writer....and I've heard him speak too. I could hear him as I read this book. Highly recommended. Now I have to figure out what I can do to stop persecution of Christians. Imagine no Christians left in the Holy Land? That is not outside the realm of possibilities.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bruinrefugee

    This is a helpful book in trying to get a handle on the world's on-going religious strife. While not necessarily exhaustive and sometimes a little overblown, it also does a valiant job of turning the lights on corners of those who still die in witness (often consciously) of their religion. And the numbers of victims should still shock. This is a helpful book in trying to get a handle on the world's on-going religious strife. While not necessarily exhaustive and sometimes a little overblown, it also does a valiant job of turning the lights on corners of those who still die in witness (often consciously) of their religion. And the numbers of victims should still shock.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brent Harris

    A staggering review of the current climate of global Christianity from an author and journalist reluctant to the hype of what some have called one of the greatest times of persecution for the global church. His title shows us that through his rigorous research and engagement that He was forced to call a spade a spade.

  28. 4 out of 5

    JoAnna

    Just read Elizabeth Scalia's review (http://www.patheos.com/blogs/theancho...) today and am declaring this a must-read. John Allen's writing is always top-notch, and this looks like no exception. Just read Elizabeth Scalia's review (http://www.patheos.com/blogs/theancho...) today and am declaring this a must-read. John Allen's writing is always top-notch, and this looks like no exception.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Arend

    Won this book in a goodreads giveaway. Very thoroughly researched!! Very impressively written!! Thought provoking

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Eye opening and quite depressing. Everyone should read this.

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