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27 Views of Raleigh: The City of Oaks in Prose & Poetry

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Eno Publishers builds on its successful 27 Views series 27 Views of Durham (2012); 27 Views of Hillsborough (2010); 27 Views of Chapel Hill (2011); 27 Views of Asheville (2012) by showcasing the literary community of Raleigh, North Carolina, in 27 Views of Raleigh: The City of Oaks in Prose & Poetry. The book features prose and poetry by 27 writers, who in poetry, essays, Eno Publishers builds on its successful 27 Views series 27 Views of Durham (2012); 27 Views of Hillsborough (2010); 27 Views of Chapel Hill (2011); 27 Views of Asheville (2012) by showcasing the literary community of Raleigh, North Carolina, in 27 Views of Raleigh: The City of Oaks in Prose & Poetry. The book features prose and poetry by 27 writers, who in poetry, essays, short stories, and book excerpts focus on the famous capital city. Contributors to this anthology include Bridgette Lacy, Tom Hawkins, Margaret Maron, David Rigsbee, Rob Christensen, Angela Davis-Gardner, Lenard Moore, Jimmy Creech, Amanda Lamb, Kelly Starling Lyons, Betty Adcock, Tracie Fellers, Grayson Currin, Eleanora E. Tate, Hillary Hebert, Scott Huler, Dan Gearino, Dana Lindquist, June Spence, Elaine Orr, Juliana Nfah-Abbenyi, Peggy Payne, and Tina Haver.


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Eno Publishers builds on its successful 27 Views series 27 Views of Durham (2012); 27 Views of Hillsborough (2010); 27 Views of Chapel Hill (2011); 27 Views of Asheville (2012) by showcasing the literary community of Raleigh, North Carolina, in 27 Views of Raleigh: The City of Oaks in Prose & Poetry. The book features prose and poetry by 27 writers, who in poetry, essays, Eno Publishers builds on its successful 27 Views series 27 Views of Durham (2012); 27 Views of Hillsborough (2010); 27 Views of Chapel Hill (2011); 27 Views of Asheville (2012) by showcasing the literary community of Raleigh, North Carolina, in 27 Views of Raleigh: The City of Oaks in Prose & Poetry. The book features prose and poetry by 27 writers, who in poetry, essays, short stories, and book excerpts focus on the famous capital city. Contributors to this anthology include Bridgette Lacy, Tom Hawkins, Margaret Maron, David Rigsbee, Rob Christensen, Angela Davis-Gardner, Lenard Moore, Jimmy Creech, Amanda Lamb, Kelly Starling Lyons, Betty Adcock, Tracie Fellers, Grayson Currin, Eleanora E. Tate, Hillary Hebert, Scott Huler, Dan Gearino, Dana Lindquist, June Spence, Elaine Orr, Juliana Nfah-Abbenyi, Peggy Payne, and Tina Haver.

30 review for 27 Views of Raleigh: The City of Oaks in Prose & Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Germann-Mc Clain

    An amazing way to look and appreciate such an incredible city! If you've never been before, you'll want to now! An amazing way to look and appreciate such an incredible city! If you've never been before, you'll want to now!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Gower

    Some interesting stories and accounts of Raleigh. There were a number of fiction stories that I did not connect with but the collection as a whole was interesting

  3. 4 out of 5

    Martha

    Really surprisingly good read. These are assorted essays, short stories, poems. The three that stood out for me were Home Is Where You Mend the Roof by Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abbenyi, a native of Cameroon, now a U.S. citizen. She defends Mississippi as having moved beyond its racist past and speaks of some negative experiences in Raleigh. Dining at Balentine's by Dana Wynne Lindquist touches on her family history, the longstanding tradition of Sunday post-church dining at Balentine's Cafeteria and Really surprisingly good read. These are assorted essays, short stories, poems. The three that stood out for me were Home Is Where You Mend the Roof by Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abbenyi, a native of Cameroon, now a U.S. citizen. She defends Mississippi as having moved beyond its racist past and speaks of some negative experiences in Raleigh. Dining at Balentine's by Dana Wynne Lindquist touches on her family history, the longstanding tradition of Sunday post-church dining at Balentine's Cafeteria and the loss of the unique building that was one of the cornerstones at Cameron Village. Ladies of the Marble Heart by Hilary Hebert is a short story about a middle-aged woman assisting her elderly mother to serve lunch to her book club. Mother is persnickety and the roof is falling in as the ladies are about to assemble and daughter has taken a day of vacation from her job to help her mother. Daughter's struggles to be independent of her mother are part of the dynamic between mother and daughter. Whoever cataloged this book originally has misspelled the author of the introduction's first name. His name is Wilton, not Wilson, Barnhardt.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alexa

    I was expecting a book about Raleigh, what I got instead is a collection of short stories, essays and poems that are set in and around Raleigh. The city is rather the supporting character in many of these tales, be they fiction or non-fiction. I’ve never put much stock in “reading local,” perhaps because I’ve been so frequently transplanted myself, but this collection is causing me to rethink my attitude. I may need to go do some further exploring! My favorites: Wilton Barnhardt’s amusing Introd I was expecting a book about Raleigh, what I got instead is a collection of short stories, essays and poems that are set in and around Raleigh. The city is rather the supporting character in many of these tales, be they fiction or non-fiction. I’ve never put much stock in “reading local,” perhaps because I’ve been so frequently transplanted myself, but this collection is causing me to rethink my attitude. I may need to go do some further exploring! My favorites: Wilton Barnhardt’s amusing Introduction, Tracie Fellers’ “Patterns” about the evocative memories of an old dress, June Spence’s “Intersections” about one’s personal historical relationship to a place, Tom Hawkins’ “Fair Ground” really touched me, Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abbenyi’s “Home is where you mend the roof” about the dislocation and pain of the immigrant experience, Betty Adcock’s “A Forest in the Middle of It,” Elaine Neil Orr’s, “Fox View, Montclair Neighborhood,” truly beautiful, Angela Davis-Gardner’s “Hungry,” and Hillary Hebert’s “Ladies of the Marble Hearth,” which might have been my favorite of all.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    Born and raised in Raleigh, I enjoyed many of the stories because it gave me that feeling of home when different landmarks and historical tales were told. The writers who had grown up in Raleigh, especially those who had family ties to the area, brought Raleigh to life on paper. I also enjoyed the story's of writers who weren't born or raised here, but came to find a home and a sense of belonging in this city. It was a beautiful homage to Raleigh, with lyrical prose and lovely poetry. A definite Born and raised in Raleigh, I enjoyed many of the stories because it gave me that feeling of home when different landmarks and historical tales were told. The writers who had grown up in Raleigh, especially those who had family ties to the area, brought Raleigh to life on paper. I also enjoyed the story's of writers who weren't born or raised here, but came to find a home and a sense of belonging in this city. It was a beautiful homage to Raleigh, with lyrical prose and lovely poetry. A definite must-read for any true Raleighite, whether born or adopted by this intricate and historical city.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Merry Jones

    27 Views of Raleigh is a collection worth reading. Wilton Barhardt's introduction brings the history of the city to life, and the pieces that follow weave together the personal and the public, the past and the present, poetry and prose. Although every entry is based in Raleigh,each presents a unique vision. Together,they create a mosaic of life in that city. Even though I've never been to North Carolina, I found 27 Views a compelling, touching read and recommend it highly. 27 Views of Raleigh is a collection worth reading. Wilton Barhardt's introduction brings the history of the city to life, and the pieces that follow weave together the personal and the public, the past and the present, poetry and prose. Although every entry is based in Raleigh,each presents a unique vision. Together,they create a mosaic of life in that city. Even though I've never been to North Carolina, I found 27 Views a compelling, touching read and recommend it highly.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jillian Goldberg

    Fun, informative stories about the city I live in.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katrina V.

    2.5. The stories were pretty hit or miss for me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Lambert

    I enjoyed this to my surprise. Little nuggets both familiar and surprising. Lived the piece by the NC prof about where your home is.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    DNF - too boring & smug.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor

    I wished it had more historical views. Also I'm not a big poetry fan I wished it had more historical views. Also I'm not a big poetry fan

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Glosson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kathi

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  16. 5 out of 5

    Justin Cranford

  17. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

  18. 5 out of 5

    Janet

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christina

  20. 5 out of 5

    Riech Joy

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  22. 4 out of 5

    Templehurst

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sonomahead

  24. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

  25. 5 out of 5

    Etta

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dominique

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gita

  28. 4 out of 5

    Deb

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Lyons

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