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The Five Orange Pips

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Sherlock Holmes, the world's 'only unofficial consulting detective', was first introduced to readers in "A Study in Scarlet" introduced by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887. It was with the publication of "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes," however, that the master sleuth grew tremendously in popularity, later to become one of the most beloved literary characters of all time Sherlock Holmes, the world's 'only unofficial consulting detective', was first introduced to readers in "A Study in Scarlet" introduced by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887. It was with the publication of "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes," however, that the master sleuth grew tremendously in popularity, later to become one of the most beloved literary characters of all time. In "The Five Orange Pips," one of the short stories in "Adventures ..," John Openshaw visits Baker Street to consult Sherlock Holmes as to the mysterious deaths of both his uncle and father upon the arrival of letters containing only five dried orange pips and an envelope mark 'K.K.K.'. The young gentleman further relates that he too has received a similar envelope with instructions to surrender some papers. Holmes quickly deduces that his client faces imminent danger from a secret society in America. The short stories comprising "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" have been amusingly illustrated using only Lego® brand minifigures and bricks. The illustrations recreate, through custom designed Lego models, the composition of the black and white drawings by Sidney Paget that accompanied the original publication of these adventures appearing in "The Strand Magazine" from July 1891 to June 1892. Paget's iconic illustrations are largely responsible for the popular image of Sherlock Holmes, including his deerstalker cap and Inverness cape, details never mentioned in the writings of Conan Doyle. This uniquely illustrated collection, which features some of the most famous and enjoyable cases investigated by Sherlock Holmes and his devoted friend and biographer Dr. John H. Watson, including "A Scandal in Bohemia" and "The Red-Headed League," is sure to delight Lego enthusiasts, as well as fans of the Great Detective, both old and new. Librarian's note: this entry relates to the story, "The Five Orange Pips." Collections of short stories, including the entry for "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" can be found elsewhere on Goodreads.


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Sherlock Holmes, the world's 'only unofficial consulting detective', was first introduced to readers in "A Study in Scarlet" introduced by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887. It was with the publication of "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes," however, that the master sleuth grew tremendously in popularity, later to become one of the most beloved literary characters of all time Sherlock Holmes, the world's 'only unofficial consulting detective', was first introduced to readers in "A Study in Scarlet" introduced by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 1887. It was with the publication of "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes," however, that the master sleuth grew tremendously in popularity, later to become one of the most beloved literary characters of all time. In "The Five Orange Pips," one of the short stories in "Adventures ..," John Openshaw visits Baker Street to consult Sherlock Holmes as to the mysterious deaths of both his uncle and father upon the arrival of letters containing only five dried orange pips and an envelope mark 'K.K.K.'. The young gentleman further relates that he too has received a similar envelope with instructions to surrender some papers. Holmes quickly deduces that his client faces imminent danger from a secret society in America. The short stories comprising "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" have been amusingly illustrated using only Lego® brand minifigures and bricks. The illustrations recreate, through custom designed Lego models, the composition of the black and white drawings by Sidney Paget that accompanied the original publication of these adventures appearing in "The Strand Magazine" from July 1891 to June 1892. Paget's iconic illustrations are largely responsible for the popular image of Sherlock Holmes, including his deerstalker cap and Inverness cape, details never mentioned in the writings of Conan Doyle. This uniquely illustrated collection, which features some of the most famous and enjoyable cases investigated by Sherlock Holmes and his devoted friend and biographer Dr. John H. Watson, including "A Scandal in Bohemia" and "The Red-Headed League," is sure to delight Lego enthusiasts, as well as fans of the Great Detective, both old and new. Librarian's note: this entry relates to the story, "The Five Orange Pips." Collections of short stories, including the entry for "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" can be found elsewhere on Goodreads.

30 review for The Five Orange Pips

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    3.5 stars. "The Five Orange Pips" is a classic Sherlock Holmes story, published in 1891, and then anthologized in the The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes set (which you can read online or download free here at Project Gutenberg). A young man, John Openshaw, comes to visit Sherlock and Dr. Watson. He tells them that four years ago his uncle, a bitter recluse who lived for many years in America before returning to England, had received a letter postmarked from Pondicherry, India. When he opens the en 3.5 stars. "The Five Orange Pips" is a classic Sherlock Holmes story, published in 1891, and then anthologized in the The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes set (which you can read online or download free here at Project Gutenberg). A young man, John Openshaw, comes to visit Sherlock and Dr. Watson. He tells them that four years ago his uncle, a bitter recluse who lived for many years in America before returning to England, had received a letter postmarked from Pondicherry, India. When he opens the envelope, five dried-up orange seeds fall out. The envelope is otherwise empty ... but then John and his uncle notice that the letters K.K.K are written on it. John's uncle shrieks in horror, saying that his sins have overtaken him. Seven weeks later his uncle is found dead, drowned in a small garden pond, an apparent suicide. The uncle's property is inherited by John's father, who similarly receives an envelope inscribed K.K.K., with five orange seeds, instructing him to ‘Put the papers on the sundial.’ He dies three days later in what looks like an accidental fall. And now John himself has received a similar letter and five orange pips. What to do? This is a far better story than the last two in this anthology. It's got a lot of atmosphere and, again, shows a more human and fallible side to Sherlock Holmes. What it isn't, is a very well thought-out mystery. Arthur Conan Doyle took the idea of the KKK and then ran with it, creating whatever fictional details he liked (like the threatening five orange seeds) with a supreme disregard for actual facts about the KKK. Sir Arthur, we all wish that the KKK had collapsed in 1869! The mystery has a lot of logical holes in it and doesn't really bear close examination; Doyle apparently dashed it off quickly without thinking it through too deeply. If you want to know more about those holes and the background of the story, there's a great summary and analysis here by a Sherlock Holmes fan, worth reading after you've read this story. (The best part of the analysis is toward the bottom of his web page, under "Plot Holes and Continuity Errors.") Or you can just read this story and appreciate it for what it is. :) Doyle liked it: he rated it #7 on his own list of favorite Sherlock Holmes stories. The list is in the comment thread to this review. Next Sherlock adventure: The Man with the Twisted Lip. Sounds creepy!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    Sir Arthur Conan Doyle would write the short stories to fit perfectly into a single edition of the Strand Magazine. The stories were normally fast paced, but also easy to follow. The Five Orange Pips though, is perhaps constrained by its length, because the reader cannot use the evidence provided to solve the case. There are a number of elements that only Holmes is privy to, and are only revealed when Holmes reveals the solution to Watson. At the same time, the modern reader will have some advant Sir Arthur Conan Doyle would write the short stories to fit perfectly into a single edition of the Strand Magazine. The stories were normally fast paced, but also easy to follow. The Five Orange Pips though, is perhaps constrained by its length, because the reader cannot use the evidence provided to solve the case. There are a number of elements that only Holmes is privy to, and are only revealed when Holmes reveals the solution to Watson. At the same time, the modern reader will have some advantages over the Victorian reader, as the letters KKK, which strongly feature in the storyline, are more recognisable today, than they were a hundred years ago. The Five Orange Pips does provide further insight into the character of Sherlock Holmes. In all the previous cases the superiority of Holmes has been evident, but in this case, Holmes is shown not to be infallible, and to a certain degree fails in bring the case to a conclusion. The Five Orange Pips also shows for the first time that Holmes is not just cold and logical, but also from time to time, he will also display anger. The concept of The Five Orange Pips has been used recently in both the American TV series Elementary, and the BBC series Sherlock; although in the case of Sherlock there is no real link to the original storyline.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alecsandra Velez

    I like that this short story was not wrapped up nice and tidy. It showed Sherlock Holmes was, in fact, a mere mortal. This is the most human he has seemed so far in my readings, especially when he first finds out about the murder of Openshaw. He takes it so hard. It is not just that he could not prove his deduction right but also that someone else has paid the price for his failing. He tries to rectify the situation the only way he knows how but revenge still escapes him in the end.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sanjay Gautam

    A Tragic Story, where Holmes fails even before starting. Dark and sinister forces are at play.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    I listened to this with an audiobook. I don't hate Southern American accents (in fact, I rather like them), but this narrator's voice was distracting. He made Holmes' accent a southern, high-pitched sound that I really didn't like. But it was a free book, so enough of my complaints. The book was very short (the audiobook lasted for only 40 minutes) but it wasn't a very exciting or thought-provoking case. (view spoiler)[ The victim who came to Holmes actually died. And then it mentions Holmes was I listened to this with an audiobook. I don't hate Southern American accents (in fact, I rather like them), but this narrator's voice was distracting. He made Holmes' accent a southern, high-pitched sound that I really didn't like. But it was a free book, so enough of my complaints. The book was very short (the audiobook lasted for only 40 minutes) but it wasn't a very exciting or thought-provoking case. (view spoiler)[ The victim who came to Holmes actually died. And then it mentions Holmes was shook but then he's like "Wow, that hurt my pride, moving on" xD I don't know what to make of it! (hide spoiler)] I didn't know Holmes was a boxer, so that was something (and I didn't know he was a cocaine addict, so that certainly was something). So overall, it was a quick read which I probably would have enjoyed better if the narrator's voice was not so oldmanly when he spoke as Sherlock!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jaksen

    Only three stars this time. (I am currently reading all the Sherlock Holmes stories.) In this one, Holmes is out to solve a mystery involving a man who has received five orange pips, or seeds, in an envelope, along with the initials KKK written on it. Okay, any American would right away say we know who the KKK are. Holmes does, too, but needs to explain it all to Watson. (Does Watson never read a newspaper? Any history?) (view spoiler)[ Haha, so anyhow, after the man receives the pips, he dies a f Only three stars this time. (I am currently reading all the Sherlock Holmes stories.) In this one, Holmes is out to solve a mystery involving a man who has received five orange pips, or seeds, in an envelope, along with the initials KKK written on it. Okay, any American would right away say we know who the KKK are. Holmes does, too, but needs to explain it all to Watson. (Does Watson never read a newspaper? Any history?) (view spoiler)[ Haha, so anyhow, after the man receives the pips, he dies a few weeks later. There's more, and it involves the man's nephew, who wants to figure out what's going on and why. Problem is that in this story Holmes fails. YES, he fails. He doesn't save the man's nephew - who came to him with the mystery in the first place - because he acts too late. Yes, TOO late! Holmes does 'solve' the mystery and identify the evil-doers, but they aren't punished because of other extenuating circumstances. For Holmes it's a miserable disappointment in more ways than one. Which, ironically, is one of the reasons many Holmes fans like this story so much - because it shows the man's fallibility! There are also multiple errors in this one which the 'Grand Game' members love to pick apart and point out. The errors don't take away from the story, however, and this is said to be one of the best, but meh, I think three stars is fair enough. (Btw, the 'Grand Game' is made up of devoted readers, including experts from all fields of science, who study and investigate every tiny possible minute detail in the Holmes' stories for 'errors.' They work from the POV that Watson and Holmes are - or were - real people and take it from there. The first of these were four brothers who wrote Doyle with a list of criticisms about this very story. Good old Sir Conan thought it amusing, and even silly that anyone would take his work so seriously, though he did admit that the story was quickly, and somewhat 'carelessly' written.) (hide spoiler)]

  7. 4 out of 5

    Katja Labonté

    4.5 stars & 5/10 hearts. This story used to frustrate and sadden me, but now it’s one of my favourites. It humanizes Holmes so much—showing the professional, the cynic, and then the real human passionate for justice—and also showing him actually making mistakes and failing. The plot is unique, with the K.K.K. involvement, and I loved seeing Holmes take on the part of “stalking the stalker.” And let’s just admit the setting/mood is epic. ;) Content: drinking, smoking, swearing x3. A Favourite Quot 4.5 stars & 5/10 hearts. This story used to frustrate and sadden me, but now it’s one of my favourites. It humanizes Holmes so much—showing the professional, the cynic, and then the real human passionate for justice—and also showing him actually making mistakes and failing. The plot is unique, with the K.K.K. involvement, and I loved seeing Holmes take on the part of “stalking the stalker.” And let’s just admit the setting/mood is epic. ;) Content: drinking, smoking, swearing x3. A Favourite Quote: “Well,” he said, “I say now, as I said then, that a man should keep his little brain-attic stocked with all the furniture that he is likely to use, and the rest he can put away in the lumber-room of his library, where he can get it if he wants it.”

  8. 4 out of 5

    Franci

    Ah!!! The wheel turns!!!!!

  9. 5 out of 5

    itsdanixx

    "The Five Orange Pips" is the fifth story in the The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes story collection, the third publication in the Sherlock Holmes series (after the first two novels, so the first story collection). Holmes is visited by a terrified young man who has received an envelope containing five orange pips... the same sort of envelope both his father and his uncle received, just days before their deaths. The first story, I think, that showed it's age a little but still great. "The Five Orange Pips" is the fifth story in the The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes story collection, the third publication in the Sherlock Holmes series (after the first two novels, so the first story collection). Holmes is visited by a terrified young man who has received an envelope containing five orange pips... the same sort of envelope both his father and his uncle received, just days before their deaths. The first story, I think, that showed it's age a little but still great.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jack Heath

    5 Stars. So ingenious. If you are anything like this admirer of Holmes and his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, you'll have to read twice the section in which our idiosyncratic detective breaks the case. It's that complex. It doesn't happen all the time, but there's also a rewarding feeling in this one, "The perpetrators got what they deserved." Their end was nasty. The 1891 story has echoes today. It's that current. I am slowly reading them all - from the 2020 "Sherlock Holmes The Complete Novel 5 Stars. So ingenious. If you are anything like this admirer of Holmes and his creator Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, you'll have to read twice the section in which our idiosyncratic detective breaks the case. It's that complex. It doesn't happen all the time, but there's also a rewarding feeling in this one, "The perpetrators got what they deserved." Their end was nasty. The 1891 story has echoes today. It's that current. I am slowly reading them all - from the 2020 "Sherlock Holmes The Complete Novels and Stories." A two volume paperback. The story first came out in "The Strand." In London's worst storm of the year, a young man, John Openshaw, visits Holmes and Watson and describes the tragic deaths of his uncle and father. They had received letters containing five orange seeds, nothing else, and more importantly, the letters KKK written on the inner flap. Soon they were dead, and now John has received the same letter. It all goes back to slavery, the American Civil War, and the Reconstruction era. Even today, we live with the repercussions of that disgrace. Although less aware of it in London in 1891, they were dealing with it too. (March 2021)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Riju Ganguly

    THIS is.one of those canonical tales which had the power of becoming a grim and violent saga of racial politics, betrayal and revenge. Unfortunately for us, Sir ACD had rushed this beautiful plot into a short story. I sincerely hope that someday someone will create a proper pastiche out of this seed. But even as a short story, it’s magical.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cora Tea Party Princess

    5 Words: Perfect length for a cuppa. Quite a bitter-sweet ending to this one, with no clear indication as to whether Holmes was right or not. Which was honestly a little frustrating. But my faith in the character tells me he is right.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jason Donoghue

    Yet another classic from sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A truly great writer who deserves the title of (sir) which was granted to him.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    Reading this right after Agatha Christie's Five Little Pigs (I only just noticed the irony of the recurring number, forgive me) was probably not my best idea. After a full 200 page novel with a thoroughly built case, characters, interviews and a brilliant Poirot slowly going through the evidence to bring light to the mystery, this was abysmal. The case is surreal (and slightly ridiculous) and the solution is unreachable for the reader since most of the proof at Holmes' disposal is displayed whil Reading this right after Agatha Christie's Five Little Pigs (I only just noticed the irony of the recurring number, forgive me) was probably not my best idea. After a full 200 page novel with a thoroughly built case, characters, interviews and a brilliant Poirot slowly going through the evidence to bring light to the mystery, this was abysmal. The case is surreal (and slightly ridiculous) and the solution is unreachable for the reader since most of the proof at Holmes' disposal is displayed while he reveals the truth. In addition, the ending is pretty open and the criminals are never brought to justice. I'm sorry to pronounce such blasphemy, but Doyle, I'm disappointed. The only redeeming quality is the portrayal of a Sherlock capable of error and human emotion, that for once makes him appear like a man and not a detecting machine.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    From BBC Radio 4 Extra After receiving a violent death threat, Colonel Elias Openshaw calls on the Baker Street detective. Stars Clive Merrison.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amina

    Well, that was quite unusual, even if it started like any other case, Mr. Holmes couldn't save his client in this one, he found the culprits but no news were to come Well, that was quite unusual, even if it started like any other case, Mr. Holmes couldn't save his client in this one, he found the culprits but no news were to come

  17. 4 out of 5

    Crime Addict Sifat

    A youthful Sussex man of honor named John Openshaw has a bizarre story: in 1869 his uncle Elias Openshaw had all of a sudden returned to England to settle on a bequest at Horsham, West Sussex in the wake of living for quite a long time in the United States as a grower in Florida and filling in as a Colonel in the Confederate Army. Not being hitched, Elias had enabled his nephew to remain at his home. Unusual episodes have happened; one is that in spite of the fact that John could go anyplace in A youthful Sussex man of honor named John Openshaw has a bizarre story: in 1869 his uncle Elias Openshaw had all of a sudden returned to England to settle on a bequest at Horsham, West Sussex in the wake of living for quite a long time in the United States as a grower in Florida and filling in as a Colonel in the Confederate Army. Not being hitched, Elias had enabled his nephew to remain at his home. Unusual episodes have happened; one is that in spite of the fact that John could go anyplace in the house he would never go into a bolted room containing his uncle's trunks. Another quirk was that in March 1883 a letter stamped Pondicherry, in India, touched base for the Colonel recorded just "K.K.K." with five orange pips encased. More bizarre things happened: Papers from the bolted room were singed and a will was drawn up leaving the home to John Openshaw. The Colonel's conduct wound up plainly unusual. He would either secure himself his room and drink or he would go yelling forward in a tipsy sally with a gun in his grasp. On 2 May 1883 he was discovered dead in a garden pool.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Smitha

    Wasn't a very convincing mystery, but the title was mysterious indeed. Members of a family who get 5 orange pips via post die within hours to days under mysterious circumstances, and Holmes go on to investigate. Wasn't a very convincing mystery, but the title was mysterious indeed. Members of a family who get 5 orange pips via post die within hours to days under mysterious circumstances, and Holmes go on to investigate.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jason Parent

    (view spoiler)[ So some of the earlier works made me think of Doyle as a racist. Nice to see the KKK showing up as villains... (hide spoiler)] (view spoiler)[ So some of the earlier works made me think of Doyle as a racist. Nice to see the KKK showing up as villains... (hide spoiler)]

  20. 5 out of 5

    RM Subramanian

    Good mystery coupled with perfect ending.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chaplain Walle

    This was an other good book of Sherlock Holmes adventures.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Erivaldo

    The Five Orange Pips: one of the 52 novels written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. With simple imagery, but not empty, and story, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle captivates the mind of the reader with a well-written, not perfect nonetheless, English novel. Reading this novel was even more interesting - and even nostalgic - for me because in 2013 my group and I were handed a school work regarding this novel, The Seven Orange Pips. A parody and a short mute-movie we did, whereby we turned out to be that our wor The Five Orange Pips: one of the 52 novels written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. With simple imagery, but not empty, and story, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle captivates the mind of the reader with a well-written, not perfect nonetheless, English novel. Reading this novel was even more interesting - and even nostalgic - for me because in 2013 my group and I were handed a school work regarding this novel, The Seven Orange Pips. A parody and a short mute-movie we did, whereby we turned out to be that our work was deemed the best among all our fellow students and our teacher of Portuguese. I can even recall that as we did the parody, playing musical instruments and dancing, many a student of the nearby classrooms passed by our classroom and peeped through the windows to see our work, whereto they all applauded in the end thereof, so great was the impression that we left in all the class. I give four stars, and not five, because although it an awesome reading it not as startling, not as magnanimous as Paradise Lost and The Lusiads, for example, both epic poems, both the prime of the works of literature evdr written in the Western World. Although The Seven Orange Pips cannot be liked to these works, five stars is a award that I shall give but to few books, to the prime books of this part of the world.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    This rating is 3.5 stars. The storyline was well thought out, and it showed further development of Holmes and Watson's characters. It was easy to figure out what was happening though because of a knowledge of U.S. history. So, this took away some of the mystery. It is crazy to think that this type of thing would really happen with the Ku Klux Klan. It is definitely a sad and dangerous part of history. I have to say though, as a modern reader who is required to learn a lot about American history This rating is 3.5 stars. The storyline was well thought out, and it showed further development of Holmes and Watson's characters. It was easy to figure out what was happening though because of a knowledge of U.S. history. So, this took away some of the mystery. It is crazy to think that this type of thing would really happen with the Ku Klux Klan. It is definitely a sad and dangerous part of history. I have to say though, as a modern reader who is required to learn a lot about American history in school, this made it easy to figure out what the K.K.K. were. This is a modern advantage that the Victorian England readers of the time this was published might not be privy to. So, I could imagine it would be a lot more mysterious and confusing to someone in that time period. It was well described in this book, however, and it was an interesting story.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This story has a wonderful ominous feel to it where the reader is aware of a great evil coming upon them but is unable to grasp why or do anything about it. The beginning is brilliantly written. Brain attic. John and Mary are very common names for a number of characters throughout the series. Watson and Holmes solve the majority of the case not minutes after the initial telling. It’s nice. Then the next morning, the pair find out their client, John Openshaw, is dead but that Holmes miraculously h This story has a wonderful ominous feel to it where the reader is aware of a great evil coming upon them but is unable to grasp why or do anything about it. The beginning is brilliantly written. Brain attic. John and Mary are very common names for a number of characters throughout the series. Watson and Holmes solve the majority of the case not minutes after the initial telling. It’s nice. Then the next morning, the pair find out their client, John Openshaw, is dead but that Holmes miraculously has the names of those guilty and has forwarded his own pips to the murderer. Finally, in an underwhelming fashion and just a few hasty lines, there is news that the ship the murderer is on has sunk and that the investigation has come to a close. Ending, not so good.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Satrina T

    In this story we have a new case about a young man receiving an envelope with five orange pips as means of a murder threat. The need for action becomes urgent after learning the fate of a couple of brothers after receiving this threat. Favorite part: it was nice seeing Sherlock under a new light when (view spoiler)[he fails to save this man from his fate, I don't mean to say I want to see him fail, it's just that I like the representation of Sherlock as a fallible man after seeing him as incapabl In this story we have a new case about a young man receiving an envelope with five orange pips as means of a murder threat. The need for action becomes urgent after learning the fate of a couple of brothers after receiving this threat. Favorite part: it was nice seeing Sherlock under a new light when (view spoiler)[he fails to save this man from his fate, I don't mean to say I want to see him fail, it's just that I like the representation of Sherlock as a fallible man after seeing him as incapable of error (hide spoiler)] I haven't read any Sherlock in a while and now I remember that I always enjoy his stories.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    "'It becomes a personal matter with me now, and, if God sends me health, I shall set my hand upon this gang. That he should come to me for help, and that I should send him away to his death -!' He sprang from his chair, and paced around the room in uncontrollable agitation, with a flush upon his sallow cheeks, and a nervous clasping and unclasping of his long thin hands." The idea that Sherlock Holmes has no emotions/doesn't care about other people is so ludicrous and people who say so should pro "'It becomes a personal matter with me now, and, if God sends me health, I shall set my hand upon this gang. That he should come to me for help, and that I should send him away to his death -!' He sprang from his chair, and paced around the room in uncontrollable agitation, with a flush upon his sallow cheeks, and a nervous clasping and unclasping of his long thin hands." The idea that Sherlock Holmes has no emotions/doesn't care about other people is so ludicrous and people who say so should probably be tarred and feathered.

  27. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Sadly, this story is more of a tale than a mystery for the American reader, because we readily know that K.K.K. stands for Ku Klux Klan and all that organization entails. Yet, it's still a Sherlock Holmes story, and as a result, is always well written. Sadly, this story is more of a tale than a mystery for the American reader, because we readily know that K.K.K. stands for Ku Klux Klan and all that organization entails. Yet, it's still a Sherlock Holmes story, and as a result, is always well written.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Noninuna

    I tried. I listened to this short adventure of Holmes twice but I just dont get what's going on and who is the culprit? If I happened have this one in any collection that I'll read later, I'd give it another go. For now, it's just an okay 2 stars. I tried. I listened to this short adventure of Holmes twice but I just dont get what's going on and who is the culprit? If I happened have this one in any collection that I'll read later, I'd give it another go. For now, it's just an okay 2 stars.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sophie C

    Really enjoyed this :)

  30. 4 out of 5

    RM Subramanian

    Definitely i was glued to the words of Arthur Conan Doyle

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