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In My Shoes: A Memoir

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When Tamara Mellon’s father lent her the seed money to start a high-end shoe company, he cautioned her: “Don’t let the accountants run your business.” Little did he know. Over the next fifteen years, the struggle between “financial” and “creative” would become one of the central themes as Mellon’s business savvy, creative eye, and flair for design built Jimmy Choo into a p When Tamara Mellon’s father lent her the seed money to start a high-end shoe company, he cautioned her: “Don’t let the accountants run your business.” Little did he know. Over the next fifteen years, the struggle between “financial” and “creative” would become one of the central themes as Mellon’s business savvy, creative eye, and flair for design built Jimmy Choo into a premier name in the competitive fashion industry. Over time, Mellon grew Jimmy Choo into a billion dollar brand. She became the British prime minister’s trade envoy and was honored by the Queen with the Order of the British Empire—yet it’s her personal glamour that keeps her an object of global media fascination. Vogue photographed her wedding. Vanity Fair covered her divorce and the criminal trial that followed. Harper’s Bazaar toured her London town house and her New York mansion, right down to the closets. And the Wall Street Journal hinted at the real red meat: the three private equity deals, the relentless battle between “the suits” and “the creatives,” and Mellon’s triumph against a brutally hostile takeover attempt. But despite her eventual fame and fortune, Mellon didn’t have an easy road to success. Her seemingly glamorous beginnings in the mansions of London and Beverly Hills were marked by a tumultuous and broken family life, battles with anxiety and depression, and a stint in rehab. Determined not to end up unemployed, penniless, and living in her parents’ basement under the control of her alcoholic mother, Mellon honed her natural business sense and invested in what she knew best—fashion. In creating the shoes that became a fixture on Sex and the City and red carpets around the world, Mellon relied on her own impeccable sense of what the customer wanted—because she was that customer. What she didn’t know at the time was that success would come at a high price—after struggles with an obstinate business partner, a conniving first CEO, a turbulent marriage, and a mother who tried to steal her hard-earned wealth. Now Mellon shares the whole larger-than-life story, with shocking details that have never been presented before. From her troubled childhood to her time as a young editor at Vogue to her partnership with cobbler Jimmy Choo to her very public relationships, Mellon offers an honest and gripping account of the episodes that have made her who she is today. As Mellon readies herself for her next entrepreneurial venture, In My Shoes is a definitive book for fashion aficionados, aspiring entrepreneurs, and anyone who loves a juicy true story about sex, drugs, money, power, high heels, and overcoming adversity.


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When Tamara Mellon’s father lent her the seed money to start a high-end shoe company, he cautioned her: “Don’t let the accountants run your business.” Little did he know. Over the next fifteen years, the struggle between “financial” and “creative” would become one of the central themes as Mellon’s business savvy, creative eye, and flair for design built Jimmy Choo into a p When Tamara Mellon’s father lent her the seed money to start a high-end shoe company, he cautioned her: “Don’t let the accountants run your business.” Little did he know. Over the next fifteen years, the struggle between “financial” and “creative” would become one of the central themes as Mellon’s business savvy, creative eye, and flair for design built Jimmy Choo into a premier name in the competitive fashion industry. Over time, Mellon grew Jimmy Choo into a billion dollar brand. She became the British prime minister’s trade envoy and was honored by the Queen with the Order of the British Empire—yet it’s her personal glamour that keeps her an object of global media fascination. Vogue photographed her wedding. Vanity Fair covered her divorce and the criminal trial that followed. Harper’s Bazaar toured her London town house and her New York mansion, right down to the closets. And the Wall Street Journal hinted at the real red meat: the three private equity deals, the relentless battle between “the suits” and “the creatives,” and Mellon’s triumph against a brutally hostile takeover attempt. But despite her eventual fame and fortune, Mellon didn’t have an easy road to success. Her seemingly glamorous beginnings in the mansions of London and Beverly Hills were marked by a tumultuous and broken family life, battles with anxiety and depression, and a stint in rehab. Determined not to end up unemployed, penniless, and living in her parents’ basement under the control of her alcoholic mother, Mellon honed her natural business sense and invested in what she knew best—fashion. In creating the shoes that became a fixture on Sex and the City and red carpets around the world, Mellon relied on her own impeccable sense of what the customer wanted—because she was that customer. What she didn’t know at the time was that success would come at a high price—after struggles with an obstinate business partner, a conniving first CEO, a turbulent marriage, and a mother who tried to steal her hard-earned wealth. Now Mellon shares the whole larger-than-life story, with shocking details that have never been presented before. From her troubled childhood to her time as a young editor at Vogue to her partnership with cobbler Jimmy Choo to her very public relationships, Mellon offers an honest and gripping account of the episodes that have made her who she is today. As Mellon readies herself for her next entrepreneurial venture, In My Shoes is a definitive book for fashion aficionados, aspiring entrepreneurs, and anyone who loves a juicy true story about sex, drugs, money, power, high heels, and overcoming adversity.

30 review for In My Shoes: A Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Pooooooooooooor me. Poor little me. I am a pretty, smart girl, born into a world of priveledge. That's me being harsh. She obviously has major family problems and from her perspective, her mom does sound absolutely wacko. But there was A LOT of complaining in this book. Complain, name drop, woe is me. Complain, name drop, woe is me. My daughter! My daughter! My daughter! Right. You don't have to read the book. You just did. The BEST part about this book was her viewpoint on Jimmy Choo! He sounds Pooooooooooooor me. Poor little me. I am a pretty, smart girl, born into a world of priveledge. That's me being harsh. She obviously has major family problems and from her perspective, her mom does sound absolutely wacko. But there was A LOT of complaining in this book. Complain, name drop, woe is me. Complain, name drop, woe is me. My daughter! My daughter! My daughter! Right. You don't have to read the book. You just did. The BEST part about this book was her viewpoint on Jimmy Choo! He sounds creepy and crazy! Boy do I want to meet him. Oh, and how he had little to nothing to do with the brand. Dear God, I want someone to give me millions of pounds just because I have a nice name. Amen.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jane Stewart

    4 ½ stars. A Memoir. Fascinating story. I felt good at the end, but I wanted pictures. This is the story of Tamara’s rise to fame (in the fashion world) and wealth. In much of the book I’m thinking “no, don’t do that” as she makes decisions that cause problems later. But the purpose of the book is to show her decisions, mistakes, consequences, her struggles through them, surviving, and succeeding. At the end of the book she is starting a new business and I am excited for her knowing she will not 4 ½ stars. A Memoir. Fascinating story. I felt good at the end, but I wanted pictures. This is the story of Tamara’s rise to fame (in the fashion world) and wealth. In much of the book I’m thinking “no, don’t do that” as she makes decisions that cause problems later. But the purpose of the book is to show her decisions, mistakes, consequences, her struggles through them, surviving, and succeeding. At the end of the book she is starting a new business and I am excited for her knowing she will not be making the same mistakes again. I am also excited because she is a creative fashion genius. She knows what is beautiful and what women will love - kind of like Steve Jobs in the tech field. If you’re looking for something about celebrities and a fancy lifestyle, you may not want this. This is more appropriate for young entrepreneurs and/or women. My feelings during the book varied. Many times I was suffering and frustrated at what she was going through. Private equity investors controlled 51% of the company and forced decisions against her wishes. She was forced to put up with a CEO who was verbally abusive and made decisions based on ego rather than the good of the company. Tamara’s mother was a monster - a narcissist and sociopath. From childhood on Tamara suffered terrible abuse from her mother. At times I felt like I was Tamara’s therapist, listening to her troubles and complaints. But she’s telling me her story. These are her words, her thoughts, her feelings. And that’s ok. This is a memoir, not a biography. A biographer would bring in a more balanced story with others’ opinions. So some readers might not be in the mood to listen that way, but I was fine with it. Several times Tamara mentioned names of famous people and investment groups that I had never heard of before. It would have been helpful if she clarified parenthetically who she was talking about. But it wasn’t a big problem, I skipped through those. Some things I found interesting: In the beginning, Tamara wanted to be involved with quality fashionable shoes. So she approached Jimmy Choo a local shoe maker proposing they work together. She thought he would design and she would do the administration, production, and marketing. But to her surprise, he was not a good designer. She threw out what he did and did the designs herself. As it turned out she was the amazing creative artistic genius, and others were hired to do what she thought she would be doing. So she didn’t need Jimmy Choo. He did nothing. Yet he owned 50% of the business and would not agree to things like expansion. I think many of us have assumed we are not good at something, yet we’ve never tried it enough to know. I liked her comment “every mistake I made was from not trusting myself.” Tamara did not know until around age 40 that she had ADD (attention deficit disorder). She also learned she had PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder) from growing up under the abusive stress from her mother. It caused permanent hormonal imbalances, which medications later helped with. Tamara also suffered verbal abuse from the private equity investors and the company CEO. Regarding this she said “The relief I feel at avoiding failure or abuse is always more pronounced than any real pleasure in achievement or recognition.” I was intrigued with Tamara’s inspiration trips which were her muse for her artistic creations. She started with flea markets and later traveled to locations throughout the world. I wish the book included pictures. This is about Tamara’s artistic creations. I wanted to see her first shoe designs and some of the more famous designs. The audiobook should have a pdf file for buyers to download. DATA: Narrative mode: 1st person Tamara Mellon. Unabridged audiobook length: 8 hrs and 31 mins. Swearing language: a couple words a couple times. Sexual content: none. Setting: U.K. and U.S. from around 1990 to 2012. Book copyright: 2013. Genre: memoirs.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    How I Came To Read This Book: I received a review copy from the publisher. The Plot: Tamara Mellon is best known as the face and co-founder of luxury goods brand Jimmy Choo. Despite living the life of a globetrotting socialite, this raw tell all reveals a far darker portrait of a woman fighting severe anxiety and stress brought on by her family, drug-addled husband, uncooperative business partners, and the general strain of being a female executive. While the book touches on Tamara’s youth in Ame How I Came To Read This Book: I received a review copy from the publisher. The Plot: Tamara Mellon is best known as the face and co-founder of luxury goods brand Jimmy Choo. Despite living the life of a globetrotting socialite, this raw tell all reveals a far darker portrait of a woman fighting severe anxiety and stress brought on by her family, drug-addled husband, uncooperative business partners, and the general strain of being a female executive. While the book touches on Tamara’s youth in America, the UK and Switzerland (or wherever her finishing school was), it’s all really a frame for the rise of Jimmy Choo and the prices she’s had to pay for climbing up the ladder with it. The Good & The Bad: I can’t even quite put into words what I thought about this book. For one thing, remind me never to get on Tamara Mellon’s shit list. For another, I can say this: if you are looking for a TRUE tell all, this book is it. Every time I’ve picked up a story that promises to dish tons of juicy gossip, it’s always fallen short or been just as easily accessed on the internet (key exception: Game Change). But this is a book that can really only have been written by Tamara Mellon. Talk about airing your dirty laundry – virtually every ‘character’ in the story gets a pretty visceral tongue-lashing, which leads me to believe that while this was perhaps a therapeutic exercise for Tamara, it wasn’t necessarily the sagest of business moves. Truth be told, I was only obliquely aware of who she was going into the book. My mom had mentioned to me a Vanity Fair profile or something that spoke to the brand’s crazy back story, but beyond that I went into the story pretty blindly, certainly aware of Jimmy Choo brand but not its creator (real or imagined). The book itself is relatively easy to follow, although the constant use of blatant foreshadowing (with frequent mentions of the ‘worse was yet to come’) becomes quite tired in the early chapters. I appreciated that Tamara’s childhood was really only explored to help explain some of the issues she grapples with as an adult – we don’t need a bio of this woman per se and she recognizes the salient parts of her life generally tie into her notoriety as the face of Jimmy Choo. From there, the book talks about Tamara’s unwitting business partner and brand namesake, coupled with the grind she went through in the early days of the brand. After that, things get a lot more complex and business-focused (and scathing) as Jimmy Choo enters the world of private equity – a match very much not made in heaven. From court cases to buyouts to misplaced shares, it can all be a little heady, but Tamara grounds the technical side of her story with pretty vicious character assassinations. It’s hard to feel total sympathy for Tamara. Between the name dropping and endless stream of poor little rich girl anecdotes, she can be a little tiresome. Of course, I think she was very shrewd and savvy in releasing this book in advance of any of her nemeses stepping up to the plate – but she’s also the only person in the story that COULD have released a book period, given she’s the ‘name’ associated with the brand. Although she gives herself a few knocks throughout, they feel almost perfunctory, as if to say “Well we all make our mistakes but clearly THESE people’s mistakes are SO MUCH WORSE THAN MINE.” Alongside these slightly self-deprecating remarks, of course, are plenty of proclamations of Tamara’s personal triumphs and numerous occasions where people simply wouldn’t listen to her brilliant ideas. I do acknowledge that some of the scenarios she paints clearly point to some poisoning in male-dominated business world. But given the overall angry, frustrated tone of the book, it does leave a kernel of suspicion in the readers mind as to how much of the story is skewed by the emotional lens Tamara is writing it through. Still, I’m hard-pressed to really complain. I found the book surprisingly gripping and interesting, and also relevant to my career (of which I have to consider things like valuations) and personal interests (fashion!) It does teeter on the precipice of being a ‘trashy read’, but credit where it’s due: Tamara (and her ghostwriter) wrangle this circus of a story into something riveting from start to finish. If you go into this with an open mind that this woman is quite literally laying it all out there (and can get past the ego-driven overtones), it’s easily a good read. I really rated it based on the idea of being a true, rather unvarnished and kinda maniacal story. If you’re expecting high journalism, look elsewhere. But for what it was, I enjoyed it. The Bottom Line: Although hyper-charged with emotion, the book easily hooks you, even during the murkiest business-focused components. Anything Memorable?: Nothing specific, although I kept on going online afterward to track down the various successes and memorable moments in the Jimmy Choo story (the H&M collaboration, the ad campaigns, the first Sex & the City reference). 60-Book Challenge?: Book #56 in 2013

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Seddon

    Meh. Very "poor little rich girl". No one cared about her education so she ended up going to Swiss finishing school by default. She had to live in the basement of her parent's mansion because she couldn't afford a place of her own. She wasn't reimbursed for a $40,000 private jet trip to St Barths. These are beyond first world problems. But there is no doubt Tamara is incredibly stylish and very business savvy. I'm sure her mother IS bat-crap crazy and some of the people at Jimmy Choo were a pain Meh. Very "poor little rich girl". No one cared about her education so she ended up going to Swiss finishing school by default. She had to live in the basement of her parent's mansion because she couldn't afford a place of her own. She wasn't reimbursed for a $40,000 private jet trip to St Barths. These are beyond first world problems. But there is no doubt Tamara is incredibly stylish and very business savvy. I'm sure her mother IS bat-crap crazy and some of the people at Jimmy Choo were a pain-in-the arse to work with - but is EVERYONE in her life out to destroy her? I admire her but she doesn't come across as particularly likeable and the book isn't even very well written, even with a ghostwriter. A little heavy on minute details of her court cases and business deals but a somewhat interesting read. I would love it if she would write a style guide. It definitely made me not want to buy anything from Jimmy Choo ever again.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    The story of building the Jimmy Choo brand is interesting, and should be admired she started with 150,000 pounds, and sold it for 185 million. Tamara Mellon has built a relevant and compelling luxury brand that she was indeed pushed out of, which seems short sighted buy the company owners. All seemed to miss the fact Tamara Mellon in addition to being the creative force, was the brand, Without doubt she understood the customer, what they wanted, and how to stay relevant in the fickle world of fa The story of building the Jimmy Choo brand is interesting, and should be admired she started with 150,000 pounds, and sold it for 185 million. Tamara Mellon has built a relevant and compelling luxury brand that she was indeed pushed out of, which seems short sighted buy the company owners. All seemed to miss the fact Tamara Mellon in addition to being the creative force, was the brand, Without doubt she understood the customer, what they wanted, and how to stay relevant in the fickle world of fashion. She also deeply understands what a luxury brand should be in terms of quality. Her tone and need to convey how mistreated she has been by her mother becomes a bit tiring. She clearly wants to be validated as the victim by the reader. Its an easy read, and worthwhile if this is an area of interest you. I did learn a fair amount about private equity, and the process of manufacturing a luxury shoe line. She has very valid points about private equity not understanding the creative process of fashion, and the whims of the customer. I am curious to see what happens with her new line, from both a creative fashion standpoint, and as a business.

  6. 5 out of 5

    RYCJ

    Enjoyable writing and easy reading; the sincerity being so frank that the account read candid to a fault. From the outset Mellon’s innovative ‘couture’ fashion ideas and desire to grow the Jimmy Choo brand, figured at odds with Jimmy (the cobbler) Choo’s interest to work in a more exclusive manner with his craft and clientele. This all sets the tone for events to come, the makings of one page-turning event. While it was hard reading about Mellon’s many troubles, the energy behind her creative id Enjoyable writing and easy reading; the sincerity being so frank that the account read candid to a fault. From the outset Mellon’s innovative ‘couture’ fashion ideas and desire to grow the Jimmy Choo brand, figured at odds with Jimmy (the cobbler) Choo’s interest to work in a more exclusive manner with his craft and clientele. This all sets the tone for events to come, the makings of one page-turning event. While it was hard reading about Mellon’s many troubles, the energy behind her creative ideas was magnetic. I especially rooted for that ending...a sentiment that was with me at the start of the story. Recommended reading, especially for aspiring entrepreneurs, or shoe junkies like me.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ginger

    The theme of my reading has been female entrepreneurs. My whole life I've (somewhat ignorantly) found money, lawyers, stocks, shares, equity, entrepreneurs and startups to be beyond boring. Tamera Mellon repeats a theme I've heard again and again, it's a man's world babe and yet, it does not have to be. The theme of my reading has been female entrepreneurs. My whole life I've (somewhat ignorantly) found money, lawyers, stocks, shares, equity, entrepreneurs and startups to be beyond boring. Tamera Mellon repeats a theme I've heard again and again, it's a man's world babe and yet, it does not have to be.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    Although I am not an obsessive shoe aficionado, this was a really interesting read about a woman making her way in the business world. Tamara Mellon, as a narrator, can be a bit of a pill. But she is also a ferocious executive and a hella talented creative force. Sure, she name drops to the point of utter silliness, and she doesn't seem to see a lot of gray in the behaviors of those around her - they are either her supporters and good, or her enemies and bad - but that doesn't make her story a bi Although I am not an obsessive shoe aficionado, this was a really interesting read about a woman making her way in the business world. Tamara Mellon, as a narrator, can be a bit of a pill. But she is also a ferocious executive and a hella talented creative force. Sure, she name drops to the point of utter silliness, and she doesn't seem to see a lot of gray in the behaviors of those around her - they are either her supporters and good, or her enemies and bad - but that doesn't make her story a bit less interesting. It's a personal narrative, and not intended to be a guide for All Women in Business. (Certainly, it is not much of a replicable path to be to the Nouveau Manor Born, and then marry one of the heirs to the Mellon fortune.) Nonetheless, you can't come away from this book not appreciating the fact that she worked like a dog for years, genuinely for the good of the company, valuing it much more highly than her own financial gains or emotional of physical well being. And she is never afraid to be brutally honest about making mistakes - sometimes big ones, like getting in bed with venture capital. She sometimes compares her story to that of a Danielle Steele heroine, and if you like your stories of romance and struggle to involve shoes and high stakes drama, that's not too far from the mark. Of course, she does get a bit poor-poor-pitiful me from time to time, but I didn't feel that it was enough to mar my overall enjoyment of the book. I do wish that she had gone into more detail at the end - her leaving the company, especially in light of all the years and all the care she had devoted to it - felt a bit sudden. Then again, when she talked about having to recover from post-traumatic stress for a year after making the break, I suppose that level of burnout makes it more understandable. Tamara Mellon doesn't always come across as likable, but she does indisputable possess and indomitable bravery, sense of style, and enviable business savvy. I'm glad I picked this up, as it took me into a world of high fashion shoes and cut throat business that I would never have otherwise experienced.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brita

    LOVED this book. It wasn't the easiest read....I found all the "mumbo jumbo" talk about the business side of things a bit much, mostly because it went WAY over my head. I also kinda of felt like Tamara was telling us a bit too much detail about the behind the scenes business dealings and her court cases (can't she get sued for telling that stuff?)....However, there was a lot of name dropping, which I find really fun. This woman obviously have lived a privileged life and hell, if she wants to tel LOVED this book. It wasn't the easiest read....I found all the "mumbo jumbo" talk about the business side of things a bit much, mostly because it went WAY over my head. I also kinda of felt like Tamara was telling us a bit too much detail about the behind the scenes business dealings and her court cases (can't she get sued for telling that stuff?)....However, there was a lot of name dropping, which I find really fun. This woman obviously have lived a privileged life and hell, if she wants to tell me about THAT stuff, then who am I to skip those pages? The book was fun because her life is so very different than mine. A lot of it was very glamorous, but at the same time, Tamara really does let you in on all the struggles that she has gone through since basically, birth, dealing with her mother, her ex-husband, and all the horrible people she gets involved with in the business world. I found this made her a more sympathetic character. She did mention a few times as well, that she became the face of the business, so the parts about the parties and events and the hair and make up costs and private jets and all that, seemed to make sense to me. I'm not going to spend 500 bucks on a pair of shoes, when I see the designer/creative head, showing up to the Oscars in jeans and with limp hair. She had to play the part, and I respect that. There was definitely enough in the book to show that she is a hard working, focused and extremely driven woman that has been through a lot, so I think the negative comments about her on this site do seem a bit silly. She came from a family of money and she may have been given opportunities that us normal folk would never get, but she very obviously worked hard and overcame a lot to get where she is today. As a side note, I am OBSESSED with magazines, any and all, not just fashion, so anytime she name dropped someone in the magazine world, I instantly Googled them and read everything I could. I loved this about the book. Overall, the book was a good read, interesting, a bit glamorous and it's something you could easily read in a Saturday afternoon.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    In My Shoes is written by the co-founder of Jimmy Choo, Tamara Mellon. It is an interesting read, with a little bout of insomnia it kept me reading for a couple of hours. Growing up with an entrepreneurial father, Tamara grows up in Los Angeles, with two younger brothers and an alcoholic mother. As a teenager she is sent off to boarding school in the UK and finishing school in Switzerland. Her parents move back to the UK and even though she has a job editing accessories at Vogue magazine, she li In My Shoes is written by the co-founder of Jimmy Choo, Tamara Mellon. It is an interesting read, with a little bout of insomnia it kept me reading for a couple of hours. Growing up with an entrepreneurial father, Tamara grows up in Los Angeles, with two younger brothers and an alcoholic mother. As a teenager she is sent off to boarding school in the UK and finishing school in Switzerland. Her parents move back to the UK and even though she has a job editing accessories at Vogue magazine, she lives in their Belgravia basement while out partying every night, with lots of drugs and alcohol. When that job ends and after a stint in rehab, she convinces her father to invest in a venture of producing shoes with a cobbler Jimmy Choo. Setting up the business and the convoluted world of business deals takes up a lots of the story, there are lots of tales of lawyers and meetings throughout her business dealings. One can't help but feel that she expected a life of privilege and was slightly spoilt, and that had their been less exotic holidays, private jets and cocaine their might have been a bit more sensible decision making and money in the bank. Once her father dies, her mother goes a bit cra cra as she is already the major benefactor of the earlier deals, but still takes her daughter to court in a disagreement over some disputed shares. Entertaining insight into what you might think is a glamorous world.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cyntha Sri

    OK this was my first memoir, I have never read one before. I'm not even sure if I'm qualified enough to rate 3 stars.The reason why I give 3 only because I was utterly shocked by how obnoxious she sounded through out the book. In the end I was able to tell myself ok maybe she is this way because after all she was "the" creative co founder of Jimmy Choo and she had quite a roller coaster of a ride. What was interesting to me was, she was able to diss almost everyone she encountered in her 15 year OK this was my first memoir, I have never read one before. I'm not even sure if I'm qualified enough to rate 3 stars.The reason why I give 3 only because I was utterly shocked by how obnoxious she sounded through out the book. In the end I was able to tell myself ok maybe she is this way because after all she was "the" creative co founder of Jimmy Choo and she had quite a roller coaster of a ride. What was interesting to me was, she was able to diss almost everyone she encountered in her 15 years in Jimmy Choo and her mother as if she she is burning the bridge between them, but she was very careful when she was talking about her ex husband & very few friends. Why? because she can't really burn the bridge between him as far as their daughter Minty is concerned? However I felt like I learned a thing or two about fashion world. A fun fact : As per Tamara, you know those beauuuuuutiful Lauboutin platform stiletto ? The idea was originally from her and Christian Lauboutin apparently stole it !!!! WHAAAAT ?

  12. 4 out of 5

    lysa

    Not only chronicling her path from unemployed ex-Voguette to Co-founder of Jimmy Choo shoes, Tamara Mellon also hopes to inspire young women of finding their 'voice' in a world where men either want to own you or control you. I applaud this sentiment and her story is a good read of life lessons learned but it's hard to see her as an inspiration when the privileged author perpetually portrays herself as a victim (no fault to her!) while laying claim to ideas that cannot be warranted (ie. she came Not only chronicling her path from unemployed ex-Voguette to Co-founder of Jimmy Choo shoes, Tamara Mellon also hopes to inspire young women of finding their 'voice' in a world where men either want to own you or control you. I applaud this sentiment and her story is a good read of life lessons learned but it's hard to see her as an inspiration when the privileged author perpetually portrays herself as a victim (no fault to her!) while laying claim to ideas that cannot be warranted (ie. she came up with the signature Louboutin platform heel silhouette). Some take away lessons: - never accept a deal where your share isn't on par with the investors - don't let accountants run your business - lawyers ruin deals (and always have your own representation) - trust your gut instincts - in private equity, it's all about the EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization)

  13. 5 out of 5

    CiderandRedRot

    Even allowing for the advantages provided by her background*, there's no denying that Mellon is a canny businesswoman. However, readers expecting a Devil Wears Prada-esqe tale of gossipy fashion shenanigans will be disappointed; business strategies and (tedious) legal wranglings abound. Mellon seems likable enough, and if her mother is even one-fifth of the monster she is depicted as here then she's a proper horror, but after the umpteenth person Tamara does business with screws her over and ste Even allowing for the advantages provided by her background*, there's no denying that Mellon is a canny businesswoman. However, readers expecting a Devil Wears Prada-esqe tale of gossipy fashion shenanigans will be disappointed; business strategies and (tedious) legal wranglings abound. Mellon seems likable enough, and if her mother is even one-fifth of the monster she is depicted as here then she's a proper horror, but after the umpteenth person Tamara does business with screws her over and steals her ideas, well, she may just be desperately unlucky or… *Today in ‘The Incredibly Rich: They’re Not Like Us’, Tamara freely admits she chose the name Araminta for her daughter because she thought the name Minty Mellon was adorable. Dude.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Monika Radclyffe

    Surprisingly entertaining read, it made me laugh out loud many times. Sometime it was due to ridiculousness of the situations super-rich put themselves into, sometimes because you can't quite believe how naive they are and yet make loads of money. There were few good lessons in business and emphasis on importance of influential friends. But generally, it's just a very interesting story on how you build a luxury brand from scratch. Surprisingly entertaining read, it made me laugh out loud many times. Sometime it was due to ridiculousness of the situations super-rich put themselves into, sometimes because you can't quite believe how naive they are and yet make loads of money. There were few good lessons in business and emphasis on importance of influential friends. But generally, it's just a very interesting story on how you build a luxury brand from scratch.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Serena Benson

    Couldn't put this down. This woman is tenacious....this is the real story behind the scenes; the old boy's club vs creativity and pure instinctive genius. Mellon fights for what she deserves - a shining example for women worldwide fighting the bean counters and suits in order to bring their visions to life. Couldn't put this down. This woman is tenacious....this is the real story behind the scenes; the old boy's club vs creativity and pure instinctive genius. Mellon fights for what she deserves - a shining example for women worldwide fighting the bean counters and suits in order to bring their visions to life.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ninakix

    Holy crap this book is a car wreck and I can't look away. This whole book is basically the trials and tribulations of Tamara Mellon and how basically everyone around her sucked so bad and she was this genius that was foiled by all of them. Really, if she started half the trends she said she's started, she'd be the next Lagerfeld. Holy crap this book is a car wreck and I can't look away. This whole book is basically the trials and tribulations of Tamara Mellon and how basically everyone around her sucked so bad and she was this genius that was foiled by all of them. Really, if she started half the trends she said she's started, she'd be the next Lagerfeld.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Interesting to learn about the jimmy choo story but way too much bitching and moaning about her personal problems and not nearly enough about business strategy and development - very hard to tell how balanced this account was

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Manser

    Two stars solely on interest in to how her life progressed. The book is extremely hard to stick with as she constantly feels sorry for herself and attacks everyone else, including some that would never speak an ill word of her despite her lack of training.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Santangelo

    Lots of name dropping, totally self indulgent. Loved it! She's a survivor. Lots of name dropping, totally self indulgent. Loved it! She's a survivor.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Loved this book! This is a great read for anyone that likes fashion and business!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Darlene Hammond

    Too much arrogance and "poor me" syndrome. O yes, and University of British Columbia is hardly "the wilds of Canada". Too much arrogance and "poor me" syndrome. O yes, and University of British Columbia is hardly "the wilds of Canada".

  22. 5 out of 5

    Daniela G.

    Really tedious. So hard to read and boring. I felt like she is not telling the whole truth and just blaming the others. Amazing and successful woman, interesting story, but the book is not for me.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karen Z

    THIS WAS THE SINGLE WORST BOOK I HAVE EVER READ IN MY LIFE. I have to start with the writing: it was awful. It was just awful. Hard to read, it somehow felt like a 12 year old wrote it and then used a thesaurus to try and put big words in there Next is the personality. I just cannot get over someone playing the victim card as much as she did. I’m sorry but you’re worth 300,000,000. She was born into the life of the rich and privileged and she only mentioned how bad her life was? Poor me!!! I’m so THIS WAS THE SINGLE WORST BOOK I HAVE EVER READ IN MY LIFE. I have to start with the writing: it was awful. It was just awful. Hard to read, it somehow felt like a 12 year old wrote it and then used a thesaurus to try and put big words in there Next is the personality. I just cannot get over someone playing the victim card as much as she did. I’m sorry but you’re worth 300,000,000. She was born into the life of the rich and privileged and she only mentioned how bad her life was? Poor me!!! I’m so beautiful and rich and I know tons of famous people, poor me!!! Okay her childhood wasn’t easy but half of us can relate to it, and we don’t go around writing books about how amazing we are and how none of the problems in our lives are due to us but rather everyone else being shitty. Literally the whole book could’ve been summarized with “poor me!” It was COMPLAINT after COMPLAINT after COMPLAINT. I do not have ANY respect of this woman, hell I’ll go on to say this was probably the worst book I’ve ever read in my life. Did you forget your father was a multimillionaire and you went to the best schools and knew famous wealthy people that got you to where you are now? It was like reading a “this is what I’ve been through and despite all that, look what I’ve done” when really it’s “yeah my life was shitty in some ways but i was very fortune that I knew the right people and I was in the right place.” Another thing, she somehow credits herself and ONLY herself for the success of jimmy choo but the failures on everyone BUT herself. I mean have you heard of ACCOUNTABILITY? Somehow JIMMY CHOO was just a lazy bum and she was the mastermind of the company. Sorry? Might as well paint a picture of how awful everyone was to you and how great you are as person. It felt like this was a press release for shitting on jimmy choo and why he was so awful. NO ONE CARES ABOUT YOUR ISSUES WITH HIM! You’re the only one who gives a sh*t. She apparently was struggling financially because she was only eating 15,000 pounds per year yet her wedding cost 500,000 and then she went on a free trip to Bali afterwards. Sorry? Where exactly is your financial struggle that you claim to be going through. Seriously the only words I could use to describe this entire book: written by a spoiled rich woman who has no accountability or self-awareness, not an inspiration to young women. It was just terrible

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hello_ripper

    Overall, a good read to learn more about the Jimmy Choo brand and the entrepreneur behind it. Since hearing of the brand in Sex and the City, I didn't connect why TM was the face behind the Chinese-sounding brand name and later read that JC just lend his name to the brand pretty much. The book chronicles TM's life from childhood trauma to her foray into fashion. Some people reviewed that she sounded like a whiny spoiled girl, but I don't think that was the case. Sure, she had a privileged upbrin Overall, a good read to learn more about the Jimmy Choo brand and the entrepreneur behind it. Since hearing of the brand in Sex and the City, I didn't connect why TM was the face behind the Chinese-sounding brand name and later read that JC just lend his name to the brand pretty much. The book chronicles TM's life from childhood trauma to her foray into fashion. Some people reviewed that she sounded like a whiny spoiled girl, but I don't think that was the case. Sure, she had a privileged upbringing, but she had an awful mom and whose to say that privileged made her successful. She worked hard and had a vision. She encountered difficulties along the way and shared her story so entrepreneurs, especially women entrepreneurs can learn from. First, JC himself who didn't really contribute much except his name since he was known in the couture world, but had no other contribution or interest. Then came the suits who had their own agenda (suits do only care about the bottom line). About halfway through, even I was exhausted by all these characters. By the ending, she found her own voice and strength to say no and moved on, which is something we can all learn from.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Willow Rankin

    Tamara Mellon should be a household name in the fashion industry, as she made the Jimmy Choo brand what it is today. However, her journey is filled with nepotism, name-dropping and playing the victim. Whilst her story is interesting, and my god does it ring true with working with men in the corporate world playing the bullying tactics and the fact that the finance industry is so messed up; playing the victim really annoyed me. Not only was her mother evil, but so were several others she surround Tamara Mellon should be a household name in the fashion industry, as she made the Jimmy Choo brand what it is today. However, her journey is filled with nepotism, name-dropping and playing the victim. Whilst her story is interesting, and my god does it ring true with working with men in the corporate world playing the bullying tactics and the fact that the finance industry is so messed up; playing the victim really annoyed me. Not only was her mother evil, but so were several others she surrounded herself with in her own company. I feel bad for some of the characters on the sidelines of her life, Sandra and Jimmy Choo specifically. Both so alienated by her, that they were content with throwing her under the bus as much as possible. I feel she definitely only tells half the story here, and that her treatment of others, which she refers to herself as cold and distant, was actually a lot harsher.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Erika Brown

    A breezy, gossipy read for any fan on fashion or Jimmy Choos. I was neither, but as an entrepreneur I enjoyed Tamara Mellon's journey from unsuccessful party-girl / editor at British Vogue to founder of (ultimately) a hugely successful shoe brand. Her story is surprising (offering insights both from her and by seeing her choices) and admirable, especially Mellon's ability to navigate private equity sharks, ugly family challenges after the death of her business partner father and her marriage to A breezy, gossipy read for any fan on fashion or Jimmy Choos. I was neither, but as an entrepreneur I enjoyed Tamara Mellon's journey from unsuccessful party-girl / editor at British Vogue to founder of (ultimately) a hugely successful shoe brand. Her story is surprising (offering insights both from her and by seeing her choices) and admirable, especially Mellon's ability to navigate private equity sharks, ugly family challenges after the death of her business partner father and her marriage to a dynamic but highly troubled American blueblood. A bittersweet story.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Avril Martin

    This was a fascinating look at how Jimmy Choo came into being as I had no idea prior. That being said, Tamara doesn't acknowledge till the last 10 pages of the book that she has been the "victim" her whole life - dad is emotionally unavailable (sorry, but who's wasn't?) and mom is a narcissistic sociopath (she talks about going to therapy to unwrap all of that). AND I wish she had written the entire book from that knowledge, instead it read as "poor, little, rich me - look at how everyone treats This was a fascinating look at how Jimmy Choo came into being as I had no idea prior. That being said, Tamara doesn't acknowledge till the last 10 pages of the book that she has been the "victim" her whole life - dad is emotionally unavailable (sorry, but who's wasn't?) and mom is a narcissistic sociopath (she talks about going to therapy to unwrap all of that). AND I wish she had written the entire book from that knowledge, instead it read as "poor, little, rich me - look at how everyone treats me so poorly".

  28. 4 out of 5

    Aoife Caitriona

    Have you ever wondered what life is like behind the doors of a renowned luxury brand? This book provides a readers insight into how Jimmy Choo started, how it evolved etc. This book is probably a little too adult for me and it contains a lot of financial and business related terms. One thing that shocked me was how utterly imperfect the brand actually is and it was quite insightful to read about someone's not-so-perfect life especially when you think you know it. Have you ever wondered what life is like behind the doors of a renowned luxury brand? This book provides a readers insight into how Jimmy Choo started, how it evolved etc. This book is probably a little too adult for me and it contains a lot of financial and business related terms. One thing that shocked me was how utterly imperfect the brand actually is and it was quite insightful to read about someone's not-so-perfect life especially when you think you know it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    An interesting read and a great insight into this cult brand and its meagre origins. Abit whiney at times and, the name dropping though! Empathized with her but still had to wonder what about her made most of her relationships in life so unsuccessful. And that mother!!! Excellent highlight on business hostility but whilst she threw so many people under the bus, would love to see the other characters version of this story especially from Jimmy Choo, Lucy Choi and these so called difficult men she An interesting read and a great insight into this cult brand and its meagre origins. Abit whiney at times and, the name dropping though! Empathized with her but still had to wonder what about her made most of her relationships in life so unsuccessful. And that mother!!! Excellent highlight on business hostility but whilst she threw so many people under the bus, would love to see the other characters version of this story especially from Jimmy Choo, Lucy Choi and these so called difficult men she worked under/with.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mariaan

    Very difficult to explain. I do feel sorry for her immensely. Especially regarding what her mother did to her, but also she says how she had no money but she only ever stayed in five star hotels etc. I have respect for what she has achieved, well done. A book that reflects exactly what corporate life is about.

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