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The first Joseph Campbell work to focus on the Goddess, edited and introduced by Safron Rossi, PhD, Curator of Collections at Opus Archives and Research Center, home to the archival collections of Joseph Campbell, Marija Gimbutas, James Hillman, and other scholars of mythology, Jungian and archetypal psychology, and the humanities. Joseph Campbell brought mythology to a mas The first Joseph Campbell work to focus on the Goddess, edited and introduced by Safron Rossi, PhD, Curator of Collections at Opus Archives and Research Center, home to the archival collections of Joseph Campbell, Marija Gimbutas, James Hillman, and other scholars of mythology, Jungian and archetypal psychology, and the humanities. Joseph Campbell brought mythology to a mass audience. His bestselling books, including The Power of Myth and The Hero with a Thousand Faces, are the rare blockbusters that are also scholarly classics. While Campbell’s work reached wide and deep as he covered the world’s great mythological traditions, he never wrote a book on goddesses in world mythology. He did, however, have much to say on the subject. Between 1972 and 1986 he gave over twenty lectures and workshops on goddesses, exploring the figures, functions, symbols, and themes of the feminine divine, following them through their transformations across cultures and epochs. In this provocative volume, editor Safron Rossi—a goddess studies scholar, professor of mythology, and curator of collections at Opus Archives, which holds the Joseph Campbell archival manuscript collection and personal library—collects these lectures for the first time. In them, Campbell traces the evolution of the feminine divine from one Great Goddess to many, from Neolithic Old Europe to the Renaissance. He sheds new light on classical motifs and reveals how the feminine divine symbolizes the archetypal energies of transformation, initiation, and inspiration.


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The first Joseph Campbell work to focus on the Goddess, edited and introduced by Safron Rossi, PhD, Curator of Collections at Opus Archives and Research Center, home to the archival collections of Joseph Campbell, Marija Gimbutas, James Hillman, and other scholars of mythology, Jungian and archetypal psychology, and the humanities. Joseph Campbell brought mythology to a mas The first Joseph Campbell work to focus on the Goddess, edited and introduced by Safron Rossi, PhD, Curator of Collections at Opus Archives and Research Center, home to the archival collections of Joseph Campbell, Marija Gimbutas, James Hillman, and other scholars of mythology, Jungian and archetypal psychology, and the humanities. Joseph Campbell brought mythology to a mass audience. His bestselling books, including The Power of Myth and The Hero with a Thousand Faces, are the rare blockbusters that are also scholarly classics. While Campbell’s work reached wide and deep as he covered the world’s great mythological traditions, he never wrote a book on goddesses in world mythology. He did, however, have much to say on the subject. Between 1972 and 1986 he gave over twenty lectures and workshops on goddesses, exploring the figures, functions, symbols, and themes of the feminine divine, following them through their transformations across cultures and epochs. In this provocative volume, editor Safron Rossi—a goddess studies scholar, professor of mythology, and curator of collections at Opus Archives, which holds the Joseph Campbell archival manuscript collection and personal library—collects these lectures for the first time. In them, Campbell traces the evolution of the feminine divine from one Great Goddess to many, from Neolithic Old Europe to the Renaissance. He sheds new light on classical motifs and reveals how the feminine divine symbolizes the archetypal energies of transformation, initiation, and inspiration.

30 review for Goddesses: Mysteries of the Feminine Divine

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Gender conflict has deep, historical roots. Goddesses: Mysteries of the Divine Feminine, is a book based on lectures and notes by the late Joseph Campbell. It is produced by the Joseph Campbell Foundation and edited by Dr. Safron Rossi. The book traces the Goddess in history from ancient times and peoples to around the time of the European Renaissance (around the 15th century). It is a fascinating work and an in-depth look into an aspect of mythology that is frequently overlooked. Many works featu Gender conflict has deep, historical roots. Goddesses: Mysteries of the Divine Feminine, is a book based on lectures and notes by the late Joseph Campbell. It is produced by the Joseph Campbell Foundation and edited by Dr. Safron Rossi. The book traces the Goddess in history from ancient times and peoples to around the time of the European Renaissance (around the 15th century). It is a fascinating work and an in-depth look into an aspect of mythology that is frequently overlooked. Many works feature entire pantheons and tribal deities but few are devoted to following the archetypal motif of the Goddess as she moves, evolves, diminishes, and rises transformed through the many arcs of history and mythologies. Goddesses is one of those few that I've encountered. The story begins in the Old Stone Age (30,000 - 10,000 BC) where archaeological artifacts depict women as magical vessels which produces life and where men are depicted as task-performers. The book notes that today, women are more often than not, seen as objects seen primarily in terms of appearance and youth, while men are seen as task-performers -- not much has changed. With the development of agricultural societies, authority transfers to the female and the Goddess is seen as the global forces and energies of nature and life. As some tribes become nomadic with hunting as their primary means of support, the Goddess decreases and the male hero-gods gain prominence. The mythologies depict these gods killing off their maternal ancestors. The male gains authority and dominance among these societies. As history continues the two types of societies increasingly come into conflict with one another. Cultures are subsumed by conquering. The warring societies dominate. Cities develop and mythologies have to change and adapt to justify specialization of tasks and castes. For a period of time, from around 3000 BC (give or take several centuries) to around 700 BC, male-oriented mythologies dominate. However, the Goddess cannot be silenced forever and begin their return into the Greek pantheon. Based on its themes, it is suggested that The Odyssey was composed by a woman to bring the feminine characteristics and power back into Greek thought. The book goes into great detail on an analysis and interpretation of the Iliad (which precedes) and The Odyssey to see the transformation in thought that takes place between these two works. Goddesses shows that throughout history, the feminine mythologies focus on life and harmony, that she help unite people into community. On the other hand, the masculine kills and divides, and promotes mostly self-interest. Because many readers have the Jewish and Christian texts as their primary religious and mythological background, comparison are made throughout Goddesses highlighting similarities between what is found in the Bible and what is found in surrounding cultures, often predating the biblical texts by hundreds and thousands of years. The major monotheistic religions are patriarchal. According to Goddesses they have effectively conquered and killed the female character, even though vestiges can be found in their texts if one looks deeply. Attributes and characteristics that are typical of the female are assigned to the male deity. In so doing, these religions are able to keep the Goddess dead. Goddesses ends in the time of the Renaissance with a return of the Goddess into mythology. The Arthurian legends, the Virgin Birth, and the veneration of Mary are interpreted as part of the return. I really enjoyed Goddesses and found it quite informative. It shows how mythology and religion have been employed as weapons in gender and sex power struggles since the dawn of human civilization. It shows how people have tried to make sense of the world and the universe from the very beginning of consciousness. It shows how mythologies form, develop, change, are borrowed, and are transformed to fit the needs of people at any given time. It shows that mythologies themselves are not sacred, but they point to a transcendent reality that is believed to exist. For some this book will be very uncomfortable. It will challenge and greatly refute the concept of divine special revelation (at least the way "special revelation" is typically understood) in certain religious traditions. It will challenge the foundational soundness of the idea that an exclusive "male deity" can be truly good. It will challenge the origins and purposes of religious thought and practice. I think this is a good thing. We need to be more aware of the use and misuse of the powers of mythology and religion. We need to be more cognizant of our commonalities across cultures and beliefs. The rise of feminism in the modern era, I now see, is no accident. It is a natural process predicted by anthropology, history, and mythology. It is part of a working out of gender relationships in our time. Will the feminine be able to successfully establish herself a lasting presence as an equal power and authority in the still-patriarchal modern society? Will she be able to transform the mythologies and religions that inform us today into ones that welcome the full participation of the feminine? (This review is based on an advance review copy supplied by the publisher through NetGalley.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    I don't know how to put into words how great this book is. I don't know how to put into words how great this book is.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Steve Cran

    Joseph Campbell is a well known scholar of mythology who has taught a number if years at the University level and has authored numerous books. His material is gold  as far as I am concerned . AT the same time as being scholarly his style is also highly readable and enjoyable. Read this and you will get lots of information. Beware though because this book may well change your perspective on things. Change it did. Many scholars such as Margaret Murray and Marija Gambutas have stated that in man kin Joseph Campbell is a well known scholar of mythology who has taught a number if years at the University level and has authored numerous books. His material is gold  as far as I am concerned . AT the same time as being scholarly his style is also highly readable and enjoyable. Read this and you will get lots of information. Beware though because this book may well change your perspective on things. Change it did. Many scholars such as Margaret Murray and Marija Gambutas have stated that in man kinds beginning there was a whorl wide religion that revered the Goddess. Now perhaps that was an overstatement but there were places that venerated the Goddess. Three such areas were identified  South Eastern Europe plus Greece and Mesopatamia, South East Asia and part of Central AMerica. THese three areas had mastered agriculture and planting. THe societies tended to be settled into communities and there was at the time no threat of invasion or violence. THe Goddesses reign lasted from the Paleolithic to Neolithic times. The Earth was seen as the mother. From her came all life and at the end all life returned to her. You did not have to be awesome to pick some fruit. Women were cultivators, admired for their beauty. Men were idolized based on how they performed their tasks. In the houses one would find figurines or Venus statues, These could be goddess statues or fertility votives. Men had their rituals in underground caves which were highly representative of the Goddesses womb. The sun was a feminine sign as was the lion and the cat and the snake. The sun radiated on the earth and represented freedom from time and space. Lions were royalty and serpents represented wisdom and life force. For the male representation it was the bull. The bull was lunar. It's horns represented  the crescent of the moon. The male figure was the child of the goddess who grew into her lover and then dies only tobe born again much like the moon. During the Iron age when the feminine world was being invaded by Indo Europeans in the north and Bedouin tribes from the south things began to change. The Indo- Europeans were semit nomadic warrior who cultivated livestock mostly cows. THe Bedouin cultivated sheep and goats. As was tendency once these warrior tribes took over the feminine lands they did not eradicate the goddess but rather had there moveable gods move and and marry them. Of  course this would change the whole mythology  Joseph Campbell covers these ideas and their evolution by going over Hindu Culture, heavy emphasis on Greco=Roman myth and Middle Eastern Mythology.  Carefully showing how three once powerful Goddess was reduced to a subordinate undeeer the ancient paganism to how she was merely venerated under monotheism. But you cannot keep a good woman down. SHe rises up during the romantic period of courtly love and she is making her voice heard again. This book is a must read

  4. 4 out of 5

    Billie Hinton

    This book is a collection of Joseph Campbell's lectures and workshops on goddesses that explore the symbols and themes of the feminine divine. Edited by Safron Rossi, this book is a treasure chest and overview of Campbell's perspective on goddess mythology. A terrific read for anyone interested in the goddess tradition but as a writer and psychotherapist, I feel this book is an important source for writers, therapists, particularly Jungian and sandplay therapists, and adds an important piece to This book is a collection of Joseph Campbell's lectures and workshops on goddesses that explore the symbols and themes of the feminine divine. Edited by Safron Rossi, this book is a treasure chest and overview of Campbell's perspective on goddess mythology. A terrific read for anyone interested in the goddess tradition but as a writer and psychotherapist, I feel this book is an important source for writers, therapists, particularly Jungian and sandplay therapists, and adds an important piece to Joseph Campbell's body of work. Highly recommended.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lina Slavova

    For those of you who are unfamiliar with Joseph Campbell, know that he was a renowned mythologist endowed with the ability to make myth accessible and appealing to all. It is a true pleasure to read his works and to receive his knowledge of the spiritual principles ingrained in all legends. This book is a compilation of lectures given by Joseph Campbell on the subject of the feminine divine. Campbell traces the evolution of the concept of the Great Goddess from Neolithic Old Europe to the Renaiss For those of you who are unfamiliar with Joseph Campbell, know that he was a renowned mythologist endowed with the ability to make myth accessible and appealing to all. It is a true pleasure to read his works and to receive his knowledge of the spiritual principles ingrained in all legends. This book is a compilation of lectures given by Joseph Campbell on the subject of the feminine divine. Campbell traces the evolution of the concept of the Great Goddess from Neolithic Old Europe to the Renaissance. I very much enjoyed reading it and I recommend the book to anyone who has an interest in the subject. The following quote, at the very beginning of the volume, touched an inner sensitive cord. It is both surprising and amazing to me that he had such deep understanding of our feminine energies. “Many of the difficulties that women face today follow from the fact that they are moving into a field of action in the world that was formerly reserved for the male and for which there are no female mythological models. The woman finds herself, consequently, in a competitive relationship with the male, and in this may lose the sense of her own nature. She is something in her own right, and traditionally (for some four million years) the relationship of that something to the male has been experienced and represented, not as directly competitive, but as cooperative in the shared ordeal of continuing and supporting life. Her biologically assigned role was to give birth to and to rear children. The male role was to support and protect. Both roles are biologically and psychologically archetypical. But what has happened now—as a result of the masculine invention of the vacuum cleaner—is that women have been relieved, in some measure, of their traditional bondage to the household. They are moving into the field and jungle of individual quest, achievement, and self-realization, for which there are no female models. Moreover, in pursuing their distinct careers they are emerging progressively as differentiated personalities, leaving behind the old archetypal accent on the biological role—to which, however, their psyches are still constitutionally bound. The grim prayer of Lady Macbeth before her deed, “unsex me here!” must be the unspoken, deeply felt cry of many a new contender in this masculine jungle. There is no such need, however. The challenge of the moment—and there are many who are meeting it, accepting it, and responding to it, in the way not of men but of women—the challenge is to flower as individuals, neither as biological archetypes nor as personalities imitative of the male. And, to repeat, there are no models in our mythology for an individual woman’s quest. Nor is there any model for the male in marriage to an individuated female. We are in this thing together and have to work it out together, not with passion (which is always archetypal) but with compassion, in patient fostering of each other’s growth.” If only he was still alive…. I would have loved to read his thoughts on “The Hunger Games” and “Fifty Shades of Gray”.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kent Winward

    The title is a little misleading, because there isn't as much about the Goddess as there is about the Goddesses' place in ancient myth telling. (Hint: It is often tangential to the main story.) When reading Campbell, you can usually count on at least one instance where you get an insight into an old story you didn't have before, like Paris choosing between Aphrodite, Athena, and Hera, was a choice between three archetypal female characters, love/lust, wisdom/career, and home/hearth. The obvious r The title is a little misleading, because there isn't as much about the Goddess as there is about the Goddesses' place in ancient myth telling. (Hint: It is often tangential to the main story.) When reading Campbell, you can usually count on at least one instance where you get an insight into an old story you didn't have before, like Paris choosing between Aphrodite, Athena, and Hera, was a choice between three archetypal female characters, love/lust, wisdom/career, and home/hearth. The obvious representations of the Goddesses were more about Paris choosing a life path. I know that seems obvious, but the shift and viewing the myth as metaphor for life choices struck me. Another story I enjoyed was Campbell's take on Chrétien's poem, Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart. . Here is Campbell's take on the Perilous Bed: A number of knights had to experience the perilous bed before getting access to a lady, and it works like this; You come into a room that’s absolutely empty, except in the middle of it is a bed on rollers. You are to come in dressed in your full armour – sword, spear, shield, all that heavy stuff- and get into bed. Well, as the knight approaches the bed, it shears away to one side. So he comes again, and it goes the other way. The knight finally thinks, “I’ve got to jump.” So with his full gear, he jumps into the bed, and as soon as he hits the bed, it starts bucking like a bronco all over the room, banging against the walls and all of that kind of thing, and then it stops. Then he’s told, ‘It’s not finished yet. Keep your armour on and keep your shield over yourself. ” And then arrows and crossbow bolts pummel him- bang, bang, bang, bang. Then a lion appears and attacks the knight, but he cuts off the lion’s feet, and the two of them end up lying there in a pool of blood. Only then do the ladies of the castle come in and see their knight, their saviour, lying there looking dead. One of the ladies takes a bit of ‘fur’ from her garment and puts it in front of his nose and it moves ever so slightly – he’s breathing, he’s alive. So they nurse him back to health.” The knight is then off to his next adventure. Per Campbell, the myth is the metaphor for the male experience of the female temperament. You have to love myths.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Anderson

    This exceedingly well-edited collection of essays, lectures and notes by Joseph Campbell was useful in seeing his overall opinion of goddesses in mythology and the goddess as she appears in various mythologies.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joanne LaFleur

    I came across Joseph Campbell's lectures on the goddesses at a time when I was in a faith crisis precipitated by the realization that my participation in a religious organization with an all-male priesthood had caused me to internalize misogyny that I had not previously been aware of. My journey to understand that led me, first, to ask why a benevolent god who regards me as having as much worth as any of his other children would ordain a social order that diminishes women (short answer: he would I came across Joseph Campbell's lectures on the goddesses at a time when I was in a faith crisis precipitated by the realization that my participation in a religious organization with an all-male priesthood had caused me to internalize misogyny that I had not previously been aware of. My journey to understand that led me, first, to ask why a benevolent god who regards me as having as much worth as any of his other children would ordain a social order that diminishes women (short answer: he wouldn't) and, second, if god were a goddess, what would that look like? Joseph Campbell's lectures were very helpful to me in answering the second question. At first I was a little put off by the idea that the only thing that seems to be divine about women is their life-giving capacity, but then Campbell pointed out that the 'masculine' and 'feminine' constructs are man-made, and the gods and goddesses are ways that we make sense of powers that are in ourselves and in the world. Women are not meant to be wholly defined by our understanding of the goddess. I very much appreciated Campbell's descriptions of the ways that our cultural myths, particularly the Judeo-Christian myths, were built upon prior myths. For example, he points out that the story of Cain and Abel is about the tension between the agricultural and herding societies, which were encountering each other in the historical era during which the bible was written. He says that Cain, a farmer, represents the agricultural society and Abel, a herder, represents the herding society. They each bring their offering to a male god, and that god prefers the meat to the grains. Cain then kills Abel out of jealousy. Campbell points out that there was an older myth in which the two offerings are presented to the goddess, and she chooses the grains over meat. Campbell points out that this biblical rewrite of the older myth is about setting supreme the male god of the herding society and erasing the goddess altogether. There are many more examples of the ways that the bible erases, demotes, or evilizes the goddess.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ivy

    Read the chapters I needed (up to the Gods and Goddess of Ancient Greece). Its been a while since I read anything even close to scholarly, and I really enjoyed Campbell's cross-cultural approach to understanding both the power of the Goddess and how that power was eventually stripped away as Creator Father figures took over. My only complaint is that the illustrations were small and in black and white. Some of the works he refers to as evidence for his theories are difficult to see, and you have Read the chapters I needed (up to the Gods and Goddess of Ancient Greece). Its been a while since I read anything even close to scholarly, and I really enjoyed Campbell's cross-cultural approach to understanding both the power of the Goddess and how that power was eventually stripped away as Creator Father figures took over. My only complaint is that the illustrations were small and in black and white. Some of the works he refers to as evidence for his theories are difficult to see, and you have to accept his interpretation of the artifacts since you can't make out details.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Miller

    A little dated and a little disjointed, and as ever I always want him to finish his thoughts. His mercurial mind jumps to the next thing before wrapping up a subject. But that aside the only other criticism is how short this was. I want more! Miraculously accessible for being presented in a flurry of connections and texts and stories. Always enlightening and edifying. A rare treat.

  11. 5 out of 5

    David Melbie

    This is a wonderful editing job, of putting together in a very cohesive way, all of Campbell's writings on the Goddesses. I am already a big fan, but this is by far the best compilation that this publisher has done to date. This is a wonderful editing job, of putting together in a very cohesive way, all of Campbell's writings on the Goddesses. I am already a big fan, but this is by far the best compilation that this publisher has done to date.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Pontus Alexander

    These lectures are investigations of the symbolic, mythological, and archetypal themes of the feminine divine in and of herself, and for Campbell her main themes are initiation into the mysteries of immanence experienced through time and space and the eternal; transformation of life and death; and the energy consciousness that informs and enlivens all life. – Foreword, Safron Rossi . . . In the older view of the goddess Universe was alive, herself organically the Earth, the horizon, and the he These lectures are investigations of the symbolic, mythological, and archetypal themes of the feminine divine in and of herself, and for Campbell her main themes are initiation into the mysteries of immanence experienced through time and space and the eternal; transformation of life and death; and the energy consciousness that informs and enlivens all life. – Foreword, Safron Rossi . . . In the older view of the goddess Universe was alive, herself organically the Earth, the horizon, and the heavens. Now she is dead, and the universe is not an organism, but a building, with gods at rest in it in luxury: not as personifications of the energies in their manners of operation, but as luxury tenants, requiring service. And Man, accordingly, is not as a child born to flower in the knowledge of his own eternal portion but as a robot fashioned to serve. . . . A powerful book (collection of lectures) on the feminine divine throughout history. Campbell has some really fascinating takes on ancient religion and its connection to the Goddess. I particularly liked his interpretation of the Odyssey, and the mystery cults of the ancient Mediterranean world: I regard The Odyssey as a book of initiations, and the first initiation is that of Odysseus himself into a proper relationship to the female power . . . Now the female power must be recognized to make possible a proper relationship . . . in which the male and female meets as co-equals. They are equals, but not the same, because when you lose the tension of polarities you lose the tension of life. . . . And having studied Christianity for some time, I can really empathise with his critique of the Abrahamic religions. There’s a repulsion, a strong unease of the worldview of the Old Testament whenever it is brought up. Here’s an example on Genisis:
 What happens to the Mother Goddess? She is reduced to the elemental level. She is cosmic water; that’s there where God’s spirit hovers, above the water. He is given the human personification, and she is not. The Chaos is exactly Tiamat, the goddess of the abyss, who now has been deprived even of her personality. This places a terrific stress on our culture.
Then you realize also that within the Jewish tradition, the covenant is symbolized by the circumcision. You can see that woman is out altogether. He is also displeased with Christianity’s obsession with historicity over symbolism and metaphors: Virgin birth has nothing to do with the biological problem: it is birth of the spiritual life in the individual. When it is read concretely as a biological or historical event, the whole symbol is thrown off center. . . . this is an important point about symbols: they do not refer to historical events; they refer through historical events to spiritual or psychological principles and powers that are of yesterday, today, and tomorrow, and that are everywhere. . . . the birth of Christ or the birth of Helen – the most beautiful and glorious representation of the human body and spirit the world has ever seen – this is all one great mythology and the Gnostic and hermetic thinkers of the early Christian Era understood that . . . . . . I really want to go on and study Campbell, as well as Jung. I read Campbell’s ‘A Hero with a Thousand Faces’ in 2016, and remember disliking it immensely. I think I would read it in a totally different light today. Mythology and symbolism has become a guide and companion for me today. Perhaps recording your dreams for almost five years will do that - once you start to develop an internal mythopoeia. Sometimes while reading Campbell’s explanations I was able to connect certain parts of my own subconsciousness that I couldn’t figure out before. And it’s almost eerie how well portrayed archetypes and symbols can be in your dreams. To repeat once more Goethe’s old line, “The eternal feminine is what draws us on”. Having been drawn on for thirty-eight years, I watch it go on its own and I go back into an observant rather than a teaching role, watching the marvel of this ascent into heaven of the Goddess.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Costa

    "Everything is changing, even the law of the masculine jungle. It is a period of free fall into the future, and each has to make his or her own way. The old models are not working; the new have not yet appeared. In fact, it is we who are even now shaping the new in the shaping of our interesting lives. And that is the whole sense (in mythological terms) of the present challenge: we are the 'ancestors' of an age to come, the unwitting generators of its supporting myths, the mythic models that wil "Everything is changing, even the law of the masculine jungle. It is a period of free fall into the future, and each has to make his or her own way. The old models are not working; the new have not yet appeared. In fact, it is we who are even now shaping the new in the shaping of our interesting lives. And that is the whole sense (in mythological terms) of the present challenge: we are the 'ancestors' of an age to come, the unwitting generators of its supporting myths, the mythic models that will inspire its lives." Este livro não é, de todo, fácil de ler mas vale cada página! Penso que nesta obra Campbell tentou honrar o papel da Deusa e dar a conhecer o quão importante a sua mitologia foi (e é) nos dias de hoje. Esta obra faz-nos voltar atrás no tempo, até as primeiras civilizações nas quais a agricultura era a atividade central e a Deusa era vista como aquela que dava vida e nutria o homem. Sem ela não seríamos capazes de nascer, muito menos de sobreviver. Nas suas páginas encontram-se descritas as histórias de Artemis, Persephone, Isis, Gaia, Demeter, Kali, Athena, entre outras. Adoro a subtileza e a leveza com a qual ele insere os Deuses também e faz-nos compreender o modo como as civilizações evoluíram de uma energia Ying para o Yang e como agora estamos a tentar equilibrar a balança de novo. Este livro vale cada página e é um must para todos aqueles que queiram aprofundar o seu conhecimento sobre a Mitologia das Deusas & Deuses. Om, Cindy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Joseph Campbell is one of the best authorities on mythology and early religion. This book has gathered together a lot of his speeches and writings on the Goddess, and he discovered the threads of the innate religion that was in various parts of the world thousands of years ago - a worship of the Mother Goddess. This tome threads together the rituals, the histories and shows how ancient civilizations worshipped the same gods and the same Goddess just by different names. What I found most fascinat Joseph Campbell is one of the best authorities on mythology and early religion. This book has gathered together a lot of his speeches and writings on the Goddess, and he discovered the threads of the innate religion that was in various parts of the world thousands of years ago - a worship of the Mother Goddess. This tome threads together the rituals, the histories and shows how ancient civilizations worshipped the same gods and the same Goddess just by different names. What I found most fascinating is how he expertly shows that the Christian religion is another product of the ancient myths given new form and may be connected to the mysteries of ancient Eleusis. I’d never heard of this theory but the threads he has woven together makes it perfectly reasonable and logical. I adored this book!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maan Kawas

    An excellent book about the Goddesses & female deity vs. male deity related mythology in the ancient history. I particularly loved reading about Demeter & Persephone and the mystery traditions, the Male and female deities in Homer's "Iliad" & "Odyssey", and, of course, about the Great Mother. I found the information about the characteristics and deity of both the hunter & Planting societies so informative and interesting. I do highly recommend this book. An excellent book about the Goddesses & female deity vs. male deity related mythology in the ancient history. I particularly loved reading about Demeter & Persephone and the mystery traditions, the Male and female deities in Homer's "Iliad" & "Odyssey", and, of course, about the Great Mother. I found the information about the characteristics and deity of both the hunter & Planting societies so informative and interesting. I do highly recommend this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hande Allen

    4.5/5 So informative. If you are not familiar with some cultures, it might be a bit challenging for you to understand some points. You may need to search while reading.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Swanger

    As important as St Jerome's fellow Latin church Father St Augustine for its contemporary post-Constantinian toleration, post-Byzantine Comparative Theology! As a participant in the local Joseph Campbell Mythological Round Table, and a presentation giver on myth and art there in my published book of verse and essays, I was interested in reading this book on goddesses, being a scholar of myth and art history and having it recommended by others in our group. I had overestimated Campbell. His Histor As important as St Jerome's fellow Latin church Father St Augustine for its contemporary post-Constantinian toleration, post-Byzantine Comparative Theology! As a participant in the local Joseph Campbell Mythological Round Table, and a presentation giver on myth and art there in my published book of verse and essays, I was interested in reading this book on goddesses, being a scholar of myth and art history and having it recommended by others in our group. I had overestimated Campbell. His Historical Atlas of World Mythology must have led to this book. But he is not a semiologist, only writing of comparisons not structure, and makes a few historic/mythic errors (Hathor/Isis), with compositional writing errors including clarity, connectives, and prepositions. Dr Dmitri Liakos, my well-known university professor of ancient art, was much more informed and accurate on ancient myth. The illustrations here are not all the best and source provenences are not listed. (For example, Pompeiian murals are shown as Roman art, in derivative line drawings and some important photos are blurry). Certain details of Eleusis may interest but falsities such as Masonic Hermes Trismegistes and Io as saints in a Vatican mural, along with the ultimate assumptions of this author, that Redemption is also mythic, led me to skim this volume in two days and see that I'd learned nothing to add to my legitimate knowledge of art and myth. The non-intellectual TV populariser Bill Moyers brought this author to public attention. Despite what I've said about this book, it's valuable as knowledge about God and gods in nature, since before Jesus on this earth, with comparative religion and the meaning of life answered best by faith: where do I come from? (I come from God). Why am I here? (to serve God). Where am I going? (You go to God). Theology answers philosophy's questions. So-called mythology from art still worships one God, creator, many names, as in St Ignatius' counter-reformation theology of the Holy Name, by which God reveals himself telescopingly as theology according to newest Church Doctor St John Newman (no more animal sacrifices and no more Jewish stone altars; no human child sacrifices as of heathen Baal on Carmel's smitten height) with the 12 pagan Olympians, 12 tribes, 12 disciples, 12 apostles, and all personally important especially when prayer seems fruitless or the world seems lost; Augustine's quandary of the conversion and fall of Rome of the other eternal City of God: don't let religion change, or does it? Not religion but the so-called Great Leap of Faith may mean that Faith means simply accepting all that the universal Church teaches, our duty to Creator worshipped (we did not create ourselves), also invoked for thanks and for our needs, not our religious opinion, perhaps partly as in Islamic practice as well.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Arthur Gailes

    Fantastic. Campbell goes through the history of goddess worship dating back to 4000 BC, and details the types of societies and environments that lead to goddess worship. That discussion leads to an overview of the broad history of European religion, from the polytheistic "indo-europeans" (who would become Greek and Hindu), and the monotheistic Semites. The discussion of Christianity as a hybrid of those two groups (Christ being a Greek-style hero in a Hebrew tradition) is thrilling, as is the ide Fantastic. Campbell goes through the history of goddess worship dating back to 4000 BC, and details the types of societies and environments that lead to goddess worship. That discussion leads to an overview of the broad history of European religion, from the polytheistic "indo-europeans" (who would become Greek and Hindu), and the monotheistic Semites. The discussion of Christianity as a hybrid of those two groups (Christ being a Greek-style hero in a Hebrew tradition) is thrilling, as is the idea Mary represents a rebirth in the Christian tradition of Goddess worship. A core insight is that peaceful, agricultural, and/or foraging societies are more likely to worship Goddesses. Warring, hunting, and/or dessert societies, on the other hand, are more likely to worship Gods. Campbell draws a clear divide between indo-European religions and Semitic ones, where the former incorporates local Gods and Goddesses into its ideology, and the latter overwrites them with a single male God figure. Politically, this is a story about the history of the rape and oppression of women by invading societies, and their gradual re-assertion as Europe settled. But more importantly, this is a book about the dangers to our collective psyche of papering-over the stories of people we live alongside. It's a very sympathetic telling of the stories of Goddesses that places more hope in the future of women than their past.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    A very well curated collection of Campbell's lectures on The Goddess. One of Campbell's best. Especially the chapters on the Greek Goddesses, including an enlightened approach to The Judgement of Paris and The Illiad/Odyssey. So many thought-provoking insights on Patriarchy/Matriarchy, Monotheism/Polytheism, and the intentional absence of a Goddess/female consort, in the development of early Judeo-Christian theology. A study of agricultural v/s herding or tribal systems, and how the addition or A very well curated collection of Campbell's lectures on The Goddess. One of Campbell's best. Especially the chapters on the Greek Goddesses, including an enlightened approach to The Judgement of Paris and The Illiad/Odyssey. So many thought-provoking insights on Patriarchy/Matriarchy, Monotheism/Polytheism, and the intentional absence of a Goddess/female consort, in the development of early Judeo-Christian theology. A study of agricultural v/s herding or tribal systems, and how the addition or subtraction of the Feminine mysteries shaped those cultures. Very much a testament to the importance of the Divine Feminine & her Mythology, and how devastating her suppression and absence can be on both the psyche and on a society. Ties to Jung, Nietzsche, Goethe, and Marija Gimbutas.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Joseph Campbell worked off of outdated theories and lacked a detailed knowledge of many of the cultures about which he theorizes. For example, he says that Egypt's geographical location protects it from stronger cultures in every direction except the north. Meroe in general, and The 25th Dynasty in particular, would like a word. He is still an acknowledged giant in the study of mythology and folklore. Many of his ideas are still worth digging into, despite his frequent casual racism and sexism. Joseph Campbell worked off of outdated theories and lacked a detailed knowledge of many of the cultures about which he theorizes. For example, he says that Egypt's geographical location protects it from stronger cultures in every direction except the north. Meroe in general, and The 25th Dynasty in particular, would like a word. He is still an acknowledged giant in the study of mythology and folklore. Many of his ideas are still worth digging into, despite his frequent casual racism and sexism.

  21. 4 out of 5

    George Viana

    The author pulls back the curtain and reveals to me secrets that connect practically all of human history into one narrative. Delightful poetry writes how the pendulum of religion leans at one time to one direction and in the next era in contrapposto to the opposite. Beautiful themes reflect each other back and forth throughout and repeatedly, by Campbell's artful arrangement. This evolution of religion reveals the motivations of dozens or hundreds of civilizations, casting our history in a diff The author pulls back the curtain and reveals to me secrets that connect practically all of human history into one narrative. Delightful poetry writes how the pendulum of religion leans at one time to one direction and in the next era in contrapposto to the opposite. Beautiful themes reflect each other back and forth throughout and repeatedly, by Campbell's artful arrangement. This evolution of religion reveals the motivations of dozens or hundreds of civilizations, casting our history in a different light. To me, a must read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jules

    Pagan religions and goddess worship are the subjects of Campbell's work. He explores how the goddess is linked to both life and death, agriculture and spirituality. I expected him to delve more into the goddess cults of history but he does spend a lot of time providing a synopsis of myths too. This I feel detracts from the focus, as a lot of attention is given to Zeus and Odysseus, Atlas and other heroes. Pagan religions and goddess worship are the subjects of Campbell's work. He explores how the goddess is linked to both life and death, agriculture and spirituality. I expected him to delve more into the goddess cults of history but he does spend a lot of time providing a synopsis of myths too. This I feel detracts from the focus, as a lot of attention is given to Zeus and Odysseus, Atlas and other heroes.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    Campbell's estate is taking all his old lectures and editing/converting them into books, and this reads like that. But I still liked a lot of the material, some of it new and some of it from other works of Campbell. Campbell's estate is taking all his old lectures and editing/converting them into books, and this reads like that. But I still liked a lot of the material, some of it new and some of it from other works of Campbell.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marcia

    Joseph Campbell never wrote a book on Goddesses so this is a compilation of talks and articles that he did on the subject during his life time. There is some repetition of ideas and information. The book as it stands though is very interesting and information.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    This was good. It linked the histories together in a clear way and explained the Greek mythology, particularly, in a way I haven't seen before. This was good. It linked the histories together in a clear way and explained the Greek mythology, particularly, in a way I haven't seen before.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jerry James

    Very enjoyable. It's helpful to know these are mostly transcribed lectures in order to understand the odd prose at times. Very enjoyable. It's helpful to know these are mostly transcribed lectures in order to understand the odd prose at times.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chrysoula

    Love this book. Inspiring.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Baxter Trautman

    The facts were a little repetitive as it is a compilation of his lectures, but because these were lectures they are written as he spoke them, hence delightful as Campbell was a master storyteller.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zach

    A sublime book that is transparent to the transcendent.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Natassia

    Really great gathering of feminine divine mythologies from practically the beginning of human history.

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