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Relational Theory for Computer Professionals

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All of today’s mainstream database products support the SQL language, and relational theory is what SQL is supposed to be based on. But are those products truly relational? Sadly, the answer is no. This book shows you what a real relational product would be like, and how and why it would be so much better than what’s currently available. With this unique book, you will: Lear All of today’s mainstream database products support the SQL language, and relational theory is what SQL is supposed to be based on. But are those products truly relational? Sadly, the answer is no. This book shows you what a real relational product would be like, and how and why it would be so much better than what’s currently available. With this unique book, you will: Learn how to see database systems as programming systems Get a careful, precise, and detailed definition of the relational model Explore a detailed analysis of SQL from a relational point of view There are literally hundreds of books on relational theory or the SQL language or both. But this one is different. First, nobody is more qualified than Chris Date to write such a book. He and Ted Codd, inventor of the relational model, were colleagues for many years, and Chris’s involvement with the technology goes back to the time of Codd’s first papers in 1969 and 1970. Second, most books try to use SQL as a vehicle for teaching relational theory, but this book deliberately takes the opposite approach. Its primary aim is to teach relational theory as such. Then it uses that theory as a vehicle for teaching SQL, showing in particular how that theory can help with the practical problem of using SQL correctly and productively. Any computer professional who wants to understand what relational systems are all about can benefit from this book. No prior knowledge of databases is assumed.


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All of today’s mainstream database products support the SQL language, and relational theory is what SQL is supposed to be based on. But are those products truly relational? Sadly, the answer is no. This book shows you what a real relational product would be like, and how and why it would be so much better than what’s currently available. With this unique book, you will: Lear All of today’s mainstream database products support the SQL language, and relational theory is what SQL is supposed to be based on. But are those products truly relational? Sadly, the answer is no. This book shows you what a real relational product would be like, and how and why it would be so much better than what’s currently available. With this unique book, you will: Learn how to see database systems as programming systems Get a careful, precise, and detailed definition of the relational model Explore a detailed analysis of SQL from a relational point of view There are literally hundreds of books on relational theory or the SQL language or both. But this one is different. First, nobody is more qualified than Chris Date to write such a book. He and Ted Codd, inventor of the relational model, were colleagues for many years, and Chris’s involvement with the technology goes back to the time of Codd’s first papers in 1969 and 1970. Second, most books try to use SQL as a vehicle for teaching relational theory, but this book deliberately takes the opposite approach. Its primary aim is to teach relational theory as such. Then it uses that theory as a vehicle for teaching SQL, showing in particular how that theory can help with the practical problem of using SQL correctly and productively. Any computer professional who wants to understand what relational systems are all about can benefit from this book. No prior knowledge of databases is assumed.

36 review for Relational Theory for Computer Professionals

  1. 4 out of 5

    M

    I feel like this book was mostly a hot mess, except for the chapter on transactions. I was already familiar with most of the concepts in the book, but was looking for another perspective and things I may need to unlearn or rethink. Date's writing style reminds me of a college professor who has a ton of great information for a lecture, however, gets easily sidetracked and goes off on distracting tangets. I would not be surprised if this book was actually transcribed from a lecture or seminar seri I feel like this book was mostly a hot mess, except for the chapter on transactions. I was already familiar with most of the concepts in the book, but was looking for another perspective and things I may need to unlearn or rethink. Date's writing style reminds me of a college professor who has a ton of great information for a lecture, however, gets easily sidetracked and goes off on distracting tangets. I would not be surprised if this book was actually transcribed from a lecture or seminar series. TLDR: good information, but presentation is confusing and all over the place.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Trevor Hartman

    Quite the tedious read consisting of many rabbit holes and boring details.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alexei Zaviruha

    Style is not the best, but content - is.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Wattenbarger

  5. 4 out of 5

    John

  6. 5 out of 5

    David

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mark Luffel

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Sookocheff

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leandro Dutra

  10. 4 out of 5

    Robert Rogers

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tom Kidd

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tomas S

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Wilson

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stefan

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mohamed Hegazy

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  17. 4 out of 5

    Julio Barrera

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jörn Dinkla

  19. 4 out of 5

    Suey

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cory

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alex Palcuie

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Lo

  23. 4 out of 5

    Craig

  24. 5 out of 5

    Corrado Piola

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paulo Salgado

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jason Dixon

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emiel

  29. 4 out of 5

    cognitive dissident

  30. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kwan

  31. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth

  32. 4 out of 5

    Dan Ryan

  33. 4 out of 5

    Henrik Treadup

  34. 4 out of 5

    AbdulRahman AlHamali

  35. 4 out of 5

    David

  36. 5 out of 5

    Tux

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