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Children of the Corn

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Driving through the cornfields in rural Nebraska, Burt and Vicky run over a young boy—only to discover that they may not be responsible for his death. Out in the corn, something is watching them, and help is nowhere to be found. From the unrivaled master of horror and the supernatural, Stephen King. “Children of the Corn,” first collected in the extraordinary collection Nig Driving through the cornfields in rural Nebraska, Burt and Vicky run over a young boy—only to discover that they may not be responsible for his death. Out in the corn, something is watching them, and help is nowhere to be found. From the unrivaled master of horror and the supernatural, Stephen King. “Children of the Corn,” first collected in the extraordinary collection Night Shift in 1973 and then adapted into a horror film franchise of the same name, is a terrifying and unforgettable classic of the genre.


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Driving through the cornfields in rural Nebraska, Burt and Vicky run over a young boy—only to discover that they may not be responsible for his death. Out in the corn, something is watching them, and help is nowhere to be found. From the unrivaled master of horror and the supernatural, Stephen King. “Children of the Corn,” first collected in the extraordinary collection Nig Driving through the cornfields in rural Nebraska, Burt and Vicky run over a young boy—only to discover that they may not be responsible for his death. Out in the corn, something is watching them, and help is nowhere to be found. From the unrivaled master of horror and the supernatural, Stephen King. “Children of the Corn,” first collected in the extraordinary collection Night Shift in 1973 and then adapted into a horror film franchise of the same name, is a terrifying and unforgettable classic of the genre.

30 review for Children of the Corn

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    Fantastically creepy, eerie, and spooky short story. What it lacked in length, it more than made up for in atmosphere. There's the desolate town of Gatlin, Nebraska. The strong sense of foreboding in the air. Not to mention the cornfields. I thoroughly enjoyed this one. Fantastically creepy, eerie, and spooky short story. What it lacked in length, it more than made up for in atmosphere. There's the desolate town of Gatlin, Nebraska. The strong sense of foreboding in the air. Not to mention the cornfields. I thoroughly enjoyed this one.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brett C(urrently deployed...can't read too much)

    I really enjoyed this creepy short story. The story pretty much follows the movie but does a better job at delivering the eerie Christian-fanatic mixed with pagan elements. The creepy part for me was when main character Burt goes into the abandoned church. The imagery, the altered Bible verses from the Book of Job 38:1-4 to include the verbiage 'He Who Walks Behind The Rows', and the books titled: 'Thus, Let the Iniquitious Be Cut Down So That The Ground May Be Fertile Again, Saith The Lord God o I really enjoyed this creepy short story. The story pretty much follows the movie but does a better job at delivering the eerie Christian-fanatic mixed with pagan elements. The creepy part for me was when main character Burt goes into the abandoned church. The imagery, the altered Bible verses from the Book of Job 38:1-4 to include the verbiage 'He Who Walks Behind The Rows', and the books titled: 'Thus, Let the Iniquitious Be Cut Down So That The Ground May Be Fertile Again, Saith The Lord God of Hosts." This was a really good one. I definitely recommend this to any Stephen King fan. Thanks!

  3. 5 out of 5

    jd 지훈

    CW/TW: physical violence, death, murder, gore "You are now leaving Gatlin, nicest little town in Nebraska—or anywhere else! Drop in anytime!" Gatlin, Nebraska (1970s) — Determined to fix their marriage and to seek for a fresh start, the struggling couple Burt and Vicky drive through the cornfields in rural Nebraska for their vacation in California and for a visit to Vicky's brother. During the drive, Burt accidentally runs over a young boy who was thrown over the road and whose throat was slit, wi CW/TW: physical violence, death, murder, gore "You are now leaving Gatlin, nicest little town in Nebraska—or anywhere else! Drop in anytime!" Gatlin, Nebraska (1970s) — Determined to fix their marriage and to seek for a fresh start, the struggling couple Burt and Vicky drive through the cornfields in rural Nebraska for their vacation in California and for a visit to Vicky's brother. During the drive, Burt accidentally runs over a young boy who was thrown over the road and whose throat was slit, with only a suitcase containing a crucifix made of twisted corn husks to be found near him. Fazed with what happened, Burt was determined to report the accident to the police until the couple began to find sinister things in the bizarre town. Out in the fields, the Children of the Corn are watching, and help is nowhere to be found. Originally published on the March 1977 issue of Penthouse, Stephen King's Children of the Corn reaps bounties of terror with its striking brevity, sowing scares rooted in its atmospheric prose and religious reimaginings that defy the general notion that only old people can do brutally bad things. Personal Enjoyment: 4 stars Quality of the Book: 3.6 stars - Use of Language: ⭐⭐⭐⭐ - Plot and Narrative Arc: ⭐⭐⭐⭐ - Characters: ⭐⭐⭐ - Integrity: ⭐⭐⭐ - Twist/Scare: ⭐⭐⭐⭐ AVG: 3.8 stars - - - This mini-review is a part of my review series of Stephen King's 1978 short horror story collection entitled Night Shift.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I chose to end the month with a final Stephen King short story, picking one that mixes a bucolic setting with a spine-tingling plot. When Burt and Vicky run over a boy in rural Nebraska, they are panicked. However, once they examine the boy, they discover that the car accident was not the primary cause of the boy’s injuries and death, as his neck has been slit. Driving into Gatlin, they try to alert someone as to what has happened, only finding remnants of a corn-based religious group, strong on I chose to end the month with a final Stephen King short story, picking one that mixes a bucolic setting with a spine-tingling plot. When Burt and Vicky run over a boy in rural Nebraska, they are panicked. However, once they examine the boy, they discover that the car accident was not the primary cause of the boy’s injuries and death, as his neck has been slit. Driving into Gatlin, they try to alert someone as to what has happened, only finding remnants of a corn-based religious group, strong on biblical retribution with a ‘husk’ spin. Burt and Vicky discover that they have drifted into a place that no tourist brochures were likely to document and for good reason. Fire and brimstone await them, but they will have to handle things on their own. Returning to the fields, they try to poke around, only to have handful of children emerge and pass judgment upon them. Vicky’s taken into their custody and Burt flees to save his life, but soon comes to his senses. When he pushes through the stalks and finds these children again, it is far worse than he imagined, as they take no prisoners in the name of God. Chilling in its depiction and yet short enough to be read in a single sitting, King shows that he is the master of the genre and full of ideas. Recommended to those who love Stephen King and all his varied ideas, as well as the reader who likes a little horror as they much on a snack, perhaps popcorn? I love finding myself in the middle of a Stephen King piece, be it a short story, novella, or one of his major works. King is able to pull ideas from all over and works them out in one of a few ways. This piece pushes towards a horror genre (and yes, I have to see the movie soon) and kept me on the edge of my seat throughout, especially the unique corn-based religion approach that weaves its way into the narrative. King works through a number of issues, including social commentaries of the day, reaching out to the reader and forcing them to think as they flip pages. The attentive reader will find hints to other King works, even in passing, which adds a new level of entertainment. While this was only a short piece, I found myself able to connect with the characters and follow the narrative, which never let-up until the final sentence. Chilling to the core, I won’t be stopping among the stalks of corn anytime soon. Kudos, Mr. King, for another winner. I do need to see the movie, as my imagination is going wild! Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Something happened back in 1964......Embarking on an extended road trip, Burt and Vicky continually argue about everything and anything...plus their troubled marriage...but soon find there is much more to worry about...like the unknown object that has just vanished "under the T-Bird's bumper."As the vacationing couple investigate what they hit on the deserted road, a feeling of unrest overcomes them..."someone's watching us"...and they hurriedly get underway, with their burden, to the nearest to Something happened back in 1964......Embarking on an extended road trip, Burt and Vicky continually argue about everything and anything...plus their troubled marriage...but soon find there is much more to worry about...like the unknown object that has just vanished "under the T-Bird's bumper."As the vacationing couple investigate what they hit on the deserted road, a feeling of unrest overcomes them..."someone's watching us"...and they hurriedly get underway, with their burden, to the nearest town....a creepy ghost town....where Burt uncovers a shocking mystery and they both encounter the CHILDREN OF THE CORN.Short freakish read with an evil presence that will not be disappointed! (Vaguely remember the movie as just being OK, but enjoyed the novella!)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sadie Hartmann

    I had an itch to re read this story and my goodness it's a good one. This is one of those shorts you wish was a novella or even a full novel--there's plenty here! I love this crazy fighting couple that happen upon a freaky little ghost down full of wicked children! And what's in the Corn??? The one who walks behind the rows... I had an itch to re read this story and my goodness it's a good one. This is one of those shorts you wish was a novella or even a full novel--there's plenty here! I love this crazy fighting couple that happen upon a freaky little ghost down full of wicked children! And what's in the Corn??? The one who walks behind the rows...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

    Welcome to Gatlin, nicest town in Nebraska After running over a child, Burt and Vicky head into the nearby town of Gatlin, Nebraska to look for help. This is widely considered to have been a bad move. This short was excellent. It's well-written with plenty of memorable moments and there is near constant tension. Pretty damn creepy too. Welcome to Gatlin, nicest town in Nebraska After running over a child, Burt and Vicky head into the nearby town of Gatlin, Nebraska to look for help. This is widely considered to have been a bad move. This short was excellent. It's well-written with plenty of memorable moments and there is near constant tension. Pretty damn creepy too.

  8. 4 out of 5

    rovic

    Childen of the Corn is the second story I read from Stephen King's 1978 collection, Night Shift. This short story is such a classic Stephen King horror. It has its bloody and somewhat gory moments. The overall creepiness and ominous atmosphere made this book so immersive although it is just a short read. Overall, it was a solid story. Childen of the Corn is the second story I read from Stephen King's 1978 collection, Night Shift. This short story is such a classic Stephen King horror. It has its bloody and somewhat gory moments. The overall creepiness and ominous atmosphere made this book so immersive although it is just a short read. Overall, it was a solid story.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jess the Shelf-Declared Bibliophile

    Highly creepy and well told in such a short amount of pages. I wish it were a full length book!

  10. 4 out of 5

    hannaღ

    This story will forever be a favourite of mine! For the last twenty years or so I haven't been able to even look at a cornfield without feeling really uncomfortable 🌽 This story will forever be a favourite of mine! For the last twenty years or so I haven't been able to even look at a cornfield without feeling really uncomfortable 🌽

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jason Pierce

    I finally made it to the main reason I wanted to read Night Shift, and it was worth the wait. "Children of the Corn" is one of my favorite Stephen King movies. Yeah, yeah, I know it sucks, but that doesn't stop me from loving it anyway. Turns out they took a few liberties with the original story. "You're kidding!" Nope, afraid not. However, I really like the story version better than the movie. First off the story in the book makes much more sense, and suspension of disbelief isn't strained to I finally made it to the main reason I wanted to read Night Shift, and it was worth the wait. "Children of the Corn" is one of my favorite Stephen King movies. Yeah, yeah, I know it sucks, but that doesn't stop me from loving it anyway. Turns out they took a few liberties with the original story. "You're kidding!" Nope, afraid not. However, I really like the story version better than the movie. First off the story in the book makes much more sense, and suspension of disbelief isn't strained to snapping. The story focuses primarily on Burt and Vicky, and everything until the last couple of pages is from Burt's point of view. Isaac doesn't even make an appearance until the last page, and he's only nine-years-old. Pictured here is not a nine-year-old. This is John Franklin who had a growth hormone problem. He's 24 here, poor man. Isaac was his most famous role. His next major claim to fame was Cousin Itt in both Addams Family movies, but I digress. Completely absent from the story are any good kids, the gas station man, and any good guys of any kind, actually. Burt and Vicky are on their own for the whole ordeal, (view spoiler)[and had they survived, Vicky would've had her tubes tied and Burt his vasa deferentia snipped, for nobody would want kids after meeting the happy-go-lucky creeps of Gatlin, NE. (hide spoiler)] Possible Randall Flagg sighting I'm always interested in character crossovers from one Stephen King work to another, and this is supposed to have one. According to many fans, He Who Walks Behind The Rows is actually Randall Flagg who causes trouble in a lot of King's stories. Personally, I didn't catch that at all, and I was looking for it as I read. So I went to the internet to see what the thinking is behind this. The Stephen King wiki says that it's implied that He Who Walks Behind The Rows is Randall Flagg, but doesn't expound on that at all. I later found that such is implied in The Stand, and there is some corn in it when everyone is in the mid-west, and they do seem to think something in the corn is watching them sometimes, and that something might as well be Randall Flagg since he is pretty much watching everyone, but he does that from places other than the corn as well. I can't find any place where Stephen King states they're one and the same, but someone did point this out: he who WALks behind ThE Rows. See that nice little sobriquet there? Walter is one of Flagg's names in the Dark Tower series... Man, you are pushing it. I guess it's possible since King was working on The Stand at the time this story came out, and he does like dropping obscure clues to this and that in his works. I would say the antics of HWWBTR are out of character for RF, but really, nothing is out of character for that weirdo, and he's certainly capable of pulling off the feats in this story. Still, it's too small scale. Flagg has huge visions with grand schemes which sometimes affect several worlds, and what goes on in this story involves a few children in the middle of BFE, and any traveler unfortunate enough to blunder into town over the course of a decade and some change. That's the inconsistent part. Read it for yourself, and draw your own conclusion.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bren fall in love with the sea.

    I really only love a few Stephen King books. I always preferred John Saul when I was going through my horror period. This one however was not bad. Creepy children are a great subject of horror and I did enjoy this book moderately. My favorite by King will always be Thinner. I saw the movie as well and besides the creepy kids eerie resemblement to the Trump kids, it was not very good. I find King's books are always better then the movies. This is one I plan to reread soon. I really only love a few Stephen King books. I always preferred John Saul when I was going through my horror period. This one however was not bad. Creepy children are a great subject of horror and I did enjoy this book moderately. My favorite by King will always be Thinner. I saw the movie as well and besides the creepy kids eerie resemblement to the Trump kids, it was not very good. I find King's books are always better then the movies. This is one I plan to reread soon.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shirley Revill

    Loved this book. Recommended.

  14. 4 out of 5

    catherine ♡

    This was a good one. But I still love corn too much to be scared.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jess ❈Harbinger of Blood-Soaked Rainbows❈

    SPOOKTOBER IS HERE! fulfilling my shortie Spooktober challenge to read one spooky short story a day. Day one: The Magic Shop by H.G. Wells Day two: Everything's Fine by Matthew Pridham Day three: It Came From Hell and Smashed the Angels by Gregor Xane Day four: Sometimes They Come Back by Stephen King Day five: The Curse of Yig by H.P. Lovecraft Day six: The Spook House by Ambrose Bierce Day seven: An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street by J. Sheridan Le Fanu Day eight: The Murders in SPOOKTOBER IS HERE! fulfilling my shortie Spooktober challenge to read one spooky short story a day. Day one: The Magic Shop by H.G. Wells Day two: Everything's Fine by Matthew Pridham Day three: It Came From Hell and Smashed the Angels by Gregor Xane Day four: Sometimes They Come Back by Stephen King Day five: The Curse of Yig by H.P. Lovecraft Day six: The Spook House by Ambrose Bierce Day seven: An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street by J. Sheridan Le Fanu Day eight: The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe Day nine: Graveyard Shift by Stephen King Day ten: Bitter Grounds by Neil Gaiman Day eleven: Finding Emma by Matthew Iden Day twelve: To Be Read at Dusk by Charles Dickens When I decided to do my little spooky short story challenge, the obvious stories are Stephen King's. I own several collections of shorts by King, but have only read two of them in their entirety. And both were several years ago. I decided to revisit three from each collection I've already read and then do two I haven't read from a different collection. This one rounds out my selections from Night Shift which I first bought as a kid and have read several stories more than others. Children of the Corn is one of those I've read more than once, and the one, except for maybe Sometimes They Come Back for which I have the most nostalgia. I blame it on my formative years, and this I admit that I probably watched the movie for the first time when I was entirely too young for it and Malachi haunted my dreams for awhile afterward (being replaced years later with Hannibal Lecter, who still hasn't entirely left.) The story and the movie are fundamentally the same, though the story is better crafted and contains much more psychological horror rather than hordes of scythe-wielding Amish looking children. It is amazing how children can be thought of so quickly as innocent and sweet but also just as quickly as the creepiest horror tools in the biz. I would take Leatherface and his chain saw over Issac any day of the week. This is another example of how much King is a master at crafting tension and terror. Having read this several times and knowing so well how it will end, it does not keep me from gritting my teeth and clenching up as I read. This is the best kind of horror. Scary children are the tools of a much larger horror here, He Who Walks Behind the Rows. Those who are well-versed in the King multiverse will see connections to other entities and works at play here, but this story also works quite well as a standalone story, where you soon find out that the titular corn is in this case much much worse than the titular children. 5 stars for nostalgia, for The King, for nightmares, for a perfect Spooktober read that absolutely stands the test of time. booksource: Night Shift collection, own.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Quickly creating ominous atmosphere is a remarkable talent of the short story writer. The proper short story does not waste time procrastinating what it is ultimately attempting to achieve. Stephen King’s Children of the Corn creates the bleak spooky atmosphere of an menacing an immanent doom right from the start. Vicky and Burt, a married couple attempting to rekindle their love for one another are driving coast to coast for vacation. They are in Nebraska driving through an endless sight of cor Quickly creating ominous atmosphere is a remarkable talent of the short story writer. The proper short story does not waste time procrastinating what it is ultimately attempting to achieve. Stephen King’s Children of the Corn creates the bleak spooky atmosphere of an menacing an immanent doom right from the start. Vicky and Burt, a married couple attempting to rekindle their love for one another are driving coast to coast for vacation. They are in Nebraska driving through an endless sight of cornfield and bickering with one another. While driving they hit a boy who is already dead. They are attempting to find a town and hail the police so they can confess what has happened in hopes of finding the real killer. What ensues is a ghost town leading to the anxiety of isolation and being stuck only with the person you love who you actually hate, which turns out to a true living hell. Reading the story, I pictured King driving through corn country in the mid-west smoking cigarettes and fiddling with the radio station attempting to find anything besides white noise when he comes across an evangelical sermon and thus his imagination runs wild and this story is born. Children of the Corn is much more than a spooky horror story. There is deeper meaning to this story than pure horror entertainment and enthusiasm. The blatant interpretation of using religion as a pulpit for extremism justifications and ultimately death and destruction and religion kills is obvious and has been done before but because there are many bible references for a horror story and not any mention of Satan makes it all the more terrifying. God is telling you to kill not Satan. Reading this short story in 2014 I have a different interpretation than just the lovely religion kills meaning, which is still salient today. Corn is omnipresent in every facet of our lives and these producers of corn will do anything and everything to keep the corn in production. The zealous corporations of Cargill, Monsanto, and Archer Midland Daniels among other global food producers are the children of the corn who lobby congress as well as much greater wicked acts to have corn byproducts in every single consumer food available and they do not care if it kills you slowly or quickly they are simply sacrificing you to their only holly god, profit.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dylan Perry

    After seeing the Children of the Corn movie last year and now having read the story, I'm happy to say they're apples and oranges. The film does the short story a disservice. This was far more interesting and better executed than a tale of creepy cornfields has any right to be. Though, it's not perfect. Adverbs are littered throughout. And the final scene is unnecessary, and mostly there for exposition. When I read the line, "And here, in the heartland of Nebraska, in the corn, there was nothing After seeing the Children of the Corn movie last year and now having read the story, I'm happy to say they're apples and oranges. The film does the short story a disservice. This was far more interesting and better executed than a tale of creepy cornfields has any right to be. Though, it's not perfect. Adverbs are littered throughout. And the final scene is unnecessary, and mostly there for exposition. When I read the line, "And here, in the heartland of Nebraska, in the corn, there was nothing but time." I was screaming, End it there! End it there! But it keeps going, and sours some of my enjoyment. Overall this was a surprise. And I would recommend it--my small gripes aside--especially if all you've seen is the film(s).

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Deal

    I read two stories for Halloween every year. This story, obviously, and the Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allen Poe. Both stories are told with a subtle craft of the writers at the peak of their abilities. In my opinion, this is the best of Stephen King’s short stories. It is certainly my personal favorite. Where the story does show its age a bit, it is still something horrifying to even today’s standards. The religious mainia that strikes a group of children centered around corn, is so well draw I read two stories for Halloween every year. This story, obviously, and the Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allen Poe. Both stories are told with a subtle craft of the writers at the peak of their abilities. In my opinion, this is the best of Stephen King’s short stories. It is certainly my personal favorite. Where the story does show its age a bit, it is still something horrifying to even today’s standards. The religious mainia that strikes a group of children centered around corn, is so well drawn out here that it still sends a good chill up my spine reading it even now.

  19. 5 out of 5

    SheAintGotNoShoes

    A really creepy short story that left me on edge as I read it. I saw the old film in the late 70s or earl 80s and it blew my mind back then but I never got around to reading it. Good things come to those that wait !!!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mike Narvaez

    This is such an amazing and creepy - very scary - short story I wish it were a long novel. King manages to tell in just a few pages what many authors couldn't do in hundreds of pages. Just another example that you don't need many pages to tell great stories. Recommended for all. Just avoid reading it in the night. I learned that the hard way. This is such an amazing and creepy - very scary - short story I wish it were a long novel. King manages to tell in just a few pages what many authors couldn't do in hundreds of pages. Just another example that you don't need many pages to tell great stories. Recommended for all. Just avoid reading it in the night. I learned that the hard way.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    The overall creepiness of this story rivals almost anything I've read. It's almost more of what you never saw than what actually happens. If you are a fan of atmospheric horror you should like this story. Just eerie. The overall creepiness of this story rivals almost anything I've read. It's almost more of what you never saw than what actually happens. If you are a fan of atmospheric horror you should like this story. Just eerie.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rafael

    This story just made me realize where all small town cult horror films come from, a horror classic, perfect king stuff of nightmares, love it!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Dunne

    Religion can be terrifying in the wrong hands.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    Published 1977. 50 pages Seemed like a novel that was just dropped. Seemed incomplete. I guess because I wanted more. I felt unsatisfied. Even still, there is something I love about King's early books that is missing in his newer stuff. The older ones have a grittiness to them. Their less polished, less, refined. More human. Darker. Would love to see this one as a full novel, but I suppose that's not gonna happen. Content concerns: (view spoiler)[ Violence, cursing, man & wife trying to save marriage Published 1977. 50 pages Seemed like a novel that was just dropped. Seemed incomplete. I guess because I wanted more. I felt unsatisfied. Even still, there is something I love about King's early books that is missing in his newer stuff. The older ones have a grittiness to them. Their less polished, less, refined. More human. Darker. Would love to see this one as a full novel, but I suppose that's not gonna happen. Content concerns: (view spoiler)[ Violence, cursing, man & wife trying to save marriage so there is lots of friction in the relationship department (hide spoiler)]

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marc-Antoine

    Playlist Buck Owens Tammy Wynette Leaning on the Everlasting Arms - Alan Jackson The Phantom of the Opera

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lelouch

    After a couple runs over a little kid, they seek help from a nearby town. They're surrounded by religious signs, but someone took down the letters that made up the church's name. They haven't seen a single car on the road, and all the prices are low enough to be from 12 years ago. Burt reads records of the births and deaths and realizes people are dying at 19 years old. When burt runs in the cornfield, he thinks he outran the disorganized mob. Then he starts to realize something is off. Every si After a couple runs over a little kid, they seek help from a nearby town. They're surrounded by religious signs, but someone took down the letters that made up the church's name. They haven't seen a single car on the road, and all the prices are low enough to be from 12 years ago. Burt reads records of the births and deaths and realizes people are dying at 19 years old. When burt runs in the cornfield, he thinks he outran the disorganized mob. Then he starts to realize something is off. Every single corn stalk is perfect. There are no bugs, no blemishes, no weeds. And what's that rustling noise he keeps hearing? I loved the atmosphere where everything looks normal at a glance, but the closer you look, the more creepy it is. I enjoyed the dark ending, and I don't remember the 1984 movie ending the same way. I just learned there's 2020 prequel film, so I'm going to have to look into that.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Le Chat Noir (having medical surgery - brb)

    [Audiobook] An eerie story about a couple who accidentally run over a dead body, seeking to report the incident to the authorities they find themselves in a quiet, deserted town seemingly frozen in a time capsule. All is not well in this sleepy town where the corn grows lush and in perfect, neat rows. Listening to this really heightened the creep factor to the story. I also really liked how in the end everyone is a victim to the corn. 4/5 - this is the type of King book I like.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Allison (hiatus until Monday) Faught

    Awesome short story!!! Things don’t really ‘happen’ until about halfway through, but man, this story kept me on the edge of my seat all the way through. I’m going to make this read a yearly Halloween tradition!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Julie Suzanne

    Met a summer reading challenge of “read a book published the year you were born.“ Pretty creepy and surprisingly short!

  30. 4 out of 5

    ✿ℎazℯℓ - thℯ ℛock Cℎick ℱairy✿

    The book is scarier than the movie, I daresay.

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