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Ivanhoe (Classics Illustrated #2)

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"Ivanhoe" (1819) was the first of Scott's novels to adopt a purely English subject and was also his first attempt to combine history and romance, which later influenced Victorian medievalism. Set at the time of the Norman Conquest, "Ivanhoe" returns from the Crusades to claim his inheritance and the love of Rowena and becomes involved in the struggle between Richard Coeur "Ivanhoe" (1819) was the first of Scott's novels to adopt a purely English subject and was also his first attempt to combine history and romance, which later influenced Victorian medievalism. Set at the time of the Norman Conquest, "Ivanhoe" returns from the Crusades to claim his inheritance and the love of Rowena and becomes involved in the struggle between Richard Coeur de Lion and his Norman brother John. The gripping narrative is structured by a series of conflicts: Saxon versus Norman, Christian versus Jew, men versus women, played out against Scott's unflinching moral realism. A beautifully illustrated comic graphic novel; a classic you will enjoy and treasure.


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"Ivanhoe" (1819) was the first of Scott's novels to adopt a purely English subject and was also his first attempt to combine history and romance, which later influenced Victorian medievalism. Set at the time of the Norman Conquest, "Ivanhoe" returns from the Crusades to claim his inheritance and the love of Rowena and becomes involved in the struggle between Richard Coeur "Ivanhoe" (1819) was the first of Scott's novels to adopt a purely English subject and was also his first attempt to combine history and romance, which later influenced Victorian medievalism. Set at the time of the Norman Conquest, "Ivanhoe" returns from the Crusades to claim his inheritance and the love of Rowena and becomes involved in the struggle between Richard Coeur de Lion and his Norman brother John. The gripping narrative is structured by a series of conflicts: Saxon versus Norman, Christian versus Jew, men versus women, played out against Scott's unflinching moral realism. A beautifully illustrated comic graphic novel; a classic you will enjoy and treasure.

30 review for Ivanhoe (Classics Illustrated #2)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marquise

    This adaptation in graphic novel format of Sir Walter Scott's book has, in my opinion, the following positive improvements in relation to the written novel: That given the nature of the medium, the plot had to be condensed, which has the good side effect of eliminating the meandering prose, jumping over the long and mostly boring portions. That it mostly fixes the plotholes in the written novel by skipping over them straight to the "meat" of it, i.e. the central plotline and the core characters, t This adaptation in graphic novel format of Sir Walter Scott's book has, in my opinion, the following positive improvements in relation to the written novel: That given the nature of the medium, the plot had to be condensed, which has the good side effect of eliminating the meandering prose, jumping over the long and mostly boring portions. That it mostly fixes the plotholes in the written novel by skipping over them straight to the "meat" of it, i.e. the central plotline and the core characters, to tighten up the narrative. The scene selection is good and generally worked for this purpose. That the art, though sure to be old-fashioned for some tastes more accustomed to the contemporary graphic novel/comics styles, is gorgeous within its style, predominant decades ago. The vibrant colours and overall design are well-done in my opinion. As downsides, I'd cite that the ending looked disjointed and abrupt, and that the Ivanhoe vs. Bois-Guilbert duel could've been handled better. It's not clear exactly why Sir Brian ended up like he did, which the novel does explain but here looks too random, and the last scene is frankly mawkish. I think adding a few more panels by the end would've been a vast improvement, and given that this book is within the standard length for this medium, a few more panels wouldn't have hurt. I'd have also loved a bit more for the Ashby tourney as this is a chivalry-centred narrative. Oh, and that here Sir Brian doesn't look like the hot(tie) mess I imagine he is. But that's another story!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lizzie

    I enjoyed this but I have no idea how it compares with the novel. Rebecca and Ivanhoe end up together and I guess that doesn't happen in the book because Scott thought a Saxon marrying a Jew would never work. There's an article at the end about historic inaccuracies in the original novel, and I liked that. The art is serviceable but nothing outstanding. Considering I got this for fifty cents at an estate sale, I'd say I got my money's worth. I enjoyed this but I have no idea how it compares with the novel. Rebecca and Ivanhoe end up together and I guess that doesn't happen in the book because Scott thought a Saxon marrying a Jew would never work. There's an article at the end about historic inaccuracies in the original novel, and I liked that. The art is serviceable but nothing outstanding. Considering I got this for fifty cents at an estate sale, I'd say I got my money's worth.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    “Ivanhoe” is arguably the most well-known of the novels by Sir Walter Scott and it is a work of historical fiction set in England in the twelfth century. It is a time when knights were bold and tournaments where they competed in jousts were major events. It is a time when there was a significant distinction between the Normans and the Saxons and there is still hostility, although not open warfare. The story also includes references to anti-Semitism, in a panel on page 5 of this comic, Isaac of “Ivanhoe” is arguably the most well-known of the novels by Sir Walter Scott and it is a work of historical fiction set in England in the twelfth century. It is a time when knights were bold and tournaments where they competed in jousts were major events. It is a time when there was a significant distinction between the Normans and the Saxons and there is still hostility, although not open warfare. The story also includes references to anti-Semitism, in a panel on page 5 of this comic, Isaac of York a Jewish merchant has been granted admittance. The panel shows him walking within the village and the text is, “Isaac entered. Even the servants withdrew from him in pious horror.” Given the length and complexity of the novel, the story in this comic is of necessity abridged. Yet, it does capture the essence of this complex novel of a time of knighthood, assimilation and accommodation. It also features one of the most well-known English kings, Richard the Lion-hearted. This is an excellent introduction to a complex story about a complex country. The panels that include the bandit known as Robin Hood increase the subplots and intrigue.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dale Muckerman

    I always wanted to know what the story of Ivanhoe was all about. Now I know. I am motivated now to read the novel.

  5. 4 out of 5

    StrictlySequential

    15c HRN 161 = 1963 = 2nd printing includes Scott Bio

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tom Hartmann

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alan Mapstone

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ian

  9. 5 out of 5

    Paul J

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rodney H.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Barry Cunningham

  14. 4 out of 5

    Romina Campos

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jos

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lee Keller

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Schvejda

  18. 5 out of 5

    John Pflugradt

  19. 4 out of 5

    James P. Daze

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alex Mccool

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ken Briggs

  23. 5 out of 5

    Edward

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Jaques

  25. 5 out of 5

    Evelina

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cagliostro

  27. 5 out of 5

    Richard Rothrock

  28. 5 out of 5

    Onur Yıldız

  29. 4 out of 5

    Satyajeet

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tom Reese

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