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Doctor Extraño: Doctor Muerte: Triunfo y Tormento

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Contiene Marvel Graphic Novels 49: Dr. Strange & Dr. Doom USA. ¡Una obra maestra que aunó el talento de dos monstruos del cómic mundial! En 1989, Roger Stern, el aclamado guionista de Los Vengadores y El Asombroso Spiderman, y Mike Mignola, poco tiempo antes de crear Hellboy, se unieron para concebir la historia definitiva de Victor Von Muerte. Cada año, el peor villano del Contiene Marvel Graphic Novels 49: Dr. Strange & Dr. Doom USA. ¡Una obra maestra que aunó el talento de dos monstruos del cómic mundial! En 1989, Roger Stern, el aclamado guionista de Los Vengadores y El Asombroso Spiderman, y Mike Mignola, poco tiempo antes de crear Hellboy, se unieron para concebir la historia definitiva de Victor Von Muerte. Cada año, el peor villano del Universo Marvel combate contra Mefisto por el alma de su madre. Cada año, pierde la batalla. Pero, ¿qué ocurriría si tuviera a su lado el poder del Doctor Extraño, el Hechicero Supremo de nuestra dimensión?


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Contiene Marvel Graphic Novels 49: Dr. Strange & Dr. Doom USA. ¡Una obra maestra que aunó el talento de dos monstruos del cómic mundial! En 1989, Roger Stern, el aclamado guionista de Los Vengadores y El Asombroso Spiderman, y Mike Mignola, poco tiempo antes de crear Hellboy, se unieron para concebir la historia definitiva de Victor Von Muerte. Cada año, el peor villano del Contiene Marvel Graphic Novels 49: Dr. Strange & Dr. Doom USA. ¡Una obra maestra que aunó el talento de dos monstruos del cómic mundial! En 1989, Roger Stern, el aclamado guionista de Los Vengadores y El Asombroso Spiderman, y Mike Mignola, poco tiempo antes de crear Hellboy, se unieron para concebir la historia definitiva de Victor Von Muerte. Cada año, el peor villano del Universo Marvel combate contra Mefisto por el alma de su madre. Cada año, pierde la batalla. Pero, ¿qué ocurriría si tuviera a su lado el poder del Doctor Extraño, el Hechicero Supremo de nuestra dimensión?

30 review for Doctor Extraño: Doctor Muerte: Triunfo y Tormento

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    This 1989 tale of an unlikely team-up featuring Drs. Strange and Doom on a quest to rescue the soul of Doom’s mother from the clutches of Mephisto is a masterwork of character building and subverting reader expectations (it also features some pretty stellar early Mike Mignola art). If you’re at all a fan of Doom or Strange, or just good comics, you’ll want to add it to your reading list. That said, I feel like Marvel really missed the boat here on a late-80s (or perhaps late 2010s) sitcom opportu This 1989 tale of an unlikely team-up featuring Drs. Strange and Doom on a quest to rescue the soul of Doom’s mother from the clutches of Mephisto is a masterwork of character building and subverting reader expectations (it also features some pretty stellar early Mike Mignola art). If you’re at all a fan of Doom or Strange, or just good comics, you’ll want to add it to your reading list. That said, I feel like Marvel really missed the boat here on a late-80s (or perhaps late 2010s) sitcom opportunity (I mean, who’s a better odd couple than these two?), so I’ve endeavored to remedy that failing with the pilot script below. Networks—I’m willing to listen to offers. And I work cheap. Like, embarrassingly cheap. That gum you just spat out? Could totally have me for that. Anyway... DOCTOR, DOCTOR Season 1, Episode 1: “Strange Bedfellows” DOCTOR, DOCTOR is filmed before a live studio audience. ACT ONE INT. APARTMENT – EVENING A tastefully but exotically decorated apartment, part Pottery Barn, part Hogwarts, on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. A handsome but serious and severe young man in his mid-twenties, VICTOR VON DOOM, sits at the kitchen table, his lips moving silently as he studies a massive leather-bound tome. His concentration is broken by the arrival of another handsome mid-twenties man, STEPHEN STRANGE, carefree and sporting an early-stage goatee. STRANGE: Honey, I’m home. Insert laugh track. DOOM: Bah! Why do you always insist on spouting that hackneyed catchphrase every time you return from some fool errand? STRANGE: Because they find it funny. Strange winks knowingly at the audience. Insert laugh track. DOOM: Who are you talking about? There is no one there! You are a madman! STRANGE: Oh, am I? Strange winks again at the audience. Insert laugh track. Again. STRANGE: Anyway, what is it you’re failing to master today, Victor? Doom scowls and closes his book. DOOM: It is of no concern to you! Bah! STRANGE: I’d offer to help, but I need to get ready—I’ve got a date. DOOM: You waste your time with such trysts. STRANGE: You’re just mad because such trysts won’t waste time with you. Insert laugh track. Cue theme song One’s a handsome doctor of the medical variety One’s an iron-fisted ruler of worldwide notoriety They share an apartment on the Upper West Side So they can go together on a mystical ride One is shallow, one is deep They split the rent because New York ain’t cheap They’re not the best of friends and sometimes they like to fight One’s an evil dictator; the other’s Tony Stark-lite The sparks will surely fly when they’re in the same room Oh, those wacky roommates, Doctor Strange and Doctor Doooooom! INT. APARTMENT – EVENING Doom is still sitting at the kitchen table, five empty coffee mugs spread around, head resting in his hand as he concentrates on the book he’s reading. DOOM (muttering): Vector of the obtuse angle is equal to the hypotenuse of the— A doorbell rings. STRANGE (off-camera): Victor, be a dear and get the door, will you? I’m not quite finished making my toilet, as you Europeans might say. DOOM (muttering again): I’ll make you INTO a toilet…my toilet…just need to find the right spell… Doom opens the door, expecting to see Strange’s date for the evening. Instead, their neighbor from across the hall, SUSAN STORM, stands at the door. Susan is about the same age as Doom, blond, striking, and visibly upset. DOOM: Susan! Doom and Susan stand awkwardly for a moment. SUSAN (sad, sniffling): Can I come in, Victor? DOOM: Yes, yes, of course! Come in. Doom moves aside and ushers Susan in, guiding her to a chair in the living room. DOOM: Sit, please. I will get you some liquid refreshment. SUSAN: Thank you, Victor. Doom rushes to the kitchen to fetch a glass of water. He hands it to Susan, who takes it and drinks, offering Victor a grateful smile. We see Doom melt a little. Strange enters. STRANGE: Ah, Suzy-Q! What brings you all the way across the hall to our humble abode? I refer only to the abode itself, of course, because more than fifty percent of its residents are exceedingly arrogant. Doom scowls at Strange. Strange winks at him. SUSAN: I need your help, Stephen. It’s…well, I need you to take a look at my Muffin. STRANGE: I’m sorry, Suzy, but I’m just about to go on a date and even I draw the line at— DOOM: Bah! She means her tiny dog, you fool! Insert laugh track. SUSAN (nodding): That’s right—she’s sick, Stephen. Can you examine her? DOOM: You don’t need him! I will care for your ridiculously small canine. SUSAN (gently): I appreciate that, Victor, but I thought I would ask Stephen because he’s…well, he’s… STRANGE: A real doctor? DOOM: I am a doctor as well! STRANGE (snickering): Sure, Victor—those Ph.D.s will solve all of his problems. Maybe you can help Muffin with his organic chem homework. Insert laugh track. DOOM: Bah! With your wasted hands, you would be better served having Rictor perform surgery on the canine. SUSAN: Huh? STRANGE: I think, though I may be wrong, our friend Victor is trying to make a joke—you see, Ms. Storm, my hands were badly injured in a car accident and I can no longer perform surgery, so “Doctor” Doom was suggesting that a D-list superhero with earthquake-based powers, namely Rictor, would be more effective in operating on your dog. Jokes, you may have guessed, are not Victor’s strong suit. Pause. STRANGE: I might have gone with Michael J. Fox… Insert laugh track. Doom looks confused. Susan offers a disgusted sigh. STRANGE: Too soon? SUSAN: Forget it—I’ll just call Reed. STRANGE: I’m sure “Mister Fantastic” will make everything all right with his super-stretchy— Susan storms out, slamming the door behind her and drowning out Strange’s last word. STRANGE: Well, that was fun. I need to finish getting ready. DOOM: Are you planning to remove the tiny and poorly groomed rodent from your face before your date? I would recommend it, as I am given to understand that people do not usually enjoy rodents rubbing against their faces during the act of saliva exchange. STRANGE: Rodent…? Strange rubs his hand across his chin, feels his goatee, and grins. STRANGE: That was actually pretty good, Victor. Maybe there’s hope for you after all. Strange goes into the kitchen and looks in the sink. He sighs. STRANGE: Dammit, Victor! You know you’re on dish duty this week. Strange gestures toward a multicolored paper plate on the refrigerator. STRANGE: Did you not look at the chore wheel? DOOM: Bah! The wheel is rigged. STRANGE: How dare you suggest that the assignation of chores is not entirely fair and random. Strange spins the wheel. STRANGE (muttering softly): Winds of Watoomb blow softly and with grace…make sure the wheel ends up in the right…place. The wheel comes to a stop on a blue square. STRANGE: Ah, see! “Be handsome.” That’s my chore for today. The wheel never lies. DOOM: One day I will laugh over your broken corpse. STRANGE: Well, until then, I need to finish getting ready for my date. Strange moves off screen to return to the bathroom; Doom resumes studying. DOOM (reading): Titration must be executed to the proper amount within 1000 parts per mL or the spell will— There is a knock at the door. Victor glares malevolently at it. DOOM: Doom will not brook further interruption! Doom mutters the words of a spell and flings his left hand toward the door. An eldritch bolt of light shoots out and melts the doorknob. Strange enters the room, surveys the situation, and shakes his head in frustration. STRANGE: You know that Howard won’t come and fix our doorknob anymore, right? You were standing here when he told us that. When he told you that, really. DOOM: Bah! I have Ph.D.s in physics, engineering, and biochemistry. Doom can fix a doorknob. STRANGE: Well, you know what they say—you are what you fix… Insert laugh track. Strange approaches the door. STRANGE: Who is it? I’d open the door, but we’re having a minor mechanical problem with it. There is no answer. Strange and Doom look at each other. Both men nod slightly and prepare to conjure spells. STRANGE: Be right with you…opening the door just now… Strange yanks the door open, ripping it from its hinges, as he and Doom prepare to blast whoever is on the other side. BRICK JONES, a handsome African-American man in his late-20s, stands in the hallway, looking sad. STRANGE: Brick! You’re early. I’m…still getting dressed. Strange looks down at his attire, which is a satin bathrobe and his red magical cape. STRANGE: Though maybe I don’t need to get any more dressed than this… Strange smiles wickedly at Brick. BRICK: Look, Stephen…I’ve been thinking. STRANGE: It’s never good when someone says that. DOOM: Bah! I am always thinking. STRANGE: Thank you for proving my point. Insert laugh track. BRICK: This just isn’t working. STRANGE: This? BRICK: This…us. This whole thing. I just can’t. STRANGE: Why? DOOM: Perhaps he does not enjoy having a rodent rubbed against his face. Strange glares at Doom, who resumes studying at the table. BRICK: It’s all this magic, man. STRANGE: What about it? BRICK: It’s too much. It’s freaking me out. STRANGE: Why? BRICK: Flying ghost snakes…tiny little demons…horny lady devils…I can’t deal with it, Stephen. It creeps me out, and I’m tired of worrying that every time my boyfriend goes to work, he’s going to get his soul eaten. Or have sex with a horny lady devil. STRANGE: The Sorcerer Supreme does what the Sorcerer Supreme must do to protect the Earth. Even horny lady devils, if that’s what the job calls for. Brick shakes his head. BRICK: I’m sorry, Stephen—I really am. You’re an easy man to care about. Maybe even love. But I need something…something more normal. Not this. Brick hugs Strange, who stands stiffly and does not return the hug. BRICK: Goodbye, Stephen. Be safe. Brick leaves and closes the door behind him. Strange stands staring at the door for a moment before walking over to the kitchen table and flopping down into the chair next to Doom. He sits silently, staring into space. Doom continues to study his book. Finally, Stephen lets out a long, slow breath and stands up. STRANGE: Pancakes? Doom looks up from his book. DOOM: What are pancakes? STRANGE: You don’t know what pancakes are? DOOM: Is it not generally standard rhetorical practice to ask a question of someone when one does not know what someone is talking about? STRANGE: Seriously? Are there no pancakes in Latveria? Strange begins rummaging around the kitchen, getting out the ingredients for pancakes. STRANGE: They’re light, golden, fluffy, flat little breakfast cakes that you top with butter, maple syrup, whipped cream, fruit…whatever you want. DOOM: Like a Doomcrepe. STRANGE: A Doomcrepe? DOOM: You do not know what Doomcrepes are? STRANGE: No. What’s a Doomcrepe? DOOM: It is like a pancake, as you describe it. It is a traditional Latverian breakfast food. STRANGE: And it’s named after you? DOOM: It is named for my family. Everything in Latveria is named for the Von Dooms. STRANGE: Toilets? DOOM: Doombowls. STRANGE: Chicken fingers? DOOM: Doomnuggets. STRANGE: Vibrators? DOOM: We do not have such things in Latveria. Von Dooms properly satisfy their lovers. Insert laugh track. STRANGE: Touché. Strange busies himself mixing up the ingredients for the pancakes while Doom yawns, stretches, and rises from his seat. Doom picks up a cup from the table and moves over to the kitchen sink to fill it with water. Just at that moment, Strange moves to drop an egg shell in the sink, and the two very nearly collide, ending up face-to-face just inches away from each other. DOOM: You impede Doom's path to hydration! Strange looks sad, almost on the verge of tears. DOOM (softly): I am sorry, Stephen. About your friend. He does not understand the difficulties faced by one who would be Sorcerer Supreme. He is a lesser mind. STRANGE (sniffling): I…thanks, Victor. It’s just…it’s hard. Doom stares at Strange. It’s clear that there is tension between the two, and not just because Strange is preventing Doom from getting water. DOOM: Yes. It is indeed…hard. The two move closer, their lips very nearly touching. STRANGE: I thought you had a thing for Sue Storm. DOOM: I find Susan intoxicating. STRANGE: Then….then what’s this all about? Their lips very nearly brush together. DOOM: Von Dooms are sexual omnivores. STRANGE: Then maybe we should… Doom pulls away. DOOM: Bah! Doom must visit the doombowl. Stand aside, wizard. Doom moves past Strange toward the bathroom, but stops and looks back. DOOM: But perhaps…in the fullness of time. Doom moves off screen, headed for the bathroom. Strange stands still for a moment, his gaze following Doom, both confused and intrigued. STRANGE: You’re just full of surprises, Victor. Hopefully Strange surprises… Insert laugh track. INT. APARTMENT BATHROOM – EVENING Doom stands in the bathroom, staring into the mirror. As he looks, a woman’s ghostly face appears. The woman looks anguished. DOOM (talking to the face in the mirror): I will save you—I swear it. I will save your soul, Mother. No matter what it takes. Even if it means…even if it means climbing into bed with strange bedfellows. END ACT ONE—APPLAUSE

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    DOCTOR DOOM vs DOCTOR STRANGE Well, sorta. It's more of a team-up than anything else, but there's not much love lost between these two powerhouses. Especially not at first. This was a pretty cool to read, and considering what happened in Secret Wars, it sort of helped put their relationship into perspective for me. Plus, (other than recently) this was one of the few times I'd seen them on the page together, so that in itself was interesting. There are two parts to Triumph and Torment. The first dea DOCTOR DOOM vs DOCTOR STRANGE Well, sorta. It's more of a team-up than anything else, but there's not much love lost between these two powerhouses. Especially not at first. This was a pretty cool to read, and considering what happened in Secret Wars, it sort of helped put their relationship into perspective for me. Plus, (other than recently) this was one of the few times I'd seen them on the page together, so that in itself was interesting. There are two parts to Triumph and Torment. The first deals with a time honored battle between the most powerful magic users on Earth for the title of Sorcerer Supreme. The fight itself was pretty lame, especially by today's standards, and the way that Strange won jut seemed cheesy. But maybe back in '89 it was cooler? Then again, weren't we all cooler? <--NO. The second half is the meaty part. Here's where you to the main plotline about Doctor Doom's mother, her deal with Mephisto (the devil for all intents and purposes), Victor's origin story, and how he basically arranged for everything to fall in place so that Stephen would have no choice but to help him rescue her soul from Hell. Dude, you coulda just asked. Pretty sure you didn't need the complicated scheme ... I say that, but actually as his nefarious (or not!) plans unfold, it makes you sorta love Doom a little bit. When you get to look back on what all the guy did to save his mom? *chokes up* Hang on... Anyway. It's an older comic, so take that into consideration, but I thought it held up pretty well. Plus, there's just not a lot of stuff with Strange in it, so if you've been looking around, this one is worth checking out.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Every Midsummer's Eve, Doctor Doom tries to rescue his mother's soul from hell and every year he fails. This time, he has Doctor Strange in tow. Will the two of them be successful? Let's find out! Back in the day, I read a Fantastic Four annual in which Doctor Doom tried to use Franklin Richards against Mephisto to free the soul of his mother. When I found out about the existence of this graphic novel, I became intrigued... then forgot about it until a couple weeks ago. The story starts out promis Every Midsummer's Eve, Doctor Doom tries to rescue his mother's soul from hell and every year he fails. This time, he has Doctor Strange in tow. Will the two of them be successful? Let's find out! Back in the day, I read a Fantastic Four annual in which Doctor Doom tried to use Franklin Richards against Mephisto to free the soul of his mother. When I found out about the existence of this graphic novel, I became intrigued... then forgot about it until a couple weeks ago. The story starts out promisingly. Doctor Strange is summoned to the Temple of the Three where he battles other sorcerers for the title of Sorcerer Supreme and winds up forced to give Doctor Doom a boon. Strange instructs Doom in the magic arts for a few weeks and they head down to hell. I'm happy to say that this graphic novel by Roger Stern and Mike Mignola does a great job standing the test of time. Stern's writing is way ahead of the curve for the time period and Mignola was heading down the artistic trail that would lead him to creating Hellboy years later. Mignola's hellish vistas resemble Steve Ditko's without being an outright copy and his depiction of Mephisto in his true form knocks the ball out of the park. Triumph and Torment also had enough twists to keep it interesting, far from the two guys punching each other it could have easily devolved into. Also contained in this volume were two stories containing seeds for this tale. One was from an issue of Astonishing Tales that depicted one of Doom's failed attempts to rescue his mother. The other was a Doctor Strange tale where Doctor Doom considered filling the vacancy left by Clea and becoming Strange's disciple. Neither were essential but gave the plot of the main story a little more depth. As opposed to the two Namor tales in the collection that had little to do with the story other than being drawn by Mignola. Since I suspect a lot of people will be giving Doctor Strange a shot based on the upcoming Cumberbatch-fest, this would be a good tale to read to see Strange in his element. Four out of five stars.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    “Greetings, Dr. Strange. I, Victor von Doom, have come to offer you an opportunity to assist me in a magical quest.” “You must be mad, Doom. As the Sorcerer Supreme you know that I’d never use my powers to help a villain like you. I’ll see you in hell first!” “Funny you should say that….” Dr. Strange and Dr. Doom are summoned to a magical trial with some other contestants to determine who will be the next Sorcerer Supreme. Strange walks away with the title, but Doom wins the right to make a request “Greetings, Dr. Strange. I, Victor von Doom, have come to offer you an opportunity to assist me in a magical quest.” “You must be mad, Doom. As the Sorcerer Supreme you know that I’d never use my powers to help a villain like you. I’ll see you in hell first!” “Funny you should say that….” Dr. Strange and Dr. Doom are summoned to a magical trial with some other contestants to determine who will be the next Sorcerer Supreme. Strange walks away with the title, but Doom wins the right to make a request of him. Doom wants help in freeing his mother’s soul from Mephisto which means going to Hades and fighting the devil himself on his home turf. Hilarity ensues. This one started out with two strikes against it with me. First, it was written back in the late ‘80s so I knew going in it’d probably seem somewhat dated. Second, I’m not a fan of Mike Mignola’s art. However, I was pleasantly surprised by this. While the dialogue is very overblown and comic booky it actually kinda works when you’re dealing with a couple of verbose characters like Strange and Doom. Teaming up a hero with one of Marvel’s worst baddies adds a fun mismatched partners dynamic like you find in a good buddy action movie. The story itself is pretty strong and the battle between them and Mephisto features some really clever twists in the way it uses as magic and plays with the idea that Doom will almost certainly betray Strange to save his mother’s soul. I also liked it because I generally find Doom to be a hoot because he is just such an unbelievably arrogant jerk, but this manages to add a tragic dimension to the character. By the end you feel almost bad for the guy.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    Sadly not exactly a household name these days, even among comicbook readers, Roger Stern is the reason I’m hooked on superhero books. Waaaay back in 1982, our paperboy accidentally delivered a copy of The Amazing Spider-Man to our house instead of my Scooby Doo comic (I was seven at the time). My mum was gearing up to go to the newsagent and complain but I’d already read the comic and fallen in love with Spidey. I asked her to cancel my Scooby Doo comic and replace it with The Amazing Spider-Man Sadly not exactly a household name these days, even among comicbook readers, Roger Stern is the reason I’m hooked on superhero books. Waaaay back in 1982, our paperboy accidentally delivered a copy of The Amazing Spider-Man to our house instead of my Scooby Doo comic (I was seven at the time). My mum was gearing up to go to the newsagent and complain but I’d already read the comic and fallen in love with Spidey. I asked her to cancel my Scooby Doo comic and replace it with The Amazing Spider-Man. If she’d have known I’d still be reading The Amazing Spider-Man thirty five years later, I’m pretty sure she’d have said no. That first issue of Amazing? Written by Roger Stern… so it’s all HIS fault. Anyway, blast from the past aside, Mr. Stern delivers the goods again in this Dr. Strange/Dr. Doom team-up book. This graphic novel (and it is actually a graphic novel, rather than a collection of previously published issues) tells the tale of how Stephen Strange won the title of Sorcerer Supreme and has more magical shenanigans going on than you can shake the Wand of Watoomb at. I’m not a huge Dr. Strange fan but this is a solid story well told and it also features everybody’s favourite villain (everybody who hasn’t seen any of the Fantastic Four movies anyway) Dr. Doom! When he’s not being pointlessly ruined by movie makers, Doom is one of the most engaging, fleshed-out and downright eeeevilll bad guys Lee and Kirby ever devised and he’s on top form in this book. Stern builds upon the work of Stan and Jack (and John Byrne) in further expanding Doom’s origins. (view spoiler)[He also has the balls to have Doom go to Hell to rescue his mother’s damned soul once and for all, thereby removing one of Doom’s major motivators. Fortunately, he’s a complex enough character to still be interesting without it. (hide spoiler)] The artwork’s pretty damned (pun intended) good, too. This was released in 1989, so there was still four years to go before Mike Mignola would unleash Hellboy on the world, but his work here is still excellent. You can see hints of what’s to come here, mainly in his fantastic sense of composition, but there are still aspects of his earlier influences on display here, mainly John Buscema and Jack Kirby but, if I’m not mistaken, even a few traces of Mike Zeck here and there. The other reason this doesn’t look exactly like the Mignola work we’ve come to know in Hellboy is because Mike’s only doing the pencils on this book. He’s being inked and coloured by Mark Badger, who does a pretty good job but is doing what all Mignola’s early inkers tried to do, namely make his rather unique drawing style adhere more closely to what superhero comic art was ‘supposed to’ look like at the time. It still looks pretty good, but I’d love to see a re-release of this book with Mignola inking his own pencils, with colours by Dave Stewart. I know, I know… never gonna happen. Overall, this is a really solid read and I recommend it to fans of either doctor.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    Best Marvel Team-Up ever! Almost 30 years old, painted by a young and still unknown Mike Mignola, this Roger Stern's Marvel Graphic Novel really aged well for good. A great tale of magic, damnation and redemption. A descent to hell and back of two arrogant characters whose pride is second only to the one of Mephisto, the Prince of Lies. A quest to save the immortal soul of Cynthia Von Doom, Victor's mother. An origin story and maybe the best one of the two most famous doctors of Marvel and pop cultu Best Marvel Team-Up ever! Almost 30 years old, painted by a young and still unknown Mike Mignola, this Roger Stern's Marvel Graphic Novel really aged well for good. A great tale of magic, damnation and redemption. A descent to hell and back of two arrogant characters whose pride is second only to the one of Mephisto, the Prince of Lies. A quest to save the immortal soul of Cynthia Von Doom, Victor's mother. An origin story and maybe the best one of the two most famous doctors of Marvel and pop culture (Dr Jones? Dr Who? Who are them?). Still one of my most fan favourite comic reads ever. A real masterwork.

  7. 5 out of 5

    'kris Pung

    ***This is the second of my "Green Theme" Buddy Reads with the Shallow Readers, criteria being: well Dr. Doom’s entire wardrobe is green.*** Firstly I got this only for Mike Mignola’s art but was pleasantly surprised with the wordsmithing Roger Stern provides. Speaking of the art it’s not quite as polished as his later Hellboy work but it’s still pretty great considering the time period (here’s a sample). I know what you’re thinking what in the Holy Hoggoth would make these two polar opposites tea ***This is the second of my "Green Theme" Buddy Reads with the Shallow Readers, criteria being: well Dr. Doom’s entire wardrobe is green.*** Firstly I got this only for Mike Mignola’s art but was pleasantly surprised with the wordsmithing Roger Stern provides. Speaking of the art it’s not quite as polished as his later Hellboy work but it’s still pretty great considering the time period (here’s a sample). I know what you’re thinking what in the Holy Hoggoth would make these two polar opposites teamup? Actually the reason is very well done (i.e. Dr. Doom is a huge mommy’s boy) and I found it pretty compelling. Also I’m not terrible familiar with either character so I did like that both characters had condensed origins so it’s very new reader friendly. My only complaint about the main story is the conflict did seem to be resolved a bit quick considering how powerful Mephisto is. Also included in my trade were a few classic tales featuring Dr. Doom and/or Dr. Strange that came off a bit dated but weren’t a total grind to read. If you enjoy the mystical side of the Marvel U or just looking for some early Mignola art give this a go. Get this review and many more at:

  8. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    Thanks to Anne and Dan, my two Goodreads buddies with the master plan, for recommending this one to me! This isn't just a great story with fantastic art (it very much is), but it is also an important story. It gives Doom a bit more personality than "DOOM NEEDS NO PERSONALITY!" and a bit more humanity than...none. It also reinforces what a good ruler he is. There have been Doom stories in the past that went to show that if he did indeed end up ruling the world, it would actually be one of the worl Thanks to Anne and Dan, my two Goodreads buddies with the master plan, for recommending this one to me! This isn't just a great story with fantastic art (it very much is), but it is also an important story. It gives Doom a bit more personality than "DOOM NEEDS NO PERSONALITY!" and a bit more humanity than...none. It also reinforces what a good ruler he is. There have been Doom stories in the past that went to show that if he did indeed end up ruling the world, it would actually be one of the world's best possible futures. This story played into that by showing how beloved he was by his own people. I also want to point out that the main villain in this one, Mephisto, was a genuinely scary villain--which is something that comics rarely achieve. When he kicks the crap out of Strange and Doom in hell, and is seen towering over them, you can physically feel how much shit our heroes have gotten themselves into.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Does anyone wonder what their young mother looks like naked, kneeling before the prince of hell? Neither do I, but apparently Doom has thought enough about it that his manservant Boris can conjure a fantastically detailed mental image of this very fact for Dr. Strange. Bravo? Holy hell does this story jump from plot idea to plot idea quickly. An origin-of-Doom's-magical-powers, a new ancient mystic, a quest among the greatest magicians...a boon to Doom? Then some great origin (re)tellings, and a Does anyone wonder what their young mother looks like naked, kneeling before the prince of hell? Neither do I, but apparently Doom has thought enough about it that his manservant Boris can conjure a fantastically detailed mental image of this very fact for Dr. Strange. Bravo? Holy hell does this story jump from plot idea to plot idea quickly. An origin-of-Doom's-magical-powers, a new ancient mystic, a quest among the greatest magicians...a boon to Doom? Then some great origin (re)tellings, and a colourful series of battles on the planes of Hell. This classic tale of Doom and Strange teaming up to battle Mephisto for the chance to release Doom's mother from Hell...quite a storytelling challenge, and a fascinating snapshot of some of the silly bombastic dialogue from the 80's. In that, this book is great - even now, the bombast suits most of the players - not only the villain and the "heroes", but this Aged Ghengis and a few of the bit players too. I don't usually like the Grand Pronouncements style of attacking every empty corner of the panels, inflating the drama with the great cymbal clashes of Plot Details. This story is a product of its times, but maybe because Doom is ALWAYS an arrogant ass, and Strange ain't no Empathetic Edgar either, it gets easier to breeze through and ride the insanity to the end. Yes there's a little visual insanity (or better, imagination) to carry these ambitious asses to their goals too - not quite Kirby or anyone paired with Morrison, but some little treats - and subtle touches too. Mignola is definitely at the start of his career, so it doesn't always work, but Mark Badger lays down some pretty pretty colours to make sure the acid is working. Rest of the book are background tales ripped from Marvel's archives, good enough. Skimmed them. This is a classic tale - something you should know about Doom - but not necessarily something you should spend big money to get your hands on. More like if you see it in a friends' collection, borrow the hell out of it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Wil Wheaton

    The main focus of this book, two story arcs that focus on Doctor Strange and Doctor Doom, are magnificent. Written by Roger Stern and Bill Mantlo, and drawn by legendary artists Mike Mignola and Kevin Nowlan, you'd be hard pressed to find a better example of who these two characters are, and why they are so beloved by two generations (at least) of readers. Even though these stories were written in the mid and late 80s, they evoke the very best elements of Marvel's Silver Age in the 70s. Still, I' The main focus of this book, two story arcs that focus on Doctor Strange and Doctor Doom, are magnificent. Written by Roger Stern and Bill Mantlo, and drawn by legendary artists Mike Mignola and Kevin Nowlan, you'd be hard pressed to find a better example of who these two characters are, and why they are so beloved by two generations (at least) of readers. Even though these stories were written in the mid and late 80s, they evoke the very best elements of Marvel's Silver Age in the 70s. Still, I'm only giving it 4 out of 5 stars, because a decision was made to include two Sub-Mariner stories to pad out the book. The only good thing I can say for these stories is that Mignola's pencils are sensational. The writing, though, is boring, demonstrative, and in one case profoundly sexist. These two stories add nothing to the book but pages, and should have been left out. If anything, they remind us why we love Strange and Doom, and why Namor is such a forgettable character, clearly created to give the Marvel stable its Aquaman. Oh, and if you're a fan of Strange, but you haven't read Neil Gaiman's 1602, you really should.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Doctor Doom and Doctor Strange team up to save the soul of Doom's mother from eternal torment. Cool. It makes sense of the two characters to meet, considering their overlapping interest in sorcery. And one of the things about Doom as a character that interests me is his prowess as both scientist and sorcerer, something that I don't think other Marvel characters share. Reed Richards is no more likely to cast a spell than Stephen Strange is to program a robot, but Doom could do either with relativ Doctor Doom and Doctor Strange team up to save the soul of Doom's mother from eternal torment. Cool. It makes sense of the two characters to meet, considering their overlapping interest in sorcery. And one of the things about Doom as a character that interests me is his prowess as both scientist and sorcerer, something that I don't think other Marvel characters share. Reed Richards is no more likely to cast a spell than Stephen Strange is to program a robot, but Doom could do either with relative ease. Stern easily delivers on a very promising concept. Now, this book is 35 years old, and in some ways it reads and looks that way. But it's solid writing and solid art that's minimally dated, aging much better than most of its contemporaries. It feels much more fresh than, say, Chris Claremont's writing from the same time. The plotting could maybe be tighter, but it does reflect the amount of exposition required to explain Doom's situation and the complexity of his plans. He desperately wants to help his mother, but is only willing to enlist aid on his own terms, and I really liked that. I've been on the lookout for good Doctor Strange stories in advance of the movie, and this one held up beautifully. Maybe not the best and easiest early primer on the character, but a great read in any event.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    Doctor Strange and Doctor Doom are two names one would not expect teaming up together. But here they are. The unlikely duo team-up against Mephisto, himself to free the soul of Doom's mother. Roger Stern has conjured an incredibly exciting story, and added depth to the titular characters. Mike Mignola's artwork is in its incipient stage, but it's still amazing. Triumph and Torment is a must read for the fans of either character. Doctor Strange and Doctor Doom are two names one would not expect teaming up together. But here they are. The unlikely duo team-up against Mephisto, himself to free the soul of Doom's mother. Roger Stern has conjured an incredibly exciting story, and added depth to the titular characters. Mike Mignola's artwork is in its incipient stage, but it's still amazing. Triumph and Torment is a must read for the fans of either character.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Baal Of

    I've had a fascination with Doctor Strange ever since I was a kid sneaking peeks at the Marvel comics of various friends when I wasn't under the watchful eye of my parents who did not approve. Once I went to college and started to buy comics for myself, Doctor Strange was one I tried and found myself still intrigued, but also kind of disappointed. I think he was always weirder in my head than ever on the printed page, and the incantations ended up seeming kind of silly. That's still the case now I've had a fascination with Doctor Strange ever since I was a kid sneaking peeks at the Marvel comics of various friends when I wasn't under the watchful eye of my parents who did not approve. Once I went to college and started to buy comics for myself, Doctor Strange was one I tried and found myself still intrigued, but also kind of disappointed. I think he was always weirder in my head than ever on the printed page, and the incantations ended up seeming kind of silly. That's still the case now, with this book full of bombastic dialog and portentous posing, but somehow I still enjoy it sheer ridiculousness of it all. This book has an absurd grandeur with densely colorful art and lots of magical bolts flying from hand (or gauntlets). The best thing to do is just revel in it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    I always like it when a hero is teamed up with a villain for a mutual cause and this early Marvel graphic novel delivered in spades. The story essentially teams Dr. Strange with Dr. Doom in a fight against the hordes of hades and their dreaded "king" Mephisto. Roger Stern is on top of his game mixing in the origin of Doom along with a glimpse of Strange's origin to boot. Stern is on top of his game again giving voice to Doom and making Doom even more three dimensional as both a villain and in I always like it when a hero is teamed up with a villain for a mutual cause and this early Marvel graphic novel delivered in spades. The story essentially teams Dr. Strange with Dr. Doom in a fight against the hordes of hades and their dreaded "king" Mephisto. Roger Stern is on top of his game mixing in the origin of Doom along with a glimpse of Strange's origin to boot. Stern is on top of his game again giving voice to Doom and making Doom even more three dimensional as both a villain and in a way a tragic hero. Mike Mignola provides some great early career art work here as well and creates some truly wicked demons in Mephisto's realm. Mark Badger provides wonderful inks and colors as well. The book came out in 1989 and could very well have come out today. It seems more Doom's story then Strange's but the story works and is always an enjoyable read to visit and re-visit.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andre

    This is, quite frankly, a stupendous compendium. If more classic Marvel comics were treated like this, the world would be a better place. Firstly, the title story: Triumph and Torment. Originally published as part of the Marvel Graphic Novel line, this is fantastic comic story. Mike Mignola had really come together by the time this was released (1989) and his illustrations of demons and sorcerors are beautiful. Stern does a great job with the story, although it is still a 1980s Marvel comic, so l This is, quite frankly, a stupendous compendium. If more classic Marvel comics were treated like this, the world would be a better place. Firstly, the title story: Triumph and Torment. Originally published as part of the Marvel Graphic Novel line, this is fantastic comic story. Mike Mignola had really come together by the time this was released (1989) and his illustrations of demons and sorcerors are beautiful. Stern does a great job with the story, although it is still a 1980s Marvel comic, so look out for some Claremont-esque purple prose but it's not too glaring considering this is about Dr. Strange and Dr. Doom, two of the most melodramatic of Marvel's roster, so it actually works. Marvel could have stopped there but they didn't (shout out to Jennifer Grunwald, who edited this collection together). Instead, you also get several more classic comics. There's a Dr. Doom story from Astonishing Tales #8, the impetus for Triumph and Torment, in which the concept of his annual fight for his mother's soul. There's Doctor Strange #57, which may be one of the few weak points, as it wasn't a particularly interesting story from Stern but does have a brief scene in which Doom considers being Strange's disciple. And just because, they also included two Mignola illustrated Namor tales from Marvel Fanfare #16 and #43, never before reprinted, written by Mignola's frequent early collaborator, the great Bill Mantlo. This is pretty much a must have for Mike Mignola fans but it's also simply a great story involving Strange, Doom and occult fun.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Doctor Strange and Doctor Doom travel to the underworld and back whooping all kinds of ass along the way. The setup to get Strange and Doom together is a bit disconnected from the meat of the story but fun to read nonetheless. Outside of that the plot was great and really explores Dr. Doom in a way I haven't seen before. Plus all of the art in the underworld is just fantastic: Essential reading to any Doom fan. Doctor Strange and Doctor Doom travel to the underworld and back whooping all kinds of ass along the way. The setup to get Strange and Doom together is a bit disconnected from the meat of the story but fun to read nonetheless. Outside of that the plot was great and really explores Dr. Doom in a way I haven't seen before. Plus all of the art in the underworld is just fantastic: Essential reading to any Doom fan.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dean

    Great main story, and excellent collection. Roger Stern and Mike Mignola have put together one of the best team-up,books out there, with Dr Doom and Dr Strange taking on Mephisto. A ton of ideas are well written and drawn, adding up to a great story. The GN also has some extra back up,stories, including an excellent reprint from Stern on Dr Stranges monthly, plus some early Mignola backups and some pin ups. A very strong collection, a great read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Let's see... Mignola drawing Dr. Strange: sounds great. Mignola drawing Dr Doom do sorcerous things added on: even better. The two Doctors team up to save Doom's mother from Mephisto and again, all drawn by Mike Mignola: I can go for that, yeah sure, sign me up. Totally lived up to the billing. And I don't wanna sell Roger Stern short, he made the kind of story for which Mignola was made. Let's see... Mignola drawing Dr. Strange: sounds great. Mignola drawing Dr Doom do sorcerous things added on: even better. The two Doctors team up to save Doom's mother from Mephisto and again, all drawn by Mike Mignola: I can go for that, yeah sure, sign me up. Totally lived up to the billing. And I don't wanna sell Roger Stern short, he made the kind of story for which Mignola was made.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katarina (poleksya)

    This was my first Doctor Strange graphic novel, but also my first Doctor Doom one too, and I have to say I loved it. The story follows Doctor Strange as he is summoned to the Temple of the Triumph where he battles other mages for the title of Sorcerer Supreme. He wins, but with that comes with a task of helping Doctor Doom with anything he orders him to do. This becomes an interesting collaboration between the two that gives us an origin story of Doctor Doom. As I said this was the first graphic This was my first Doctor Strange graphic novel, but also my first Doctor Doom one too, and I have to say I loved it. The story follows Doctor Strange as he is summoned to the Temple of the Triumph where he battles other mages for the title of Sorcerer Supreme. He wins, but with that comes with a task of helping Doctor Doom with anything he orders him to do. This becomes an interesting collaboration between the two that gives us an origin story of Doctor Doom. As I said this was the first graphic novel about Doctor strange that I've read, so I'm not really a person to come for recommendations about this, but I feel like it was a nice place to start with Doctor Strange and I can't wait to read more about both characters.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    A short and satisfying comic. It's been on my shelf in the shrink for 28 years(!). It took me back to the Doctor Doom solo stories from the 70's. Excellent artwork throughout, although I didn't like the black framing chosen by the book designer. A short and satisfying comic. It's been on my shelf in the shrink for 28 years(!). It took me back to the Doctor Doom solo stories from the 70's. Excellent artwork throughout, although I didn't like the black framing chosen by the book designer.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tom A.

    A journey into hell brings the best out of Marvel's best characters Strange: Von Doom, if you have worked so long for your mother's salvation, why did you subject yourself to the contest of the Vishanti… …why did you not simply seek me out and ask for my help? Von Doom: I will bear any ordeal, Strange… but Doctor Doom does not beg. Good Night. After enduring a grueling mystical tournament organized by the Vishanti, Dr. Strange emerges victorious, and he is declared Sorcerer Supreme. The catch A journey into hell brings the best out of Marvel's best characters Strange: Von Doom, if you have worked so long for your mother's salvation, why did you subject yourself to the contest of the Vishanti… …why did you not simply seek me out and ask for my help? Von Doom: I will bear any ordeal, Strange… but Doctor Doom does not beg. Good Night. After enduring a grueling mystical tournament organized by the Vishanti, Dr. Strange emerges victorious, and he is declared Sorcerer Supreme. The catch: The Sorcerer Supreme must give the prize to the other sorcerer who endured the challenge, and that is Doctor Doom. Strange is furious and refuses the demands of the Vishanti, citing that Doom is a dictator and a villain. But Doom has only one request from Strange: help him rescue the soul of his mother from Mephisto's realm. Strange sees this as a noble effort and complies. They embark for Latveria to prepare. In that time, Strange learns of the creepy and tragic events that led to Doom's mother imprisoned in the underworld. But what horrors await these two in the demon underworld? And can Strange put his trust in the notorious Doom? When people enumerate what they think are the best comics around, they usually spout the same books: Watchmen, Maus, 100 bullets, classic Stan Lee with whoever runs, etc. Doctor Strange, Doctor Doom: Triumph and Torment belongs in that list. Reasons: 1. Doom and Strange have ample opportunity to shine and be their very best. Roger Stern, one of the leading experts on Marvel Continuity, knows and augments the personality of each character well. Strange's best qualities are on display: humble, optimistic, and introspective while Doom is ever cocky (but assured), focused, arrogant, and devious. Also, we are used to seeing Dr. Doom operate under his megalomaniac tendencies; how many times have we seen him defending something personal and dear to him? Doom's mystical prowess is also discussed and elaborated on, especially the fact that he was into sorcery even before his fateful encounter with Reed Richards. We rarely see him use his training in spells and magic in regular Fantastic Four comics. (except for that scene where Doom was ah comic fans know) In this TPB, he gets to display his talent for the mystic arts, and it is a reminder of how good Doom is in any field. If you only knew these characters from their respective movies, then be prepared to be introduced to their best incarnations. 2. The combination of action, horror, and drama is top-notch. Marvel "action" is seen in the early battles, complete with colorful displays of mystical power. The proceedings soon turn dark with the revelation of the fate of Doom's mother (a mini-horror tale in itself). The journey into Mephisto's underworld, however, is where these elements interplay beautifully; Doom's technology and Strange's mystic arts do battle with ALL the forces of darkness of Mephisto (including those pesky morale-diminishing illusion demons). Oh, and the art by Mike Mignola. (yeah, you know him) 3. There are a lot of strong themes on display here, and it goes beyond "good and evil" shenanigans. For one, there is the theme of trusting your worst enemy for the greater good. Strange is probably aware of the many times collaborations with Doom ended with treachery and betrayal, and yet he still strives to help the desperate villain. This conflict rears its ugly head later in the story as they face Mephisto. Also, the tale of Doom's mother touches on the ole Devil's Bargain dilemma and mixes it with righteous vengeance. And of course, the Devil wins. But as they say, the proof of the pudding is in the eating. If you don't believe me, then read it for yourself. And be prepared to witness a great Marvel tale.

  22. 5 out of 5

    How to Love Comics

    I read this as part of research for a Doctor Strange stories you should read article I recently wrote and out of all the stories I read this was one of my favourite. While it's a Doctor Strange story, it's equally a Doctor Doom one too as it digs deeper into his past and motivations in a way that has never been before. Doom has always been a cool super-villain, but Triumph and Torment is the first time I have ever felt empathy for him. That's an impressive feat considering he's selfish, condesce I read this as part of research for a Doctor Strange stories you should read article I recently wrote and out of all the stories I read this was one of my favourite. While it's a Doctor Strange story, it's equally a Doctor Doom one too as it digs deeper into his past and motivations in a way that has never been before. Doom has always been a cool super-villain, but Triumph and Torment is the first time I have ever felt empathy for him. That's an impressive feat considering he's selfish, condescending and overall a pretty bad dude. Mike Mignola's art is impressive too. I'm used to his current style through his work on Hellboy and other creator-owned series of his, but this particular style is great too look at too. It's got shades of Frank Miller and is more European leading than the general superhero comics of the time. The watercoloured colours are great too and partner with his loose line-work well. It's not long read, but it definitely is an enjoyable one. If you're looking for a solid story featuring Doctor Doom or Doctor Strange this one should be high on your list.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Felipe Canedo

    Beautiful art by Mignola and a great solid plot by Stern. Seeing Doom capable of self-sacrifices and accompanying Dr. Strange's quest to become officially Sorcerer Supreme are, indeed, more than enough reasons for me to appreciate this comic. A very good arch for anyone who is an old fan of Strange, but also for those who have just discovered the character and wish to delve further in Marvel's magical universe mythology. And, of course, an excellent graphic novel for anyone who is a fan of comics Beautiful art by Mignola and a great solid plot by Stern. Seeing Doom capable of self-sacrifices and accompanying Dr. Strange's quest to become officially Sorcerer Supreme are, indeed, more than enough reasons for me to appreciate this comic. A very good arch for anyone who is an old fan of Strange, but also for those who have just discovered the character and wish to delve further in Marvel's magical universe mythology. And, of course, an excellent graphic novel for anyone who is a fan of comics.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Very good story. Doc Strange and Dr Doom are like two sides of a coin but of very different views. Very good art and story. Very recommended

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris Robertson

    Marvel villainy is a many faceted subject: you have everything from mob bosses, serial killers bonded to an alien, gigantic planet eaters....even a guy on stilts. And then there is Doom. Guy runs his own country, refers to himself in third person, has cool armor. May not sound like much of a menace, but it is his intellect and relentlessness that make him my favorite. This volume shines added light on Doom’s overall motivation: he wants to save his mother. Sound heartwarming? Well, Doom’s method Marvel villainy is a many faceted subject: you have everything from mob bosses, serial killers bonded to an alien, gigantic planet eaters....even a guy on stilts. And then there is Doom. Guy runs his own country, refers to himself in third person, has cool armor. May not sound like much of a menace, but it is his intellect and relentlessness that make him my favorite. This volume shines added light on Doom’s overall motivation: he wants to save his mother. Sound heartwarming? Well, Doom’s methods are very cunning and ruthless, often several steps ahead. He will use any resource, even people, then discard them when his aims are met. Strange is an interesting one to pair with Doom: normally you have the Richards vs. Doom war of intellects battle, but Strange is kind of like Doom in a way. He is also focused and driven, often coming off as brusque and ruthless, even though a hero. Art by Mignola is compelling as usual, with unique panel design that isn’t too crowded. Few capture the supernatural as well as he can. Don’t think the added issues are needed, but nice to give some bang for your buck.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kole

    An interesting crossover. In the first part of this comic, Dr. Doom and Dr. Strange participate in a magic competition, this part is fun but kind of silly and, unfortunately, it ends in an extremely dumb way. It seems to only exist to set up the second part of the story where Doom and Strange travel to Hell to battle Mephisto for the soul of Doom's mother. This part is much better and has some interesting character dynamics involving this unlikely team-up. Overall, this particular story is defin An interesting crossover. In the first part of this comic, Dr. Doom and Dr. Strange participate in a magic competition, this part is fun but kind of silly and, unfortunately, it ends in an extremely dumb way. It seems to only exist to set up the second part of the story where Doom and Strange travel to Hell to battle Mephisto for the soul of Doom's mother. This part is much better and has some interesting character dynamics involving this unlikely team-up. Overall, this particular story is definitely worth a read for comic fans. The art by Mike Mignola is good throughout this whole collection with it's own unique style. The art in the comics not by Mignola is decent and tells the story well but feels generic in comparison. In addition to the main story, this collection includes 4 other comics that are also worth a read with the two Prince Namor comics drawn by Mike Mignola being especially good. This collection comes recommended for comic book fans and especially fans of these two characters or the artwork of Mike Mignola. 4/5

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Of the three Doctor Strange "greatest hits" I read (the others being the first Marvel Masterworks volume and the Season One graphic novel), this was far and away my favorite. Doctor Doom tricks (for lack of a better word) Doctor Strange into helping him rescue his mother (Doom's, not Strange's) from Hell. There are some nice touches to the writing - I like the implication that the Aged Genghis whose cult helped Doom create his armor is sort of a colleague of the Ancient One - and Mignola's art i Of the three Doctor Strange "greatest hits" I read (the others being the first Marvel Masterworks volume and the Season One graphic novel), this was far and away my favorite. Doctor Doom tricks (for lack of a better word) Doctor Strange into helping him rescue his mother (Doom's, not Strange's) from Hell. There are some nice touches to the writing - I like the implication that the Aged Genghis whose cult helped Doom create his armor is sort of a colleague of the Ancient One - and Mignola's art is really nice and also really fascinating. (You can see the first hints of his later style in the early "contest of wizards" section and in the Castle Doom segment.) Some additional early Mignola Marvel work and earlier issues that set up this storyline are included, but these are pretty much just filler. This doesn't reach any really great heights of storytelling, ultimately, but it's a great concept solidly executed that finds a clever new way to deliver on the promise of the Marvel universe.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Doctor Doom (when written well) is a villain who always thinks three steps ahead of his foes -- and here he exemplifies that, finding an opportunity to gain Doctor Strange's help in a rescue attempt for his mother's lost soul. It leads to a wonderfully trippy adventure that is equal parts phantasmagoric Marvel magic and Hellboy-esque atmosphere. The framing story was a bit odd, an attempt to inject some humor into a heavy story, but the core tale and the world-building and origin-exploring eleme Doctor Doom (when written well) is a villain who always thinks three steps ahead of his foes -- and here he exemplifies that, finding an opportunity to gain Doctor Strange's help in a rescue attempt for his mother's lost soul. It leads to a wonderfully trippy adventure that is equal parts phantasmagoric Marvel magic and Hellboy-esque atmosphere. The framing story was a bit odd, an attempt to inject some humor into a heavy story, but the core tale and the world-building and origin-exploring elements were spot on.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rizzie

    The DEFINITIVE Doctor Strange comic, and essentially the definitive Doctor Doom comic as well. This is just wonderful. Mignola's art is always a gift, and it couldn't be better suited to the subject matter. The unlikely duo play on each other so well, and their journey through hell has some surprise emotional punch and genuine horror. One of the top 5 comics Marvel has ever published. The DEFINITIVE Doctor Strange comic, and essentially the definitive Doctor Doom comic as well. This is just wonderful. Mignola's art is always a gift, and it couldn't be better suited to the subject matter. The unlikely duo play on each other so well, and their journey through hell has some surprise emotional punch and genuine horror. One of the top 5 comics Marvel has ever published.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Henry

    Wasn't so sure about the first half, but once the second half's story kicks in I was very interested, and found Doctor Doom rather compellingly written and enjoyed his backstory. This does suffer from a major case of "magic is just lasers" of which I am never a fan. It's magic, it can do more than just shoot light at people! Wasn't so sure about the first half, but once the second half's story kicks in I was very interested, and found Doctor Doom rather compellingly written and enjoyed his backstory. This does suffer from a major case of "magic is just lasers" of which I am never a fan. It's magic, it can do more than just shoot light at people!

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