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Captain America: The Chosen

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Collects Captain America: The Chosen #1-6. Who will be chosen to follow in Cap's footsteps? Captain America lies dying. And in perhaps his greatest mission, he uses his last moments to search for the nobility, sacrifice and heroism of the next generation's Captain America. Collects Captain America: The Chosen #1-6. Who will be chosen to follow in Cap's footsteps? Captain America lies dying. And in perhaps his greatest mission, he uses his last moments to search for the nobility, sacrifice and heroism of the next generation's Captain America.


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Collects Captain America: The Chosen #1-6. Who will be chosen to follow in Cap's footsteps? Captain America lies dying. And in perhaps his greatest mission, he uses his last moments to search for the nobility, sacrifice and heroism of the next generation's Captain America. Collects Captain America: The Chosen #1-6. Who will be chosen to follow in Cap's footsteps? Captain America lies dying. And in perhaps his greatest mission, he uses his last moments to search for the nobility, sacrifice and heroism of the next generation's Captain America.

30 review for Captain America: The Chosen

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tiara

    Spoilers ahead. Before I get to the Captain America gushing, I need to get this out of the way. I don’t like the setting for this. No, I’m okay with the war environment, but I didn’t like that it specifically had to be Afghanistan and Al Qaeda related with the 9/11 references. That felt, in my opinion, felt like a cheap sympathy grab on Marvel’s part, making it feel more like an US versus THEM problem, which can distract from what I felt was the true message of this story. This story is mostly to Spoilers ahead. Before I get to the Captain America gushing, I need to get this out of the way. I don’t like the setting for this. No, I’m okay with the war environment, but I didn’t like that it specifically had to be Afghanistan and Al Qaeda related with the 9/11 references. That felt, in my opinion, felt like a cheap sympathy grab on Marvel’s part, making it feel more like an US versus THEM problem, which can distract from what I felt was the true message of this story. This story is mostly told from the POV of James Newman, a young soldier serving in the United States military. He wants to help his country and the country he’s fighting in, but he’s no longer sure how to help when he can’t distinguish those who need help from those he needs to fight. He misses his wife and infant son. And he’s also becoming jaded toward fear because he’s living in a constant state of fear. During a fight, Captain America shows up on the battlefield and “helps” Newman to save some of his squad. The only problem? No one else saw Cap. In fact, he’s many miles away dying. The super soldier serum has finally “failed” for Captain America. Not only is he losing all the physical conditioning he had, but he’s regressing to a state far more frail than he was even before the serum. He’s initially given 6 months to live, but his health degrades in weeks instead of months. Captain America agrees to submit to one last test, an experiment that allows him to telepathically project himself in any location, but causes him to expend a lot of energy, which speeds up his regression. He’d been using this ability to find and map out terrorist hideouts, but then he learns that he can project himself into the consciousness of others, making them believe that he was standing right there with them. Not only that, but apparently, this also gives him access to their thoughts, feelings, and memories. He uses this to cause fear at first, but changes his focus to inspire ordinary heroes to be courageous. He says that courage isn’t the absence of fear, but a motivation for it. Fear will make you do things you didn’t think possible, which is true. I appreciated the idea of Captain America expending himself to help people in any way he can even after his body starts to fail him. Captain America pushes himself so hard and takes it so personally when he feels he failed the people he swore to protect. Despite his rapidly deteriorating state, he still puts everything he’s got into helping others. This does feel like something that Captain America would do—defending others until he just couldn’t any longer. The idea of the serum finally catching up to him and proving that it wasn’t a complete success was an interesting angle. It’s never fully discussed in the comic how that might’ve happened. If he hadn’t been frozen in ice, would he have burned out a few months later? Had the experiment actually been a complete success and his time in the ice had subtly degraded the effect of the serum? Did he overextend himself? It’s a mystery, but I’m not upset there isn’t some drawn out explanation about why this might’ve happened. It leaves readers to speculate for themselves. However, I wasn’t too crazy about how that story was told. In some panels, there was too much back and forth going on trying to get Newman to keep it together. I know it was necessary, but it started to feel a bit filler-ish after a while. And I’m not even going to touch that part of the ending where Newman went full Rambo (and this was written by the author of the Rambo books), and it was a bit too hackneyed in some panels. Many of the lab scenes didn’t really feel necessary, especially since he was basically telling Newman his story from beginning to end at the same time. The lab scenes added too many questions that weren’t addressed like when they wanted to know who he chose. Chose for what? To become the next Captain America? To fetch his dinner? How were they supposed to make a new Captain America, if they were hoping he’d choose an heir, to be able to perform physically on the same level? Or were the hoping for someone to continue this new experiment they started? The government obviously didn’t care about—or was blind to—the fact that it took more than physical prowess to make Captain America, if that’s what they were going for. But part of, maybe even a large part of, the traits that make Captain America who he is doesn’t have to do with physical conditioning, but his indomitable will and the virtues he holds close to his heart, and this was something he had even before he became Captain America. This is something that anyone can have and extends beyond beliefs, race, citizenship, etc. Captain America knew this and admired the people who didn’t have his conditioning, but performed their duties every day. He questioned if ordinary people could go out there and risk their lives to help others, what made him any different? What made him better? Just because he may be physically superior to them didn’t make him better. After Captain America did his final heroic deed in the book, the first question posed was, “What will we do without him?” But I can see this question being the opening for them to start relying on their own strengths, a wakeup call to the fact that you can’t always rely on a superhero to save the day. Quite often, you can only rely on yourself, and you have the necessary “powers” to do so. I thought this was a good story, but it could’ve been better. Some of the ideas behind it were magnificent in theory, but were not executed to their full potential. In the end, I felt like the story’s main goal was to show how there are ordinary people doing extraordinary things every day. Even though we only see him with Newman, he is actually inspiring many others at the same time, encouraging them to use their strengths to help their fellow man. You don’t have be Captain America to embody the virtues of courage, honor, sacrifice, and loyalty. You can find these same “hero” traits in doctors, teachers, farmers, any average person in the world. Everyone has the potential to be a Captain America. It’s not always the strength of body that makes a hero.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    The perfect read for the Memorial Day weekend. Cap acts as a Obi-Wan / Jiminy Cricket for a leatherneck who literally gets stuck between a rock and a hard place.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Oh, Captain America. He's such a good lookin' kid--the artwork in this volume is top notch--but the poor guy has recently become victim to more revisionist history than Chuck Norris. Here we have a stand-alone non-canonical limited series that places Captain America in Afghanistan in the midst of the American invasion. Well, actually, no. Cap is wasting away in an undisclosed bunker, and his "consciousness" is in Afghanistan, assisting in a) psychological warfare against the Taliban, and b) lifti Oh, Captain America. He's such a good lookin' kid--the artwork in this volume is top notch--but the poor guy has recently become victim to more revisionist history than Chuck Norris. Here we have a stand-alone non-canonical limited series that places Captain America in Afghanistan in the midst of the American invasion. Well, actually, no. Cap is wasting away in an undisclosed bunker, and his "consciousness" is in Afghanistan, assisting in a) psychological warfare against the Taliban, and b) lifting the morale of the American soldiers. According to the author's addendum, The Chosen was originally written to be part of Marvel's "The End" project, which told of the eventual demise and deaths of the Universe's seemingly indestructible heroes (see Wolverine: The End, Hulk: The End). The problem was that by the time The Chosen was completed, Captain America of the main continuity had just been killed off ( Captain America vol. 5, #25 ). Thus, we are left with a stand-alone story that features no one from the Marvel Universe except Captain America himself (unless you count the brief back-of-the-head image of Nick Fury). Now, I have no problem with non-canon stories; heck, some make up the best stories of our beloved superheroes (The Dark Knight Returns, Captain America: Dead Man Running). Unfortunately, The Chosen falls victim to a writer who by his own admission knew nothing about comic books, let alone Marvel's most famous character, and whose claim to fame is for creating...Rambo?!? Yep, Rambo. *SIGH* So that means Captain America, in his death throws, succumbs to not only the adverse effects of the Super Soldier Serum in his veins, but to the clichéd action sequences and one-liners of American war propaganda. Propaganda? Captain America? NO WAY!!! Yes, yes, yes I'm well aware that Cap was created (by Simon & Kirby on paper, and by American military scientists in the Marvel Universe) specifically to be a living propaganda poster, with the intention of countering the Nazis' own image of the Super Soldier. But as any fan knows, he refused to be merely a pawn of the government, instead serving the people--often in direct defiance of corrupt politicians. And this story is full of 'em. Captain America appears as an "imaginary friend" to a scared, injured soldier. He repeats words such as "courage", "honor", and "strength" with no apparent context. He is visible only to the soldier who believes in him (none of the other service men can see him), and only during times of great distress. For example, a scene where our young soldier overcomes his fears and leaps across a ravine is superimposed with Cap parachuting over Germany. As such, Captain America more closely resembles Thor as interpreted by the little girl in Adventures in Babysitting. Or Little League Jesus. Or maybe the Body Massage Machine. Can't you see? Don't you die on me! Nooooo! *sob* I know he'll always be with me. He's alive...inside all of us. Even though the story is non-canon, the sheer lack of knowledge of Captain America's character development over the past 60 years is quite evident. The premise of the story relies upon Captain America's demise due to the effects of the Super Soldier Serum running through his veins--ignoring the fact that this premise was already used in the mid-90s, with Cap receiving a complete blood and bone marrow transfusion (uh, yeah) thus removing the serum from his system entirely. It also flashes back to "1941", when Steve Rogers began the Super Soldier treatments that would turn him into the ultimate warrior--a full year after Captain America duked it out face-to-face with Hitler himself. Nitpicky? Hell yeah! These are COMIC BOOKS we're talking about! We take them very seriously!!!! But are you still aching for a Captain America story arch that features Cap serving his country the post-9/11 age of terror? Go for Captain America: The New Deal . Far, far superior.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jedi Sunni

    This was an original story with little to no surprises. I knew everything that was going to happen but the plot did a great job of keeping me engaged. I like to art and the main character was very relate-able. What did not appreciate is so much of our real world being portrayed in this story. I personally read comics to escape reality not to be reminded of the terror that seemingly lurks around the corner. Other than this I thought story took me somewhere comic dare not go and for that I give th This was an original story with little to no surprises. I knew everything that was going to happen but the plot did a great job of keeping me engaged. I like to art and the main character was very relate-able. What did not appreciate is so much of our real world being portrayed in this story. I personally read comics to escape reality not to be reminded of the terror that seemingly lurks around the corner. Other than this I thought story took me somewhere comic dare not go and for that I give the writer of comic a lot of credit. My overall rating for this issue is a 4.4 out of 5.0.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Albert Yates

    Other than the movies, I've never been much of a fan of Captain America. He was always in the periphery of the books I read, part of the teams I was following but I never really read anything that centered around him. Who better to write a story about Captain America other than the man who invented Rambo? What a perfect pairing. Other than the movies, I've never been much of a fan of Captain America. He was always in the periphery of the books I read, part of the teams I was following but I never really read anything that centered around him. Who better to write a story about Captain America other than the man who invented Rambo? What a perfect pairing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Wordwizard

    Read ages ago, back in my first or second year of college. Finally tracked down and re-read in late 2017.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    I'm not crying . . . I just . . . have something in my eye . . . This is a great Captain America story, if kind of tragic . . . I'm not crying . . . I just . . . have something in my eye . . . This is a great Captain America story, if kind of tragic . . .

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vincent Lombardo

    The story was a little too bland for me. The best part is the artwork by Breitweiser. The detail and the grit makes a perfect atmosphere for the war.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Reyhan

    2.5 overall

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dion

    A moving story and told in an original way. The artwork and colouring make most panels works of art in themselves. This is what graphic novels are all about.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    Captain America: The Chosen (Mini Comic File) Corporal James Newman serves with the U.S. Marines in Afghanistan fighting the war on terror. It is a difficult and emotionally scaring journey, and very realistic. When facing adversity, Newman has a unseen partner in Captain America! Cap attempts to inspire Newman to new levels of courage and sacrifice. Can Newman and Cap survive this tour of duty? This story is written by David Morrell, you know of Rambo fame! Though I personally prefer the Brotherh Captain America: The Chosen (Mini Comic File) Corporal James Newman serves with the U.S. Marines in Afghanistan fighting the war on terror. It is a difficult and emotionally scaring journey, and very realistic. When facing adversity, Newman has a unseen partner in Captain America! Cap attempts to inspire Newman to new levels of courage and sacrifice. Can Newman and Cap survive this tour of duty? This story is written by David Morrell, you know of Rambo fame! Though I personally prefer the Brotherhood of the Rose. Morrell's righting is gritty and realistic. And he takes this Captain America story and puts it in what feels like our world and real conflict. But this story is not about the war on terror. This is about Newman and his personal character struggle as he attempts to define who he is as a man and how Captain America has served as a model. To guide Newman, Captain America retells his own origin story. Captain America has a goal. And it really is something we see in other titles like Avengers World. Cap wants his ideals for justice and sacrifice to spread beyond him. And in Newman he sees someone who could be part of his legacy. Newman really is just a normal guy, like us agents. Really this is a inspiring story, not a fighty fighty story, which attempts to make us better people. For MCU fans this story will feel like something that is a good extension of Captain America: The First Avenger with Cap's origin feeling like it could easily fit in the MCU. Rating: 5 out of 5 stars.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Erik

    Other than Brubaker’s current run on Captain America, I have found most of the stories centered on the first Avenger to be either too derivative a rehash of his WWII origins or simply corny histrionic jingoism. And I would have thought much the same from the writer of First Blood, the novel upon which the Stallone movie was based. But luckily I was quite wrong. Morrell had created a brilliant premise in this modern-day Captain America narrative that alternates between a bedridden and ailing Cap Other than Brubaker’s current run on Captain America, I have found most of the stories centered on the first Avenger to be either too derivative a rehash of his WWII origins or simply corny histrionic jingoism. And I would have thought much the same from the writer of First Blood, the novel upon which the Stallone movie was based. But luckily I was quite wrong. Morrell had created a brilliant premise in this modern-day Captain America narrative that alternates between a bedridden and ailing Cap and Corporal James Newman, the latter of whom is facing his greatest wartime fears in the hinterlands of Al-Queda infested Afghanistan. The clever sci-fi premise that emerges is second only to the message of courage, honor, loyalty, and sacrifice that provides the backbone of this war story – which is just as internal as it is external. And let’s not forget the stunning realism of Breitweiser’s art. Honestly, I have seen this level of cleanly drafted storytelling since Jae Lee’s work on the Inhumans mini-series. His work is Michael Lark, Butch Guice, and Steve Epting at their best. (Which surprises me as Breitweiser isn’t currently employed full-time by either of the Big Two, DC and Marvel. At least as far as I know.) Reading The Chosen also makes me eager for Marvel Studios’ upcoming summer blockbuster, Captain America: The First Avenger.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Berrie

    Read the four stars above as 4.5 stars and you will see that I really liked this book, despite the strange premise of the story/series. This is one of Marvel's 'The End' series of comics that were supposed to be stand-alones that explored the death of some of their major characters. The Captain America story, diverged from the normal MO for these stories in that it wasn't written by a comic book writer, it was written by a novelist, David Morrell; Morrell was the writer who wrote 'First Blood', t Read the four stars above as 4.5 stars and you will see that I really liked this book, despite the strange premise of the story/series. This is one of Marvel's 'The End' series of comics that were supposed to be stand-alones that explored the death of some of their major characters. The Captain America story, diverged from the normal MO for these stories in that it wasn't written by a comic book writer, it was written by a novelist, David Morrell; Morrell was the writer who wrote 'First Blood', the book the first Rambo movie was based on. Like the movie or not, Morrell is obviously a pretty decent writer with a natural flair for the medium because he did a very good job here. Add to that the superb artwork of Mitch Breitweiser—I especially liked his depiction of American soldiers and their technology in Afghanistan and the images of the aftermath of real-life terrorist attacks (though see below for a gripe)—and you end up with an excellent story with a suitable ending for the United State's greatest hero. My gripe was with the depiction of Cap's chain mail tunic in the early part of the book. It looked like he was covered in fluffed up feathers. And this was an artistic choice apparently, because towards the end of the book the uniform was drawn looking more like I was used to seeing. Still, that was a minor issue with a damned good read. One for the Cap lovers.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    A good but not great Captain America story from the guy that created Rambo. It's about a soldier in Afghanistan on the verge of nervous exhaustion who is visited by the spirit of Cap, who helps him find courage within himself when he's ready to give up. The idea being we all have the spirit of Captain America within us and can all be heroes. Morrell writes Cap as a soldier who has always fought the good fight without question and sacrificed everything until the end. That's fine but it lacks a cert A good but not great Captain America story from the guy that created Rambo. It's about a soldier in Afghanistan on the verge of nervous exhaustion who is visited by the spirit of Cap, who helps him find courage within himself when he's ready to give up. The idea being we all have the spirit of Captain America within us and can all be heroes. Morrell writes Cap as a soldier who has always fought the good fight without question and sacrificed everything until the end. That's fine but it lacks a certain kick or extra layer in the story. For me Cap works best when he has doubts. He represents America's ideals and is often disappointed because he sees how we're failing those ideals. By setting the story in Afghanistan, in the "good" war, the author finds an easy way out from asking tough questions and creates a story about duty and heroism. If set in Iraq, in the more controversial war, it possibly could have been more complex and asked questions about America at war and what makes one war good and the other bad, and what does it mean for a loyal soldier who finds himself fighting in a "bad" one.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    While on the battlefield fighting Al Qaeda, Corporal Newman sees Captain America joining him. Those around him though he was hallucinating, he wasn't. Cap's body is dying, but he's signed up for one more experiment, one more chance to serve His country and to make a difference. The book is an emotional powerful work by David Morrell, author of the book First Blood on which the Rambo series was base. The book is less about being a Captain America story and more about the inspiration the ideal of C While on the battlefield fighting Al Qaeda, Corporal Newman sees Captain America joining him. Those around him though he was hallucinating, he wasn't. Cap's body is dying, but he's signed up for one more experiment, one more chance to serve His country and to make a difference. The book is an emotional powerful work by David Morrell, author of the book First Blood on which the Rambo series was base. The book is less about being a Captain America story and more about the inspiration the ideal of Captain America represents to so many fans around the world. He's a role model and an ideal who represents who we want to be on the best days of our lives. At the same time, the book is about the real heroes of the U.S. Military whose courage and fortitude makes a difference in the real world. The book was an emotional experience: A story that's simple yet powerful in its examination of honor, duty, and sacrifice. The art is very well-done creating a realistic feel without being gratuitously violent. If you love Captain America for the heroic tradition he represents, or if you love the American military, this is a beautiful book that shows what it's all about.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    This was an interesting view at a possible fate of Steve Rogers aka Captain America. Set against the modern war in Afghanistan, Morrell (who by the way is the creator of Rambo) gives us a view of how one man's bravery and refusal to give up can make a true difference to others. The story asks the question of how America, if not the world, would be different should we change our thought process of "looking out for number one" to "why can't we work together". Inspirational but still giving the rea This was an interesting view at a possible fate of Steve Rogers aka Captain America. Set against the modern war in Afghanistan, Morrell (who by the way is the creator of Rambo) gives us a view of how one man's bravery and refusal to give up can make a true difference to others. The story asks the question of how America, if not the world, would be different should we change our thought process of "looking out for number one" to "why can't we work together". Inspirational but still giving the reader the things they love about Captain America (his sense of duty and honor, not to mention whooping up on the bad guys). Although removed from the general 616 reality of the the Marvel Universe, the story was entertaining and perfectly believable for the character. The art was gritty, but effective for the story being told. All around interesting read that Cap fans and other will probably enjoy.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sorcha

    Multi stranded story, where Captain America lies dying. Meanwhile a Corporal in the US Army is in Afghanistan, missing his wife and the 5 month old son he's never seen. During a patrol, when the unit are under fire Corporal Newman rescues the rest of his unit, believing that Captain America is beside him, supporting him. He only finds out later, during another rescue (which forms the main part of the book), that Captain America is telepathically talking to him, as Newman has been selected to bec Multi stranded story, where Captain America lies dying. Meanwhile a Corporal in the US Army is in Afghanistan, missing his wife and the 5 month old son he's never seen. During a patrol, when the unit are under fire Corporal Newman rescues the rest of his unit, believing that Captain America is beside him, supporting him. He only finds out later, during another rescue (which forms the main part of the book), that Captain America is telepathically talking to him, as Newman has been selected to become one of the new Captain Americas. During his escape attempt, Captain America tells Newman of how Steve Rogers became "Cap", why there was only one super soldier ever produced, and why he is now dying. There is also a new project being set up, for which Newman has been selected to take part. Excellent graphics and writing, good to see a story in a modern setting, with the problems still being encountered by soldiers still in Afghanistan being included.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mike Thomas

    This is a great graphic novel, about a dying Captain America, who undergoes one more Govt, experiment to project his image and voice to a chosen soldier, to make him ready to become the next generation Captain America, even though he hasn't Caps strength, he has honour and courage, and that is just as good, that's the novels main message. Its written by David Morrell, who is most famous for being the writer of the novel that Stallone's film, first blood was based on. Its set in Afghanistan, the This is a great graphic novel, about a dying Captain America, who undergoes one more Govt, experiment to project his image and voice to a chosen soldier, to make him ready to become the next generation Captain America, even though he hasn't Caps strength, he has honour and courage, and that is just as good, that's the novels main message. Its written by David Morrell, who is most famous for being the writer of the novel that Stallone's film, first blood was based on. Its set in Afghanistan, the art is very good, you can almost feel the sand and dust. It has a few flashbacks recalling Caps origin too, so you don't need to be a massive comic book fan to get this very enjoyable book. A very good graphic novel.....

  19. 4 out of 5

    Doug

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Top notch artwork, compelling story, and great characters. I only wish Cap's new power had been scientifically explained a little better. You are forced to accept that he has this mental power for the story to work, so I wish there had been a few pages devoted to making me believe it, rather than just writing it off as a side effect of the deteriorating Super Soldier serum). And since I'm getting into spoiler territory, I'll go the whole way and say Cap's death in the end was unforgettable. My j Top notch artwork, compelling story, and great characters. I only wish Cap's new power had been scientifically explained a little better. You are forced to accept that he has this mental power for the story to work, so I wish there had been a few pages devoted to making me believe it, rather than just writing it off as a side effect of the deteriorating Super Soldier serum). And since I'm getting into spoiler territory, I'll go the whole way and say Cap's death in the end was unforgettable. My jaw literally dropped, definitely a holy smokes moment.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Ruth

    I don't know. I had a harder time connecting with this graphic novel, but maybe that's because the main character wasn't really Captain America? Maybe because it felt like a moral tale (ish?)? Maybe I don't know enough about Captain America yet? It is kind of funny though. I picked up this one because the other two were called The Death of Captain America and I was like, I don't want to read about him dying. And then I read this. So maybe I was set up for disappointment no matter what. I don't k I don't know. I had a harder time connecting with this graphic novel, but maybe that's because the main character wasn't really Captain America? Maybe because it felt like a moral tale (ish?)? Maybe I don't know enough about Captain America yet? It is kind of funny though. I picked up this one because the other two were called The Death of Captain America and I was like, I don't want to read about him dying. And then I read this. So maybe I was set up for disappointment no matter what. I don't know. *shrugs*

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tiago Castro

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Who Is Captain America? Is he ever afraid? This book answers those and some other questions. It's written by Rambo's creator and narrated by James Newman, a U.S. Marine. I didn't love this book. It has a good idea And some strong points but it's not something we've never seen. It is still interesting to see Captain America dying and searching for legacy, and the way he does it is really something different than what most heroes would do (even if his methods are kinda non-sensical). All in all this bo Who Is Captain America? Is he ever afraid? This book answers those and some other questions. It's written by Rambo's creator and narrated by James Newman, a U.S. Marine. I didn't love this book. It has a good idea And some strong points but it's not something we've never seen. It is still interesting to see Captain America dying and searching for legacy, and the way he does it is really something different than what most heroes would do (even if his methods are kinda non-sensical). All in all this book is good, but not great enough to leave any kind of special impact on the reader.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mat Brewster

    My first Captain America book and I rather hated it. It was filled with lots of rah rah yea America! propaganda. Apparently this is a completely stand-alone story that's not part of the official canon, which is good cause it stinks. Captain America is on his death bed but has somehow developed psychic powers which he uses to wage psychological warfare against the terrorist in Afghanistan and boost the egos of soldiers. The moral is that there is a bit of Captain America in all of us. Well if thi My first Captain America book and I rather hated it. It was filled with lots of rah rah yea America! propaganda. Apparently this is a completely stand-alone story that's not part of the official canon, which is good cause it stinks. Captain America is on his death bed but has somehow developed psychic powers which he uses to wage psychological warfare against the terrorist in Afghanistan and boost the egos of soldiers. The moral is that there is a bit of Captain America in all of us. Well if this is what he's got, I say get him out of me.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rick Lee Lee James

    A fresh, original take on Captain America, even while it tells of his last days of life. This book shows is that the ideals that make a hero great or in all of us. David Morel, author of iconic characters like Rambo, is a good and interesting choice to write the story. I don't want to give too much away about the book so I'll just tell you to read it without expecting continuity. It's a truly original idea, something that is in comics today. A fresh, original take on Captain America, even while it tells of his last days of life. This book shows is that the ideals that make a hero great or in all of us. David Morel, author of iconic characters like Rambo, is a good and interesting choice to write the story. I don't want to give too much away about the book so I'll just tell you to read it without expecting continuity. It's a truly original idea, something that is in comics today.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    A new and modern day take on one of Marvel's most popular heroes. Captain America helps to inspire confidence in an American soldier in Afghanistan, encouraging and leading, while laying thousands of miles away dying. This story was written by David Morrell, the author of First Blood (which the Rambo movies are based on), Brotherhood of the Rose and Creepers. A new and modern day take on one of Marvel's most popular heroes. Captain America helps to inspire confidence in an American soldier in Afghanistan, encouraging and leading, while laying thousands of miles away dying. This story was written by David Morrell, the author of First Blood (which the Rambo movies are based on), Brotherhood of the Rose and Creepers.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jaq

    Okay I love Captain America, and this collection didn't disappoint. It did provide me the crystallization of why I love Cap - his code of honour and civility. Really well told and a testament to the courage displayed everyday by those who choose to live serving others. Well drawn and well told - what more could you ask for? Okay I love Captain America, and this collection didn't disappoint. It did provide me the crystallization of why I love Cap - his code of honour and civility. Really well told and a testament to the courage displayed everyday by those who choose to live serving others. Well drawn and well told - what more could you ask for?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Interesting book to finish on Memorial Day, as it's a "death of Captain America" story... it takes the old "everyone is a hero" cliche and adds some nice twists to it - but in the end, it's a not a story with a lot of surprises: Cap is a hero, so is the main non-superhero character, etc., etc. Interesting book to finish on Memorial Day, as it's a "death of Captain America" story... it takes the old "everyone is a hero" cliche and adds some nice twists to it - but in the end, it's a not a story with a lot of surprises: Cap is a hero, so is the main non-superhero character, etc., etc.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laryn

    BEAUTIFULLY drawn, expertly written- this is easily in my favorites and definitely worth purchasing. I actually started tearing up a bit through it (cut me some slack, I'm a girl...)! But seriously, if you want to read courage, here you go. BEAUTIFULLY drawn, expertly written- this is easily in my favorites and definitely worth purchasing. I actually started tearing up a bit through it (cut me some slack, I'm a girl...)! But seriously, if you want to read courage, here you go.

  28. 5 out of 5

    David Agranoff

    Besides the inherit national of the character, I read this because it was written by Morrell. This is a well written Cap story which is a bit like source code, but I think this was before that movie I think.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sean Kennedy

    Great artwork, but a jingoistic storyline about the "Captain America" within us all which ruthlessly exploits 9/11 for some flag-waving one-sided brouhaha. Didn't Cap fight against being used by his government for propaganda? Great artwork, but a jingoistic storyline about the "Captain America" within us all which ruthlessly exploits 9/11 for some flag-waving one-sided brouhaha. Didn't Cap fight against being used by his government for propaganda?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    The Chosen is a truly off-beat Cap story in which Captain America becomes the "Holy Spirit" for our nation. The Holy Ghost analogy fits well in that Cap's ultimate role becomes that of adviser, empower-er, and encourager. BTW the art is spectacular with a dark but cinematic flare. The Chosen is a truly off-beat Cap story in which Captain America becomes the "Holy Spirit" for our nation. The Holy Ghost analogy fits well in that Cap's ultimate role becomes that of adviser, empower-er, and encourager. BTW the art is spectacular with a dark but cinematic flare.

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