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How to Stay Christian in Seminary

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Seminary is exhilarating . . . and dangerous. Seminary can be thrilling, with the potential to inspire and equip church leaders for a lifetime of faithful ministry. But it's not without its risks. For many who have ignored the perils, seminary has been crippling. But with an extra dose of intentionality, and God's help, this season of preparation can invigorate your affecti Seminary is exhilarating . . . and dangerous. Seminary can be thrilling, with the potential to inspire and equip church leaders for a lifetime of faithful ministry. But it's not without its risks. For many who have ignored the perils, seminary has been crippling. But with an extra dose of intentionality, and God's help, this season of preparation can invigorate your affections for Jesus. How to Stay Christian in Seminary takes a refreshingly honest look at the seminarian's often-neglected devotional life, offering real-world advice for students eager to survive seminary with a flourishing faith.


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Seminary is exhilarating . . . and dangerous. Seminary can be thrilling, with the potential to inspire and equip church leaders for a lifetime of faithful ministry. But it's not without its risks. For many who have ignored the perils, seminary has been crippling. But with an extra dose of intentionality, and God's help, this season of preparation can invigorate your affecti Seminary is exhilarating . . . and dangerous. Seminary can be thrilling, with the potential to inspire and equip church leaders for a lifetime of faithful ministry. But it's not without its risks. For many who have ignored the perils, seminary has been crippling. But with an extra dose of intentionality, and God's help, this season of preparation can invigorate your affections for Jesus. How to Stay Christian in Seminary takes a refreshingly honest look at the seminarian's often-neglected devotional life, offering real-world advice for students eager to survive seminary with a flourishing faith.

30 review for How to Stay Christian in Seminary

  1. 4 out of 5

    Abby Hogan

    Super helpful read. Even though the book is written specifically for seminarians, its principles certainly apply to undergraduate students, especially those studying theology. The book is short and sweet, offering lots of practical advice for how to keep God the goal of education & how to prevent losing wonder to study. My biggest takeaways were (1) real life doesn’t begin at graduation, thus we shouldn’t feel as though it’s on hold during college; and (2) a regular rhythm for devotional life is Super helpful read. Even though the book is written specifically for seminarians, its principles certainly apply to undergraduate students, especially those studying theology. The book is short and sweet, offering lots of practical advice for how to keep God the goal of education & how to prevent losing wonder to study. My biggest takeaways were (1) real life doesn’t begin at graduation, thus we shouldn’t feel as though it’s on hold during college; and (2) a regular rhythm for devotional life is one of the most valuable tools we have to keep our love for Jesus hot and our care for other people consistent.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Linkous

    Two-stars may give the perception this is a bad book. It is not a bad book, just not a great one. Here are my thoughts and summary. Mathis and Parnell share their wisdom on important ways to remain spiritual vital throughout seminary, mainly: focus on Christ and the gospel, don't forget your need of the gospel, make sure to pray and read the Bible for devotion, and be a good husband. Many ideas are drawn from classic works such as "The Religious Life of Theological Students" (B.B. Warfield), A Li Two-stars may give the perception this is a bad book. It is not a bad book, just not a great one. Here are my thoughts and summary. Mathis and Parnell share their wisdom on important ways to remain spiritual vital throughout seminary, mainly: focus on Christ and the gospel, don't forget your need of the gospel, make sure to pray and read the Bible for devotion, and be a good husband. Many ideas are drawn from classic works such as "The Religious Life of Theological Students" (B.B. Warfield), A Little Exercise for Young Theologians (Helmut Thielicke), and "Learning at Jesus Feet: A Case for Seminary Training" (John Frame). It handles more about the seminarians heart than pragmatic matters. You can read this book in an hour or less. I think the book does a few things well: 1. It reminds the seminarian that their time studying is for Christ. If they leave seminary less concerned about Christ and not treasuring him, then they've tragically missed the point. This is really important which makes me glad the book was written. 2. Every seminarian knows that things feel dry from time to time and most seminarians know the temptation to drift into an academic superiority complex. You know more, therefore a) no one should refute you and everyone should listen to you and b) spirituality is less important in some areas, risking coldness and failure to allow your studies fuel your faith and devotion. The solution: make sure you pray. Without prayer, seminary is likely to be fruitless. Prayer keeps one humble. Prayer is warfare against demons and beckons the work of God in your life and in the word, while simultaneously being a platform for worshiping God. (that's my version at least) 3. They have an excellent list of things a seminarian can pray for his wife. My critiques are as follows: 1. The book doesn't say anything new. It's main difference is that it infuses John Piper-esque (Piperian?) language with wisdom and ideas that are pretty general (thought nevertheless important). I believe new seminarians would be better served reading on the tracts by Warfield, Thielicke, or Frame (listed above) who have some more novel things to say. 2. A few opportunites this book misses out on are opportunities to talk about 1) technology and the seminarian, 2) the important of the seminarian to do physical exercise, and 3) to take a break from theology to enjoy other things in order to help your studies be more palatable and enjoyable. 3. The book reads like a bunch of blog posts, which limits the depth they can apply to each chapter. They are also writing to seminarians they know have little time to read extracurricular books, so that's ok. I wouldn't recommend this book, not because it is bad, but because you can read better things. Check out the resources listed about by Warfield or Frame. Thankfully, those are similar in length (Frame might be shorter), but likely more helpful and insightful.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Pindak

    This little book was very encouraging in how to continue to keep perspective, specifically in seminary, but in general of any/all things: knowing and loving and glorifying Christ is the goal!!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    scott meadows

    This book would have been very useful either during seminary orientation or the first month of classes. Why no-one recommended it or the texts that it draws from, I do not know. While I am thankful to have stumbled upon the much shorter and better essays such as B. B. Warfield’s word to theological students, I found this book to be an effective “modernized” rendition of the old. If the Lord gives me an opportunity to mentor or befriend future generations of theological students, I will be sure t This book would have been very useful either during seminary orientation or the first month of classes. Why no-one recommended it or the texts that it draws from, I do not know. While I am thankful to have stumbled upon the much shorter and better essays such as B. B. Warfield’s word to theological students, I found this book to be an effective “modernized” rendition of the old. If the Lord gives me an opportunity to mentor or befriend future generations of theological students, I will be sure to recommend this short read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Kassing

    This was an enjoyable and refreshing little book to read. It focuses in on personal piety and why it should shape your studies. In that regard it was a good book. I appreciated the chapter on prayer the most.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Drew Duncan

    Cannot recommend this book highly enough to anyone in seminary or going to attend it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

    This is a helpful and (mercifully) short book for seminarians feeling the struggle to maintain regular Christian practices while in the fervor of seminary studies. Each chapter is short but brimming with encouragements and applications. (The chapter about being a faithful husband and father was particularly moving for me.) Highly recommended for current seminary students and anyone planning to start soon!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Philip Mcduffie

    I enjoyed this book. It had a great deal of practical application in it that was completely Gospel centered.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    The way to stay Christian in seminary is the same way you stay a Christian in life, by fixing your eyes on Jesus and staying a Christian every day.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alex Kearney

    1: A Gospel-centered, Jesus-saturated, principled and practical exhortation for this incoming seminarian. (7/2/2021) 2: Read before seminary (again 😄). (8/21/2021)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn McGuffin

    The title is a misnomer. Instead it should be titled "How to stay a Conservative Evangelical Complementarian Father in Seminary." This book is not written for me, even though I am a seminary student, because I am a woman. It did not take me until chapter 6, which is titled "Be a Real Husband and Dad" to notice, either. That entire chapter is demeaning to read as a wife, who is in seminary alongside her husband. Instead of "husband" the entire chapter could have been about "spouses" and "parents, The title is a misnomer. Instead it should be titled "How to stay a Conservative Evangelical Complementarian Father in Seminary." This book is not written for me, even though I am a seminary student, because I am a woman. It did not take me until chapter 6, which is titled "Be a Real Husband and Dad" to notice, either. That entire chapter is demeaning to read as a wife, who is in seminary alongside her husband. Instead of "husband" the entire chapter could have been about "spouses" and "parents," but instead the authors chose to exclusively glorify husbands and fathers. This book is written to seminarians who are married complementarian fathers. This book is not written for single seminarians, women seminarians, or even wives of seminary students, seminary students whose husbands are not in seminary, or to non-parents. I had to mentally insert "woman" and "spouse" for every time it said "man" and "husband" to make it even close to relevant to me. In general, it's just not a very helpful text. It has some good prayer suggestions, but there are plenty of books about prayer than are better than trudging through this one, especially as a woman seminarian. This book is not worth the time or money. Instead, to all, I highly recommend "Surviving and Thriving in Seminary: An Academic Spiritual Handbook" by Daniel Zacharias & Benjamin Forrest. Zacharias's text is inclusive of ALL seminary students out there, including women, single seminarians, and those who don't have kids. My copy of "How to Stay Christian in Seminary" was a gift by a dear friend and mentor who fairly assumed that the title meant this was applicable to me as a seminary student. The Gospel Coalition should STOP writing books that are deceptively marketed to "all seminary students" and instead have a disclaimer that they are written for men ONLY. Otherwise, please stop attempting to market this book as if it is relevant to any other kind of seminary student.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eric Michel

    There are some truths in this book, but the authors have missed the mark and I understand that they couldn't give the true answer because it would invalidate most of their life's work. That, I understand. Truly, the answer is to IMMEDIATELY LEAVE SEMINARY. 100% of seminaries and 99% of Bible colleges and institutes are designed to indoctrinate the student into the science of textual and biblical criticism. They teach the students to "go to the greek" and that there are errors in the King James B There are some truths in this book, but the authors have missed the mark and I understand that they couldn't give the true answer because it would invalidate most of their life's work. That, I understand. Truly, the answer is to IMMEDIATELY LEAVE SEMINARY. 100% of seminaries and 99% of Bible colleges and institutes are designed to indoctrinate the student into the science of textual and biblical criticism. They teach the students to "go to the greek" and that there are errors in the King James Bible. There are not. There are errors in the thinking of the corrupt schools where the only final authority is the teacher's mind. There is no difference between the final authorities of any seminary and any liberal state college. No wonder so many students lose their faith in both institutions. The book provides a great example of the folly of a seminary education. The authors state that in John 5, Jesus is rebuking a bunch of people who were reading the scriptures but they were thinking about themselves. And so, they think, Jesus rebukes them by saying "you search the scriptures...." This is most certainly NOT what is happening in the chapter. The Jews had exalted tradition over the reading of the Scriptures and Christ is commanding them to "SEARCH THE SCRIPTURES". Don't go to "the greek" either translation is acceptable in the Greek. The Jews weren't searching and Christ is commanding them to do so. Nothing in the context is about "how" to search.... Seminary taught them nothing. My advice, get a King James. Believe it. Find a King James only, dispensational church. And you'll learn more in a year than in 10 in seminary. And you won't lose your faith. Your choice.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Velin

    If you want seminarians to read your book, chum the water with names like Warfield, Frame, Carson, Flavel, Calvin and Vanhoozer. “How to Stay Christian in Seminary” by David Mathis and Jonathan Parnell draw you in with the footnotes seminarians love, but behind the veil of scholasticism lies a deeply practical and necessary message. I loved everything that was written in this book, it made my heart sing. But I was also disappointed in one huge gap I believe the authors left when it comes to “sta If you want seminarians to read your book, chum the water with names like Warfield, Frame, Carson, Flavel, Calvin and Vanhoozer. “How to Stay Christian in Seminary” by David Mathis and Jonathan Parnell draw you in with the footnotes seminarians love, but behind the veil of scholasticism lies a deeply practical and necessary message. I loved everything that was written in this book, it made my heart sing. But I was also disappointed in one huge gap I believe the authors left when it comes to “staying Christian in seminary.” (This omission is what knocks this book from 4 stars to 3) When I saw the book was up for review, I lunged at the opportunity. I am a pastor, who is in seminary, who has a wife, and a growing family, and I really would like to stay Christian. In fact I would love to stay Christian in seminary. Mathis and Parnell go to great lengths in such a short book to present a picture of God which is attractive, demanding, and captivating. Seminary is not a place where one should go to put God under a microscope. It is not a place where we attempt to enlarge and enhance aspects of a small God. Seminary is a place where we get the privilege and the challenge of viewing God through a telescope. We have a God who is beyond our comprehension and grasp, and those in seminary get the privilege of diving in and attempting to better understand the nature of this big God in small, yet transformative ways. Parnell quotes Edwards saying, “God glorifies himself in communicating himself, and he communicates himself in glorifying himself.” Seminarians are left tumbling in observation and worship. For the authors, the study of God is innately devotional and must be worship stirring. This is something I must constantly remind myself of as I can easily narrow my view to mere “study.” My study should always lead to worship, if it doesn’t, I’m not studying the God of the Bible. This idea of seminary as worship stirring is a necessary message. Mathis and Parnell avoid the blame game, and cut straight to the heart of the “seminary as cemetery” argument: “But even the best of the evangelical, confessional seminaries can be spiritually dangerous places, not mainly because of the administrators at the top or the teachers at the front, but because of the sinners in the seats.” It is a sin to gaze into the throne room and not be stirred to worship. In true “Piperinian” fashion (Piper also wrote the forward for the book), the key to staying Christian in seminary is to provide an anchor amid the studying: “that Jesus must be tasted and treasured by us and through us.” Mathis adds, “If seminarians lose their taste for grace, they have no good business calling themselves Christians, much less putting themselves forward as leaders in the church.” I loved this aspect of the book, but I was pressed most in the latter chapters which get into the practical applications of prayer, weakness and the Christian home. For me personally my failure to see myself as Biblically weak leads to a deficiency in my prayer life and as a husband/father. I highly recommend these three chapters by Parnell to any man, seminary or not. I have talked with a Pastor who hosts seminary students at his house over the school year. His message: “Be a ‘B’ student.” Often times the amount of time and energy required for an ‘A’ can come out of energy and time best spent on your family or the leading of your church. Obviously we should seek to work hard and diligently, but we should have a right value and weight on what it is that we are doing. I was extremely grateful for Parnell’s 10 ways in which he prays for his wife (Chapter 6). These are simple ways where I can focus on my family and lead them in silent and powerful devotion. I love the emphasis on Biblical Theology, and Christocentric eyes in the latter portions of the book, but I wish they had written one more chapter. One of my professors at Western Seminary has engrained into my head, “You never assume the gospel.” Parnell and Mathis will not be accused of that, but in this book, they have assumed church involvement. Certainly this is assumed throughout the book. In the introduction the authors give us the severity of the message: “What’s at stake in this situation? The church is soon to suffer.” But outside of this assumption and some passing mentions (and a portion of a prayer in Chapter 6), there is no explicit mention of church involvement. Seminary is for Christians. Christians need the church. I think it is a danger to assume that all the men who are reading this book are attending classes, growing in their knowledge of theology, as well as submitting to a local church. The lead pastor at my church often comments on the lack of church involvement from students as he finished his M.Div. This should not be the case. Before we are seminarians, we are Christians, and Christians are called to submit to, participate in, and serve the church (Eph 4). Mathis and Parnell do a fantastic job of presenting the need for affection and holiness in seminary, but the author of Hebrews connects the affection towards the blood of Jesus and the “full assurance of faith” with the need for church involvement (Hebrews 10:19-25). This small omission leaves a big gap in our pursuit of holiness amid the homework. Seminarians will one day steer the church, you best be ready to submit to one for growth, worship, encouragement and admonition in the meantime. In the conclusion Mathis lists the need for church involvement as a real issue, but it is far too little given the weight of the issue. I loved this book, I recommend this book, but I hope that in a second edition they can weave the affection stirring and devotional nature of seminary in with the need to submit and serve the local church. A free copy of this book was provided to my by Crossway via the Beyond the Page program.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Tankersley

    Wise and Short This book is easy to sit down and read through. The author's keep the focus entirely on Jesus and guide you through some important practices to keep in mind. Any Christian would benefit from this book. The wisdom given applies to any "season" of a person's life. It stays foundational, and reminds us of the beauty in keeping focused on daily enjoying our faith in God and the responsibilities he has given us. Wise and Short This book is easy to sit down and read through. The author's keep the focus entirely on Jesus and guide you through some important practices to keep in mind. Any Christian would benefit from this book. The wisdom given applies to any "season" of a person's life. It stays foundational, and reminds us of the beauty in keeping focused on daily enjoying our faith in God and the responsibilities he has given us.

  15. 5 out of 5

    C.J. Moore

    I thought it was helpful. Will definitely be most helpful for someone prior to their starting seminary, and that's what I'll use it for in later recommendations. Seems like the book could've simply been "How to Stay Christian," though - with a few details added specific to seminary students. I was hoping for more contextual application for seminary students than I got. It's not a bad thing, necessarily, since it makes the book's audience a bit wider. I thought it was helpful. Will definitely be most helpful for someone prior to their starting seminary, and that's what I'll use it for in later recommendations. Seems like the book could've simply been "How to Stay Christian," though - with a few details added specific to seminary students. I was hoping for more contextual application for seminary students than I got. It's not a bad thing, necessarily, since it makes the book's audience a bit wider.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Excellent devotions for new seminarians, or just for gaining perspective on the role of study and ministry in our lives as a whole. A pithy and wise little book that stirs our affections Godward in our studies. How great the temptations are to drift from cultivating our walk with the Lord as we study!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julie Scrudato

    Loved this book and understand why it’s a necessary read when starting seminary— our head and our heart are taking in extremely complex theological concepts at wayyy different rates, and we need to remember the gospel, remember grace, stay near to God, and go back to the basics of sitting at the feet of Jesus.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    I always enjoy most works in the genre of what to read as you are going to seminary. This work is brief, helpful, and to the point, which are its greatest advantages. The downside is that the wisdom in the book is perhaps a little too simplistic.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Really good impactful short ready. As a seminary student this book hit home with me. It address the need to not lose focus of your personal walk with Christ while in seminary and covers so many aspects.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Grindberg

    Good

  21. 5 out of 5

    John Paul

    Can be read alongside Thielicke's and Kapic's short book for young theologians. Very practical. Can be read alongside Thielicke's and Kapic's short book for young theologians. Very practical.

  22. 5 out of 5

    David Wright

    Some great encouragement to stay focused on the real thing, my walk with Jesus, while in seminary.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    The timing of this book couldn't be better--this book fills a needed void in equipping students--of any discipline and level--on the disciplines (especially spiritual) that effectively puts education in its proper place: secondary to glorifying God and the health of personal faith. Coming in under 100-pages, HSXS is a quick read; I was able to read it in two sittings, totaling about 2 hours. Aim of the book: As the title suggests, Mathis and Parnell aim to: "help you be aware of the danger and app The timing of this book couldn't be better--this book fills a needed void in equipping students--of any discipline and level--on the disciplines (especially spiritual) that effectively puts education in its proper place: secondary to glorifying God and the health of personal faith. Coming in under 100-pages, HSXS is a quick read; I was able to read it in two sittings, totaling about 2 hours. Aim of the book: As the title suggests, Mathis and Parnell aim to: "help you be aware of the danger and appropriately sobered by [seminary]. We want you to face the challenge in earnest and see your faith strengthened, deepened, enlivened, and enriched by seminary, not shipwrecked." The book certainly accomplishes this aim and more; I was particularly challenged with my leadership assumptions on top of walking a daily Christian walk. What I Wish: Two things about the text. First, I wish Mathis and Parnell would have expanded their audience to all students rather than just complimentarian seminarians. Second, much of what HSXS admonishes the reader to do has hints of an air of perfection, as if the authors were able to master the concepts they present during their seminary experiences. Make no mistake, both Mathis and Parnell are solid men of God, active in the Church, love and lead their families well, but I know them well enough (via Bethlehem Baptist Church) to know they write from these struggles and admonish us to learn from their mistakes before we make them ourselves. What I Walked Away With: 1. How can this be applied? * HSXS is rich with applications. A few things of note: * I have the immediate application of a biblical liturgy to daily pray over my wife. * To constantly connect the learning to the glory of God. * The radical need to not partition my devotional life from my academic pursuits. * Parnell suggests in the first chapter to write a life mission statement. Best part of the book I've been emphasizing this for a couple years, and Parnell does a great job to equip the readers to start this important, nay vital pursuit of intentional living. "That mission is articulated in a memorable line that becomes the point of gravity around which everything operates." How does it make much of Jesus? HSXS is laced with glorifying God, making much of Jesus, and treasuring the gospel. The best quote implies the breadth of God's glory and our inability to completely understand him. "You go to seminary to grow, yes. You go to seminary to learn and steward your gifts, absolutely. But here’s the thing: the goal of seminary is not to become unweak...Therefore, determine to be known less for your strengths in academic rigor and more for how that rigor helps you grasp what it means that the God-man was crucified to save the world. Embrace your weakness. Bring it all back to grace." The church needs this book to be read, because at the end of the day our churches are at stake: seminarians plant churches, lead churches, shepherd churches, and this book is a field guide for seminary students to live devotionally before, during, and after seminary. Who Should Read This? Not just seminarians, but everyone. The point isn't that it's harder to stay Christian in Seminary; the point is it's hard to be Christian as a learner. I'm convinced life is a continual exposure to learn, some enjoy it, and some avoid it. Everyone needs to learn how to make glorifying God primary, not learning. If this didn’t exist, what would be missing? As I said before, there's been a void in the literature for a practical guide to root oneself in the faith while attending seminary (explicitly), but (implicitly) attending any educational institution. This hits the spot, even the length makes it easy for already overloaded students to read it, apply it, and share it. In sum, to refresh your mindset with seminary, graduate school, undergraduate studies, high school, and even daily living. Pick the book up, your mind and heart will be refreshed and challenged. Your church will benefit from it; your family will benefit from it; your spiritual walk will benefit from it; and God will be glorified by all these things. --Crossway provided me a complimentary copy for review. All opinions are my own.--

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Loy

    The biggest fault of this book is that it's improperly titled. Like any good book, a title should best convey what the book is about. In this case, it doesn't. Upon completion of "How to Stay Christian in Seminary", I realized that the book SHOULD have been titled "Christian Principles for the Seminarian". The book never really delivers on the "How to" of the title. Instead of practical and implementable advice, it simply discusses PRINCIPLES that one should keep in mind while attending seminary The biggest fault of this book is that it's improperly titled. Like any good book, a title should best convey what the book is about. In this case, it doesn't. Upon completion of "How to Stay Christian in Seminary", I realized that the book SHOULD have been titled "Christian Principles for the Seminarian". The book never really delivers on the "How to" of the title. Instead of practical and implementable advice, it simply discusses PRINCIPLES that one should keep in mind while attending seminary. After reading the foreword by John Piper and the first few pages of the book's authors, it's CLEAR that they are "Piper Proteges" (not to mention they both have close ties to him). From the language used, to the sermon-esque format, the book comes across as more of an essay written in seminary, than a book that's simply trying to talk "on the level" with prospective seminarians. To be fair, most of what is written is Biblical and sound, but I was sorely disappointed in the fact that I didn't feel that I got what I paid for. As I read further into this short book (80 pages), I found myself wondering when the REAL advice was going to kick in. Unfortunately, as the book concludes, it simply answers the question of "How to Stay Christian in Seminary" as follows: "be one". Let's just say I felt underwhelmed... Favorite Passage: "Intellectual proficiency takes a back seat when your only hope is in what some call offensive and others call folly. Therefore, determine to be known less for your strengths in academic rigor and more for how that rigor helps you grasp what it means that the God-man was crucified to save the world. Embrace your weakness. Bring it all back to grace."

  25. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Kleven

    To quote John Frame (as they do, on page 19): "Seminary does require a devotional discipline to match our academic discipline." As a current seminary student, I've found this a helpful book toward cultivating that devotional discipline in the midst of my studies. It's short, so you can squeeze it in, especially at the beginning of a semester. It aims at cultivating wonder, crushing pride, keeping our eyes fixed on Jesus, prioritizing our wives and families, and diligence in prayer. They get what To quote John Frame (as they do, on page 19): "Seminary does require a devotional discipline to match our academic discipline." As a current seminary student, I've found this a helpful book toward cultivating that devotional discipline in the midst of my studies. It's short, so you can squeeze it in, especially at the beginning of a semester. It aims at cultivating wonder, crushing pride, keeping our eyes fixed on Jesus, prioritizing our wives and families, and diligence in prayer. They get what it's like to be in seminary, the struggles, the dreams, the nuanced and conflicting desires. I've read it twice now, and I recommend it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Paterson

    Both of these men write blog posts at desiringGod.org that I consistently and thoroughly enjoy. I was eager to read this book as a Biblical Studies undergraduate student with Moody Bible Institute (online). It was a short book that I was able to read in a day—but one that I expect to read again often to remind me of my purpose and goal in my studies. This is a book I'd recommend to all Bible college students and seminary students—and it would make a great gift for anyone you know entering underg Both of these men write blog posts at desiringGod.org that I consistently and thoroughly enjoy. I was eager to read this book as a Biblical Studies undergraduate student with Moody Bible Institute (online). It was a short book that I was able to read in a day—but one that I expect to read again often to remind me of my purpose and goal in my studies. This is a book I'd recommend to all Bible college students and seminary students—and it would make a great gift for anyone you know entering undergraduate or graduate studies in Bible or theology.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Aurich

    Truth be told, I read it far too infrequently to give an accurate representation of the book. I did appreciate that the book was short and concise. It reads as a devotional reminder of our call as Christians in general, and students of the Word, more specifically. This would be an excellent book to read through on days when one is feeling particularly discouraged or defeated by their overwhelming circumstances. My prayer, both for myself, and those who read this, is that it will be an excellent Truth be told, I read it far too infrequently to give an accurate representation of the book. I did appreciate that the book was short and concise. It reads as a devotional reminder of our call as Christians in general, and students of the Word, more specifically. This would be an excellent book to read through on days when one is feeling particularly discouraged or defeated by their overwhelming circumstances. My prayer, both for myself, and those who read this, is that it will be an excellent source of encouragement amidst the unique trials of "Christian education."

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lily-joseph Jo

    It is a short book that I finished maybe in several hours but the content was great. The authors give many challenges and warnings about being a seminarian on the basis of experiences they had when they were seminarians. Among many great emphases, I took a challenge that I as seminarian should have a mission statement. I took that challenge seriously and the Lord gave me a good one for me to remind myself when I am distracted. Enjoyed the reading!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adam Calvert

    I really enjoyed this work. The authors are mainly talking to those students who are attending an actual brick-and-mortar seminary; but the points they make are very applicable even to those who are studying at home through correspondence, online, or intensives. It’s a great read on how to keep Christ as the center of your seminary experience - both in home life and in the academic realm. Very great insights into living the Christian life as a seminary student!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alan Yau

    Having been in seminary for three semesters now (about a year and a half), I know the rigors of being in seminary, in addition to working and being active church. I couldn't imagine about being a husband and a father right now. But anyways, I am really thankful for this book for the helpful reminders and exhortations for those in seminary to not neglect their Christian faith and their duties because those are the most important and not merely the seminary education itself. Having been in seminary for three semesters now (about a year and a half), I know the rigors of being in seminary, in addition to working and being active church. I couldn't imagine about being a husband and a father right now. But anyways, I am really thankful for this book for the helpful reminders and exhortations for those in seminary to not neglect their Christian faith and their duties because those are the most important and not merely the seminary education itself.

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