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The Smurfs #1: The Purple Smurfs

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When a strange fly bites one of the Smurfs, a full-on epidemic develops in the Smurf Village! After being bit, a Smurf turns purple and his vocabulary is reduced to one single word: "gnap!" The purple Smurf runs around the Smurf Village biting other Smurfs on the tail, causing them to turn purple and act crazy too! Soon enough, there are more purple Smurfs than blue Smurfs When a strange fly bites one of the Smurfs, a full-on epidemic develops in the Smurf Village! After being bit, a Smurf turns purple and his vocabulary is reduced to one single word: "gnap!" The purple Smurf runs around the Smurf Village biting other Smurfs on the tail, causing them to turn purple and act crazy too! Soon enough, there are more purple Smurfs than blue Smurfs in the village. It's up to Papa Smurf to find a cure and save the Smurf Village before all of the Smurfs lose their minds for good!


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When a strange fly bites one of the Smurfs, a full-on epidemic develops in the Smurf Village! After being bit, a Smurf turns purple and his vocabulary is reduced to one single word: "gnap!" The purple Smurf runs around the Smurf Village biting other Smurfs on the tail, causing them to turn purple and act crazy too! Soon enough, there are more purple Smurfs than blue Smurfs When a strange fly bites one of the Smurfs, a full-on epidemic develops in the Smurf Village! After being bit, a Smurf turns purple and his vocabulary is reduced to one single word: "gnap!" The purple Smurf runs around the Smurf Village biting other Smurfs on the tail, causing them to turn purple and act crazy too! Soon enough, there are more purple Smurfs than blue Smurfs in the village. It's up to Papa Smurf to find a cure and save the Smurf Village before all of the Smurfs lose their minds for good!

30 review for The Smurfs #1: The Purple Smurfs

  1. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Although I do indeed think that Peyo's Les Schtroumpfs noirs, his three featured tales about the eponymous little blue Smurfs (and the first of an entire series of comic books on the latter) is entertaining enough and also mildly interesting, diverting and at times even socio-critically sarcastic, the rather constant and massive use of the word smurf whenever the little gnome-like blue entities are conversing (and in the French original, smurf is of course rendered into schtroumpf, which being a Although I do indeed think that Peyo's Les Schtroumpfs noirs, his three featured tales about the eponymous little blue Smurfs (and the first of an entire series of comic books on the latter) is entertaining enough and also mildly interesting, diverting and at times even socio-critically sarcastic, the rather constant and massive use of the word smurf whenever the little gnome-like blue entities are conversing (and in the French original, smurf is of course rendered into schtroumpf, which being a fantastical and artificial language creation actually seems to be phonetically and in my opinion likely very much deliberately linked to the German noun for sock or stocking, to Strumpf), while definitely entertaining and even rather fun to a certain extent, does tend to become more than a bit tedious and repetitive (with its totally and massive overuse), it being much too much of the proverbial good thing so to speak (not to mention that because I am also and perhaps even primarily using and reading Peyo's Les Schtroumpfs noirs for French language practice and review, the fact that in nearly EVERY sentence uttered by the Smurfs, they are somehow smurfing something or someone, they are using schtroumpf in some manner, that can be, that actually is more than a trifle confusing on a linguistic and language learning level, not so much that it is being done, but that it happens constantly and with no break, with no end in sight). And yes, even with regard to the main movers and shakers of Peyo's collection of three illustrated comic book tales, even the Smurfs themselves, I do tend to consider them rather wearing and annoyingly frustrating in larger dosages, as they appear more as types, as character trait manifestations (Jokey Smurf, Happy Smurf, Brainy Smurf, Grumpy Smurf etc.) and not so much as beings, as entities with actual and nuanced personalities (except for perhaps Papa Smurf, which is kind of problematic in and of itself, as we seem to be presented with a village where some kind of benevolent and more nuanced personality trait wise, but still for all intents and purposes DICTATORIAL leader reigns supreme, and the rest of the village inhabitants, the other Smurfs, they all appear as basically Papa Smurf's uncritical minions, who as cardboard like manifestations without developed personalities are generally and simply meticulously following Papa Smurf's directions, regulations, his personal rule, in other words, everyone in the village is goose stepping to Papa Smurf's tune). But strangely and frustratingly enough, with Les Schtroumps noirs, it has NOT been the to and for me so annoying general and constant lack of characterisation of the Smurfs, the fact that they appear and act, function as rather one dimensional entities with usually only ONE main character trait to distinguish them form one another (and are often under the DIRECT control of the main village elder, of Papa Smurf, who really does function and appear as a type of absolutely powerful authority, an absolute monarch of sorts) that has been a continuous bone of contention for some, and in fact for many potential readers. No indeed, the main issue with Peyo's Les Schtroumpfs noirs seems to have always been the fact that in the first story (the episode that has given this book of three Smurf stories its title, its name), the plot centres on the Smurfs being bitten by a type of dangerously toxic fly and turning into biting zombie-like black Smurfs (until the entire village is almost wiped out and only a deus ex machina explosion saves the day). And it is not really and all that much the fact that the Smurfs turn in zombies (but really, when one thinks of what the Smurfs are like in and of themselves, with their one-sidedness and lack of nuance character and personality wise, them turning into zombies or potential zombies is not that much of a difference after all) but rather that they turn into black coloured zombies which has been and still is often condemned and seen as somehow racist (so much so that Les Schtroumpfs noirs has only recently been translated into and released in English, and only after the colour to which the Smurfs turn had been rendered purple and the title of the book changed to The Purple Smurfs). Now I am as a reader ALWAYS very sensitive to issues of race and potential racial stereotyping in the books I read, but sorry, in my humble opinion, there is NOTHING racist or even potentially racist with regard to the blue Smurfs turning black when they are bitten by that fly (and them then turning the other Smurfs into black zombies once they are infected, a vicious circle). I mean, black as a colour (or as a lack of pigment as some claim) is simply that and I think we need to guard against making everything that is potentially negative with regard to black as a colour in culture, lore, in reading materials into some kind of racially bigoted problem. I mean, the infected Smurfs turn black and turn into zombies, but Peyo has not tuned them into some type of exotic different type of negative looking Smurf, as aside from the colour difference, the infected Smurfs still all look like Smurfs (they have turned into black coloured zombies because they have been infected by an insect bite and are now passing this on, a pandemic perhaps, but not in any manner or fashion a pandemic due to race or culture, but a pandemic due to an infected fly wreaking havoc). Honestly, if one wants to see racial bigotry in a story that portrays problematic issues such as disease and such (and in my opinion, with the first story of Les Schtroumpfs noirs, that fly bite is or should first and foremost be seen as a disease of sorts), usually, if one looks hard enough and twists the content, the themes enough, one can and will probably find this. But how does this type of thinking in any way combat racism? It does not, and in fact, it tends to actually have the opposite effect, as just like with the little boy who kept calling "wolf" if one constantly, if we constantly strive to see racism everywhere and in everything we read, even when and if there is none and no racial stereotyping was ever intended, people do start becoming tired of the constant negative pontificating and will more than likely with frustration start to ignore the claims, and even when and if there are legitimate problems with actual racism, ethnic stereotyping and such within books (and especially books for children). Yes, the story of the blue Smurfs turning into black zombie like Smurfs is a tad disconcerting and creepy, but it is creepy because the Smurfs turn into zombies (or rather, that they turn violent, scary and a bit more zombie like than before, with their already limited and rather "yes, Sir" "yes, Papa Smurf" personalities), but the story is NOT disconcerting or at least it should not be disconcerting because the blue Smurfs turn into black Smurfs (and in fact, that in the "santised" English translation, that in The Purple Smurfs, the ONLY difference is basically that in the illustrations, the blue Smurfs now turn not black but a dark purple, that there has not been ANY changes within the text itself, this I strongly believe clearly shows that there absolutely is NOT really any racially insensitive content present in the text, in the narrative and quite frankly, the dark purple of the "santised" Smurfs is still pretty similar colour wise to the colour of the Black Smurfs in Yvan Delporte's original illustrations). And yes, my own two star ranking for Peyo's Les Schtroumpfs noirs (actually, more realistically, two and a half stars) also thus has NOTHING at all to do with the fact that the Smurfs turn black in the first, in the title story. My main and personal reasons for only mildly liking but absolutely not ever loving this collection are as already mentioned above for one the tendency of the Smurfs to constantly be presented as conversing using the word "smurf" (basically because it just becomes a bit too repetitively tedious and that from a language learning point of departure this constant "smurfing" really does tend to render the presented narrative at times frustrating and often rather confusing) and for two, and indeed much more importantly, that the Smurfs are all rather majorly typecast, non-nunanced beings that really not only simply seem to exist but not actually live, but that they also are utterly under the direct control and thumb of Papa Smurf, of perhaps a benevolent but yes still very much an in all ways dictatorial authority figure. And of course, if you are German (or are familiar with German comedians), you might well know or at least be aware of Otto Waalkes' brilliant parody of Vader Abraham's Das Lied der Schlümpfe (The Song of the Smurfs in English), totally hilarious, but most definitely majorly off colour, rather sexually perverted at that and not really appropriate for younger children (but oh my, how I laughed myself silly when I listened to it the first time, especially the part about the Smurfs being blue and small of stature because they work in a nuclear power plant). If you are at all interested and enjoy good or rather horribly good parodies, this is readily available online (there are a multitude of videos available for listening and viewing). But I do have to offer the necessary caveat that Otto Waalkes is definitely not for everyone, that some find him offensive, not funny at all.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Diz

    The short collection contains a few stories. The highlight is the title story, "The Purple Smurfs." It's basically a zombie story for kids as smurfs spread the purple infection by biting another smurf. The story itself is done in a lighthearted way, but there is a sense of dread that I think kids can handle as the number of survivors dwindles. The other stories are OK. The art is slick and attractive. One thing that I was thinking about while reading this is the use of the word "smurf" to replac The short collection contains a few stories. The highlight is the title story, "The Purple Smurfs." It's basically a zombie story for kids as smurfs spread the purple infection by biting another smurf. The story itself is done in a lighthearted way, but there is a sense of dread that I think kids can handle as the number of survivors dwindles. The other stories are OK. The art is slick and attractive. One thing that I was thinking about while reading this is the use of the word "smurf" to replace other words. At first, I felt it was a little irritating, like a joke that overstayed its welcome. However, as a language teacher, I started wondering if my students could figure out which words the word "smurf" replaced, and I started to think of it as a kind of cloze test. That made me more interested in this book in the end.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Peacegal

    Like most children of the '80s, I loved the Smurfs cartoon series. The Smurfs have returned in a new CGI animated feature and reprinting of the comics that launched the series in effort to introduce the characters to a new audience. (Or, more likely, to get the now adult fans of the original Smurfs to buy blue plastic stuff in fits of nostalgia.) The book was OK--even if Papa Smurf was kind of a jerk in this one. I will say that I am surprised by how closely Hanna-Barbera adhered to the source m Like most children of the '80s, I loved the Smurfs cartoon series. The Smurfs have returned in a new CGI animated feature and reprinting of the comics that launched the series in effort to introduce the characters to a new audience. (Or, more likely, to get the now adult fans of the original Smurfs to buy blue plastic stuff in fits of nostalgia.) The book was OK--even if Papa Smurf was kind of a jerk in this one. I will say that I am surprised by how closely Hanna-Barbera adhered to the source material.

  4. 4 out of 5

    XnamelessreaperX

    I smurfed it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Phil Jensen

    I came hoping for the authentic, unaltered version of the cartoon. I found out that the Peyo's original intent was exactly what the cartoon turned out to be: a series of gags involving one-dimensional characters and the word "smurf." I liked the cartoon growing up, so this wasn't really much of a problem to me. If you'd told me that this comic was adapted from the cartoon, I might have believed you. The main difference is that the cartoon characters were more developed than the ones in this comic I came hoping for the authentic, unaltered version of the cartoon. I found out that the Peyo's original intent was exactly what the cartoon turned out to be: a series of gags involving one-dimensional characters and the word "smurf." I liked the cartoon growing up, so this wasn't really much of a problem to me. If you'd told me that this comic was adapted from the cartoon, I might have believed you. The main difference is that the cartoon characters were more developed than the ones in this comic. I support the decision to change the black smurfs in the original to purple smurfs in the American edition. There was clearly no intended or even unconscious racism in Peyo's original comic, but some phrases are just going to sound different to American ears. It's an easier read with "purple" instead of "black." The thing that impacted this the most was the publisher's (Papercutz) decision to print the book in a standard American comic size rather than the larger European album size that is standard for books like Tintin and Asterix. The result is that the font and pictures are shrunken, and all the jokes and reactions feel smaller. What with the overuse of the word "smurf," you really need the physical aspect of the characters to deliver the meaning, and they just don't do it as well in little panels. It was cute, but nothing more.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kimberley doruyter

    i remember this as a cartoon and since i was kinda young it scared me and i kept looking for the evil little things under my bed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Samyuktha Gopinath

    This book is pretty cool. It is a comic. It is an awesome book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sylvester Olson

    Zombie Smurfs! Do I need to say anything more? The television adaptation of this storyline was always my favorite as a kid back in the 80's. Years later, as a middle schooler in the 90's, I even got in an argument with a summer camp counselor when he introduced the scenario of being chased by killer Smurfs during an outdoor team-building activity... because I insisted that the killer Smurfs must be purple. I had no idea that this storyline was of the original Smurfs stories in the comics. I questi Zombie Smurfs! Do I need to say anything more? The television adaptation of this storyline was always my favorite as a kid back in the 80's. Years later, as a middle schooler in the 90's, I even got in an argument with a summer camp counselor when he introduced the scenario of being chased by killer Smurfs during an outdoor team-building activity... because I insisted that the killer Smurfs must be purple. I had no idea that this storyline was of the original Smurfs stories in the comics. I question the claim made in the afterward that it's never been translated into English; I owned a Smurfs paperback as a child in the 80s, and I could swear that this story was included. 5 starts. It's good kids' stuff, but it's nothing earth-shattering for adults.

  9. 5 out of 5

    David Haggett

    Smurfing Smurf-tastic! One of the Bonus Borrows through Hoopla.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joceleny

    This book is about two friends. I like this book because it is about two friends at school.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This little book contains three short comics. The first story summary is found in the book blurb above. Cute story about a smurf being bitten by a BZZ fly which then infects the bitten smurf. The bitten smurf turns purple and jumps around yelling "GNAP!" Evidently they become contagious because the infection spreads as the bitten smurf begins to bite other smurfs. Papa Smurf attempts to find a cure, but not before nearly the entire village of smurfs have been bitten. After capturing the BZZ fly This little book contains three short comics. The first story summary is found in the book blurb above. Cute story about a smurf being bitten by a BZZ fly which then infects the bitten smurf. The bitten smurf turns purple and jumps around yelling "GNAP!" Evidently they become contagious because the infection spreads as the bitten smurf begins to bite other smurfs. Papa Smurf attempts to find a cure, but not before nearly the entire village of smurfs have been bitten. After capturing the BZZ fly Papa Smurf is able to find a cure. As the purple smurfs close in on the village the few smurfs left attempt to fight off the purple smurfs. Unbeknownst to the others, a purple smurf paints himself blue to trick the others. As the battle ensues he begins biting the cured smurfs and healthy smurfs alike. In one swift explosion luckily all the smurfs are saved! And so ends the terror of the purple smurf!! The second story follows one smurf in particular in his desire to fly. He is determined and tries many an idea to accomplish his goals. He wrecks havoc with the other smurfs in his quest but does eventually achieve small moments of flight. In the end he discovers a way to fly, but is unable to come back down to the ground. Realizing his dilemma he is fed bricks by his fellow smurfs. Yes bricks. This not only makes him heavy, but it effectively brings him back to the ground. The problem now being he is too heavy from eating too many bricks!! The story ends with his desire to sail....yet he finds he is too heavy for this dream!! The final comic in the book is a cautionary tale of be careful what you wish for. One smurf is disgruntled with his neighbors as he is unable to get a good nights rest. He sets off to the forest to find peace and quiet away from his noisy fellow smurfs. He finds a nice tree stump in which to make his home. A couple nights pass and slowly but surely he finds himself unable to sleep in what he thought was peace. A dangerous storm comes up one night and he decides to head back to the village because the storm is frightful. Upon returning to the village he finds lightening has struck his home and he is very lucky indeed to have not been home. When the smurfs learn of his desire to return home Papa Smurf consoles the unhappy smurf telling him they will rebuild his home. The smurf is ecstatic and requests a new location away from his noisy neighbors. As irony would have it, the new home is built between Handy Smurf and Harmony Smurf.....loud banging on one side and beautiful music on the other.... I grew up watching the Smurfs and have always enjoyed them. This little book is perfect for moments of nostalgia as I think of my childhood. I hope to stumble upon more of these books in the future!! I've learned a few new phrases from this little book such as "smurf-tastic", "Shut your smurf!" and "Smurf-reka". I admit my favorite is "Shut your smurf!" In case you were wondering...."smurf-reka" came with a footnote on the definition....an interjection expressing joy in a discovery, usually uttered while taking a bath. I did not read of this phrase while a smurf was in the bath tub, but that little addition to the definition is a little disturbing.....

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laila

    A fun and funny story!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shaene Ragan

    A very interesting take on the bubonic plague's decimation of European villages during the middle ages, especially in its use of telling the tale to children. The original French version of this story was a bit more direct as the name of the plague in Europe for centuries was actually "Black Death" referring to the purple-tinted black swellings that disfigured the victims as the tongue became swollen and turned black rendering the victim incoherent (Gnap!) The other two tales also serve a purpos A very interesting take on the bubonic plague's decimation of European villages during the middle ages, especially in its use of telling the tale to children. The original French version of this story was a bit more direct as the name of the plague in Europe for centuries was actually "Black Death" referring to the purple-tinted black swellings that disfigured the victims as the tongue became swollen and turned black rendering the victim incoherent (Gnap!) The other two tales also serve a purpose showing that sometimes following a dream can go to extreme proportions and that going out on one's own is not easy, especially if you are not yet mature enough to handle it. Aside from that the stories themselves are fun and the drawings are adorable. It also has the added advantage of containing a piece of The Magic Flute containing Johan and his height-challenged friend Peewit, characters that I have always had a fondness for whenever they showed up.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    I never knew “Smurf” could stand in for so many words. Funny and inappropriate at times as my 9 yr old says. The sound effects and made up expressions were enjoyed by my youngest. I grew up with the cartoon on tv and don’t remember them overusing Smurf, or all only having the same name “smurf” (frankly I remember a lot of their names and personalities) but it was an interesting comic strip style book... with tiny writing. It was fun to see & we picked it up from the Library because of the “1001 B I never knew “Smurf” could stand in for so many words. Funny and inappropriate at times as my 9 yr old says. The sound effects and made up expressions were enjoyed by my youngest. I grew up with the cartoon on tv and don’t remember them overusing Smurf, or all only having the same name “smurf” (frankly I remember a lot of their names and personalities) but it was an interesting comic strip style book... with tiny writing. It was fun to see & we picked it up from the Library because of the “1001 Books to Read before you grow up” list.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Indy

    This is the first Smurfs comic book ever that I have read. I wanted to read the Smurf series after visiting Belgium, and starting from the first comic book is great. There are 3 stories in this first comic book - The Purple Smurfs, The Flying Smurf, as well as The Smurf and His Neighbors. All the stories are short, yet well developed with twists. Very enjoyable to read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gana

    One of the best comics I've ever read. it filled with a beautiful illustration of smurfs with beautiful sceneries and their beautiful village. I've read a lot of smurfs comics and this specific one seems to be one of the best ones I've read. I always pick this book to read if I was bored I highly recommend reading this book, it is very interesting One of the best comics I've ever read. it filled with a beautiful illustration of smurfs with beautiful sceneries and their beautiful village. I've read a lot of smurfs comics and this specific one seems to be one of the best ones I've read. I always pick this book to read if I was bored I highly recommend reading this book, it is very interesting

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kristal

    2.5 stars. I never realized the smurfs have been around so long. The first story- the purple smurfs- was interesting enough, the other two weren’t as interesting to me. And I think it’s so strange how smurf is used randomly in place of other words- all I could think of was a parody from Rick and morty where a character says “squanch” in place of other words in a funny vulgar way.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Very charming, very well drawn, lots of fun. I don't plan to continue reading it past this one volume, but I'm glad I gave this one a chance. Definitely worth it for youngsters, and good enough to work for adults, if not inspire them. Very charming, very well drawn, lots of fun. I don't plan to continue reading it past this one volume, but I'm glad I gave this one a chance. Definitely worth it for youngsters, and good enough to work for adults, if not inspire them.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laven

    representative of the whole series | The smurfs are cute and entertaining. The best combination for the child I was when I read them.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Krisz

    I just love them. I was thinking, do I love smurfs more than Donald duck? Well, no, but almost. I hope I get hold of the Astrosmurf too... (Note to self: Etele könyvtár)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    I love these reprints of the original Smurfs comics.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Still funny.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Owen Enero

    Excellent! Its very smurfy!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    This is a book about the Purple smurfs. It's a quick, kids read and I was okay for it. This is a book about the Purple smurfs. It's a quick, kids read and I was okay for it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Martelon

    Title: The Purple Smurfs Author: Peyo Illustrator: Genre: Graphic Novel Theme(s): Adventure Opening line/sentence: The “Land of the Smurfs” is located far, far from here, and very rare are the human beings who have ever gone there. Brief Book Summary: One of the smurfs is bit by a weird purple fly that then starts spreading the disease to other smurfs by biting them. There is only a few blue smurfs left and Papa smurf needs to find a way to stop the purple smurfs and find a cure to this disease. Prof Title: The Purple Smurfs Author: Peyo Illustrator: Genre: Graphic Novel Theme(s): Adventure Opening line/sentence: The “Land of the Smurfs” is located far, far from here, and very rare are the human beings who have ever gone there. Brief Book Summary: One of the smurfs is bit by a weird purple fly that then starts spreading the disease to other smurfs by biting them. There is only a few blue smurfs left and Papa smurf needs to find a way to stop the purple smurfs and find a cure to this disease. Professional Recommendation/Review #1: Jesse Karp (Booklist, Oct. 15, 2010 (Vol. 107, No. 4)) If Belgium s two most obvious cultural contributions a style of waffle and The Adventures of Tintin are to be roundly applauded, what are we to say about the dubious third, the Smurfs? Although adults will be most familiar with the fad and cartoons from the 1980s, kids now have the chance to see the Smurfs in their original comics incarnation, and it turns out they deserve a warm welcome back. In the three Belgian originals reprinted here, the chubby, blue Hobbit-like creatures battle an outbreak of purple that turns Smurfs mean, try to invent a way to fly, and go on a frustrating hunt for a little solitude, always watched over by the smart but tough-as-nails Papa Smurf. More than a touch reminiscent of the current Sticky Burr books, these clever, entertaining stories featuring simple, charming art and a low-key message of community will prove a guilt-free recommendation for kids seeking lighthearted adventure. Just the same, you ll want to brace for the onslaught of marketing that will no doubt pave the way for the upcoming film. Grades 1-4 (PUBLISHER: Papercutz 56 pp. $10.99., PUBLISHED: 2010) CAProfessional Recommendation/Review #2: Kirkus (Kirkus Reviews, August 15, 2010 (Vol. 78, No. 16)) Smurf-reka! In anticipation of a film scheduled for release in 2011, this previously untranslated version of the cerulean gnomes' first solo collection (1963) offers three tales: A fly's contagious bite turns nearly all of the Smurfs into aggressive purple grunters (black ones in the French original—here the translator wisely keeps the color change of Hanna-Barbera's 1981 TV adaptation); one Smurf's determination to fly results in multiple crashes and calamities; another's desire to find peace and quiet away from Smurf Village runs afoul of a mosquito and other hazards. Replete with pratfalls, butt-biting and like slapstick, the neatly squared-off comic-strip–style panels look small at first glance, but coated paper and high production values make both the dialogue and the brightly colored art easy to read. Reminiscent of Asterix in tone but shorter and less sophisticated, these episodes don't show their age, and they should find a ready audience of recent Toon Book graduates. Also available: The Smurfs and the Magic Flute (ISBN: 978-1-59707-209-6; paper ISBN: 978-1-59707-208-3), a retitled reissue of their first appearance as characters in an earlier comics series. 2010, Papercutz, 56 pp., $10.99. Category: Graphic fiction. Ages 6 to 8. © 2010 Kirkus Reviews/VNU eMedia, Inc. All rights reserved. (PUBLISHER: Papercutz 56 pp. $10.99., PUBLISHED: 2010) Response to Two Professional Reviews: I agree with both reviews that I found. I agree that this book is both entertaining and creative. Just like the second review I think that when you first look at the pages the print is small and seems like it would be hard to read but, this is actually an easy graphic novel to read since it is brightly colored and keeps you wanting to read. Evaluation of Literary Elements: I think that the all together theme of this book along with the plot are attractive and interesting to children. This graphic novel makes reading fun since it is graphic and comic book form. It will have children wanting to read without even realizing they are learning and not just having fun. Consideration of Instructional Application: I would assign this book for the students to read individually. After reading individually I would have them each come up with a different end to the story. They would create their own comic that has Papa Smurf curing the disease in a different way than what happened in the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    S

    The first ever Smurfs comic (which I had no idea even existed until a few weeks ago) was a standard zombie flick. Weird.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christa Seeley

    Bizarre language aside, I initially had a lot of fun reading Les Schtroumpfs. The stories are written for children, so they’re usually quite light and humorous, but that isn’t to say there isn’t some deeper analysis to be made. In the first few pages of we’re introduced to what I interpreted to be a bit of a socialist utopia. Their economy is a cooperative. Everyone chips in and helps with the work in whatever way they are able, everyone owns the land together and in exchange they are provided w Bizarre language aside, I initially had a lot of fun reading Les Schtroumpfs. The stories are written for children, so they’re usually quite light and humorous, but that isn’t to say there isn’t some deeper analysis to be made. In the first few pages of we’re introduced to what I interpreted to be a bit of a socialist utopia. Their economy is a cooperative. Everyone chips in and helps with the work in whatever way they are able, everyone owns the land together and in exchange they are provided with shelter, food, and a community. In Socio Political Themes of the Smurfs, J Marc Schmidt even argues that Gargamel is a symbol of capitalism as he “is what happens when the individual makes himself more important than the society he lives in." However, I also found a number of different arguments for the true meaning of the text. This included a completly opposite analysis of the Smurfs as metaphor of totalitarianism, with strong Nazi influences, such as Gargamel playing the part of the evil Jew and Smurfette the Aryan princess..... Read more over on Women Write About Comics

  28. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    In this politically-correct era, it was ill-advised to re-release this book as a straight translation of the original Les Schtroumpfs Noirs (the Black Smurfs), as it was believed that it might offend black people, so instead we get "The Purple Smurfs". Same story, same everything, except that all the black smurfs are now purple. Okay then. With this explanation for the re-titling out of the way, let's review the actual book & story: This was the very first all-Smurfs book, a classic in its own rig In this politically-correct era, it was ill-advised to re-release this book as a straight translation of the original Les Schtroumpfs Noirs (the Black Smurfs), as it was believed that it might offend black people, so instead we get "The Purple Smurfs". Same story, same everything, except that all the black smurfs are now purple. Okay then. With this explanation for the re-titling out of the way, let's review the actual book & story: This was the very first all-Smurfs book, a classic in its own right, and it is a fun adventure complete with adorable little creatures who live - of all places - in mushrooms. Kids will get a kick out of both the art & the story, and that's all we can ask for really. Kids need to learn to read, and to read often. What better way to do this with the formula that Peyo & Delporte came up with? As an added benefit (mostly to the parents buying the books), this edition is very affordable (somewhere around six dollars). There's really no reason, then, for not getting this book for your children.

  29. 5 out of 5

    David Edmonds

    A fun little nostalgic read for me. As a kid, I loved the cartoon and had a respectable number of the Smurf PVC figures, so when I discovered that Papercutz has been reprinting the original comics, I thought I'd pick up the first volume and have a nice little walk down memory lane. Coming at these stories as an adult, however, some things that I noticed beyond the "cute" factor: Papa Smurf is kind of an ass in these early stories, demanding that the other Smurfs in the village do his bidding at A fun little nostalgic read for me. As a kid, I loved the cartoon and had a respectable number of the Smurf PVC figures, so when I discovered that Papercutz has been reprinting the original comics, I thought I'd pick up the first volume and have a nice little walk down memory lane. Coming at these stories as an adult, however, some things that I noticed beyond the "cute" factor: Papa Smurf is kind of an ass in these early stories, demanding that the other Smurfs in the village do his bidding at every turn, without question; the purple Smurfs may have been my earliest (altho unknown at the time) experience with zombies - the fact that the regular Smurfs aren't infected until they are bitten and then they in turn become "evil" purple Smurfs is definitely a reflection of the modern idea of the zombie; holy crap they use the word "smurf" a lot in the dialogue in these stories, almost to the point of being obnoxious. I actually found that I still enjoyed the stories, so I'm sure I'll be picking up some more of the volumes as I find them.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Who doesn't love the smurfs?? well if you don't then you suck!! I grew up watching the cartoons not knowing they originated from comics, now here we are reading the graphic novels. This particular edition has three separate stories. First is the tale of the purple smurfs, a plague running ragged over smurf village. Can papa smurf find and antidote before everyone is transformed? The second story is a smurf that wants to fly. Can he be creative enough to create something that will let him fly and Who doesn't love the smurfs?? well if you don't then you suck!! I grew up watching the cartoons not knowing they originated from comics, now here we are reading the graphic novels. This particular edition has three separate stories. First is the tale of the purple smurfs, a plague running ragged over smurf village. Can papa smurf find and antidote before everyone is transformed? The second story is a smurf that wants to fly. Can he be creative enough to create something that will let him fly and soar like the birds and bees? Or will he destroy the village and give up? The last story is about a smurf that just wants some peace and quiet so he can sleep. Stuck between two noisy snorer smurfs, he gives up and tries to find a place in the woods. he thinks he has found the perfect abode and fixes it up to suit his needs, he even finds a new friend in a squirrel. Things are seldom what they seem, find out what happens...

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