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Eric Carle's Treasury of Classic Stories for Children

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Treasury of classic stories for children, by Aesop and others; selected, retold and illustrated by Eric Carle.


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Treasury of classic stories for children, by Aesop and others; selected, retold and illustrated by Eric Carle.

30 review for Eric Carle's Treasury of Classic Stories for Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    Chock-full of Eric Carle's distinctive illustrations, this composition of traditional tales includes the familiar ("Tom Thumb", "The Grasshopper and the Ants") and the not-so-familiar ("The Seven Swabians", "Big Klaus, Little Klaus". Children of all ages will delight in the timeless theme of good overcoming evil present in each fairy tale and fable. Chock-full of Eric Carle's distinctive illustrations, this composition of traditional tales includes the familiar ("Tom Thumb", "The Grasshopper and the Ants") and the not-so-familiar ("The Seven Swabians", "Big Klaus, Little Klaus". Children of all ages will delight in the timeless theme of good overcoming evil present in each fairy tale and fable.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shanna

    A collection of fables and folktales. Although this is for children, many of the stories seem to have unnecessarily gruesome acts (many animals are murdered for the gain of greedy humans). The stories are simply told, sometimes excessively, so that the events were sudden and random and unexplained.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sara Larson

    A good read aloud with Oliver! Aesops Fables and some of the stories were great. The illustrations were paired nicely. A few of the stories were difficult to follow or downright depressing. Overall, very enjoyable book!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shel

    Carle, E. (1988). Treasury of Classic Stories for Children: by Aesop, Hans Christian Anderson and the Brothers Grimm, selected retold and illustrated by Eric Carle. New York: Orchard Books. 0531057429 Carle's beautiful illustrations (in his usual style) help these classic folktales and stories to come--not alive, necessarily, but at the very least more eye-catching. With artwork incorporated onto each page, Carle's interpretations of the works of Aesop, the Grimms, and Anderson may be enjoyed. Whil Carle, E. (1988). Treasury of Classic Stories for Children: by Aesop, Hans Christian Anderson and the Brothers Grimm, selected retold and illustrated by Eric Carle. New York: Orchard Books. 0531057429 Carle's beautiful illustrations (in his usual style) help these classic folktales and stories to come--not alive, necessarily, but at the very least more eye-catching. With artwork incorporated onto each page, Carle's interpretations of the works of Aesop, the Grimms, and Anderson may be enjoyed. While there is a great deal of trickery and the occasional death among the these pages, there is not nearly as much depressing or morbid content as could be found in the complete collections of the Grimm brothers or Hans Christian Anderson's works. I also liked that the morals of Aesop's fables were not emphasized too heavily or pulled out into a special section as occurs in some other collections. Overall, Carle includes some more famous stories (such as Tom Thumb by the Grimms and The Grasshopper and the Ants or The Rabbit and the Turtle by Aesop) balanced with stories that students will probably be less familiar with. Activities to Do with the Book: This collection would serve as an excellent read aloud to children who love fairytales and folktales, whether they've been exposed to such stories extensively or only have the Disney versions. The stories would lend themselves to be acted out among children. Also, since most of these stories come to us from Ancient times or the 1800s, students could consider the clothing and setting Carle chose to use in his illustrations. Many of the stories could be tied or used with other literature because of similar themes. For example, The Grimms' Hans in Luck works well with Shel Silverstein's poem "Smart." The Evil King by Hans Christina Anderson has details similar to The Emperor's New Clothes. etc. Favorite Quotes: “What a sad thing it is that we have no children. We live too quietly. A child would cheer us up" (p. 9). "A well-known judge loved to talk about the good old times. Whether he was visiting someone else or someone was visiting him, it wasn't long before he began talking about the olden days and how much better they had been" (p. 31). "A rabbit and a turtle were looking for something to do to while away the afternoon. "How about a race?" suggested the rabbit, who was a very fast runner" (p. 36). For more of my reviews, visit sjkessel.blogspot.com.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Yusuf Sahin

    Very funny and good stories, but the pictures aren't my stile. This book is nice for small kids about age 7-10. A page has a lot of words. Very funny and good stories, but the pictures aren't my stile. This book is nice for small kids about age 7-10. A page has a lot of words.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    I was rather disappointed in this. I usually really like Eric Carle's books, but this one was disturbing to my children (and I didn't enjoy it, either). The story choices seemed contrary to the dustjacket's boast that "this is a perfect book for family reading and sharing." Both my kids, ages 5 and 7, cried and complained that the stories were too "icky" and sad. I agreed and we put the book in our giveaway pile, unfinished without regret. I was rather disappointed in this. I usually really like Eric Carle's books, but this one was disturbing to my children (and I didn't enjoy it, either). The story choices seemed contrary to the dustjacket's boast that "this is a perfect book for family reading and sharing." Both my kids, ages 5 and 7, cried and complained that the stories were too "icky" and sad. I agreed and we put the book in our giveaway pile, unfinished without regret.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    We didn't finish this. Probably because we had already read a HUGE book of Aesop's Fables and fairy tales and this just retold a lot of what we'd already heard. I wouldn't use this as a primary source for Aesop or fairy tales anyways. There are much better retellings out there. Oh, did I just say something really mean about one of my favorite children's authors? Bad Heather, bad. (But I still won't use it again.) We didn't finish this. Probably because we had already read a HUGE book of Aesop's Fables and fairy tales and this just retold a lot of what we'd already heard. I wouldn't use this as a primary source for Aesop or fairy tales anyways. There are much better retellings out there. Oh, did I just say something really mean about one of my favorite children's authors? Bad Heather, bad. (But I still won't use it again.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Miss Byler

    Do you think you know every fairy tale ever told? I thought I knew most of them until I read this collection of traditional literature. Read about your favorites and some new ones with exciting pictures along the way.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Orchid McMillan

    Loved it so much the pages started to fall out so I had to get a new copy. :) Great classic stories and wonderful illustrations.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chris Gager

    From back in the day I remembered(just) a book with many classic stories. Long ago...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kailee

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shelby

  15. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paul Hankins

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alex Davies

  20. 4 out of 5

    Han

  21. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marjorie

  23. 5 out of 5

    savana basham

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gloria

  25. 4 out of 5

    Iladyj

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kori

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michele

  28. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

  29. 4 out of 5

    rhonda

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gale

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