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The Lady Chillers: classic ghost and horror stories by women authors (15 complete stories by Victorian and Edwardian mistresses of the macabre)

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If you enjoy period ghost stories of that bygone England of country house parties, servants and hansom cabs, with foggy London nights and sinister goings-on in the churchyard, you’ll love this varied and entertaining collection of chillers from some of the greatest-ever mistresses of the macabre and supernatural. The ghost and horror short story reached its zenith in Victor If you enjoy period ghost stories of that bygone England of country house parties, servants and hansom cabs, with foggy London nights and sinister goings-on in the churchyard, you’ll love this varied and entertaining collection of chillers from some of the greatest-ever mistresses of the macabre and supernatural. The ghost and horror short story reached its zenith in Victorian and Edwardian Britain, and women authors of the day seemed particularly attracted to the genre. This brand-new anthology presents fifteen complete tales of spooks, horror and the occult, ranging in length from a few pages to almost a novella, and including some extremely rare and hard-to-find gems that richly deserve a new readership. Many of the tales were first published in the popular periodicals of the age such as Charles Dickens’ ‘Household Words’. Each story is by a different lady author, and each is preceded by an introduction and biographical notes about these fascinating and talented women with their hyperactive imaginations and common desire to scare, shock, thrill and thoroughly rattle their readers. The text has been carefully edited and formatted for Kindle and compatible devices, with an active Table of Contents and section markers to enable easy browsing and a smooth, enjoyable reading experience. Contents: ‘The Whispering Wall’ by Henrietta Everett ‘The Old Nurse’s Story’ by Elizabeth Gaskell ‘The Summoning of Arnold’ by Alice Perrin ‘The Open Door’ by Charlotte Riddell ‘Seen in the Moonlight’ by Ellen Wood ‘The Missing Model’ by Lettice Galbraith ‘The Dutch Officer’s Story’ by Catherine Crowe ‘Witnessed by Two’ by Mary Molesworth ‘The Picture on the Wall’ by Katharine Tynan ‘The Phantom Coach’ by Amelia Edwards ‘John Charrington’s Wedding’ by Edith Nesbit ‘The Shadow in the Corner’ by Mary Braddon ‘The Man with the Nose’ by Rhoda Broughton ‘How He Left the Hotel’ by Louisa Baldwin ‘The Haunted Organist of Hurly Burly’ by Rosa Mulholland Total length: 86,000 words, equivalent to around 250 paperback pages. Also check out these other great Kindle titles in the same series: ‘Hauntings and Horrors’ – the collected ghost stories of E. F. Benson. ‘The Beast with Five Fingers’ – the collected weird tales of W. F. Harvey, Edwardian master of the psychological mystery. ‘The Gap in the Curtain’ – John Buchan’s fascinating borderline science fiction story of predestiny and free will. 'The Greatest Ghost Stories of M. R. James and His Circle (1871-1928)' - 24 haunting tales from the golden age of supernatural short fiction


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If you enjoy period ghost stories of that bygone England of country house parties, servants and hansom cabs, with foggy London nights and sinister goings-on in the churchyard, you’ll love this varied and entertaining collection of chillers from some of the greatest-ever mistresses of the macabre and supernatural. The ghost and horror short story reached its zenith in Victor If you enjoy period ghost stories of that bygone England of country house parties, servants and hansom cabs, with foggy London nights and sinister goings-on in the churchyard, you’ll love this varied and entertaining collection of chillers from some of the greatest-ever mistresses of the macabre and supernatural. The ghost and horror short story reached its zenith in Victorian and Edwardian Britain, and women authors of the day seemed particularly attracted to the genre. This brand-new anthology presents fifteen complete tales of spooks, horror and the occult, ranging in length from a few pages to almost a novella, and including some extremely rare and hard-to-find gems that richly deserve a new readership. Many of the tales were first published in the popular periodicals of the age such as Charles Dickens’ ‘Household Words’. Each story is by a different lady author, and each is preceded by an introduction and biographical notes about these fascinating and talented women with their hyperactive imaginations and common desire to scare, shock, thrill and thoroughly rattle their readers. The text has been carefully edited and formatted for Kindle and compatible devices, with an active Table of Contents and section markers to enable easy browsing and a smooth, enjoyable reading experience. Contents: ‘The Whispering Wall’ by Henrietta Everett ‘The Old Nurse’s Story’ by Elizabeth Gaskell ‘The Summoning of Arnold’ by Alice Perrin ‘The Open Door’ by Charlotte Riddell ‘Seen in the Moonlight’ by Ellen Wood ‘The Missing Model’ by Lettice Galbraith ‘The Dutch Officer’s Story’ by Catherine Crowe ‘Witnessed by Two’ by Mary Molesworth ‘The Picture on the Wall’ by Katharine Tynan ‘The Phantom Coach’ by Amelia Edwards ‘John Charrington’s Wedding’ by Edith Nesbit ‘The Shadow in the Corner’ by Mary Braddon ‘The Man with the Nose’ by Rhoda Broughton ‘How He Left the Hotel’ by Louisa Baldwin ‘The Haunted Organist of Hurly Burly’ by Rosa Mulholland Total length: 86,000 words, equivalent to around 250 paperback pages. Also check out these other great Kindle titles in the same series: ‘Hauntings and Horrors’ – the collected ghost stories of E. F. Benson. ‘The Beast with Five Fingers’ – the collected weird tales of W. F. Harvey, Edwardian master of the psychological mystery. ‘The Gap in the Curtain’ – John Buchan’s fascinating borderline science fiction story of predestiny and free will. 'The Greatest Ghost Stories of M. R. James and His Circle (1871-1928)' - 24 haunting tales from the golden age of supernatural short fiction

43 review for The Lady Chillers: classic ghost and horror stories by women authors (15 complete stories by Victorian and Edwardian mistresses of the macabre)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    I heartedly recommend “The Lady Chillers: Classic ghost and horror stories by women writers.” All the women flourished during the Victorian and Edwardian periods. Some, like Elizabeth Gaskell, Amelia Edwards, and Edith Nesbit, are still fairly frequently read but most of the 15 writers in this interesting collection are nearly forgotten--though they were well-known in their day. Each story is prefaced by an introduction which gives some information about the author and a few non-spoiler comments I heartedly recommend “The Lady Chillers: Classic ghost and horror stories by women writers.” All the women flourished during the Victorian and Edwardian periods. Some, like Elizabeth Gaskell, Amelia Edwards, and Edith Nesbit, are still fairly frequently read but most of the 15 writers in this interesting collection are nearly forgotten--though they were well-known in their day. Each story is prefaced by an introduction which gives some information about the author and a few non-spoiler comments about each tale. What is remarkable is the very high quality of these stories and novelettes. Some are quite unforgettable. “The Lady Chillers” is a Kindle ebook and quite moderately priced. Since all the authors are in the public domain one could find the stories and download them free of charge from Project Gutenberg but it is worth the very modest price to get them already formatted as an ebook. There is also the advantage of using this volume to explore the genre so as to discover which of these writers you may particularly enjoy. Then look them up in PG to see what is available for free. As I said, this is an ebook and so far as I know, there is no equivalent publication in either Hardback or Paperback formats.

  2. 5 out of 5

    K.B. Goddard

    When talking about ghost stories the writers whose names get bandied about a lot are often men. So it was nice to find an entire volume dedicated to the often overlooked lady ghost story writers of the Victorian and Edwardian eras. I actually discovered during the course of reading this book that I had read a couple before as part of various anthologies. You know how it is though, you read a story think 'that was good' and then can’t for the life of you find it again to re-read it because you’ve When talking about ghost stories the writers whose names get bandied about a lot are often men. So it was nice to find an entire volume dedicated to the often overlooked lady ghost story writers of the Victorian and Edwardian eras. I actually discovered during the course of reading this book that I had read a couple before as part of various anthologies. You know how it is though, you read a story think 'that was good' and then can’t for the life of you find it again to re-read it because you’ve no idea what it was called! Anyway all the stories in this book are very worthy in their own right. Some were creepier than others; some not altogether satisfactory but that’s all subjective and I hope to get around to finding more stories by some of these ladies. So, here are my personal favourites: 1.The Open Door by Charlotte Riddell- Not so much a locked room mystery as an open door mystery! I really like this one; it’s got a touch of humour, suspicious deaths, missing wills, strange nocturnal visitors and a door that wont stay closed, despite the best efforts of many people. 2.The Shadow In The Corner by Mary Elizabeth Braddon – A good old fashioned haunted room story, complete with innocent young girl, cynical servants and sceptical master and family disgrace. Good and spooky this one. 3.The Old Nurse’s Story by Elizabeth Gaskell (of Cranford fame) – Guilt, immorality, shame, snow storms, a haunted organ and a ghostly child. Oh and it’s Christmas! Of course these are just three of the 15 stories in the book, I enjoyed reading all of these stories, though you could probably skip the first couple of pages of the haunted organist or Hurly Burly by Rosa Mulholland. Personally I found the opening dragged a bit. I thought it detracted from an otherwise pretty spooky story. Anyway I’d recommend a look at this book if ghost stories are your thing. I’m not sure that there is a physical version of this book but I’m sure if you haven’t got a Kindle you can find the stories in other anthologies.

  3. 5 out of 5

    H.C. Gray

    This has been a real treat to read. Some absolutely cracking stories, wonderful to read and some genuine chills from a handful of the varied tales. There were only about three that I couldn't get into and found myself skipping through the pages. Interesting that the more adventurous stories had male leads, in fact quite a lot of them did, which perhaps says something of the more restrictive lives of our Victorian sisters. Most of these are ghost stories but there are recognisable horror elements This has been a real treat to read. Some absolutely cracking stories, wonderful to read and some genuine chills from a handful of the varied tales. There were only about three that I couldn't get into and found myself skipping through the pages. Interesting that the more adventurous stories had male leads, in fact quite a lot of them did, which perhaps says something of the more restrictive lives of our Victorian sisters. Most of these are ghost stories but there are recognisable horror elements in some stories which goes to show a love of the macabre is not a new thing. Loved the brief introductions to each writer too.

  4. 4 out of 5

    GARY

  5. 5 out of 5

    Julie Howarth

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mrs D Kelsall

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bethan M.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Macgill

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Davies

  10. 5 out of 5

    nicola ana drury wardle

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joyce Linda Mooney

  12. 5 out of 5

    Irene Lofthouse

  13. 5 out of 5

    Claudia C

  14. 4 out of 5

    Elspeth

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jutta

  16. 5 out of 5

    Aastha

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Macfarlane

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jae

  19. 5 out of 5

    John

  20. 5 out of 5

    Storm

  21. 5 out of 5

    Red Phoenix

  22. 4 out of 5

    C

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mari Biella

  24. 4 out of 5

    Peter

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jules

  27. 5 out of 5

    John Rackham

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christina Browne

  29. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  31. 5 out of 5

    C G Walker

  32. 4 out of 5

    Carly Nicholas

  33. 5 out of 5

    Alan

  34. 4 out of 5

    Marta

  35. 4 out of 5

    elizabeth eyre

  36. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  37. 5 out of 5

    Ineke van Mackelenbergh

  38. 4 out of 5

    Kat

  39. 4 out of 5

    Pam

  40. 4 out of 5

    {U n s o l v e d M y s t e r y}

  41. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Lynn

  42. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten

  43. 5 out of 5

    Julianes

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