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Business Brilliant: Surprising Lessons from the Greatest Self-Made Business Icons

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In Business Brilliant, Lewis Schiff combines compelling storytelling with ground-breaking research to show the rest of us what America’s self-made rich already know: It’s synergy, not serendipity that produces success.He explodes common myths about wealth and explains how legendary entrepreneurs such as Richard Branson, Suze Orman, Steve Jobs, and Warren Buffet have subscr In Business Brilliant, Lewis Schiff combines compelling storytelling with ground-breaking research to show the rest of us what America’s self-made rich already know: It’s synergy, not serendipity that produces success.He explodes common myths about wealth and explains how legendary entrepreneurs such as Richard Branson, Suze Orman, Steve Jobs, and Warren Buffet have subscribed to a set of priorities that’s completely different from those of the middle class.Schiff identifies the seven distinct principles practiced by individuals who may or may not be any smarter than the rest of the population, but seem to understand instinctively how money is made. This guide also reveals how these business icons excel in areas of team building, risk management, and leadership development to accumulate their wealth.He offers a practical four-step program, from choosing one’s livelihood and pinpointing skills to focus on, to negotiating job terms and salary, in order to bring upon greater success.Business Brilliant by Lewis Schiff, coauthor of The Middle Class Millionaire: The Rise of the New Rich and How They are Changing America and The Armchair Millionaire, can help you can achieve better results in your business and in your career.


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In Business Brilliant, Lewis Schiff combines compelling storytelling with ground-breaking research to show the rest of us what America’s self-made rich already know: It’s synergy, not serendipity that produces success.He explodes common myths about wealth and explains how legendary entrepreneurs such as Richard Branson, Suze Orman, Steve Jobs, and Warren Buffet have subscr In Business Brilliant, Lewis Schiff combines compelling storytelling with ground-breaking research to show the rest of us what America’s self-made rich already know: It’s synergy, not serendipity that produces success.He explodes common myths about wealth and explains how legendary entrepreneurs such as Richard Branson, Suze Orman, Steve Jobs, and Warren Buffet have subscribed to a set of priorities that’s completely different from those of the middle class.Schiff identifies the seven distinct principles practiced by individuals who may or may not be any smarter than the rest of the population, but seem to understand instinctively how money is made. This guide also reveals how these business icons excel in areas of team building, risk management, and leadership development to accumulate their wealth.He offers a practical four-step program, from choosing one’s livelihood and pinpointing skills to focus on, to negotiating job terms and salary, in order to bring upon greater success.Business Brilliant by Lewis Schiff, coauthor of The Middle Class Millionaire: The Rise of the New Rich and How They are Changing America and The Armchair Millionaire, can help you can achieve better results in your business and in your career.

30 review for Business Brilliant: Surprising Lessons from the Greatest Self-Made Business Icons

  1. 5 out of 5

    Teri Temme

    Delightful book on how people think about money, success and failure. Featured: • Do What You Love, but Follow the Money • Save Less, Earn More • Imitate, Don't Innovate • Know-How is Good, "Know-Who" is Better • Win-Win is a Loser • Spread the Work, Spread the Wealth • Nothing Succeeds Like Failure • Mastering the Mundane - with his LEAP Philosophy: Learning, Earning, Assistance and Persistence Delightful book on how people think about money, success and failure. Featured: • Do What You Love, but Follow the Money • Save Less, Earn More • Imitate, Don't Innovate • Know-How is Good, "Know-Who" is Better • Win-Win is a Loser • Spread the Work, Spread the Wealth • Nothing Succeeds Like Failure • Mastering the Mundane - with his LEAP Philosophy: Learning, Earning, Assistance and Persistence

  2. 4 out of 5

    Caro Raciti

    Good case examples and the history of businesses and individuals that made a big impact, after struggling for a long time or by doing something else that brought unintended results. Like Cirque di Soleil and Pixar, or the story of the CEO/founder of Jet Blue. Grit, persistence and negotiation among other skills of course got them to achieve success. Something I found interesting is that the author mentions that per his research, for most people among middle class it's almost Tabu to speak about Good case examples and the history of businesses and individuals that made a big impact, after struggling for a long time or by doing something else that brought unintended results. Like Cirque di Soleil and Pixar, or the story of the CEO/founder of Jet Blue. Grit, persistence and negotiation among other skills of course got them to achieve success. Something I found interesting is that the author mentions that per his research, for most people among middle class it's almost Tabu to speak about failure, but self-made millionaires talk about failure and what they learned from it without big concerns, plus they say 80% of their friends also feel comfortable taking about their failure. We all have had to deal with failure one way or the other so why is it so hard to speak about it?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ed Barton

    Well Researched While you’ll walk away with a lot of knowledge about the behaviors of self-made millionaires, the key to this knowledge is the extensive research conducted by the author. Starting each chapter with a surprising statistic, you are then taken through the research in a very readable way followed by anecdotes and stories. A great addition to the entrepreneurial library.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Liliana

    If there's anything I learned from this book it's that I'll probably never be a millionaire. And it's not because millionaires are smarter than the rest of us, it's because they are utterly Machiavellian. This book explores the results of a survey comparing self-made millionaires and the middle class. Schiff draws on the stories of millionaires who came from middle class backgrounds like Bill Gates and Guy Laliberte to illustrate his concepts. Schiff argues that the only difference between the m If there's anything I learned from this book it's that I'll probably never be a millionaire. And it's not because millionaires are smarter than the rest of us, it's because they are utterly Machiavellian. This book explores the results of a survey comparing self-made millionaires and the middle class. Schiff draws on the stories of millionaires who came from middle class backgrounds like Bill Gates and Guy Laliberte to illustrate his concepts. Schiff argues that the only difference between the middle class and the business brilliant is mindset, although he doesn't say whether that is something that is inborn or taught. Boiled down for simplicity, self-made millionaires are opportunists that given the chance seek to advance in any way possible, while the typical middle class individual is too concerned with the opinion of others to truly seek the advantage. He breaks this down into various situations. For example, people who become millionaires are more likely simply to ASK for what they want while the rest of us are too bashful to do so. Self-made millionaires are least likely to compromise while the middle class focus on a win-win situation (which Schiff argues doesn't actually exist as there will always be someone who got more). The middle class mindset would rather earn 50,ooo and be the top dog in a community, than earn 55,000 and be at the bottom of the ladder. This was quite gripping and revealing and begged the question of what this means for cultural upbringing. He brushed by this on one occasion when he described how women are less likely to ask for more money than men, and when they do they are more moderate in their demands, but that is where he left it. Since the survey illustrates that the more independent and self-centered you are, the more likely you are to become a millionaire, what of middle class individuals who are raised in cultures where the community is more important than the individual? Overall a thought provoking read that I would recommend.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chãndí

    Finally I have found something, someone who has taken the general ideas and lessons of entrepreneurship mindset and kind of flipped in its head. With each chapter I could better understand and see clearly in tandem with the other perspectives I've taken away from other works and authors. This is not a read that I'd advise anyone to just skim or read through simply. There's both some old, well known stuff and yet also some well pieced together examples, concepts and disciplines this author made v Finally I have found something, someone who has taken the general ideas and lessons of entrepreneurship mindset and kind of flipped in its head. With each chapter I could better understand and see clearly in tandem with the other perspectives I've taken away from other works and authors. This is not a read that I'd advise anyone to just skim or read through simply. There's both some old, well known stuff and yet also some well pieced together examples, concepts and disciplines this author made very clear, exact and adamant. Will definitely have to go back and reread several sections. With this work, I feel a bit more organized as far as how to think as opposed to why and what to do. This the most pragmatic, straightforward book if come across so far on the subject of business and self-interest business -worth a five star.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Becka

    This book dispels fairy tale endings and the mythology around success story businesses, big and small. I was not surprised to hear that the multimillionaires surveyed had a higher-than-average incidence of Machiavellianism as, by chapter five, I had already noted its similarities to Machiavelli's seminal work. Like The Prince, it leaves the reader with a choice – if this is what it takes to be successful in business, do I really want to be successful? If you're looking for a no-BS, no-hype busine This book dispels fairy tale endings and the mythology around success story businesses, big and small. I was not surprised to hear that the multimillionaires surveyed had a higher-than-average incidence of Machiavellianism as, by chapter five, I had already noted its similarities to Machiavelli's seminal work. Like The Prince, it leaves the reader with a choice – if this is what it takes to be successful in business, do I really want to be successful? If you're looking for a no-BS, no-hype business book, this is the one. This is the best book I have ever hesitated to recommend.

  7. 4 out of 5

    David Chong

    Makes you want to start something right away. Book is about principles and is not a how to book. But you should learn the habits of a multimillionaire to see what bias thinking you grew up with that has to change. I found it easy to read and while I read faster took 1.5 hours of my time. I would recommend for sure.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kelleigh

    I skimmed some of the storytelling, all of the concepts were broken down into very useful ideas that I could apply to my career. Don't stop ready half-way, the last chapter is very actionable and gives specific tasks that can help you right now. I skimmed some of the storytelling, all of the concepts were broken down into very useful ideas that I could apply to my career. Don't stop ready half-way, the last chapter is very actionable and gives specific tasks that can help you right now.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Casey Bell

    Really liked the contrast on perspective between the classes. Excellent suggestions and quotes. One quote that really stood out: “In business as in life, you don’t get what you deserve, you get what you negotiate.” -Dr. Chester Karrass

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Interesting stories, tips, & ideas. The tips/advice are a bit abstract, but I think that comes from the fact that it's hard to pinpoint an exact scientific method to why certain individuals are so successful. Interesting stories, tips, & ideas. The tips/advice are a bit abstract, but I think that comes from the fact that it's hard to pinpoint an exact scientific method to why certain individuals are so successful.

  11. 5 out of 5

    scott tucholsky

    Focus on the 17 Essentials Broke down the paths to hyper wealth creation through a series of segments that contain 17 essential characteristics and techniques that one should follow to excel

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cameron White

    Very good and practical read Entertaining and insightful book with practical ideas everyone can use. In fact, the lessons presented in the book can benefit everyone, from a salaried employee to an entrepreneur. Finally, the steps the author recommends to follow are very realistic.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Connor Oswald

    Decent I mean I probably won't use any of this information in my life but I had a good time, business. Decent I mean I probably won't use any of this information in my life but I had a good time, business.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Zeuli

    I learned some surprising things about successful people.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael Brajczewski

    Repeat and repeat and repeat...and then repeat again OMG...how many times can we repeat, ad nauseam, the same basic point ??!! A decent point over stressed unbelievably !

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ricardo Vilalta

    Great read. For anyone ready to take the leap into a buisness that will earn money. Easy to read and follow. Great anecdotes.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Venkat Vangala

    Excellent read. Excellent and enjoyed reading this book. I like the way the author laid down the repeated failures drives them to success.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ken Staab

    Excellent! I lot of good information!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Esther Rose

    Great book! Great read and book. Highly recommend. Lots of great information and very inspiring. Work to be done. So thank you.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jose Luis Cham

    Great research, awesome way to present the data, and good stories for showing the application of the principles

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carla Brown

    Insightful Business Read I'd recommend this book to aspiring and long-time business people. Actionable and stackable insights that are backed up with the what might be stopping you details . Insightful Business Read I'd recommend this book to aspiring and long-time business people. Actionable and stackable insights that are backed up with the what might be stopping you details .

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Lilly

    I've read quite a few books aimed at helping people handle money, start businesses, or retire early. This one offers an interesting angle - it is based on a survey of self-made millionaires. Some of the advice contradicts that of most finance gurus -- for instance, the author argues that you cannot scrimp and save your way to prosperity and asserts that many wealthy individuals, including Suze Orman, became wealthy by earning a great deal more, not by learning to save more. The book also address I've read quite a few books aimed at helping people handle money, start businesses, or retire early. This one offers an interesting angle - it is based on a survey of self-made millionaires. Some of the advice contradicts that of most finance gurus -- for instance, the author argues that you cannot scrimp and save your way to prosperity and asserts that many wealthy individuals, including Suze Orman, became wealthy by earning a great deal more, not by learning to save more. The book also addresses and somewhat modifies the old adage "do what you love and the money will follow," illustrating how most self-made millionaires enjoy what they do, but follow what they are good at that also earns them money. The author writes in a conversational fashion that is easy to read and understand. He also includes summaries and lists for easy later review. I liked the book's mix of anecdotes and statistics. I feel this book truly helped me understand what I've done right and what I could do better in both my law practice and my fiction writing career. I highly recommend it to entrepreneurs, artists, writers, and anyone interested in getting a better grip on her or his financial well-being.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Lee

    This analysis excels at providing insights into the brilliant business successes and failures of our time, separating the myths from the men who seem to have had it all together in their careers and ventures. We learn how Laliberté's and Hirst's fortunes were hardly built on artistic vision alone; how Jobs bought Pixar to sell software initially, not animation; how Gates rewrote Microsoft's founding history to make it seem like IBM had courted him when he was actually the client of last resort. This analysis excels at providing insights into the brilliant business successes and failures of our time, separating the myths from the men who seem to have had it all together in their careers and ventures. We learn how Laliberté's and Hirst's fortunes were hardly built on artistic vision alone; how Jobs bought Pixar to sell software initially, not animation; how Gates rewrote Microsoft's founding history to make it seem like IBM had courted him when he was actually the client of last resort. It was not innate talent but rather a synergistic combination of luck, persistence, networks, and an opportunistic streak that stood these larger-than-life personae in good stead. Despite the weak prescriptive last chapter (the book functions better as descriptive commentary), Business Brilliant is ultimately a feel-good read that challenges prevailing assumptions about what it takes to become immensely successful through engaging storytelling.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brad Dunson

    Although it doesn't offer the reader anything particularly new or revealing, Schiff clearly communicates through 10 years of research how to achieve a success that is above average. He argues that to go beyond the middle class, you must practice and have sensibilities inherent in the wealthy: Take an ownership mentality in your work, fail often and learn from it, take advantage of weakness in negotiations, and execute well (not about a grand idea, but rather executing well on ordinary ideas). He Although it doesn't offer the reader anything particularly new or revealing, Schiff clearly communicates through 10 years of research how to achieve a success that is above average. He argues that to go beyond the middle class, you must practice and have sensibilities inherent in the wealthy: Take an ownership mentality in your work, fail often and learn from it, take advantage of weakness in negotiations, and execute well (not about a grand idea, but rather executing well on ordinary ideas). He takes some of the most successful names in business -- Warren Buffet, Bill Gates, Richard Branson -- and through their example extolls the efficacy of these same principals. This is a wikipedia read. Scan it and you'll have the essence of what this book is trying to say, a seemingly common trait in contemporary business lit.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ray Edwards

    Contrarian. Challenging. Brilliant. At first, I hated this book. It challenged many of my premises about business and entrepreneurialism. I almost stopped reading it. Almost. As I pressed on, page after page, I saw the real picture: Lewis Schiff uses data, research, and critical thinking to destroy "magical thinking" about what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur. This book contradicts the conventional wisdom about what qualities make a person brilliant at business, will challenge some of yo Contrarian. Challenging. Brilliant. At first, I hated this book. It challenged many of my premises about business and entrepreneurialism. I almost stopped reading it. Almost. As I pressed on, page after page, I saw the real picture: Lewis Schiff uses data, research, and critical thinking to destroy "magical thinking" about what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur. This book contradicts the conventional wisdom about what qualities make a person brilliant at business, will challenge some of your deepest beliefs about what separates the middle class from the rich, and proves its premise with an evidence-based approach absent from many popular business books. In a word: brilliant.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bar Franek

    absolutely critical book for entrepreneurs. I like to think of it as a modern "Think and Grow Rich" (which everyone should read anyway) Lot of great insight on the differences between what the 'middle class' thinks and how that differs from what successful, wealthy people think. Basically it boils down to 8 common misconceptions regular people have when it comes to certain situations, specifically in business. You're bound to change your outlook on at least one or two things after reading this b absolutely critical book for entrepreneurs. I like to think of it as a modern "Think and Grow Rich" (which everyone should read anyway) Lot of great insight on the differences between what the 'middle class' thinks and how that differs from what successful, wealthy people think. Basically it boils down to 8 common misconceptions regular people have when it comes to certain situations, specifically in business. You're bound to change your outlook on at least one or two things after reading this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Vinos

    A really fab book with some eye-opening stories of famous entrepreneurs and what we can learn from their mistakes. The references and stories relating to Bill Gates were particularly eye-opening. The crux of the book is about not feeling the need to re-invent the wheel when you consider starting a business. I highly recommend this book to anyone in business for themselves. It may save you a lot of unnecessary work and soul searching at the outset.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Curtismchale

    There is much to love about this book, but if you’re going to read it start with chapter 9. Then if you’re still interested go back and read the rest of the book. True you’ll miss interesting stories about business owners like Bill Gates and Richard Branson, but the real takeaways are in the last chapter.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andrei Bergners

    Very thought provoking. Had to listen to some parts twice in order to drill the lesson home. It also helped me to remove some cognitive dissonance that I previously held :) Now I'm wondering where and how to apply the lessons in my life... Very thought provoking. Had to listen to some parts twice in order to drill the lesson home. It also helped me to remove some cognitive dissonance that I previously held :) Now I'm wondering where and how to apply the lessons in my life...

  30. 4 out of 5

    Russell

    Illustrates mainstream fallacies A thorough investigation of the beliefs and behaviors that create millionaires. Finishes with an action plan you can use to become financially successful.

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