Hot Best Seller

Free to Learn: Five Ideas for a Joyful Unschooling Life (Living Joyfully with Unschooling Book 1)

Availability: Ready to download

Humans are born to learn. So why are we so determined to get in our children's way? Leaving the traditional education system behind is definitely unconventional and sometimes scary, but it enables us to preserve our children's curiosity, creativity, and enthusiasm for learning. And that means more learning, not less. With more than a dozen years of unschooling experience, Pa Humans are born to learn. So why are we so determined to get in our children's way? Leaving the traditional education system behind is definitely unconventional and sometimes scary, but it enables us to preserve our children's curiosity, creativity, and enthusiasm for learning. And that means more learning, not less. With more than a dozen years of unschooling experience, Pam Laricchia explains the five paradigm-shifting ideas about learning and living that freed her family from the school system's compulsory schedule and typical teaching methods. Her practical examples and stories may make all the difference in your life and the life of your child. In Free to Learn, you'll discover:  Why you want to look for learning, not teaching How to see the learning that is happening everywhere, all the time How judgement and shame short circuit learning, and what to do instead How saying yes more encourages our children's learning and cultivates their confidence How to give your children a voice in your family, and much, much more!  Through its concise, easy-to-understand language, Free to Learn explores the depth and potential of unschooling and how it can strengthen your family's learning and relationships. If you like thoughtful educational ideas, step-by-step guides, and complex concepts explained in simple ways, then you'll love Pam's robust, user-friendly book.  Buy Free to Learn today to find the joy in learning for your family!


Compare

Humans are born to learn. So why are we so determined to get in our children's way? Leaving the traditional education system behind is definitely unconventional and sometimes scary, but it enables us to preserve our children's curiosity, creativity, and enthusiasm for learning. And that means more learning, not less. With more than a dozen years of unschooling experience, Pa Humans are born to learn. So why are we so determined to get in our children's way? Leaving the traditional education system behind is definitely unconventional and sometimes scary, but it enables us to preserve our children's curiosity, creativity, and enthusiasm for learning. And that means more learning, not less. With more than a dozen years of unschooling experience, Pam Laricchia explains the five paradigm-shifting ideas about learning and living that freed her family from the school system's compulsory schedule and typical teaching methods. Her practical examples and stories may make all the difference in your life and the life of your child. In Free to Learn, you'll discover:  Why you want to look for learning, not teaching How to see the learning that is happening everywhere, all the time How judgement and shame short circuit learning, and what to do instead How saying yes more encourages our children's learning and cultivates their confidence How to give your children a voice in your family, and much, much more!  Through its concise, easy-to-understand language, Free to Learn explores the depth and potential of unschooling and how it can strengthen your family's learning and relationships. If you like thoughtful educational ideas, step-by-step guides, and complex concepts explained in simple ways, then you'll love Pam's robust, user-friendly book.  Buy Free to Learn today to find the joy in learning for your family!

30 review for Free to Learn: Five Ideas for a Joyful Unschooling Life (Living Joyfully with Unschooling Book 1)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jen (bookscoffeedogs)

    Picked this up from the library for new homeschooling inspiration. While I agree with some of it, it is definitely a radical unschooling approach, one in which kids can go to bed when THEY want, eat pb&j for every meal for 5 days if THEY want in the theory that they will learn what works for THEM and not to follow some arbitrary rule that works for others. Unfortunately, I need to take care of myself too which means them going to bed at a reasonable hour, eating food that is healthy enough we do Picked this up from the library for new homeschooling inspiration. While I agree with some of it, it is definitely a radical unschooling approach, one in which kids can go to bed when THEY want, eat pb&j for every meal for 5 days if THEY want in the theory that they will learn what works for THEM and not to follow some arbitrary rule that works for others. Unfortunately, I need to take care of myself too which means them going to bed at a reasonable hour, eating food that is healthy enough we don't end up in the ER (as we have from not enough fruit and veggies and my daughter having bouts with constipation) And I find when my kids don't have some sort of structure to their lives, they take it out on each other, which is also stressful for my husband and I. Sometimes what works for the whole family needs to take precedent in our house at least. I am just not a radical unschooler, if you are this book is great, if you aren't skip it an move on to others about unschooling. There is a variety of ideas on what 'unschooling' is I am finding, pretty much as many families as claim unschooling status, that is how many different visions of unschooling you get. If you are curious about radical unschooling then yes, read this book. I did like the reminder about trying to say 'yes' more and not just going for the 'no' or 'cause I said so' bit, but taking more time to focus and discuss with the kids the challenges that come up. Which to me really means being more mindful of what is really going on when they are fighting or frustrated.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    If you've never heard of unschooling, it's basically homeschooling without a curriculum. The central idea is that people learn well when they are interested/invested in the subject matter, so children should be encouraged to follow their passions without having a curriculum imposed on them by a teacher/parent. The other ideas Laricchia shares all flow from there, challenging parents to consider how, when, what and where people can (and "should") learn. I agree with her about many of the limitat If you've never heard of unschooling, it's basically homeschooling without a curriculum. The central idea is that people learn well when they are interested/invested in the subject matter, so children should be encouraged to follow their passions without having a curriculum imposed on them by a teacher/parent. The other ideas Laricchia shares all flow from there, challenging parents to consider how, when, what and where people can (and "should") learn. I agree with her about many of the limitations of public schooling and generally appreciate the reminder to ask myself "Why?" and "Why not?" more often as I parent my kids. I can't follow her all the way to the extreme belief that kids should be "free" to learn anything via any method or that I shouldn't steer them at all, but the overall concept of giving them more freedom is a helpful course-correct. I found this interesting because I'm a sucker for books about various educational philosophies, but it was pretty limited in scope so I was ultimately disappointed. Some of the overarching concepts here are found in Simplicity Parenting, which I'd recommend more highly. Simplicity Parenting: Using the Extraordinary Power of Less to Raise Calmer, Happier, and More Secure Kids

  3. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    This book was repetitive and not dense. It also didn't seem to cover much new ground. That being said, it emphasized/reminded me of a few critical things that ideal education should be: 1) Child directed 2) Allow play 3) Age mixed I am not sure how to make this actionable. The nearest similar philosophied schools are 45 minutes away. My opinion on my options are to 1) Homeschool (I don't think I have the time to do a good job with this) 2) Start a charter school with other parents (probably also don't This book was repetitive and not dense. It also didn't seem to cover much new ground. That being said, it emphasized/reminded me of a few critical things that ideal education should be: 1) Child directed 2) Allow play 3) Age mixed I am not sure how to make this actionable. The nearest similar philosophied schools are 45 minutes away. My opinion on my options are to 1) Homeschool (I don't think I have the time to do a good job with this) 2) Start a charter school with other parents (probably also don't have the time for this) 3) Augment my daughter's education whenever I can. This probably won't be much and would require focus (we'd have to limit other activities unless she is certain she will want to do them). 4) If the above schools offer busing and my daughter wants to sending her to one of them. This would probably fill her day a bit too much and may stress her out. These options don't feel that great and all in all this book is somewhat frustrating. It clearly shows how education should be, but doesn't mesh well with reality where this education is hard to come by.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    An easy read about unschooling, discusses five main ideas: 1. Allow real learning to take place (i.e. not textbook/curriculum based learning) 2. Follow your child's interests (learning takes place best when the learner is interested and engaged) 3. Learn how to make choices and decisions (don't make the choices for your child) 4. Yes instead of no 5. Live together, give children a voice in the family An easy read about unschooling, discusses five main ideas: 1. Allow real learning to take place (i.e. not textbook/curriculum based learning) 2. Follow your child's interests (learning takes place best when the learner is interested and engaged) 3. Learn how to make choices and decisions (don't make the choices for your child) 4. Yes instead of no 5. Live together, give children a voice in the family

  5. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    I would term this more of a radical unschooling book. Radical unschooling would not be joyful to me. ;-) We definitely allow our children to learn at their own pace and to learn what they want. However, we do have some basic rules in our home so that we can be respectful to each other and learn how to live together in harmony. I feel like if we took Mrs. Laricchia's approach to unschooling, we would have a messy, chaotic house, without any structure at all. And I think it would produce some gru I would term this more of a radical unschooling book. Radical unschooling would not be joyful to me. ;-) We definitely allow our children to learn at their own pace and to learn what they want. However, we do have some basic rules in our home so that we can be respectful to each other and learn how to live together in harmony. I feel like if we took Mrs. Laricchia's approach to unschooling, we would have a messy, chaotic house, without any structure at all. And I think it would produce some grumpy, selfish children, too. I believe that children should be valued and respected without a doubt, but I also believe that gentle and loving guidance from parents is necessary. I think there is a healthy in-between. I did glean some useful tips and ideas from her, so this book was not a total waste of my time.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

    I appreciate where this book is coming from. I think unschooling is an admirable choice and I like a lot of the concepts here but find the author too judgemental and don't agree with some of what she is saying. For example, kids like 'sugary treats' because that is what we are genetically programmed to like, not just because they are restricted from eating these foods.. I don't think I could follow her idea of unschooling. I appreciate where this book is coming from. I think unschooling is an admirable choice and I like a lot of the concepts here but find the author too judgemental and don't agree with some of what she is saying. For example, kids like 'sugary treats' because that is what we are genetically programmed to like, not just because they are restricted from eating these foods.. I don't think I could follow her idea of unschooling.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    Simple, quick and enlightening read. It helped solidify our choice to unschool our kids and brought to light many ideas on how to better trust our children and cultivate our family relationships. We won't be utilizing everything she mentions but have taken many great nuggets of info, without getting bogged down by too many details. I love the short examples she included in each chapter and helped me relate to her explanations. Simple, quick and enlightening read. It helped solidify our choice to unschool our kids and brought to light many ideas on how to better trust our children and cultivate our family relationships. We won't be utilizing everything she mentions but have taken many great nuggets of info, without getting bogged down by too many details. I love the short examples she included in each chapter and helped me relate to her explanations.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    This is the first book I've read on unschooling. I expected to find research to back up the ideals and a home that still had a "little" structure and guidance. I need to do a little more research on the topic, but I will be very disappointed if it is about encouraging my child to play video games all day while I bring them food in their room. This is the first book I've read on unschooling. I expected to find research to back up the ideals and a home that still had a "little" structure and guidance. I need to do a little more research on the topic, but I will be very disappointed if it is about encouraging my child to play video games all day while I bring them food in their room.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alex Polikowsky

    Wonderful book specially if you are new to the idea of unschooling!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    This book is a life-changer for me!!! I devoured it in an afternoon ... then shared it with my family. So much inspiration and optimism within these pages!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Noel

    This would have been so much better if it would stuck with unschooling ideas and theories instead of how to parent.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Janey

    "In those first years some teachers were more flexible, while others were quite determined to shave off his uniqueness.............Most of the teachers understood what I was talking about, but their feedback was that they don't have the time to work with kids outside the personalities and learning styles that mesh with the classroom setting. The kids have to fit the surroundings, not the other way around...........It became clear to me that he would not thrive in public school." "And soon you beg "In those first years some teachers were more flexible, while others were quite determined to shave off his uniqueness.............Most of the teachers understood what I was talking about, but their feedback was that they don't have the time to work with kids outside the personalities and learning styles that mesh with the classroom setting. The kids have to fit the surroundings, not the other way around...........It became clear to me that he would not thrive in public school." "And soon you begin to glimpse the true nature of unschooling unfolding: living joyfully and passionately as a family, and building lifelong relationships in an environment where your children are free to discover and to grow into the people they were born to be." "Whether teachers like it or not, the students themselves are completely in control of whether learning is happening." "The other challenge is accommodating different learning styles. This is a daunting task in the highly structured school environment. Those students that don't learn well in the typical classroom environment are regarded as unintelligent and many carry that judgment well into their adult lives. People don't realize that the issue was really that the typical classroom setup was not conducive to how they learn best." Quoting Herbert Geurjoy: "Tomorrow's illiterate will not be the man who can't read; he will be the man who has not learned how to learn." "The point is that there is no start or end to learning; it can happen at any time, at any age, whenever the need to attain the skill or knowledge arises." "It takes time to move from a teacher-centered, structured view of learning to a learner-centered one." "Learning need not be defined as exclusively occurring in classrooms, during school hours, with those of school age. It can be found everywhere, at anytime, and can happen at any age........People (and again, children are people) enjoy learning things that are useful to them now, and they learn best when they are interested and engaged." "At this time in history, there is so much information readily available in the world; it is no longer only available in the classroom, dispensed by a teacher." "There is no right and wrong time to learn something when learning is seen as a lifelong endeavor; learn it when you want or need the knowledge. And there is no behind or ahead in learning. Comparing marks or knowledge against others is not a measure of personal learning and is irrelevant to the learner if the goal is expanding their own knowledge base." "Free to learn, children in all these overlapping groups will gather knowledge and pick up skills in ways that work for them. They may prefer to learn through books or magazines (read by themselves or by others); TV, movies, or documentaries; mentors or interested peers; hands-on exploration; online websites, blogs, and podcasts; visits to related places close or far; and so forth. No one method of learning is superior to another, except to an individual." "Remember, your child is not just an extension of you. It's not hard to imagine that different choices in the same situation could work out well for different people, yet it's still pretty easy to fall into the trap of thinking that you know the best choice for another person: a spouse, a friend, or especially a child you love and want the best for." I really, really, needed to learn this: "While developing this trust, it is important that you don't judge their choices, even implicitly. Real choice is lost if you even subtly manipulate them with a sigh or a certain look. Certainly discuss the options, but it's important that they feel free to follow their preference because people learn best from an experience when it is their own. If they are living someone else's choices, they are often learning something different. Can you recall a situation where this was true for you? Even as an adult, when you're told what to do, it is human nature to feel a twinge of rebellion, especially when you think there is a better choice. You may well do what you're told, but what you are likely thinking about and learning from is not the situation at hand, but rather your feelings toward the messenger--your boss, your coach, or your parent." "Experience in making the smaller choices in life while growing up has a number of wonderful benefits for children: they get to know and understand themselves well, their likes and dislikes, what they excel at, and what they find challenging; they gain lots of experience in analyzing situations and choosing which path forward to take; and their parents are close by to talk to while analyzing situations, available to share their experiences and thoughts. Young adults aren't left to ponder whether their choices are truly theirs, or are in reaction to their parents' control." "Learning happens when their is interest. In terms of learning and building their web of knowledge, choosing which threads to pursue now and which to leave for later also helps children build experience and confidence. Without choice in this area they aren't free to explore what they are most interested in, which is where the best learning is found. And if that thread they decided not to pursue last month comes up again this month related to something else, they begin to see that it might be a useful bit of information to have or skill to pick up and may soon choose to give it their attention." "A person makes fewer detours as an adult if given the time and opportunities during childhood to really understand themselves, how they tick, and to incorporate that knowledge into their decision making when evaluating choices. Also, seeing how their perspective and goals change over time, especially during the teen years, helps them more easily understand and accept their changes of perspective and goals during adulthood, seeing them not as failures but as part of living." "Would you rather be a parent that supports their child's interests as much as possible? One who helps their child to explore the world? Do you prefer to see you and your child as a team working together? If so, then give your child's requests full consideration." "The more you are able to help your child accomplish and explore what piques her interest, the more your child will learn about herself and the world." "It takes time to move through that outlook to a team-based one where the children--and parents--feel respected enough to release their need to feel powerful, trusting other family members to not take advantage of them." "What I found was that when I looked at real learning, learning that was understood and remembered, the potential for it was much greater when living directly in the real world versus spending a large part of the day in a classroom learning from a simulated world." "As I was making these paradigm shifts I uncovered an underlying theme: trust." "Just because I didn't understand the situation did not mean that it didn't have the same value for my child as a situation that was more transparent to me." "Looking at unschooling through a relationship lens, it becomes quite clear that the paradigm shifts I underwent were also those that most improved our relationships."

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ozy Frantz

    (This is a review of Pam Laricchia's entire series, not just Free to Learn; while the books were inexpensive, they really should have been one book and not three.) I have complicated feelings about this book. Sometimes I call myself half an unschooler. On one hand, I agree with following the child's interests, creating an enriched environment that helps the child learn, encouraging the child's independence, and fostering a culture of lifelong learning in the family. On the other hand, Laricchia r (This is a review of Pam Laricchia's entire series, not just Free to Learn; while the books were inexpensive, they really should have been one book and not three.) I have complicated feelings about this book. Sometimes I call myself half an unschooler. On one hand, I agree with following the child's interests, creating an enriched environment that helps the child learn, encouraging the child's independence, and fostering a culture of lifelong learning in the family. On the other hand, Laricchia repeatedly says that it doesn't matter if a child fails to learn calculus or American history, because they'll learn something else that is more important to them right now. I disagree with her idea that all knowledge is equally valuable. Learning how to beat every boss in Dark Souls is just not as valuable as calculus; it is possible to waste time. I am deeply skeptical of Laricchia's attitude towards teaching math; I don't think board games and cooking give enough practice to build number sense and mastery of arithmetic. I think it is possible to unschool math, just as it's possible to unschool reading. But thanks to our school system's incompetent teaching of mathematics, many people hate and are frightened by math. They create an environment rich in books, stories, and language, but not in numbers, puzzles, and shapes. I am concerned by Laricchia completely ignoring the concept of discipline. Sometimes any person wants to do something in general but has difficulty doing it in the moment. I think guiding children gently to help them reach their own goals is much better than saying "well, if you don't want to work on your book today, you can play Minecraft."

  14. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    Another interesting book about unschooling from Pam, although I found that quite a bit was repeated in her “What Is Unschooling” book. Definitely a great place to start if you’d like to introduce unschooling into your family life. Pam isn’t advocating just giving kids absolute free rein from day one, just introducing the concepts that make up an unschooling life in increments that work for you. Some of these ideas might never work for your family (e.g kids going to bed when they’re ready) but th Another interesting book about unschooling from Pam, although I found that quite a bit was repeated in her “What Is Unschooling” book. Definitely a great place to start if you’d like to introduce unschooling into your family life. Pam isn’t advocating just giving kids absolute free rein from day one, just introducing the concepts that make up an unschooling life in increments that work for you. Some of these ideas might never work for your family (e.g kids going to bed when they’re ready) but that’s the great thing about unschooling, it’s different for us all.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    3 stars for lightness of material, though I liked the book well enough. I already agree with the premise and the principles, so there's not really any handwringing over how my needs as a person must necessarily come into conflict with my children's and therefore, they must be told what to do... that I need to do. It's all about trust, and I'm still doing tons of self-work on it, but I get it. Can't wait to say the exact same thing for the other books she's written. 😂 3 stars for lightness of material, though I liked the book well enough. I already agree with the premise and the principles, so there's not really any handwringing over how my needs as a person must necessarily come into conflict with my children's and therefore, they must be told what to do... that I need to do. It's all about trust, and I'm still doing tons of self-work on it, but I get it. Can't wait to say the exact same thing for the other books she's written. 😂

  16. 5 out of 5

    Krista

    Not really anything new here for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Hasty

    Great easy read for a homeschool parent!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paula Wharram

    As someone trying to wrap my head around, and embrace unschooling, it was a great read. I read it in one afternoon and made notes. we already do the food, sleep, and chores stuff; But I found the information about learners to be very helpful. I happen to also be a school teacher so deschooling is very hard, will likely never happen, but it certainly made me question my teaching practice, and made me more inspired and comfortable in following my husbands lead with our unschooling

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    This is a good overview of the unschooling philosophy, some examples and the basic paradigm shifts that happen for those who have been taught that learning only happens at a desk in a classroom from September to June. There is much here that is not solely applicable to unschooling. I appreciated her discussion on rules versus principles in the home, opening up discussions and eliminating the "knee-jerk no" response. I can't remember a book I have ever agreed AND disagreed with so strongly. It wa This is a good overview of the unschooling philosophy, some examples and the basic paradigm shifts that happen for those who have been taught that learning only happens at a desk in a classroom from September to June. There is much here that is not solely applicable to unschooling. I appreciated her discussion on rules versus principles in the home, opening up discussions and eliminating the "knee-jerk no" response. I can't remember a book I have ever agreed AND disagreed with so strongly. It was a fun read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jenna Anderson

    Oh man, am I an unschooler?? I loved this short and sweet little book. I do not know yet how homeschooling will look in our house, but these ideas make such a good foundation. I assumed that many of the things that I’ve leaned on while parenting little babies (letting them sleep when they’re tired, eat when they’re hungry, feel their big feelings) would have to be tempered when they started school. And I wasn’t looking forward to that transition. This book affirms my instincts and opens the door Oh man, am I an unschooler?? I loved this short and sweet little book. I do not know yet how homeschooling will look in our house, but these ideas make such a good foundation. I assumed that many of the things that I’ve leaned on while parenting little babies (letting them sleep when they’re tired, eat when they’re hungry, feel their big feelings) would have to be tempered when they started school. And I wasn’t looking forward to that transition. This book affirms my instincts and opens the door to deepening this way of living. Love.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    This was a good homeschool inspiration book, though probably better suited to a parent at the beginning of the homeschool journey, not one nearing the end. It did give me a few twinges of regret that I had not had the courage to live an unschooling life when my kids were younger. That's why I gave it 4 stars: not for me, but for younger moms with younger kids who can get a better start than my kids had. This was a good homeschool inspiration book, though probably better suited to a parent at the beginning of the homeschool journey, not one nearing the end. It did give me a few twinges of regret that I had not had the courage to live an unschooling life when my kids were younger. That's why I gave it 4 stars: not for me, but for younger moms with younger kids who can get a better start than my kids had.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Archana Ananthaswamy

    Loved this one! Clear and concise whether you need a reminder or want to apply the essence of it to your life. I really enjoyed the section on expectations. Highly recommend to anyone who feels that our children's learning needs to aim at personal happiness which depends more on lighting their own path and the quality of key relationships in their life rather than success as defined by society. Loved this one! Clear and concise whether you need a reminder or want to apply the essence of it to your life. I really enjoyed the section on expectations. Highly recommend to anyone who feels that our children's learning needs to aim at personal happiness which depends more on lighting their own path and the quality of key relationships in their life rather than success as defined by society.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    I really wanted to like this more. But I think what I'd like in a homeschooling book is more ideas about actually how to make it work and while there was some of this, eventually I started feeling like I was being constantly critiqued for being a substandard parent. That's probably just me and my baggage, though. I really wanted to like this more. But I think what I'd like in a homeschooling book is more ideas about actually how to make it work and while there was some of this, eventually I started feeling like I was being constantly critiqued for being a substandard parent. That's probably just me and my baggage, though.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emma Bliss

    This is a small book and an easy read. It covers the basics of unschooling and makes it make sense. Ideal as an intro or for giving to family members that question what it's all about, but you will probably want to read deeper than this offers if you do plan to unschool. There is an excellent list of books at the back with a description of each to guide you on these next steps. This is a small book and an easy read. It covers the basics of unschooling and makes it make sense. Ideal as an intro or for giving to family members that question what it's all about, but you will probably want to read deeper than this offers if you do plan to unschool. There is an excellent list of books at the back with a description of each to guide you on these next steps.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Justine

    This is a nice, straightforward introduction to unschooling done in a way that even people who are fairly married to the idea of school can read without becoming too uncomfortable. It would be a good book to give to friends or family who are needing a bit of background on unschooling or for parents interested moving to unschooling their children.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jill Medina

    How to unschool for beginnets I love how Pam broke up the ideas and expounded on each idea, with plenty of examples. This book and her website & podcasts are really helping me with our unschooling journey, & I recommend it to anyone who is unschooling or thinking about it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    Excellent resource for those new to homeschooling and for their loved ones who might not be happy with that decision.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gretchen Guglietta

    Good intro to unschooling. Now just have to delve in a little deeper.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline White

    The author has some interesting thoughts, but the book is not very well written. She repeats herself a lot, there were entire paragraphs that she repeated word for word just a few pages apart.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Shields

    A very thoughtful and well-written discussion of Unschooling and its basic philosophies.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...