Hot Best Seller

The War of the Jewels

Availability: Ready to download

In volumes ten and eleven of The History of Middle-earth, Christopher Tolkien recounts from the original texts the evolution of his father's work on The Silmarillion, the legendary history of the Elder Days or First Age, from the completion of the Lord of the Rings in 1949 until J.R.R. Tolkien's death. In volume ten, Morgoth's Ring, the narrative was taken only as far as t In volumes ten and eleven of The History of Middle-earth, Christopher Tolkien recounts from the original texts the evolution of his father's work on The Silmarillion, the legendary history of the Elder Days or First Age, from the completion of the Lord of the Rings in 1949 until J.R.R. Tolkien's death. In volume ten, Morgoth's Ring, the narrative was taken only as far as the natural dividing point in the work, when Morgoth destroyed the Trees of Light and fled from Valinor bearing the stolen Silmarils. In The War of the Jewels, the story returns to Middle-earth and the ruinous conflict of the High Elves and the Men who were their allies with the power of the Dark Lord. With the publication in this book of all of J.R.R. Tolkien's later narrative writing concerned with the last centuries of the First Age, the long history of The Silmarillion, from its beginnings in The Book of Lost Tales, is completed; the enigmatic state of the work at his death can now be understood. A chief element in The War of the Jewels is a major story of Middle-earth, now published for the first time - a continuation of the great "saga" of Turin Turambar and his sister Nienor, the children of Hurin the Steadfast. This is the tale of the disaster that overtook the forest people of Brethil when Hurin came among them after his release from long years of captivity in Angband, the fortress of Morgoth. The uncompleted text of the Grey Annals, the primary record of the War of the Jewels, is given in full; the geography of Beleriand is studied in detail, with redrawings of the final state of the map; and a long essay on the names and relations of all the peoples of Middle-earth shows more clearly than any writing yet published the close connection between the language and history in Tolkien's world. The text also provides new information, including some knowledge of the divine powers, the Valar.


Compare

In volumes ten and eleven of The History of Middle-earth, Christopher Tolkien recounts from the original texts the evolution of his father's work on The Silmarillion, the legendary history of the Elder Days or First Age, from the completion of the Lord of the Rings in 1949 until J.R.R. Tolkien's death. In volume ten, Morgoth's Ring, the narrative was taken only as far as t In volumes ten and eleven of The History of Middle-earth, Christopher Tolkien recounts from the original texts the evolution of his father's work on The Silmarillion, the legendary history of the Elder Days or First Age, from the completion of the Lord of the Rings in 1949 until J.R.R. Tolkien's death. In volume ten, Morgoth's Ring, the narrative was taken only as far as the natural dividing point in the work, when Morgoth destroyed the Trees of Light and fled from Valinor bearing the stolen Silmarils. In The War of the Jewels, the story returns to Middle-earth and the ruinous conflict of the High Elves and the Men who were their allies with the power of the Dark Lord. With the publication in this book of all of J.R.R. Tolkien's later narrative writing concerned with the last centuries of the First Age, the long history of The Silmarillion, from its beginnings in The Book of Lost Tales, is completed; the enigmatic state of the work at his death can now be understood. A chief element in The War of the Jewels is a major story of Middle-earth, now published for the first time - a continuation of the great "saga" of Turin Turambar and his sister Nienor, the children of Hurin the Steadfast. This is the tale of the disaster that overtook the forest people of Brethil when Hurin came among them after his release from long years of captivity in Angband, the fortress of Morgoth. The uncompleted text of the Grey Annals, the primary record of the War of the Jewels, is given in full; the geography of Beleriand is studied in detail, with redrawings of the final state of the map; and a long essay on the names and relations of all the peoples of Middle-earth shows more clearly than any writing yet published the close connection between the language and history in Tolkien's world. The text also provides new information, including some knowledge of the divine powers, the Valar.

30 review for The War of the Jewels

  1. 5 out of 5

    Linda ~ they got the mustard out! ~

    This was the least interesting of the HoME so far. Other than a fairly elaborate story/synopsis of Húrin's wanderings after his torment and release by Morgoth, there's nothing here of note. The story of Húrin's coming to Brethil was as messed up and foreboding as you'd expect from The Silm, and it's a shame it was never fully finished and so wasn't used in the published Silm. I understand Christopher's reasonings for not including it, as there were just too many missing pieces for how to fit it This was the least interesting of the HoME so far. Other than a fairly elaborate story/synopsis of Húrin's wanderings after his torment and release by Morgoth, there's nothing here of note. The story of Húrin's coming to Brethil was as messed up and foreboding as you'd expect from The Silm, and it's a shame it was never fully finished and so wasn't used in the published Silm. I understand Christopher's reasonings for not including it, as there were just too many missing pieces for how to fit it into the larger story. There's yet another annal which is delivered in one long block, and as with the other annals, they're really only of interest if you want to know what year the various events took place (roughly, of course, as the years keep changing with each revision). I was able to read these in previous volume when they were broken up into more manageable blocks, but this was 100+ pages straight, followed by 70-ish pages of notes and commentary, and I just couldn't muster the interest this time around. There's also a very elaborate section on Quendi and the Eldar at the end, which is really only of interest to those actually wanting to learn the language. Pepper in various lists about the minute changes in to the later Quenta Silmarillion (of which none of those stories came anywhere near completion before Tolkien's death) and commentary about various technical details, and this thing was a slog. I admit, I skipped/skimmed a lot of this. It was interesting to see which of Tolkien's later changes were not incorporated in the published Silm, due largely to the stories never being finished and/or being so at odds with what was written before, but that's about it and certainly wasn't worth the 400 pages it took to convey that information. Still, boring as most of this was, I can't help but admire Christopher's dedication to bringing all this together and organizing what must be an entire warehouse worth of notes, letters, scribblings on loose piece of papers and whatnot, and actually making it largely comprehensible. How I imagine it must have felt like for him: 😂 I have no idea what the final volume in the HoME is going to be about (we're going to back to LOTR to cover the appendices from a glance at the ToC, among other things) but I hope it's more interesting than this to finish this project up.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The War of the Jewels (The History of Middle-Earth #11), J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien (Editor)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katrin

    I'm very torn with giving stars to this book. If I'd rate only the content by J.R.R. Tolkien and the work Christopher has done, his passion and his patience, I would give 5 stars without even thinking about it. But this book was difficult to read. First of all there are many cross-references which can be best understood while having the Silmarillion and the Unfinished Tales next to you. Reading it this way would acquire a hell lot of time and interrupt the reading at every page. I was simply not I'm very torn with giving stars to this book. If I'd rate only the content by J.R.R. Tolkien and the work Christopher has done, his passion and his patience, I would give 5 stars without even thinking about it. But this book was difficult to read. First of all there are many cross-references which can be best understood while having the Silmarillion and the Unfinished Tales next to you. Reading it this way would acquire a hell lot of time and interrupt the reading at every page. I was simply not willing to do that. I believe if you are a real fanatic and know the history of the elves and all their sub-branches plus the first Men by heart AND preferably read the 12-volume series in order of their publishing, you might get much more out of this book and actually understand everything. I love Tolkien, I have read 8 of his books or so, but I'm not one to remember everything easily. I just can't, and that's why this book was tough to get through. I still read everything and am glad I did, but I sadly can only give three stars due to the lack of joy in reading it. It was a great joy to get to know new things, to learn more about Tolkien's world and his thoughts etc., but all around those moments were countless pages with notes, explanations, footnotes etc. that just frustrated me and were tiring to get through.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Max

    This is part 11 of a 13-part series with the history of Middle Earth. I really love Tolkien's stories so reading this series was a bit of a necessity for me! This one had some great stuff, but the first half was a repeat of works I read earlier. The additions and edits are so minor that I did not notice them, so I don't think this was very necessary. There's a piece on Beren and Luthien again, and also a lot about Turin and Nienor. The Grey Annals are given here in full, and Christopher Tolkien's This is part 11 of a 13-part series with the history of Middle Earth. I really love Tolkien's stories so reading this series was a bit of a necessity for me! This one had some great stuff, but the first half was a repeat of works I read earlier. The additions and edits are so minor that I did not notice them, so I don't think this was very necessary. There's a piece on Beren and Luthien again, and also a lot about Turin and Nienor. The Grey Annals are given here in full, and Christopher Tolkien's notes are useful for this one. Nice stories, a little repetitive, that's why I gave it three stars instead of four. Onto the next part!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    Reading the History of Middle-Earth series requires skills in determining when to read closely and when to skim. I don't say that to insult the series--and I don't think Christopher Tolkien would disagree--and certainly each reader will have a different opinion on which sections are "read-closely" and which sections are "skim." Of the volumes I've read so far (only one more to go now!), The War of the Jewels was the most taxing to read, having what I considered the highest percentage of skimmabl Reading the History of Middle-Earth series requires skills in determining when to read closely and when to skim. I don't say that to insult the series--and I don't think Christopher Tolkien would disagree--and certainly each reader will have a different opinion on which sections are "read-closely" and which sections are "skim." Of the volumes I've read so far (only one more to go now!), The War of the Jewels was the most taxing to read, having what I considered the highest percentage of skimmable text. The first part, the Grey Annals, is a marathon of flipping between the main text section and the commentary section. By this point in the series, I feel like we've reached a point at which the changes are so small, and the layers of previous versions so dense, that it's a bit difficult to fully recall what it is that's being developed or changed in these new versions. The same was true of the next section, the final chapters of "the Later Quenta Silmarillion"--though that was followed by some fascinating new elements in the story of Hurin. The close of this volume is a section of grammar and phonological description of elvish languages. I have some experience in linguistics, and I recognize Tolkien's achievement in designing such a complex history for the languages, but I'm not interested enough to read straight through this section without a lot of skimming.Just one volume remains, and then I'll have finished the series. I'm looking forward to the final bits that Christopher presents. In all of the volumes, I really appreciate Christopher's humility. Here is the person in the world who could swagger as much as he likes, since he is the closest to his father of any Tolkien scholar, but he consistently admits his uncertainties and possible missteps. It's a refreshing attitude in any kind of scholarship.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ulysses

    The books in the History of Middle-Earth series are a crapshoot. The better ones, like Morgoth's Ring (Volume 10), are full of interesting insights into the development of Tolkien's "audience-facing" works (i.e. The Hobbit, LOTR, and The Silmarillion) as well as standalone rarities and outtakes that increase the reader's understanding of the Tolkien legendarium. The worse ones, like Sauron Defeated (Volume 9), are full of dry and virtually indistinguishable variations on themes that have been pr The books in the History of Middle-Earth series are a crapshoot. The better ones, like Morgoth's Ring (Volume 10), are full of interesting insights into the development of Tolkien's "audience-facing" works (i.e. The Hobbit, LOTR, and The Silmarillion) as well as standalone rarities and outtakes that increase the reader's understanding of the Tolkien legendarium. The worse ones, like Sauron Defeated (Volume 9), are full of dry and virtually indistinguishable variations on themes that have been propounded in superior fashion elsewhere, and/or bizarre ramblings whose significance to the legendarium is minimal. This one falls somewhere in between, but closer to the Worse end of the spectrum: its core (a series of riffs on the development of the latter part of the Silmarillion) is note-heavy but body-light, and anyone interested in this content can now find it in a far more refined form in Christopher Tolkien's subsequently published The Children of Hurin, Beren and Luthien, and The Fall of Gondolin, each of which extends one of the three major themes of the latter Silmarillion to feature length. The book's new content consists mainly of a chapter on the further misadventures of the renowned warrior Hurin after the death of his children at the end of The Children of Hurin, and a lengthy dissection of Elven languages. Although fresh, the Hurin story is simply too mundane to seem worthy of inclusion, and the section on Elven linguistics is so granular as to be of interest only to someone who is actually studying the language. As such, this book has value for Tolkien scholars/historians and fantasy linguists but can be skipped otherwise.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Once again this is an interesting read that hints at the extent of Middle Earth that Tolkien originally envisioned but sadly didn't finish. There is a far bit of commentary and notes for each one although this time it was more helpful as many of the stories were incomplete and needed some explanation but still would've preferred these a little shorted with longer notes to the back of the book. Despite this though the big imagination of Tolkien's original work still comes through and takes you on Once again this is an interesting read that hints at the extent of Middle Earth that Tolkien originally envisioned but sadly didn't finish. There is a far bit of commentary and notes for each one although this time it was more helpful as many of the stories were incomplete and needed some explanation but still would've preferred these a little shorted with longer notes to the back of the book. Despite this though the big imagination of Tolkien's original work still comes through and takes you on a journey through the wars and battles of Middle Earth.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael Pryor

    Deep, absorbing, enlightening.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael Davis

    Great stuff- much more meaty than I anticipated, being the 11th volume in a 12 volume collection. I wrote about the experience of reading all 12 of those volumes here: http://soundscryer.com/2011/06/13/chr... (part 1) and here: http://soundscryer.com/2011/12/02/chr... (part 2). Much more detail about the series in those two pieces. Great stuff- much more meaty than I anticipated, being the 11th volume in a 12 volume collection. I wrote about the experience of reading all 12 of those volumes here: http://soundscryer.com/2011/06/13/chr... (part 1) and here: http://soundscryer.com/2011/12/02/chr... (part 2). Much more detail about the series in those two pieces.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Raul Pegan

    Read this mainly for the Wanderings of Húrin. The story wasn’t that interesting or compelling though necessary for a complete understanding of Tolkien’s legendarium.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ancillar

    this is the second of a two-part history of the development of the Silmarillion materials after the completion of the Lord of the Rings. PART ONE: The Grey Annals the primary history for Beleriand from the beginning of the exile of the Noldor, this gives the basis for a good chunk of the published Silmarillion. this is the final form of this entity, or close to it. enjoyable. nothing obviously new, but somehow still not boring, and i found myself trailing through large swaths of the notes & commen this is the second of a two-part history of the development of the Silmarillion materials after the completion of the Lord of the Rings. PART ONE: The Grey Annals the primary history for Beleriand from the beginning of the exile of the Noldor, this gives the basis for a good chunk of the published Silmarillion. this is the final form of this entity, or close to it. enjoyable. nothing obviously new, but somehow still not boring, and i found myself trailing through large swaths of the notes & commentary more often with this one than with previous annotated texts in this series. PART TWO: The Later Quenta Silmarillion A largely fragmentary changelog. Some interesting bits about dwarves. Some less interesting bits about the coming of the Edain into the West. PART THREE: The Wanderings of Húrin and other writings not forming part of the Quenta Silmarillion I The Wanderings of Húrin The opening salvo in what was to have been a cannon blast of melodrama narrating the travels of Húrin after... earlier... difficulties with Morgoth. As an opening chapter in such a thing, it was probably just right, but it only gets us into & out of Brethil & just past Morwen. Later events in earlier rescensions -- at Nargothrond, at Menegroth and at points further east -- were never written in this mode, which is probably one of the top three tragedies of the history of the Silmarillion. II Ælfwine and Dírhaval Some minor short prefatory notes on the fictional literary provenance of the Children of Húrin story. No independent narrative value. III Maeglin Extended discussion of discourses and divergences between Tolkien's original draft material (some as late as 1970) and the published version of the Isfin/Ëol/Maeglin story. Of little to no independent narrative value except to the deepest of process nerds. IV Of the Ents and the Eagles Two pages of truly trivial changelog between the original drafts and the published Silmarillion Chapter 2 (Of Aulë and Yavanna). Zero independent narrative value. V The Tale of Years This is it, folks: the latest written authority on the stories forming the end of the Elder Days. This document is an outline, a master tracking copy of top-tier-major events in the First Age, and as such it follows (although far more tersely) the Annals of Aman and the Grey Annals, insofar as each of those goes, and adds nothing to their more elaborate takes. But the Tale of Years is (tantalizingly and more than a little bit tragically) pretty much the only material written after the Lord of the Rings that describes the event sequence from where the Grey Annals leave off (at the end of the story of Túrin and Níniel) through the end of the First Age. Covered are Ëarendil's story; the tale of the Nauglamír and the fate of Thingol and Melian; the fate of Beren and Lúthien and their descendants; the fate of Turgon and of Gondolin; the second and third Kin-slayings; the travails of peoples displaced by war and the long exodus to the West of elves and the Fathers of Men; the origins and early lives of Elrond Half-Elven and his brother Elros, who made different choices; the acts and fates of the sons of Fëanor and the ultimate disposition of the Silmarils; the final Great Battle of the Valar for Middle-Earth; and the cosmic doom of the Dark Power. Longer versions of these stories do exist in one form or another, but all were written before LoTR and were never brought up to date, as was planned. Narrative voice, depth of coverage, fundamental relationships between characters (beyond the bare-bones anchors listed in the Tale of Years, and probably some of those as well): all of these were on the table for potential profound change before offering them to the world, but remain forever unfinished. This was the single saddest part of my entire experience of reading the History of Middle-Earth. I regret nothing. PART FOUR: Quendi and Eldar An extended linguistic treatise. I will not pretend I read this. Surely invaluable for students of Elvish languages. Also contains the only material on the native language of the incarnate Valar.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    This eleventh volume of The History of Middle-earth documents pretty much the final stages of Tolkien's post-Lord of the Rings work on the texts that would eventually be edited and published as The Silmarillion after his death. Characteristically, this work is unfinished—any readers who have made it this far into the History will probably have reconciled themselves long ago to the fact that there is no final, definitive form of the mythology, but a vast series of variations: a corpus rather than This eleventh volume of The History of Middle-earth documents pretty much the final stages of Tolkien's post-Lord of the Rings work on the texts that would eventually be edited and published as The Silmarillion after his death. Characteristically, this work is unfinished—any readers who have made it this far into the History will probably have reconciled themselves long ago to the fact that there is no final, definitive form of the mythology, but a vast series of variations: a corpus rather than a text. Perhaps it is better so: richer but also more frustrating. The War of the Jewels leans more heavily towards the latter than most of the other volumes in the series. Much of the content here is painstaking scholarhip but painful reading either because it re-covers ground gone over many times before in the earlier drafts ("The Grey Annals" and "The Later Quenta Silmarillion") or because it is hopelessly bound up in details: the section on Maeglin is as dull as the History gets outside of the purely linguistic sections such as the notes on Adûnaic in Volume Nine and the essay on "Quendi and Eldar" here. However, there are some gems here for the Tolkien devotee, although they are closer to mini-Arkenstones than the Silmarils to be found in Morgoth's Ring! Skimming through "Quendi and Eldar" reveals some interesting information about the Dwarves and the Valar, and the "surviving Elvish 'fairytale' or child's tale, mingled with counting-lore" that describes the first awakening of the Elves at Cuiviénen is an intriguing fragment. More substantial is the story of the wanderings of Húrin after the death of his children, which I don't think I've seen before, and which does more socio-political worldbuilding than elsewhere in Tolkien's work. Most tantalizing of all is Christopher Tolkien's explanation of his (and Guy Gavriel Kay's) attempts to make something publishable out of the contradictory fragments dealing with accounts of the Ruin of Doriath. Had J.R.R. Tolkien done more work on this, it might have made a fourth "Great Tale", with a fifth dealing with the War of Wrath and the end of the First Age. But it was not to be. On then, to the final volume! The flame of my childhood love of Tolkien, kindled by The Hobbit, was fanned by the appendices to The Lord of the Rings, so I am looking forward to seeing how they came to be.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nonethousand Oberrhein

    Understanding Silmarillion The revisions following the Lord of the Rings publications take us back again in the study of Beleriand annals and linguistic evolutions. A new layer of polish on a legendarium that while it gets more and more defined in its focal points, it is constantly at risk of a massive rewriting by its dissatisfied author. An interesting read (a certainty now!) that will deliver some surprises as well as some confidences about Christopher’s Silmarillion editing. Here below my Understanding Silmarillion The revisions following the Lord of the Rings publications take us back again in the study of Beleriand annals and linguistic evolutions. A new layer of polish on a legendarium that while it gets more and more defined in its focal points, it is constantly at risk of a massive rewriting by its dissatisfied author. An interesting read (a certainty now!) that will deliver some surprises as well as some confidences about Christopher’s Silmarillion editing. Here below my reviews to the previous volumes of the History of Middle-earth: Vol.1: Sit down and listen Vol.2: Heroics of a young author Vol.3: The poet of Middle-earth Vol.4: Sketches and Annals of the First Age Vol.5: A glimpse of Númenor Vol.6: When Trotter led the way Vol.7: From Rivendell to Rohan Vol.8: How the King returns Vol.9: The eagles will always come at the end Vol.10: Life, Death and Arda in-between

  14. 5 out of 5

    Thijs

    Another splendid part in the Complete History of Middle Earth. Parts that stood out most were for me: - The major upheaval of the genealogy of the Three Houses of the Edain, and the massive amount of new background that comes with it. - The wanderings of Hurin, especially in Brethil. Oh the awefulness of Tolkien never having having reworked the Nauglamir and further! The Silmarillion will never read the same for me, alas. - A part on linguistics that is really more an analysis of the early days of Another splendid part in the Complete History of Middle Earth. Parts that stood out most were for me: - The major upheaval of the genealogy of the Three Houses of the Edain, and the massive amount of new background that comes with it. - The wanderings of Hurin, especially in Brethil. Oh the awefulness of Tolkien never having having reworked the Nauglamir and further! The Silmarillion will never read the same for me, alas. - A part on linguistics that is really more an analysis of the early days of the Eldar, as such things are intrinsically linked in Tolkiens worldbuilding. Don't skip this part even if you're not into Linguistics! This is but a small and comprised sampling of the superb edition in which Christopher overdid himself once more. Now, Once More Unto The Breach and so on to the last part of the CHoMA.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Poltz

    This is the eleventh volume in the History of Middle Earth series by Christopher Tolkien. This one focuses on the development of the later Silmarillion works after the publication of The Lord of the Rings. This was a companion piece to volume 10, Morgoth’s Ring. Together, they cover most of the works of Tolkien’s legendarium. It is not quite as tough a read as Morgoth’s Ring, but it’s still only for the die-hard fan looking for intensive detail into the development of the stories. The only part This is the eleventh volume in the History of Middle Earth series by Christopher Tolkien. This one focuses on the development of the later Silmarillion works after the publication of The Lord of the Rings. This was a companion piece to volume 10, Morgoth’s Ring. Together, they cover most of the works of Tolkien’s legendarium. It is not quite as tough a read as Morgoth’s Ring, but it’s still only for the die-hard fan looking for intensive detail into the development of the stories. The only part that I had trouble with was the final chapter, which was a detailed description of roots and stems of the different Elvish languages. Come visit my blog for the full review… https://itstartedwiththehugos.blogspo...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    I’m going to give this one a qualified pick, there were some parts that were new and I loved them...the waking up of the first elves, the origin of Ents, some new Dwarven history, including their language, a whole new side story to Húrin, but there were also parts that seemed a bit repetitive (I think because I read the later books like the Children of Húrin first), and I still found myself skimming through some of the language breakdown. I’ll also note that as much as I love the way he pieces t I’m going to give this one a qualified pick, there were some parts that were new and I loved them...the waking up of the first elves, the origin of Ents, some new Dwarven history, including their language, a whole new side story to Húrin, but there were also parts that seemed a bit repetitive (I think because I read the later books like the Children of Húrin first), and I still found myself skimming through some of the language breakdown. I’ll also note that as much as I love the way he pieces these together and talks about the choices he made with the Silmarillion and things he’d do different now that he found more info... some of the notes with what seems to me like minor word order changes seemed a bit excessive in some parts of this one.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    In the penultimate volume of the History of Middle Earth series, Christopher Tolkien presents his father's final writings that made up what would later come to be the Silmarillion. Hardcore fans will appreciate the end of a journey begun in the Book of Lost Tales, as the legendarium as we know it reaches its final stages prior to publication. Of greatest interest are the various versions of Tolkien's attempts to bring the story of Eol and Maeglin into a Quenta Silmarillion mode, the story of the In the penultimate volume of the History of Middle Earth series, Christopher Tolkien presents his father's final writings that made up what would later come to be the Silmarillion. Hardcore fans will appreciate the end of a journey begun in the Book of Lost Tales, as the legendarium as we know it reaches its final stages prior to publication. Of greatest interest are the various versions of Tolkien's attempts to bring the story of Eol and Maeglin into a Quenta Silmarillion mode, the story of the literal first days of the elves upon their Awakening beside Cuivienen, and the extensive essay about various elvish word-roots and their derivation.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rossrn Nunamaker

    The War of the Jewels, as noted in the Foreward, is a companion to Morgoth's Ring, the two together address per Christopher Tolkien, "The War of the Jewels, is an expression that my father often used of the last six centuries of the First Age: the history of Beleriand after the return of Morgoth to Middle-earth and the coming of the Noldor, until its end." While there is much good in these pages, as a fan of Turin, I particularly enjoyed The Wanderings of Hurin. The War of the Jewels, as noted in the Foreward, is a companion to Morgoth's Ring, the two together address per Christopher Tolkien, "The War of the Jewels, is an expression that my father often used of the last six centuries of the First Age: the history of Beleriand after the return of Morgoth to Middle-earth and the coming of the Noldor, until its end." While there is much good in these pages, as a fan of Turin, I particularly enjoyed The Wanderings of Hurin.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shaene Ragan

    Once again Tolkien's pre-history of Middle Earth is revealed just that much more to give conclusive answers to questions people have been musing about since Lord of the Rings. This is a wonderful examination of the world of Tolkien's imagination and reveals the perfectionism in his view of writing and the genius of his storytelling. Once again Tolkien's pre-history of Middle Earth is revealed just that much more to give conclusive answers to questions people have been musing about since Lord of the Rings. This is a wonderful examination of the world of Tolkien's imagination and reveals the perfectionism in his view of writing and the genius of his storytelling.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Warren Dunn

    Although the story was of course always interesting, much of this book seemed like unnecessary repetition of previous versions of the story, leading up the final one in the Silmarillion. The most interesting part was the new story of Hurin's travels after the death of his children. http://ossuslibrary.tripod.com/Bk_Fan... Although the story was of course always interesting, much of this book seemed like unnecessary repetition of previous versions of the story, leading up the final one in the Silmarillion. The most interesting part was the new story of Hurin's travels after the death of his children. http://ossuslibrary.tripod.com/Bk_Fan...

  21. 4 out of 5

    EspeciallySarah

    I think I prefer these volumes where the notes are from the Silmarillion and things that JRR Tolkien never completed because they feel more like myths and legends slowly settling into a steady form. That said I struggle a little with the linguistics even though I know that's where everything comes from. I think I prefer these volumes where the notes are from the Silmarillion and things that JRR Tolkien never completed because they feel more like myths and legends slowly settling into a steady form. That said I struggle a little with the linguistics even though I know that's where everything comes from.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    I love Tolkien but I'm ready to be done with HOME. I love Tolkien but I'm ready to be done with HOME.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    The War of the Jewels had the same level of quality scholarship as the rest of HoME, but the actual texts analyzed are less unique and interesting than in other volumes. That said, it was great to see everything coming into final form as it would be published. Some random thoughts: - I particularly loved the emergence of Lady Haleth and the incorporation of Galadriel/Cirdan. - It's very sad that the last few Tales never got a full reimagining to bring them into line with later conceptions of the m The War of the Jewels had the same level of quality scholarship as the rest of HoME, but the actual texts analyzed are less unique and interesting than in other volumes. That said, it was great to see everything coming into final form as it would be published. Some random thoughts: - I particularly loved the emergence of Lady Haleth and the incorporation of Galadriel/Cirdan. - It's very sad that the last few Tales never got a full reimagining to bring them into line with later conceptions of the mythos. - The Wanderings of Hurin was kinda bad, I'm very grateful Christopher spared us from it in the published Silmarillion. - Quendi and Eldar provided a strong ending, with lots of unique linguistic nuggets (especially about Telerin). Considering HoME is a very internally connected series, it's hard to rate this on its own, but I'll go with 3/5. You should obviously read it if you've already gotten this far, but every volume can't be the best.

  24. 4 out of 5

    PottWab Regional Library

    SM

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dru

    This will be my 12-volume write-up of the entire series "The History of Middle Earth". -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This series is ONLY for the hardcore Tolkien fanatic. Predominantly written by JRR's son, based on JRR's notes on the creation of The Silmarilion and The Lord of the Rings (much less on The Hobbit). It is somewhat interesting to see the evolution of the story (for example, "Strider" was originally conceived as a Hobbit (one of tho This will be my 12-volume write-up of the entire series "The History of Middle Earth". -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- This series is ONLY for the hardcore Tolkien fanatic. Predominantly written by JRR's son, based on JRR's notes on the creation of The Silmarilion and The Lord of the Rings (much less on The Hobbit). It is somewhat interesting to see the evolution of the story (for example, "Strider" was originally conceived as a Hobbit (one of those who "went off into the blue with Gandalf" as alluded to in The Hobbit). But the downside to this is that it isn't very fun to read. You can only read yet another version of Beren and Luthien so many times before you're tired of seeing the miniscule changes from one version to the next. So, overall, I slogged through this over about a year. I'd say it was worth it in the end for someone like me who loves Tolkien and his entire created world of Arda (and Ea in general). But I'll never re-read them. They come off too much as seeming like Christopher Tolkien just bundled every scrap of paper he could find, rather than thinning them down into a logical consistency.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Whyte

    http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2007516.html The War of the Jewels brings together some final notes from the Silmarillion and a few other essays. The first chunk, the Grey Annals, is yet another attempt to retell the Silmarillion stories but this time taking a year-by-year approach; it also has much more detail on the Dark-Elf Ëol and his fathering of Maeglin than I remember before. There's also a long section on the tragic wanderings of Húrin after the deaths of his children which I don't remember http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/2007516.html The War of the Jewels brings together some final notes from the Silmarillion and a few other essays. The first chunk, the Grey Annals, is yet another attempt to retell the Silmarillion stories but this time taking a year-by-year approach; it also has much more detail on the Dark-Elf Ëol and his fathering of Maeglin than I remember before. There's also a long section on the tragic wanderings of Húrin after the deaths of his children which I don't remember from elsewhere, though it may have been in the Tale of the Children of Húrin. Various essays include some reflections on the origins of the races other than Elves and Men, more Elvish linguistics and the story of the Elves' awakening. Several comments from Tolkien junior reflecting on how he now wishes he had done the Silmarillion a bit differently.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tommy Grooms

    This volume is a companion to the tenth volume, focused on the later, Beleriand-oriented material. Aside from Tolkien's final revisions, it includes the unpublished (and exciting) "The Wanderings of Hurin" showing what is essentially a courtroom drama in Brethil, which warmed my law student's heart. It also includes a treatise of Elvish phonology, which will probably only appeal to a select few. The meat of the book, the final Silmarillion revisions, approaches the tedium of volume four (again, This volume is a companion to the tenth volume, focused on the later, Beleriand-oriented material. Aside from Tolkien's final revisions, it includes the unpublished (and exciting) "The Wanderings of Hurin" showing what is essentially a courtroom drama in Brethil, which warmed my law student's heart. It also includes a treatise of Elvish phonology, which will probably only appeal to a select few. The meat of the book, the final Silmarillion revisions, approaches the tedium of volume four (again, the five-star review reflects the History of Middle-Earth series as a whole), but they are valuable primarily for the insight into the challenges Christopher Tolkien faced when redacting the unified, published Silmarillion. Christopher's dissatisfaction with his treatment of the "Of the Ruin of Doriath" material was particularly interesting.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nona

    I found this book the hardest to read from the entire series. Most of it is just a list of changes to previous texts, so if you want to be really thorough you need to keep Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales open at the same time, otherwise you won't understand a thing. I ended up skipping most of that and focusing on content that hasn't been published before in any of the previous 10 books of the series. The Grey Annals was a fun read, although having to always go to the notes/commentary section c I found this book the hardest to read from the entire series. Most of it is just a list of changes to previous texts, so if you want to be really thorough you need to keep Silmarillion and Unfinished Tales open at the same time, otherwise you won't understand a thing. I ended up skipping most of that and focusing on content that hasn't been published before in any of the previous 10 books of the series. The Grey Annals was a fun read, although having to always go to the notes/commentary section can be annoying. Hurin's story was great though and just for that I think this book is worth a read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Christopher Tolkien compiles father's esoteric writings, basis for "The Silmarillion". May feel like rereading, revelatory how many years of thought behind Middle Earth creation. Tolkien establishes reasons why Valar behave and they are not omnipotent. They are bound by creator, Eru Illuvatar, and by the Doom of Valar seer, Mandos. More information about Valinor, aka the Undying Lands and Elves, forsaking Middle Earth stewardship, through Feanor's coveting creation's light, in his forged Silmari Christopher Tolkien compiles father's esoteric writings, basis for "The Silmarillion". May feel like rereading, revelatory how many years of thought behind Middle Earth creation. Tolkien establishes reasons why Valar behave and they are not omnipotent. They are bound by creator, Eru Illuvatar, and by the Doom of Valar seer, Mandos. More information about Valinor, aka the Undying Lands and Elves, forsaking Middle Earth stewardship, through Feanor's coveting creation's light, in his forged Silmarils. Weighty and philosophical.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    While not as revealing as Morgoth's Ring, this history of the second half of the Silmarillion gives more detail into the wanderings of Hurin after his release from Angband, which was the most interesting part of this work for me. I find the Hurin/Turin saga to be one of the most moving of the stories of the First Age, so seeing different, more in depth versions of it does continue to keep me interested as a reader. With that being said, I can live with simply skimming the chapters on Elvish langu While not as revealing as Morgoth's Ring, this history of the second half of the Silmarillion gives more detail into the wanderings of Hurin after his release from Angband, which was the most interesting part of this work for me. I find the Hurin/Turin saga to be one of the most moving of the stories of the First Age, so seeing different, more in depth versions of it does continue to keep me interested as a reader. With that being said, I can live with simply skimming the chapters on Elvish languages. While I'm sure some would go gaga for those, I am not one of those people.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...