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City of Glass: The Graphic Novel

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Novel about a novelist named Quinn who's mistaken for a detective named Paul Auster and loses his mind and identity in the course of a meaningless case Novel about a novelist named Quinn who's mistaken for a detective named Paul Auster and loses his mind and identity in the course of a meaningless case


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Novel about a novelist named Quinn who's mistaken for a detective named Paul Auster and loses his mind and identity in the course of a meaningless case Novel about a novelist named Quinn who's mistaken for a detective named Paul Auster and loses his mind and identity in the course of a meaningless case

30 review for City of Glass: The Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Kelsey

    Such a great adaptation of the Paul Auster novel. In the original City of Glass, the labyrinthine feel of the story was created through Auster's prose. In this adaptation, it's illustrated through beautifully creative visuals. It made me want to read Auster's book again, just to experience it through a new interpretive lens. Such a great adaptation of the Paul Auster novel. In the original City of Glass, the labyrinthine feel of the story was created through Auster's prose. In this adaptation, it's illustrated through beautifully creative visuals. It made me want to read Auster's book again, just to experience it through a new interpretive lens.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Scott Mccloud

    Not only a fantastic, engrossing read, but also the most teachable comic I know. My students in a recent 9 week class took a deep dive into the book and found layers of depth even I was unaware of. It's also an adaptation that's true to the original, but does much more than merely illustrate the text. It uses every tool in the comics toolbox. Not only a fantastic, engrossing read, but also the most teachable comic I know. My students in a recent 9 week class took a deep dive into the book and found layers of depth even I was unaware of. It's also an adaptation that's true to the original, but does much more than merely illustrate the text. It uses every tool in the comics toolbox.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    the original City of Glass, by paul auster, was a book that i enjoyed greatly when i first read it. i thought it was really unique, a thoughtful, stylish blend of raymond chandler, kafka, and borges. i still like it, but it hasn't aged that well for me. a lot of what i thought was playfulness now seems precious, facile. the prose is polished, but by the same token oddly eroded, flat, sanded down. often it feels like auster doesn't actually inhabit the english language--he reads like he's always the original City of Glass, by paul auster, was a book that i enjoyed greatly when i first read it. i thought it was really unique, a thoughtful, stylish blend of raymond chandler, kafka, and borges. i still like it, but it hasn't aged that well for me. a lot of what i thought was playfulness now seems precious, facile. the prose is polished, but by the same token oddly eroded, flat, sanded down. often it feels like auster doesn't actually inhabit the english language--he reads like he's always already a french translation (which is maybe why he's so popular over there). and anyway, i like exuberence now, headlong run-on rushes and spiky thickets of clauses. this graphic novel, with art by paul karasik and the amazing david mazzuchelli (one of my all time comic book favorites), is another beast entirely. it takes the fine small bones of auster's narration and clothes it in images. they are, individually, simple--black and white, stylized, deliberately cartoonish. but they flow in and out of each other with the exuberance that auster's prose lacks, and it makes all the difference. in the opening sequence, for example, the protagonist looks out a window and sees a brick wall. the lines of the brick wall turn into a cityscape. the cityscape zooms out, and we see a map of the city, a giant maze. and the maze melts and fragments and abstracts, until we're looking at a fingerprint. and then we see that it's an smudge of ink on a piece of paper... amazing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    This graphic novel was based on a novella by the same author and Comic Journals voted this in the top 100 for the 20th century. It's about a writer who takes on the role of his detective character to investigate a mystery but this choice sends him down a path of obsessive madness. It blurs the line between reality and fantasy and even identity as the author of this tale finds himself changing roles, stories and overall identities. The voices coming out of objects and gradual changes and pullback This graphic novel was based on a novella by the same author and Comic Journals voted this in the top 100 for the 20th century. It's about a writer who takes on the role of his detective character to investigate a mystery but this choice sends him down a path of obsessive madness. It blurs the line between reality and fantasy and even identity as the author of this tale finds himself changing roles, stories and overall identities. The voices coming out of objects and gradual changes and pullbacks were intriguing. That said, it's so cleverly done that I feel there wasn't enough of an interesting story here so I'd say it's worth a look for its overall cleverness but it isn't Sterling Silver quality for the tale. Casual readers will find this graphic novel mind boggling. STORY/PLOTTING: B minus; CHARACTERS/DIALOGUE: B; SOMETHING NEW AND FRESH: B plus to A minus; ARTWORK: B; OVERALL GRADE: B; WHEN READ: January 2012.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mikheil

    Despite the fact I remembered original novel (including ending, etc.) by Paul Auster, I enjoyed having one day with this comic and think that it is worth reading. Brilliant from the very beginning to the very last page. The ideas of climbing inside an imaginary skin of someone you don’t know, chasing the ghostly footsteps of unknown man, vanishing into the heart of megalopolis seem still catchy for me. While reading I remembered the first time I read novel ”City of Glass” and I loved the nostalg Despite the fact I remembered original novel (including ending, etc.) by Paul Auster, I enjoyed having one day with this comic and think that it is worth reading. Brilliant from the very beginning to the very last page. The ideas of climbing inside an imaginary skin of someone you don’t know, chasing the ghostly footsteps of unknown man, vanishing into the heart of megalopolis seem still catchy for me. While reading I remembered the first time I read novel ”City of Glass” and I loved the nostalgic feeling I had. What also should be told is that Art Spiegelman who is a real prodigy in comics’ field tells the introduction story about how this book was created. He also speaks about respectability and reputation of comics (uses term “graphic novel”) and etc. Very interesting and good pages to read. As for the art by David Mazzucchelli, I can only say positive words. It hauntingly follows the narration and combined with the story is so good that you cannot skip any panel. By the way, I still cannot explain how this brilliant novel is not adapted into feature film by any of the good directors of NY School?! I can imagine how Jim Jarmusch and Paul Auster can create the best NY movie of all time!

  6. 5 out of 5

    blueisthenewpink

    [magyarul lentebb] On my journey of discovering graphic novels... just kidding, I have no intention of doing that. But I really liked this one. With a foreword by Maus's Art Spiegelman, City of Glass has a great story written amazingly (that should not come as a surprise, it's Auster after all), so it had a strong skeleton. But the graphics were not just illustrations either, they helped the story transform into something new. I found an original idea on every page, in the creative use of the gri [magyarul lentebb] On my journey of discovering graphic novels... just kidding, I have no intention of doing that. But I really liked this one. With a foreword by Maus's Art Spiegelman, City of Glass has a great story written amazingly (that should not come as a surprise, it's Auster after all), so it had a strong skeleton. But the graphics were not just illustrations either, they helped the story transform into something new. I found an original idea on every page, in the creative use of the grid, showing the character of a voice, the disintegration of a mind in pictures instead of words while still keeping the importance of language, and it was fun to see the drawn versions of Auster and his family, too. My attention never faltered for a second, this graphic novel had a firm grip on it. Very well done. ------------------------------------------- A kép(es?)regények világában tett felfedezéseim következő állomása Paul Auster New York trilógiájának átdolgozása. Valójában nincs szó semmiféle műfajfelfedezésről, csak ez a kettő* érdekelt, de az Üvegváros alapján nem tennék le a formáról. A Maust elkövető Art Spiegelman előszavával megjelent kötetnek persze őrülten erős alapja volt, hiszen Auster írta. Az előszó szerint figyelmeztette is a projekt mögött álló Spiegelmant, miszerint már többször próbáltak filmforgatókönyvet varázsolni ebből a szövegből, mindhiába. Karasik és Mazzucchelli párosának végül mégis fantasztikusan sikerült az adaptáció. Nem csupán illusztrálták a történetet, egy egészen új művet hoztak létre. Minden oldalon újabb eredeti ötlettel találkoztam, a képregény rácsainak kreatív használatától az írott jellemzések képi megjelenítésre cserélésén át (miközben a nyelv semmit nem veszít jelentőségéből) a rajzolt Auster-családig. Egy pillanatra sem eresztette a figyelmem, remek munka. *a másik a Cheshire Crossing volt, sóhaj

  7. 4 out of 5

    Casey McLaughlin

    Pure masturbation. Lots of build up with no closure. Lazy. Reminded me of the show "Lost", the endless questions keep you going until you realize they have given you no answers. Perfect bookshelf filler for the pseudo-intellectual. Pure masturbation. Lots of build up with no closure. Lazy. Reminded me of the show "Lost", the endless questions keep you going until you realize they have given you no answers. Perfect bookshelf filler for the pseudo-intellectual.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Violet

    I haven't read the original book, but the story seems so unbelievable that I doubt I would enjoy it as a novel. The visuals of this graphic novel told the most interesting story, despite the loosely held together strings that are the existential plot. I didn't see the deconstruction of language in the story at all. I would describe the adaption of City of Glass (and possibly the novel itself) as Film Noir for 13 year-olds. I haven't read the original book, but the story seems so unbelievable that I doubt I would enjoy it as a novel. The visuals of this graphic novel told the most interesting story, despite the loosely held together strings that are the existential plot. I didn't see the deconstruction of language in the story at all. I would describe the adaption of City of Glass (and possibly the novel itself) as Film Noir for 13 year-olds.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mattia Ravasi

    Video review How do you move into a different medium a story that's written to remain stubbornly anchored to its native one? Video review How do you move into a different medium a story that's written to remain stubbornly anchored to its native one?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Neil (or bleed)

    This was mind-boggling and depressing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I read City of Glass about 2 years ago for my international baccalaureate, and had to analyse the heck out of it. I remember not being into graphic novels at all, but I had to read it for my international baccalaureate. The moment I started reading it, I was amazed by the setup of the story. It reminded me of this old detective movie, with a shady and gloomy setting. Then I started reading it, and I recognized a lot of old-detective aspects to this story. For example: Daniel Quinn often picturin I read City of Glass about 2 years ago for my international baccalaureate, and had to analyse the heck out of it. I remember not being into graphic novels at all, but I had to read it for my international baccalaureate. The moment I started reading it, I was amazed by the setup of the story. It reminded me of this old detective movie, with a shady and gloomy setting. Then I started reading it, and I recognized a lot of old-detective aspects to this story. For example: Daniel Quinn often picturing himself as a ice-cold detective, with a long trench coat and a cigarette hanging at his lips, ready to solve the mysteries whilst seducing the ladies. However, as I started to read more of this story, there were a lot more themes that perfectly integrated with one another in this story. There was the identity crisis, religion, darkness & light, reality vs. fantasy... I think that covers about all of them, but I'm sure that there's more. Besides the amount of themes in this story, there are also loads of references to other authors and novels in this story. When I read the first page of the book, I noticed an introduction written by Art Spiegelman, the author of the one and only graphic novel that I ever enjoyed reading besides city of glass: The Complete Maus. As it turned out, the adapters of the graphic part of this novel, Karasik & Mazzucchelli, were influenced by Spiegelman in their careers, as Spiegelman describes. And it makes sense, because Karasik & Mazzucchelli did use somewhat similar techniques in their imagery in order to display the theme of darkness & light. And I really did appreciate that, because it adds so much value to the story. Not only does it contribute to darkness & light as a theme, but also to reality vs. fantasy. For example, the moments of Quinn's reality sequences are displayed with bright and white imagery, while his moments of madness and fantasy are often displayed with darker and black imagery. Then there are the other literary works that have been referenced to, and make a great contribution to the story. For example, Paul Auster integrating himself in the story as a character to display the identity crisis of Quinn. William Wilson, the picture of Dorian Gray... both literary figures that have identity crises. And then there was a monologue by Paul Auster in City of Glass about Don Quixoté, which also greatly contributed to the theme of identity. However, not only did it made the audience think about the themes in City of Glass, but also about another question that played a big role in both City of glass and Don Quixoté: Who is the narrator? What I am trying to say is that there are so many clever references in City of Glass, and that every single aspect of this novel has been worked out carefully in order to make sense. And I appreciate this in novels. It makes you think about the different meanings of the book. Especially with the references to other literary works, it makes it all look like one big exciting mystery. I highly recommend this book to anyone. Even if you're not familiar with graphic novels, it doesn't matter. Neither was I, and neither were many others. Even if you are not familiar with the novels being references to, it is worth finding out more about these novels, and will make you appreciate your classic literature.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dominick

    Interesting comics adaptation of Auster's novel is very strong on graphic design. Karasik and Mazzucchelli do some remarkable work with layout and panel design, with mixing representational and symbolic art. It's a pleasure to look at. Narratively, though, this is a highly self-conscious and post-modern take on noir. It includes the expected elements--first-person narrative, femme fatale, long-hidden secrets, etc.--but it's not really interested in telling a story so much as exploring subjectivi Interesting comics adaptation of Auster's novel is very strong on graphic design. Karasik and Mazzucchelli do some remarkable work with layout and panel design, with mixing representational and symbolic art. It's a pleasure to look at. Narratively, though, this is a highly self-conscious and post-modern take on noir. It includes the expected elements--first-person narrative, femme fatale, long-hidden secrets, etc.--but it's not really interested in telling a story so much as exploring subjectivity and indeterminacy. as a result, what's actually going on is never made clear--if, indeed, Auster even had a clear idea. Mystery is always about finally explaining the inexplicable, so it perhaps lends itself especially well to postmodern subversion of objectivity and determinability. But if you like your mysteries to have resolutions, and your plot points to have payoffs, you would do well to look elsewhere.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    This is one of the most moving, weird, horrifying, heart-stopping graphic novels I've ever read, and there aren't many friends I'll be recommending it to- but I loved it. I kept singing the Fionn Regan song that says, "For the loneliness you foster/ I suggest Paul Auster," as the book deals with the themes of language, names, identity, and how we use all those things to both reveal and conceal. "Things have broken apart, and our words have not adapted. If we can't name a common object, how can we This is one of the most moving, weird, horrifying, heart-stopping graphic novels I've ever read, and there aren't many friends I'll be recommending it to- but I loved it. I kept singing the Fionn Regan song that says, "For the loneliness you foster/ I suggest Paul Auster," as the book deals with the themes of language, names, identity, and how we use all those things to both reveal and conceal. "Things have broken apart, and our words have not adapted. If we can't name a common object, how can we speak of things that truly concern us? My work is simple. In New York, brokenness is everywhere. I collect shattered objects to examine, and I give them names."

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ill D

    Fucking stupid. It's nothing short of a cute and novel expiriment that doesn't really go anywhere. My disapointment with this graphic novel was sorely exacerbated once I found out Spiegelman was the creative overseer and he did nothing to focus the narrative which is presented way too piecemeal and cut up for a normal reader to understand littleone enjoy. Fucking stupid. It's nothing short of a cute and novel expiriment that doesn't really go anywhere. My disapointment with this graphic novel was sorely exacerbated once I found out Spiegelman was the creative overseer and he did nothing to focus the narrative which is presented way too piecemeal and cut up for a normal reader to understand littleone enjoy.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Titus Bird

    I generally have very little interest in comics that adapt prose novels, but I made an exception for this one because David Mazzucchelli’s Asterios Polyp is one of my favourite comics, and a lot people seem to think his work on City of Glass is in the same league (and in any case, it’s one of the few other things he’s published outside of superheroes). To be perfectly honest, my misgivings about adaptations haven’t been fully assuaged. I’ve never read the original novel (or any Auster), but I ca I generally have very little interest in comics that adapt prose novels, but I made an exception for this one because David Mazzucchelli’s Asterios Polyp is one of my favourite comics, and a lot people seem to think his work on City of Glass is in the same league (and in any case, it’s one of the few other things he’s published outside of superheroes). To be perfectly honest, my misgivings about adaptations haven’t been fully assuaged. I’ve never read the original novel (or any Auster), but I can’t shake the feeling that this comic is something of an abridged version – a taster to whet my appetite for the real thing. I can’t really say whether that’s just a product of my own prejudice, if it’s due to a failure on the part of the adapters, or if it’s inevitable because of the nature of the comic medium. What I can say is that, despite a creeping sense that the original is probably superior, I still really like the comic. It’s a very postmodernist work, in a way that reminds me of Thomas Pynchon. Events flow from realistic to surreal in a disorientating manner, characters deliver stream-of-consciousness soliloquies, everyone’s sanity is questionable, and the plot is full of inexplicable, bizarre twists and turns. Moreover, there are direct philosophical discussions of decidedly postmodernist topics, such as the relationship between words and the true essence of the things they describe, and the existence of a true self independent of the roles one fulfills (the same themes that are explored indirectly through the story). This is an unashamedly intellectual and literary work, sometimes dense and often confusing, and I can’t say I fully grasp everything it’s trying to say, but nonetheless I certainly enjoy it overall. It’s compelling both as a weird and wonderful series of strange happenings, and as a thought-provoking exploration of heady topics. The art does a perfect job of matching and enhancing the narrative’s particular brand of weirdness. Although the story’s low on action and full of long conversations, there are no pages filled with talking heads. Instead, focus shifts mesmerizingly from characters to backgrounds to thoughts to memories to inexplicably evocative abstraction. This is exactly the kind of masterful and innovative use of the comic medium that Mazzucchelli demonstrates in Asterios Polyp, so on this count, it doesn’t disappoint at all. Interestingly, though, it’s not clear how much actually comes from Mazzucchelli himself, and how much is from his collaborator, Paul Karasik. Karasik is actually credited above Mazzucchelli on the cover, and both are just credited for “adaptation”, with no indication of how their duties were divided. My edition has a foreword by Art Spiegelman that suggests Karasik is actually responsible for the more innovative and abstract elements. In any case, the style is consistent throughout, with no sign that the two artists drew different pages. In sum, this hasn’t quite dispelled my reservations about adaptations – I feel compelled to read the novel to compare – but, if I put that consideration aside and treat this as a work in its own right, I can say unreservedly that it’s an excellent one. It’s cerebral, surreal and enigmatic in ways that may sometimes be a little frustrating, but are totally enthralling.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Samidha; समिधा

    I am aware that’s its an adaptation from the original 1972 novel of the same name. Holy hell, did I enjoy this. It was very intriguing to read. On top of that there is so much meta textuality, as Paul Auster (the author) is placed within the text as a secondary character, who also is a writer. There were so many beautiful panels, my favourite being the finger print and the language ones. I really enjoyed this so much.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emmi

    Edit/Update: After discussing the book in book club, im more than willing to give it another chance after some time has passed.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    So you think you know why people are the way they are, huh, do ya, bigshot? Well why don’t you try to imagine a language uninformed by experience? Why don’t you try to be someone you aren’t, tough guy. Can ya even do it? Are ya too soft?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Penelope

    I thought this was a pretty amazing graphic novel, and I definitely plan on reading the original City of Glass next. Concepts of identity, the role of the author in creating meaning, and the blurred line between fiction and reality are all present here, and explored in quite an intriguing way. I don't know how I felt about the ending, though. Maybe I just haven't thought about it enough, but it seemed too open-ended to me. In a way it makes sense, since this story is not a traditional narrative. I thought this was a pretty amazing graphic novel, and I definitely plan on reading the original City of Glass next. Concepts of identity, the role of the author in creating meaning, and the blurred line between fiction and reality are all present here, and explored in quite an intriguing way. I don't know how I felt about the ending, though. Maybe I just haven't thought about it enough, but it seemed too open-ended to me. In a way it makes sense, since this story is not a traditional narrative. It attempts to extend itself beyond the confines of the page by involving the author himself as a "fictional" character (but he's still the author...further complicated by the fact that Quinn himself is a writer also--but goes by a different pen name). Still, I would have liked an ending that was more...final...even if that finality was contrived (as all literary endings are, I guess). I think what left me wanting a "final" ending was the fact that the story starts off in a somewhat "normal" narrative vein. The issues of identity and the inclusion of the author are introduced pretty early on, but about 3/4 of the way in, the narrative quickly descends into abstraction. A part of me loves it, a part of me doesn't. I'm undecided I guess.

  20. 5 out of 5

    L

    A mystery about a mystery which experiments with irony, identity and reality for an altogether unique reading experience. Paul Auster cleverly combines contemporary detective fiction with nouveau roman and American ‘postmodernism’ –for a supremely singular story of philosophical premise and impaction. As the main protagonist descends into madness, being able to see clarity amidst the congested cityscape is imperative if one is to find themselves ‘on their feet’ when reaching the end. It A mystery about a mystery which experiments with irony, identity and reality for an altogether unique reading experience. Paul Auster cleverly combines contemporary detective fiction with nouveau roman and American ‘postmodernism’ –for a supremely singular story of philosophical premise and impaction. As the main protagonist descends into madness, being able to see clarity amidst the congested cityscape is imperative if one is to find themselves ‘on their feet’ when reaching the end. It is the intertextual relationship and the clever way in which the author captures the character’s psychoscape, which ultimately makes this graphic novel stand apart –from its novel counterpart. confounding confusion in illuminating illusions… Everything lies within!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joana Veríssimo

    This book surprised me!! The story wasn't my favorite thing - if I had read the novel that inspired this graphic novel, the rating probably wouldn't be this high... but the story was done so well in graphic novel format The way art was used to tell a story, to (I suspect) show the rhythm of the writing, the visual and metaphors that probably existed in the novel... I just can't express how well art was used in this - it was done in a way I had never seen before, it was more than just telling you This book surprised me!! The story wasn't my favorite thing - if I had read the novel that inspired this graphic novel, the rating probably wouldn't be this high... but the story was done so well in graphic novel format The way art was used to tell a story, to (I suspect) show the rhythm of the writing, the visual and metaphors that probably existed in the novel... I just can't express how well art was used in this - it was done in a way I had never seen before, it was more than just telling you what happened, it explored the mind and writing as a process Really, if you like art, check out this book, because it was used in such an amazing way :)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Jackson

    The rare adaptation that exceeds its source material. A doubly impressive feat since it's based on Paul Auster's best novel. With its deft ink strokes and airtight plot, this brilliant graphic perfectly captures and distills the original existential detective story. One of the great graphic novels and a perfect introduction to the fictional world of Paul Auster, too. The rare adaptation that exceeds its source material. A doubly impressive feat since it's based on Paul Auster's best novel. With its deft ink strokes and airtight plot, this brilliant graphic perfectly captures and distills the original existential detective story. One of the great graphic novels and a perfect introduction to the fictional world of Paul Auster, too.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jake Nap

    Paul Auster: City it Glass is an adaptation of the Paul Auster novel city of glass. The adaptation done by Karasik and Mazzucchelli is a fantastic story. Now I haven’t read the original, but I can’t imagine how it would be because the way this ones told could only be done as a comic book. Karasik tells Auster’s story of self identity crisis perfectly and Mazzuchelli makes it something that could only be done in comics. The story follows Daniel Quinn, crime fiction writer who gets mistaken for pri Paul Auster: City it Glass is an adaptation of the Paul Auster novel city of glass. The adaptation done by Karasik and Mazzucchelli is a fantastic story. Now I haven’t read the original, but I can’t imagine how it would be because the way this ones told could only be done as a comic book. Karasik tells Auster’s story of self identity crisis perfectly and Mazzuchelli makes it something that could only be done in comics. The story follows Daniel Quinn, crime fiction writer who gets mistaken for private eye Paul Auster. He takes on Auster’s identity and gets himself involved in a case that slowly breaks him down mentally. The plot is existential and there are heavy themes of identity. The story gets very stream of consciousness at times, but what Auster (or Karasik, I’m not sure how much of what Karasik injected into the story was original) remains engaging and though provoking. Don Quixote is used frequently as a symbol for Daniel Quinn and I don’t want to spoil too much, but it’s genius. Mazzuchelli here annihilates the art duties on this book. He experiments in ways that would define later works like Asterios Polyp and adapts that style also. I have seen pictures of the pages he drew for his Rubber Blanket short story anthology and it looks similar to that, but I can really see where Asterios Polyp comes from aesthetically now. Mazzuchelli is an absolute master of utilizing unique layouts that add to the story. There’s a 9 panel grid in the story where he uses panels 2,4,6 and 8 to show a character aging around him while he’s walking through the city, explaining it doesn’t do it justice but I promise it’s extremely inventive and amazing at grounding Quinn after his first real ego death in the story. Overall, Paul Auster: City of Glass is a fantastic graphic novel that’s boundary pushing and challenges the reader in all the right places. 10/10

  24. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

    I enjoyed it more than I expected, maybe because I'm biased against adaptations of any kind but probably because David Mazzuchelli is just a brilliant comic book artist. The story is a post-modern take on the noir genre. The reader follows crime author Daniel Quinn as he tries to unravel the mystery behind a father and a son and the meaning of words. It gets metaphorical and abstract with every turn, something I feel like very few artists can represent as well as Mazzuchelli did here. Personally, I enjoyed it more than I expected, maybe because I'm biased against adaptations of any kind but probably because David Mazzuchelli is just a brilliant comic book artist. The story is a post-modern take on the noir genre. The reader follows crime author Daniel Quinn as he tries to unravel the mystery behind a father and a son and the meaning of words. It gets metaphorical and abstract with every turn, something I feel like very few artists can represent as well as Mazzuchelli did here. Personally, the philosophical pondering behind the meaning of words and the lack of proper terms for altered or damaged objects was interesting but not anything I expect to loose any sleep over. My only issue with the adaptation is with the ending. I feel like it was somewhat rushed and the events unfolded somewhat suddenly. Not having read Paul Auster’s novel, I can’t say whether or not this is a faithful representation of the original work but, regardless, I didn’t love it. Still, even if the story was just ok (which I don’t think it was), Mazzuchelli’s exceptional artwork probably would have been enough to justify its existence for me. While far from the heights he reached in his magnum opus Asterios Polyp (which is, in my opinion, the most technically impressive comic ever produced), it was really good, especially towards the two thirds/three quarters mark, when it got all rough and blurry and reminded me of Blutch’s Peplum. Overall, I’d recommend this to any Mazzuchelli fan as well as to people looking for something new and experimental in their noir. I’m not a crime reader and I really enjoyed it, so take this as you will.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vilmos Kondor

    It's a truly wonderful adaptation an also wonderful novel which I'm not sure I "get" but I enjoyed it again in this form immensely. Mesmerizing artwork, evocative, precise, poetic, mysterious - as the novel itself. It's a truly wonderful adaptation an also wonderful novel which I'm not sure I "get" but I enjoyed it again in this form immensely. Mesmerizing artwork, evocative, precise, poetic, mysterious - as the novel itself.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kat Stromquist

    Eerie and compelling.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Maria Maciel

    intense

  28. 5 out of 5

    Buster Chambless

    What?

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alex Estevam

    Paul Auster is one of my favourite authors and this adaptation was fun to read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    StrictlySequential

    Here comes my ego in its magnitude- but more importantly a journal entry for myself to come across later: My selection in books these days has made it impossible to rate the ***** with those below and had already made me give up reviewing (more-so diagnosing critically) them completely or at all since it would take so much time that I could not justify it without being hired to do so. I'll give this some credit but may stop reviewing for awhile. Maybe just dictate and forgot editing, ordering of Here comes my ego in its magnitude- but more importantly a journal entry for myself to come across later: My selection in books these days has made it impossible to rate the ***** with those below and had already made me give up reviewing (more-so diagnosing critically) them completely or at all since it would take so much time that I could not justify it without being hired to do so. I'll give this some credit but may stop reviewing for awhile. Maybe just dictate and forgot editing, ordering of thought or formatting. This adaptation was so good that I could review the book it came from without reading it. Not ideally but well enough to make anyone want to read it. Definitely strong-arm some into its pages. Original Book: BRILLIANT and beyond the reach of the mass of fiction in its scope. The careful reader will, by the way its written, become ALL characters which is the greatest compliment of writing that I have. While picking apart the inexperience of the new detective you gain appreciation of the writers' ability to write against reason for the bigger picture which swells proportionately until roller-coaster ride stops abruptly and you realize that he is writing a book within a book just as his characters had diagnosed within the story. The hardest thing for a sane writer to do well is to write incrementally blossoming insanity directly from the consequences of a characters' actions when that subject begin categorically sane. Even more-so when the insanity is borne from interaction with other characters. He writes the inner-workings of a characters' genius as well as any without straying from the sanity which resides within the individual's insanity. That also has to take into acount the fact that those catagorized as sane (not me by my personal definitions!) are intrinsicall insane living within our established parameters. The challenge, that Auster may have met flawlessly, is correctly detaching the character from his beginning parameters of sanity- directly building pressure on and extrapolating the mental soft-spots which are well-defined in their introduction. He loses his mind in appropriate pace which takes vigilance- any good writer can have an event unhinge a character to proper and compelling effect. Mastering the hard way needs to be applauded by the reader that takes nothing for granted. Those last seven words are the reason I have to cut this off now. I want to go back and add more examples and infuse more depth into all which would cause the review/diagnosis of the original book to expand until I had to edit for the readers (your) sake. The same would happen below: BACK TO THIS ADAPTATION: You're not going to get a better introduction than Callahan's so read it and by keeping it in mind throughout you will enjoy the book and its depth even more. Specific knowledge of and/or good exposure to genre makes it brilliant and will bring the rest of you to the correct mindset and expectations forcing you, like a great teacher, to appreciate for its accomplishments within a sphere as icing on the delicious cake of the whole. The written adaptation by Paul Karasik AND* David Mazzucchelli (always better every time that artist is a/the writer) gets the second and third highest compliments with the possibly of the Grand Prix: 3.) It makes made me feel like I read the whole book- specifically by making me have to think purposefully to decide where I was positive (incorrectly or not) that too much, importance-wise, was cut. 2.) Makes me feel that I got enough greatness out of the adaptation that I'll forego reading the original. 1.) I would bet significantly that the highest honor- being better than the original (pretending the art is stricken from the assessment)- is off-limits here IN WHICH CASE THIS DOES ACHIEVE THE PARAMOUNT PRIZE! In my experience, with great text-only books that are managed with appropriate economy from start to finish, the depth and details that are lost makes significant abridgements inferior. I believe Auster achieved that kind of quality as do most works that are put-to-pictures. BUT! When you factor in the art you have something that can't be fairly compared to the text-only father which, in my case, is superior when art and text are done well. My fondness for Guy Davis ( A dropped at least a notch because of Mazzi's art in this book. Guy is what I term a "business artist" in his sequential work that I've enjoyed and I respect that as servant of capitalism but now cringe, the same way I did before I gained an appreciation of it, looking back at his work. The hands and feet, drawn like an every-man, did/does ALWAYS bother me. Mazzi draws with the same gravity of pen -I have absolutely no idea what that means to anybody but me- but does it EXCEPTIONALLY and cares about all the details in all parts of the panel. Don't include Sergio in this because his art is not for speed, it's just how his art is- at least I hope. Plus he fits so much fun in each panel that it can be excused no matter how sloppy.

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