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A Life Like Mine: How Children Live Around the World

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After ten years of study and consultation, UNICEF, the premier organization devoted to the care and welfare of the world's children, published the results of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Using these tenets as a base, A Life Like Mine profiles children from all over the globe leading their lives in different and fascinating ways. The challenges of nations both After ten years of study and consultation, UNICEF, the premier organization devoted to the care and welfare of the world's children, published the results of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Using these tenets as a base, A Life Like Mine profiles children from all over the globe leading their lives in different and fascinating ways. The challenges of nations both developed and developing are revealed in the stories and photographs in this special volume. DK and UNICEF have combined their inspirational forces to provide remarkable insight into children's lives.


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After ten years of study and consultation, UNICEF, the premier organization devoted to the care and welfare of the world's children, published the results of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Using these tenets as a base, A Life Like Mine profiles children from all over the globe leading their lives in different and fascinating ways. The challenges of nations both After ten years of study and consultation, UNICEF, the premier organization devoted to the care and welfare of the world's children, published the results of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Using these tenets as a base, A Life Like Mine profiles children from all over the globe leading their lives in different and fascinating ways. The challenges of nations both developed and developing are revealed in the stories and photographs in this special volume. DK and UNICEF have combined their inspirational forces to provide remarkable insight into children's lives.

30 review for A Life Like Mine: How Children Live Around the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    سماح عطية

    To be reviewed...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sue Goldman

    This is a lovely book full of information and colour photographs. It is based around children's rights; to survival, development, protection and participation and how these are met around the world. We are introduced to children from different countries and text and photographs inform us about their daily lives. This book covers many topics such as healthy living, identity, shelter and education. Each page bursts with beautifully presented information. This is a great book for PSHE and Geography This is a lovely book full of information and colour photographs. It is based around children's rights; to survival, development, protection and participation and how these are met around the world. We are introduced to children from different countries and text and photographs inform us about their daily lives. This book covers many topics such as healthy living, identity, shelter and education. Each page bursts with beautifully presented information. This is a great book for PSHE and Geography, but also has many other links particularly in literacy.This book could be used for both fiction and non fiction texts. For instance children could write an imaginative piece about the life of one of the children,a letter to the child themselves or to an oraganisation / the government/queen regarding children's rights internationally. There are also endless possibilities for comparisons between the lives of children in the U.K and children abroad.I would say this book is suitable for both Key stages and could inspire some interesting projects or units of work. it may also be useful for making fund raising relevant and for helping children to understand we are all the same but all different.I recommend teachers get this book, it could be a great resource in the classroom.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Books about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child tend to be problematic because the focus is really on what's easy for us to cope with - the articles that focus on Protection and Provision and that's what the problem is here. But, as well, I also have an issue with trying to present the lives of children, as this book does, as if they weren't problematic - there's an essentialist perspective that I find troubling. I'm not sure exactly what the best way to approach this is but Books about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child tend to be problematic because the focus is really on what's easy for us to cope with - the articles that focus on Protection and Provision and that's what the problem is here. But, as well, I also have an issue with trying to present the lives of children, as this book does, as if they weren't problematic - there's an essentialist perspective that I find troubling. I'm not sure exactly what the best way to approach this is but this book isn't it

  4. 4 out of 5

    Abby Johnson

    In large, colorful spreads A Life Like Mine shows the lives of children living all over the world. The book is divided into sections showing how different children get water, feed themselves, go to school, play, stay healthy, etc. The book also discusses the fact that a large number of children don't have the basic necessities. This is a great book for browsing and will be interesting to kids who like to know about kids in other cultures. In large, colorful spreads A Life Like Mine shows the lives of children living all over the world. The book is divided into sections showing how different children get water, feed themselves, go to school, play, stay healthy, etc. The book also discusses the fact that a large number of children don't have the basic necessities. This is a great book for browsing and will be interesting to kids who like to know about kids in other cultures.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tiyahna Ridley-Padmore

    In A Life Like Mine : How Children Live Around the World , UNICEF introduces the reality of children around the world. Centred around the Convention of Rights of the Child and using photographs, quotes, statistics and personal stories, the book unpacks different realities from around the world. As far as international development books go, this is one of the better ones I have read through. Here are some of the things that I liked : - UNICEF shows Black, Indigenous and People of Colour from No In A Life Like Mine : How Children Live Around the World , UNICEF introduces the reality of children around the world. Centred around the Convention of Rights of the Child and using photographs, quotes, statistics and personal stories, the book unpacks different realities from around the world. As far as international development books go, this is one of the better ones I have read through. Here are some of the things that I liked : - UNICEF shows Black, Indigenous and People of Colour from North America and Europe instead of just showing BIPOC folk from the Global South and depicting the Global North as White folk - UNICEF does a great job at weaving in bits about child protection into personal stories so that the book is engaging and informative - The book includes a number of easy-to -digest comparatives to help readers better understand different experiences in relation to their own. For example, to demonstrate issues related to drought or restricted access to clean water, UNICEF uses helpful infographics to illustrate how much water is used when flushing the toiler, when running the faucet, when filling the bathtub etc in comparison to how much water some communities have access to. - I liked that UNICEF didn't exploit a power imbalance between historically disadvantaged countries and the Global North. For example, children from all over got to take pride in introducing their staple foods/meals, activities, and interests. - I liked the ability and religious inclusivity. (Though those pieces were earmarked as sections on their own instead of inclusively woven throughout) Here are some things I thought could be approved : - The book sometimes relied too heavily on a singular story to represent a country. Instead of recognizing the vast diversity within a region, one child was put forth (almost as a token) to represent their entire country. In some cases, the book even compares the state of things in different countries and then compares Africa as though it too was a country. Ultimately, for a book published in 2002, A Life Like Mine is a good introduction to the experience of children around the world.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    While the title is a bit misleading (A Life Like Mine: How Children Live Around the World makes me think the book will be following day-to-day routines of children from around the world) I do think the book does a lovely job of comparing and contrasting how children live around the world through the perspective of basic rights all children should be able to share. This is an important lesson for children—despite our differences, our basic needs are still the same and we must respect one another. While the title is a bit misleading (A Life Like Mine: How Children Live Around the World makes me think the book will be following day-to-day routines of children from around the world) I do think the book does a lovely job of comparing and contrasting how children live around the world through the perspective of basic rights all children should be able to share. This is an important lesson for children—despite our differences, our basic needs are still the same and we must respect one another. I can see this book being used in bits and pieces in a classroom or as a whole to inspire service learning projects. I love the message at the end that children do have a voice and can speak out for their rights. I also love the diversity in the book. So often in books like this, the children from the US and Europe are depicted as blond hair/blue eyes, but this book features children from a variety of races and backgrounds, even in the US and Europe. The layout and photos are beautiful and eye-catching. I did not give the book 5 stars though due both to the title and the fact that some information is a bit outdated at this point (publication date is 2006).

  7. 5 out of 5

    N

    This was really cool. A lot of DK books can feel really scattered and disorganized, but this one does a really good job of grouping information. I wonder if there's an updated book, because I'd love to see more recent things, but this book does hold up well since it's about the basic needs/ rights of all children everywhere. This was really cool. A lot of DK books can feel really scattered and disorganized, but this one does a really good job of grouping information. I wonder if there's an updated book, because I'd love to see more recent things, but this book does hold up well since it's about the basic needs/ rights of all children everywhere.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mrs. Ruigrok

    Every teacher should have this book so that children can learn about children around the world...their basic rights and how their lives differ around the world. Beautiful photographs, and language that children can understand make this a very informative and beautiful book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rosie Gearhart

    We loved this overview of how different children around the world live. Lots of pictures. 5+

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tamary

    I love this book

  11. 5 out of 5

    Noah Carpenter

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I like

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Lowe

    This book has such great information on how children live around the world. It is less of a read aloud book and more of a reference book that be a starting point for a cultural research project.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maren

    Similar to the book Children Like Me, in that it exposes children to the differences in how people live around the world. It goes through the necessities of life like food, water, education, etc., and gives a realistic view of what many children have and don't have in different countries. But it does this in an appropriate way for a child (probably intended for children ages 8-11, but can be read by an adult to any-aged child) to understand and to realize that they should be grateful for what th Similar to the book Children Like Me, in that it exposes children to the differences in how people live around the world. It goes through the necessities of life like food, water, education, etc., and gives a realistic view of what many children have and don't have in different countries. But it does this in an appropriate way for a child (probably intended for children ages 8-11, but can be read by an adult to any-aged child) to understand and to realize that they should be grateful for what they do have. Again, my 20-month-old just loved flipping through the book and pointing out several of the things that she recognized and I attempted to tell her a little bit about what was going on in the photos, but I would consider buying this book as a great (and fun) reference book to have at home to enjoy in the future. I am finding that I really appreciate children's books published by DK for their nonfiction. They always use really good photographs and I've been impressed by the quality of the ones that we have read so far. A neighbor showed me a kids' cooking book that she had by DK and she raved about the recipes, too.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Charli Philpott

    I really enjoyed this book. I read it for a project in one of my education courses. I was already interested in learning more about children from all over the world, but this definitely heightened my interest. It gives great perspective on the rights of children, and does so in a way that is approachable for all readers. I found this book inspiring, and i think it would be a great way to get more students/kids interested in being better global citizens. It is a very manageable book, although the I really enjoyed this book. I read it for a project in one of my education courses. I was already interested in learning more about children from all over the world, but this definitely heightened my interest. It gives great perspective on the rights of children, and does so in a way that is approachable for all readers. I found this book inspiring, and i think it would be a great way to get more students/kids interested in being better global citizens. It is a very manageable book, although there is a lot of detail, a child could read it in a day. The best part about this book for me was the topics, and that with many of the blurbs on each page I was interested in looking up more information on those topics. This book led me down a variety of rabbit holes, but in the end I felt like I had learned a lot and my eyes had been opened to a variety of new ideas. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in gaining a new world perspective.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    This book was recommeded in our class in an article written by our teacher and a fellow student. This book is considered global literature. I am familiar with these books that DK publishes. This book could be used to teach about the concept of neighborhoods. Students could see how children live around the world and see the differences and similarities. The photographs are engaging and would lend to great discussions. The book is set up into four parts. I have the book Children Just Like Me which This book was recommeded in our class in an article written by our teacher and a fellow student. This book is considered global literature. I am familiar with these books that DK publishes. This book could be used to teach about the concept of neighborhoods. Students could see how children live around the world and see the differences and similarities. The photographs are engaging and would lend to great discussions. The book is set up into four parts. I have the book Children Just Like Me which is organized in the same fashion. I am going to try to find other books in this DK series to house in my library. I think they would be great references books for children.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    This book provides plenty of interesting photographs and quick glimpses into the lives of children from all over the world. I appreciated the fact that it focuses on the four major areas that the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child decided are necessary for children to have a happy life. Those four things are survival (water, food, shelter, etc.), development (school,etc.), protection (love and care, etc.), and participation (nationality, religion, etc.). Each section focuses on This book provides plenty of interesting photographs and quick glimpses into the lives of children from all over the world. I appreciated the fact that it focuses on the four major areas that the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child decided are necessary for children to have a happy life. Those four things are survival (water, food, shelter, etc.), development (school,etc.), protection (love and care, etc.), and participation (nationality, religion, etc.). Each section focuses on children who do and do not have their needs met. I had some good discussions with my older students (4th and 5th grade) about what human beings need to be happy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    (NS) Becca

    This nonfiction book is assembled by UNICEF,and was published by DK publishing in 2002. This collection of wonderful pictures and stories of children from all over the world enthralls students as they can flip through the pages and discover all about how different children survive, develop, are protected, and what makes them who they are. The book does an excellent job of interweaving the idea that all children are the same, but at the same time, they have a right to a unique and special identit This nonfiction book is assembled by UNICEF,and was published by DK publishing in 2002. This collection of wonderful pictures and stories of children from all over the world enthralls students as they can flip through the pages and discover all about how different children survive, develop, are protected, and what makes them who they are. The book does an excellent job of interweaving the idea that all children are the same, but at the same time, they have a right to a unique and special identity that they should be proud of.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lynesha Williams

    I truly believe that diversity is a key component to educating children. When reading books or celebrating holidays all students should feel included in the lesson. This book truly celebrates the value of diversity and multiculturalism. Whether a student is African-American, Hispanic, Caucasian, Asian, or Indian they can relate to the four components addressed in various cultures: survival, development, protection, and participation. This is an amazing book for children to learn more about thems I truly believe that diversity is a key component to educating children. When reading books or celebrating holidays all students should feel included in the lesson. This book truly celebrates the value of diversity and multiculturalism. Whether a student is African-American, Hispanic, Caucasian, Asian, or Indian they can relate to the four components addressed in various cultures: survival, development, protection, and participation. This is an amazing book for children to learn more about themselves and others.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rivka Varnai

    "A Life Like Mine" is a great way for children to learn about other children around the world. This book can also open children's eyes to the poverty and difficulty that some children face. I look forward to reading this book with my students and leading discussions on what they can do to help people in need around the world. This book has beautiful pictures and the information is organized and easy to read. "A Life Like Mine" is a great way for children to learn about other children around the world. This book can also open children's eyes to the poverty and difficulty that some children face. I look forward to reading this book with my students and leading discussions on what they can do to help people in need around the world. This book has beautiful pictures and the information is organized and easy to read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I really enjoyed this book but it wasn't quite at the right level either for me or for my 5 and 7 year olds. Perhaps it would be best for a 10 year old or so. I like the pages dedicated to more in-depth stories about individual kids and I wish there was more of that. I guess in the end I would prefer a book of longer and more narrative stories about a bunch of kids around the world rather than strict division into categories (e.g., water, housing, expression) and stories limited to one area. I really enjoyed this book but it wasn't quite at the right level either for me or for my 5 and 7 year olds. Perhaps it would be best for a 10 year old or so. I like the pages dedicated to more in-depth stories about individual kids and I wish there was more of that. I guess in the end I would prefer a book of longer and more narrative stories about a bunch of kids around the world rather than strict division into categories (e.g., water, housing, expression) and stories limited to one area.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Faye

    I have been reading this book to my 4 year old daughter and she is really enjoying it! The pictures are a really great way to introduce challenging topics & she really enjoys using the map at the front of the book to understand the geographical context of the children in the stories. I would recommend this book for children quite a bit older than my daughter though - around 8-10 years. But for her age it is really great for all the photographs.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Grassie

    This reads more like an encyclopedia so typically we would only read a dozen or so pages at a time. While my niece and nephew (7) fully enjoy the book and often pull it out, it is a bit much for them to take in all at once. They love seeing the photos of the real kids around the world. It has been a great book to also engage them in geography lessons as they always want to look at globe or map to see exactly where the kids they are reading about live.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Molly | whatismollyreading

    I like to think that this book was what started my passion with international relations and travel. I spent hours as a kid pouring over these pages, looking at the maps, imagining the conversations I would have with the children in this book. I would memorize the facts listed on the pages, memorize the stories of these children whose lives were very similar to mine. I still have this book, and it remains one of my favorites to this day.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Estenson

    This book is wonderful for getting elementary students to think about the world beyond their own community. The purpose of this book is to show that though children of the world lead different lives, many children have the same hopes and needs in life such as education, food, health care, shelter, play, and protection. I will read this book to my students and have an extension lesson on similar wants, needs, and rights that all children of the world have in common.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ladyknightstar

    This is great for reading with my children. My son, who is seven, really was able to understand the concepts the book is presenting. He is really interested in the children and it puts a human face on what he hears and learns about how the world works.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    I love books like this!!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This is one of my all time favorite books. I was just reminded how very much information is packed inside by a good friend who recently gave me a copy.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Nice, but a little dated--info abt Afghanistan is old.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Like any of this style book it is totally unsatisfying as a read aloud - but great pictures/nuggets of info for browsing through.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    A very fun and interesting book. I learned a lot from reading it, and it almost broke my heart to hear about how poor people all over the world are and how unfortunate they are.

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