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J.K. Rowling Harry Potter to the Casual Vacancy a JK Rowling Biography 2012

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The most up to date Biography of J.K Rowling completed July 2012 From Harry Potter to the Casual Vacancy, this book has it all. Joanne Rowling was born in July 1965 at Yate General Hospital in England and grew up in Chepstow, Gwent where she went to Wyedean Comprehensive. Jo left Chepstow for Exeter University, where she earned a French and Classics degree, her course includi The most up to date Biography of J.K Rowling completed July 2012 From Harry Potter to the Casual Vacancy, this book has it all. Joanne Rowling was born in July 1965 at Yate General Hospital in England and grew up in Chepstow, Gwent where she went to Wyedean Comprehensive. Jo left Chepstow for Exeter University, where she earned a French and Classics degree, her course including one year in Paris. As a postgraduate she moved to London and worked as a researcher at Amnesty International among other jobs. She started writing the Harry Potter series during a delayed Manchester to London King’s Cross train journey, and during the next five years, outlined the plots for each book and began writing the first novel. Jo then moved to northern Portugal, where she taught English as a foreign language. She married in October 1992 and gave birth to a daughter in 1993. When the marriage ended, she and Jessica returned to the UK to live in Edinburgh, where Harry Potter & the Philosopher’s Stone was eventually completed. The book was first published by Bloomsbury Children’s Books in June 1997, under the name J K Rowling. The “K”, for Kathleen, her paternal grandmother’s name was added at her publisher’s request who thought that a woman’s name would not appeal to the target audience of young boys. The second title in the series, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, was published in July 1998 and was No. 1 in the adult hardback bestseller charts for a month after publication. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban was published on 8th July 1999 to worldwide acclaim and spent four weeks at No.1 in the UK adult hardback bestseller charts. The fourth book in the series, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was published on 8th July 2000 with a record first print run of 1 million copies for the UK. It quickly broke all records for the greatest number of books sold on the first day of publication in the UK. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, was published in Britain, the USA, Canada and Australia on 21st June 2003 and broke the records set by Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire as the fastest selling book in history. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, was published in the UK, US and other English-speaking countries on 16th July 2005 and also achieved record sales. The seventh and final book in the series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, was published in the UK, US and other English speaking countries in 2007. J K Rowling has also written two small volumes, which appear as the titles of Harry’s school books within the novels. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and Quidditch Through The Ages were published in March 2001 in aid of Comic Relief. In December 2008, The Tales of Beedle the Bard was published in aid of the Children’s High Level Group (now Lumos). As well as an OBE for services to children’s literature, J.K. Rowling is the recipient of numerous awards and honorary degrees including the Prince of Asturias Award for Concord, France’s Légion d’Honneur, and the Hans Christian Andersen Award, and she has been a Commencement Speaker at Harvard University USA. She supports a wide number of charitable causes through her charitable trust Volant, and is the founder of Lumos, a charity working to transform the lives of disadvantaged children. J.K. Rowling lives in Edinburgh with her husband and three children.


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The most up to date Biography of J.K Rowling completed July 2012 From Harry Potter to the Casual Vacancy, this book has it all. Joanne Rowling was born in July 1965 at Yate General Hospital in England and grew up in Chepstow, Gwent where she went to Wyedean Comprehensive. Jo left Chepstow for Exeter University, where she earned a French and Classics degree, her course includi The most up to date Biography of J.K Rowling completed July 2012 From Harry Potter to the Casual Vacancy, this book has it all. Joanne Rowling was born in July 1965 at Yate General Hospital in England and grew up in Chepstow, Gwent where she went to Wyedean Comprehensive. Jo left Chepstow for Exeter University, where she earned a French and Classics degree, her course including one year in Paris. As a postgraduate she moved to London and worked as a researcher at Amnesty International among other jobs. She started writing the Harry Potter series during a delayed Manchester to London King’s Cross train journey, and during the next five years, outlined the plots for each book and began writing the first novel. Jo then moved to northern Portugal, where she taught English as a foreign language. She married in October 1992 and gave birth to a daughter in 1993. When the marriage ended, she and Jessica returned to the UK to live in Edinburgh, where Harry Potter & the Philosopher’s Stone was eventually completed. The book was first published by Bloomsbury Children’s Books in June 1997, under the name J K Rowling. The “K”, for Kathleen, her paternal grandmother’s name was added at her publisher’s request who thought that a woman’s name would not appeal to the target audience of young boys. The second title in the series, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, was published in July 1998 and was No. 1 in the adult hardback bestseller charts for a month after publication. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban was published on 8th July 1999 to worldwide acclaim and spent four weeks at No.1 in the UK adult hardback bestseller charts. The fourth book in the series, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was published on 8th July 2000 with a record first print run of 1 million copies for the UK. It quickly broke all records for the greatest number of books sold on the first day of publication in the UK. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, was published in Britain, the USA, Canada and Australia on 21st June 2003 and broke the records set by Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire as the fastest selling book in history. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, was published in the UK, US and other English-speaking countries on 16th July 2005 and also achieved record sales. The seventh and final book in the series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, was published in the UK, US and other English speaking countries in 2007. J K Rowling has also written two small volumes, which appear as the titles of Harry’s school books within the novels. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and Quidditch Through The Ages were published in March 2001 in aid of Comic Relief. In December 2008, The Tales of Beedle the Bard was published in aid of the Children’s High Level Group (now Lumos). As well as an OBE for services to children’s literature, J.K. Rowling is the recipient of numerous awards and honorary degrees including the Prince of Asturias Award for Concord, France’s Légion d’Honneur, and the Hans Christian Andersen Award, and she has been a Commencement Speaker at Harvard University USA. She supports a wide number of charitable causes through her charitable trust Volant, and is the founder of Lumos, a charity working to transform the lives of disadvantaged children. J.K. Rowling lives in Edinburgh with her husband and three children.

30 review for J.K. Rowling Harry Potter to the Casual Vacancy a JK Rowling Biography 2012

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Jackson maydole

    After the Harry Potter series, I, like so many others, questioned whether J.K.Rowling was up to the challenge of writing a book for adults. The answer, at least for me, is an unqualified YES! Rowling's The Casual Vacancy is a book about appearances and actions. Our public and private selves...the masks we wear to help us get through the days...how we react to the external world and how we control our inner thoughts and actions. Rowling has her finger on the pulse of what it means to be human and After the Harry Potter series, I, like so many others, questioned whether J.K.Rowling was up to the challenge of writing a book for adults. The answer, at least for me, is an unqualified YES! Rowling's The Casual Vacancy is a book about appearances and actions. Our public and private selves...the masks we wear to help us get through the days...how we react to the external world and how we control our inner thoughts and actions. Rowling has her finger on the pulse of what it means to be human and humane and I hope she will continue to write for the adult audience.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I am in the minority in that I am not or never have been a Harry Potter fan and quite honestly the Harry Potter franchise put me off ever reading any Rowling. I do however have tremendous respect for her as a human being and this led me to exploring the text between the pages of a Casual Vacancy. I was very pleasantly surprised. While the scaffolding is there from the outset and we can see where the plot is going to head it does this in an almost Brechtian manner which I found very engaging. I r I am in the minority in that I am not or never have been a Harry Potter fan and quite honestly the Harry Potter franchise put me off ever reading any Rowling. I do however have tremendous respect for her as a human being and this led me to exploring the text between the pages of a Casual Vacancy. I was very pleasantly surprised. While the scaffolding is there from the outset and we can see where the plot is going to head it does this in an almost Brechtian manner which I found very engaging. I really liked the manner in which Rowling set up her characters and although I am not generally a reader who enjoys the visual elements of a fictional creation (in fact I usually go out of my way to avoid that kind of prose)Rowling's technique did not grate on me as much as I thought it might. Her ability to present a social commentary that works effortlessly to make her personal points is exemplary.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Johannamroberts

    Wanted to read this before the TV series started, and I'm glad I did as it means I can skip watching what seems to be only a vague approximation of a well-written tale. There's a wide range of characters, but all are drawn with enough detail to make them live on the page, with the dichotomous setting of town and estate adding a further dimension to the action as the characters weave in and out of both, raising questions of identity, nature v nurture, and civic responsibility, but all in a subtle Wanted to read this before the TV series started, and I'm glad I did as it means I can skip watching what seems to be only a vague approximation of a well-written tale. There's a wide range of characters, but all are drawn with enough detail to make them live on the page, with the dichotomous setting of town and estate adding a further dimension to the action as the characters weave in and out of both, raising questions of identity, nature v nurture, and civic responsibility, but all in a subtle rather than belaboured way.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kellie

    I can't believe I waited so long to read this book. JK Rowling's magical ability to plumb the depths of our hearts and minds, create characters that come completely to life, and to interweave story lines is as much in evidence here as in Harry Potter. If you are squeamish about the grimmer realities of life, don't read this story - for everyone else, this is a must-read. I can't believe I waited so long to read this book. JK Rowling's magical ability to plumb the depths of our hearts and minds, create characters that come completely to life, and to interweave story lines is as much in evidence here as in Harry Potter. If you are squeamish about the grimmer realities of life, don't read this story - for everyone else, this is a must-read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nanno Mulder

    This is a brilliantly written book, about mostly dreadful people without perspective. Some humor could have helped this reader not to become utterly depressed. However ultimately it might be a masterpiece...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Paul Olson

    This is no Harry Potter! An adult themed semi thriller kept me absorbed! I highly reccomend trying this out.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cyntia Aurora

    In this review, I'm going to be separating the art from the artist - because I absolutely loved this book. I've seen a lot of people criticise the slow pacing of this book. And I don't disagree. But I enjoyed that since - I'm a sucker for slower paced novels. I also saw people complain about the characters being unlikeable. To that I have two retorts: 1) Their unlikeability is what made them so REAL (or as Fats would say - authentic). This made their interpersonal conflict that much more intrigui In this review, I'm going to be separating the art from the artist - because I absolutely loved this book. I've seen a lot of people criticise the slow pacing of this book. And I don't disagree. But I enjoyed that since - I'm a sucker for slower paced novels. I also saw people complain about the characters being unlikeable. To that I have two retorts: 1) Their unlikeability is what made them so REAL (or as Fats would say - authentic). This made their interpersonal conflict that much more intriguing. 2) I liked so many of the characters - despite their miniscule or colossal flaws. In summation, if you find a copy of this book in a charity shop or something - I highly recommend you pick it up. Then come back and read the rest of this review. Alright? Alright? Cool. SPOILERY THOUGHTS - (IF YOU HAVEN'T READ THIS BOOK YET - DON'T LET YOUR EYES DRIFT DOWNWARDS). I'm going to break this next section up by characters. Firstly - Fats. Did anyone else picture him as a more psychopathic Holden Caulfield? I liked Fats for the pure entertainment that he provided, to me, as a reader. In real life, I don't think he would have been my cup of tea. We don't get told why he bullied Sukhvinder. For a bit, I thought JK was going to give them a romance arc - I'm glad she didn't. Next up - Andrew. I had heard that the theme of teen suicide was going to be explored within this novel. Because Andrew was the first teenager who's POV we saw - combined with what we witnessed of his home life and the colossal crush he had on Gaia (which I thought wouldn't end well) - I was predicting that he'll be the one to take his own life. I disapproved of his not standing up for Sukhvinder, but I still wanted the best for him. I was waiting, just waiting, for Simon to trip and fall - and break his neck while tumbling down the hill upon which his small white house was settled on. Sadly - no dice. I guess that's realistic. A lot of kids in abusive households, like Andrews, don't have their abuser taken away like that. Krystal - Again, a character I was rooting for. That moment where she had a flashback to a conversation with Barry - where he was encouraging her to put effort into her education so she could break out of the poverty cycle - and she thought to herself something along the lines of - too late now. I physically shouted, 'No! No, it's not!' At the book. Did anyone else think that when Fats told her about where Kai lived, she would abandon the baby-making plan and just seek refuge there? Moving into the adult characters... Colin - Holy shit. In an interview I watched with JK Rowling about this book - she mentioned that she struggled with OCD as a teenager. Well...yes. I believe her. I have struggled with OCD in the past - so Colin's struggle really hit home for me. Everything was so REAL. From his feelings of self-disgust, to his deep dependence on Tessa for constant reassurance. I just want to give JK huge credit for this portrayal - since usually most novels tackling OCD revolve around a character struggling with a fear of contamination (and it makes sense - since it's most common and seemingly, the least taboo). Gavin - what a spineless twat. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Random thought: I was surprised by the lack of page time dedicated to Barry's actual family. Literally, we got to know more about Lexie than the twins. I think not diving deeply into the impact on his close-family was a good move. Made the novel more unconventional and interesting.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sibylle

    A well-written book, but so black and depressing a tragedy. At the start, Mr. Fairweather dies of a stroke. The book then explores the effects of his death on his friends, family and associates -- and in all cases, Rowling finds one of the worst possible things that character could do, or that could happen to the character, and describes it in detail. Did every person in the story have to be negative? We have a heroin addict mother, her neglected 3-year old, her older daughter, and their friends A well-written book, but so black and depressing a tragedy. At the start, Mr. Fairweather dies of a stroke. The book then explores the effects of his death on his friends, family and associates -- and in all cases, Rowling finds one of the worst possible things that character could do, or that could happen to the character, and describes it in detail. Did every person in the story have to be negative? We have a heroin addict mother, her neglected 3-year old, her older daughter, and their friends ( or tormentors), who all do terrible things to each other. I prefer books with some humor, or at least one uplifting character.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rachelle

    This was a brilliant read. It shows us politics in small towns are no different from the main politics in a country. The pettiness of the human spirit and the search and drive for power can be seen throughout the novel. Rowling wrote beautifully. It's a long story with many different characters and she developed each one clearly and for a particular purpose. A lovely read. At times it just flowed and then at other times, I couldn't put it down. This was a brilliant read. It shows us politics in small towns are no different from the main politics in a country. The pettiness of the human spirit and the search and drive for power can be seen throughout the novel. Rowling wrote beautifully. It's a long story with many different characters and she developed each one clearly and for a particular purpose. A lovely read. At times it just flowed and then at other times, I couldn't put it down.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I was really let down by this book… it seemed to drag..

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Garlock

    Bored. Don't care about the characters. Don't care about the plot. Might finish. Might not. Aargh! Bored. Don't care about the characters. Don't care about the plot. Might finish. Might not. Aargh!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Miki Lund

    I have just started this book..reluctantly , I may add, as I am not a fan of the Harry Potter books, and only approve as they seem to have got the modern children to read, which is such a wonderful thing. I am just sorry that the books that got them reading did not include Treasure Island and Lord if the flues, Midwich Cuckoos, and many more those other wonderful books I read as a child, and where everything was possible and not " magic" However, I have just started this book.. I am so excited by I have just started this book..reluctantly , I may add, as I am not a fan of the Harry Potter books, and only approve as they seem to have got the modern children to read, which is such a wonderful thing. I am just sorry that the books that got them reading did not include Treasure Island and Lord if the flues, Midwich Cuckoos, and many more those other wonderful books I read as a child, and where everything was possible and not " magic" However, I have just started this book.. I am so excited by it, I forgive her totally for exposing the world to Harry Potter. I am thrilled , by the writing, the story, and the characters therein. I put it down only to savour the flavour, and to make it last, in case I finish it to quickly.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Millied

    It is difficult to believe that one small town could be populated by so many mean people! While a few characters displaying a somewhat redeeming quality once or twice, I don't believe I liked any of them. No complaints on the writing,though. It is difficult to believe that one small town could be populated by so many mean people! While a few characters displaying a somewhat redeeming quality once or twice, I don't believe I liked any of them. No complaints on the writing,though.

  14. 4 out of 5

    William

    Wish I hadn't read this. Wish I hadn't read this.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gregg Zwillling MD

    Slow to start, but it finished well!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Phoebe Torres

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lynne Gehling

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eleanor Molgaard

  19. 5 out of 5

    Feybe Randang

  20. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  21. 5 out of 5

    susan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Becampillo

  23. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

  24. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kaci

  26. 5 out of 5

    Macie potter girl who lived

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  28. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Barsook

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nellie Hatcher

  30. 5 out of 5

    Margaretherridge

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