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Education Of A Princess A Memoir By Marie, Grand Duchess Of Russia

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1930. Translated from the French and Russian under the editorial supervision of Russell Lord. To clarify the confusing Romanov family: this Marie was the granddaughter of Czar Alexander II, the daughter of Grand Duke Paul, and the cousin of Tsar Nicholas. Her brother, Prince Dmitri, was one of the plotters against Rasputin. He was exiled for that, to the Persian frontier, 1930. Translated from the French and Russian under the editorial supervision of Russell Lord. To clarify the confusing Romanov family: this Marie was the granddaughter of Czar Alexander II, the daughter of Grand Duke Paul, and the cousin of Tsar Nicholas. Her brother, Prince Dmitri, was one of the plotters against Rasputin. He was exiled for that, to the Persian frontier, which saved his life when the roundup of the Imperial family began. These are the memoirs of her childhood, a glittering version of solitary confinement, and young adult life. Her father was banished for marrying without the Czar's permission, which left Marie and her brother to be brought up by her uncle, the military governor of Moscow. After her uncle's assassination in 1905, her aunt arranged a marriage with a Swedish prince whom Marie saw a few times before the wedding. The marriage was disastrous, and a divorce was arranged, quickly and quietly. Marie's young son stayed in Sweden. Charity was an acceptable occupation for the women of the aristocracy, but Marie became a qualified nurse and spent much of the early part of WWI in field hospitals. The last part of the book contains her account of the final tense days of the Romanovs, her second marriage, and her escape through the Ukraine.


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1930. Translated from the French and Russian under the editorial supervision of Russell Lord. To clarify the confusing Romanov family: this Marie was the granddaughter of Czar Alexander II, the daughter of Grand Duke Paul, and the cousin of Tsar Nicholas. Her brother, Prince Dmitri, was one of the plotters against Rasputin. He was exiled for that, to the Persian frontier, 1930. Translated from the French and Russian under the editorial supervision of Russell Lord. To clarify the confusing Romanov family: this Marie was the granddaughter of Czar Alexander II, the daughter of Grand Duke Paul, and the cousin of Tsar Nicholas. Her brother, Prince Dmitri, was one of the plotters against Rasputin. He was exiled for that, to the Persian frontier, which saved his life when the roundup of the Imperial family began. These are the memoirs of her childhood, a glittering version of solitary confinement, and young adult life. Her father was banished for marrying without the Czar's permission, which left Marie and her brother to be brought up by her uncle, the military governor of Moscow. After her uncle's assassination in 1905, her aunt arranged a marriage with a Swedish prince whom Marie saw a few times before the wedding. The marriage was disastrous, and a divorce was arranged, quickly and quietly. Marie's young son stayed in Sweden. Charity was an acceptable occupation for the women of the aristocracy, but Marie became a qualified nurse and spent much of the early part of WWI in field hospitals. The last part of the book contains her account of the final tense days of the Romanovs, her second marriage, and her escape through the Ukraine.

30 review for Education Of A Princess A Memoir By Marie, Grand Duchess Of Russia

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    This book deserves a full review. Unfortunately, it is out of print now and I see a paperback copy on Amazon going for $109. I ran into it in a used bookstore several years ago, so I am lucky. I could not put the book down. It is a candid, eyewitness account of the Russian Revolution from its very beginning to its aftermath, by the sister of Grand Duke Dmitri, one of the assassins of Rasputin. Her writing style is clear, elegant and restrained, but at the same time it is conversational and quite This book deserves a full review. Unfortunately, it is out of print now and I see a paperback copy on Amazon going for $109. I ran into it in a used bookstore several years ago, so I am lucky. I could not put the book down. It is a candid, eyewitness account of the Russian Revolution from its very beginning to its aftermath, by the sister of Grand Duke Dmitri, one of the assassins of Rasputin. Her writing style is clear, elegant and restrained, but at the same time it is conversational and quite personal. Her experiences and her personality came alive to me through her writing. This book needs to be reprinted.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Education of a Princess grants the reader a first-hand perspective of people, life and events in the Romanov family before and during the Revolution. It shatters some widely-held assumptions. For example, Grand Duchess Ella (who was the sister of the Tsarina Alexandra and the wife of Grand Duke Sergei) is usually written of in only the most glowing terms. The author was taken in by Sergei and Ella as a child and reveals a different side of Ella: cold, jealous, unempathetic, and at times quite me Education of a Princess grants the reader a first-hand perspective of people, life and events in the Romanov family before and during the Revolution. It shatters some widely-held assumptions. For example, Grand Duchess Ella (who was the sister of the Tsarina Alexandra and the wife of Grand Duke Sergei) is usually written of in only the most glowing terms. The author was taken in by Sergei and Ella as a child and reveals a different side of Ella: cold, jealous, unempathetic, and at times quite mentally unbalanced (rather like her sibling). The reader has that envied place: that of a fly on the wall in what many today would call a "lifestyle" which even then was drawing rapidly to a close, largely thanks to the Tsar's lack of comprehension of political and social realities, his weakness as a leader, his profound belief in absolute autocracy and the terrible but compelling advice of his wife (whose "suggestions" as well as her personal lack of popularity proved fatal to the very autocracy in which she fervently believed and to the family she so loved). It has been argued that had Nicholas married someone else things might have turned out much differently. A great read for the historian or anyone fascinated with the last legs of the Romanov dynasty. (Not available in e-book form but very affordable/available).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Allen

    An incredible book. I could hardly set it down. Robert Massie's Nicholas and Alexandra gives an outsider's view of the last decades of the Romanov Dynasty. Romanova, Maria Pavilovna's memoir gives us the insider's view. Maria was the granddaughter of Alexander II and cousin of Nicholas II. She writes, in straightforward simple language, of her childhood, of the vast disconnect between royalty and the Russian people, of her brief marriage to a Swedish Prince, of coming to maturity as a nurse in W An incredible book. I could hardly set it down. Robert Massie's Nicholas and Alexandra gives an outsider's view of the last decades of the Romanov Dynasty. Romanova, Maria Pavilovna's memoir gives us the insider's view. Maria was the granddaughter of Alexander II and cousin of Nicholas II. She writes, in straightforward simple language, of her childhood, of the vast disconnect between royalty and the Russian people, of her brief marriage to a Swedish Prince, of coming to maturity as a nurse in WWI, of Rasputin and the gathering storm of revolution and her last minute escape from the Bolsheviks. Maria and her husband Prince Putiatin managed to make their way through a series of made for a movie miracles from St Petersburg to Odessa. From Odessa they were assisted in getting to Romania, where her cousin Helene was Queen, by Canadian adventurer "Colonel" Boyle. For a good biography of larger than life Klondike Joe Boyle and his role in Eastern Europe during and after WWI and the Bolshevik revolution see Pierre Burton's Prisoners of the North.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Fascinating account of the youngest Grand Duchess to escape the Bolsheviks with her life. I was particularly interested in details of the relationship she and her brother Grand Duke Dmitri had with the Grand Duke Serge Alexandrovich and Grand Duchesses Ella. Though she takes the reader as close in as she can, she doesn’t get close enough to shed much light. One senses she chooses her words carefully, especially in regards to GD Serge. GD Ella, she seems to have forgiven for her coldness and foun Fascinating account of the youngest Grand Duchess to escape the Bolsheviks with her life. I was particularly interested in details of the relationship she and her brother Grand Duke Dmitri had with the Grand Duke Serge Alexandrovich and Grand Duchesses Ella. Though she takes the reader as close in as she can, she doesn’t get close enough to shed much light. One senses she chooses her words carefully, especially in regards to GD Serge. GD Ella, she seems to have forgiven for her coldness and found room in her heart to admire her in the end. I ended up admiring the Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna (the younger) who seems to have been a strong woman and appreciate that she took the time to tell the story of her life as she wanted to tell it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Loreleilouise

    Fine Read. Very interesting look to history.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nat

    It is ashame this book is out print. It a great to read a first hand account instead of a historians. It shattered many preconceptions of the last Russian royal family

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Its been many years since I first found this book on the library's shelves, but I can still remember it. Especailly the end. The writing was beautiful, her life remarkable. Any twelve year old girl (I don't think I was a teenager yet when I read it) will love a title like "Education of a Princess" and I was no exception. Its been many years since I first found this book on the library's shelves, but I can still remember it. Especailly the end. The writing was beautiful, her life remarkable. Any twelve year old girl (I don't think I was a teenager yet when I read it) will love a title like "Education of a Princess" and I was no exception.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lanell

    learned things in this book that I hadn't learned elsewhere. Such as, details about Rasputin's death, the Russian aristocracy of this period. Also, I wish Russia had remained non Communist, even more after reading this book. learned things in this book that I hadn't learned elsewhere. Such as, details about Rasputin's death, the Russian aristocracy of this period. Also, I wish Russia had remained non Communist, even more after reading this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    So completely amazing. I admit, I got bored in the middle for a bit, but once the Revolution picked up I just couldn't put it down. Learning the actual experiences of a Russian Grand Duchess of the time teaches you so much more than anything from a history book. So completely amazing. I admit, I got bored in the middle for a bit, but once the Revolution picked up I just couldn't put it down. Learning the actual experiences of a Russian Grand Duchess of the time teaches you so much more than anything from a history book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    It is really interesting to get the story from an insider's first person point of view instead of from historians. Furthermore, Marie writes in a stunningly beautiful way giving a poetic feel to the memoir. It is really interesting to get the story from an insider's first person point of view instead of from historians. Furthermore, Marie writes in a stunningly beautiful way giving a poetic feel to the memoir.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rhode

    Hugely readable. A real life sweeping saga from palaces to poverty. It ends with her leaving Russia on what feels like the last train out.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Very interesting insider view into the Romanov family in the final years of the Romanov dynasty, as well as a great first-hand account of WWI on the Russian Front.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Johnson

  14. 4 out of 5

    Veronika

  15. 4 out of 5

    Allison

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

  17. 4 out of 5

    Terri

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nina

  19. 5 out of 5

    Roberta

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  22. 5 out of 5

    Krista

  23. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marcia Ballek

  25. 5 out of 5

    Scarlett

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mary Alice

  27. 5 out of 5

    Judy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Martha

  29. 5 out of 5

    Liza

  30. 4 out of 5

    Allyce Horan

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