Hot Best Seller

Grimms' Fairy Tales (Puffin Classics)

Availability: Ready to download

From the land of fantastical castles, vast lakes and deep forests, the Brothers Grimm collected a treasury of enchanting folk and fairy stories full of giants and dwarfs, witches and princesses, magical beasts and cunning children. From classics such as 'The Frog-Prince' and 'Hansel and Grettel' to the delights of 'Ashputtel' or 'Old Sultan', all hold a timeless magic whic From the land of fantastical castles, vast lakes and deep forests, the Brothers Grimm collected a treasury of enchanting folk and fairy stories full of giants and dwarfs, witches and princesses, magical beasts and cunning children. From classics such as 'The Frog-Prince' and 'Hansel and Grettel' to the delights of 'Ashputtel' or 'Old Sultan', all hold a timeless magic which has enthralled children for centuries.


Compare

From the land of fantastical castles, vast lakes and deep forests, the Brothers Grimm collected a treasury of enchanting folk and fairy stories full of giants and dwarfs, witches and princesses, magical beasts and cunning children. From classics such as 'The Frog-Prince' and 'Hansel and Grettel' to the delights of 'Ashputtel' or 'Old Sultan', all hold a timeless magic whic From the land of fantastical castles, vast lakes and deep forests, the Brothers Grimm collected a treasury of enchanting folk and fairy stories full of giants and dwarfs, witches and princesses, magical beasts and cunning children. From classics such as 'The Frog-Prince' and 'Hansel and Grettel' to the delights of 'Ashputtel' or 'Old Sultan', all hold a timeless magic which has enthralled children for centuries.

30 review for Grimms' Fairy Tales (Puffin Classics)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    I'm thrilled that this book contains the nasty version of Cinderella, where the stepsisters not only cut off parts of their feet in an attempt to wear the slipper, but also get their eyes pecked out by birds during the royal wedding. That'll learn 'em. These "children's classics" are fairly dripping with blood - particularly the evil blood of those who seek to keep true love from running its natural, ho-hum course. These were dark and scary times to be a stepmother. Even though Snow White is stupi I'm thrilled that this book contains the nasty version of Cinderella, where the stepsisters not only cut off parts of their feet in an attempt to wear the slipper, but also get their eyes pecked out by birds during the royal wedding. That'll learn 'em. These "children's classics" are fairly dripping with blood - particularly the evil blood of those who seek to keep true love from running its natural, ho-hum course. These were dark and scary times to be a stepmother. Even though Snow White is stupid enough to fall for the wicked queen dressed as a peddler woman bearing poisoned goodies on THREE SEPARATE OCCASIONS, it's the queen who's forced to don "red-hot iron shoes" and dance until she drops dead. Then there is the wicked stepmother in The Twelve Brothers. She is put to death in a barrel filled with boiling oil and venomous snakes - (boiling-oil-resistant serpents, one must presume), where she died "an evil death." Reading more than 50 of these stories in a row tends to get a bit monotonous. In fact, many seem to be the SAME story re-told with only slight changes. Here are the fairy tale rules: 1) Share your food and drink with tiny forest folk. Kindness to animals is always rewarded. 2) Teeny tiny men seem to have trouble staying out of cows' stomachs. 3) A multitude of tasks must be completed before one is allowed to marry royalty. 4) When three siblings set out on quests, it's always the youngest, weakest, most childlike and kindhearted who succeeds. That one also always goes last, does not make the same mistakes as his or her predecessors, and wins the heart of the prince or princess who is cleverly disguised as an old man or woman. 5) For some reason, tailors see a lot of action. If you haven't read these, you really should...though I recommend sampling one every now and then, rather than all in one fell swoop. Too many happily ever afters can leave a sour taste in your mouth. Not to mention a disturbing amount of sympathy for stepmothers.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    I was originally was going to give this a 3 because it is uneven strange, and sometimes surprisingly amoral, but then i realized how much I acutally had to say about it, and just how much I enjoyed reading these goofy stories. So bear with me while i recount some of the best and worst stories and some of the strange themes of grimm's fairy tales. (I have to admit, I write these reviews almost entirely for myself) Some themes/things you should know: -If you are an evil stepmother or witch, and you I was originally was going to give this a 3 because it is uneven strange, and sometimes surprisingly amoral, but then i realized how much I acutally had to say about it, and just how much I enjoyed reading these goofy stories. So bear with me while i recount some of the best and worst stories and some of the strange themes of grimm's fairy tales. (I have to admit, I write these reviews almost entirely for myself) Some themes/things you should know: -If you are an evil stepmother or witch, and you are looking for a brother and sister or pair of lovers, they've probably turned themselves into a duck and a lake, respectively. -people or animals geting released from wolf's stomaches and then placing stones in their place. -if you kill a dragon, giant or other fearsome creature, always cut out the tongue and hang onto in case you are betrayed by someone who claims to have killed the beast himself (when confronted, the deceiver will always claim that the beast had no tongue, but no one will believe him) -if you rescue someone (a fair maden, of course) from the bottom of the well while your companions are above ground, always put something else in the basket to replace your weight, because they will drop you and try to kill you. -Never bet against: -A tailor -Anyone named Dummling, or Thumbling -The youngest of 3 brothers -Anyone that can talk to, or is kind to animals, or who is kind to old women -basically anyone young, pretty, and poor. -Always bet against: -ugly people Best stories. Two Brothers-two brothers wander the world with a shitload of animals at their beck and call, so many in fact, that they decide to split up. they stab some knife or something into a tree that they can look at to see if the other is ok. One becomes a king (after killing a dragon), the other wanders the world. the king goes hunting, gets turned into stone by a witch. the other brother her saves him. lots of other things happen. it's one of the longest and strangest stories and it's just great. Rumpelstiltskin-One of the classics that the one I knew was actually very similar to the original. NOthing quite as funny as how upset the little guy gets when she figures out his name. Brother Lustig-Another long and weird story, this is different in that Brother Lustig first appears to be a good guy, then he is kind of a jerk, but he sort of gets picked on by a priest and then he tricks his way into heaven. it's weird. The Man of Iron-Robert Bly wrote a whole book on manliness based upon this fairy tale, and I can see why. It just a really good story, and very rich with male stereotypes. Not that stereotypes are necessarily good, but it just really well written and interesting. The Straw, The Coal and The Bean-my favorite. So funny. Contains this passage, as the coal tries to cross the river by walking on the straw: "The straw, however, beginning to burn, and the Coal slipping after, hissed as it reached the water, and gave up the ghost. The Bean, which had prudently remaned up the shore, was forced to laugh at this accident, and the joke being so good, it laughed so immoderately that it burst itself." Fortunately a wandering tailor is able to stitch the bean back up. 3 disturbing stories: The Frog Prince: Did you know that in the original, the frog is turned into a prince after being thrown against the wall?! She gets pissed at him because she is supposed to be his companion (because he retrieved her ball), but then he turns into a prince and they marry. what kind of lesson does that teach?? Actually the story is really more about the last paragraph, about the prince's loyal servant, Henry, who had tied bands around his heart which broke of happiness upont the prince's return. Cinderella: one stepsisters tries to get into the shoe by cutting off a toe, the other by cutting off a heel. Their punishment for failure? They get their eyes pecked out by birds. The Poor Boy in his Grave An orphaned boy is adopted by a cruel farmer and wife. The farmer beats for his honest or endearing mistakes, like eating a bundle of grapes because he was a hungry. While baling hay while they are out, his sweater gets caught in the hay. Knowing he will be beaten, his despair leads him to drink what the the farmer's wife said was poison, but is actually honey. At this point you still think things are going to end up well. And it's kind of funny, he says "I thought death would be bitter, but it is so sweet!" He then moves onto to the fly-poison, about which he was also lied to, because it turns out to be wine. Still funny. But then his drukeness makes him feel a bit woozy, so he thinks he might be dying so, he goes and lays in an open grave, and the cold and the wine kill him! He lays in the grave forever. The farmer's house burns down later on and he and his wife live in poverty and misery, but come on!! That's all. See, I told you I had a lot to say.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    “Kinder-und Hausmärchen” is a key German contribution to world literature. It comprises about 250 traditional tales, which were collected by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, and first published in 1812, with a second volume dated 1815. Although the most accurate translation of this title would be “Children’s and Household Tales”, most English readers know these stories as Grimms’ Fairy Tales, sadly often with the apostrophe misplaced, as “Grimm’s Fairy Tales”. Between 1824 and 1839, Edgar Taylor had tran “Kinder-und Hausmärchen” is a key German contribution to world literature. It comprises about 250 traditional tales, which were collected by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, and first published in 1812, with a second volume dated 1815. Although the most accurate translation of this title would be “Children’s and Household Tales”, most English readers know these stories as Grimms’ Fairy Tales, sadly often with the apostrophe misplaced, as “Grimm’s Fairy Tales”. Between 1824 and 1839, Edgar Taylor had translated these tales into English, again in two volumes. In 1870, Wilhelm’s eldest son, Hermann, edited what has come to be known as the definitive edition of “Kinder- und Hausmärchen”. In 1901, Marian Edwardes made a selection of these tales, and it is on her selection which most modern collections are now based. There is a typical “English Grimm”, which always comprises around fifty stories; not always the same fifty, but all chosen from a list of around half of the original number of 250 in the 1870 edition. Charles Folkard - “Hansel and Gretel” The list is short, because these were tales for children, and some were little more than riddles or anecdotes. Some were merely variations on the same theme. And in addition to those banned by the Victorians for their impropriety, the 20th century rejected some for their brutality, horror and anti-Semitism. It is easy enough to find a list of all 250 online, and some of the little known ones are indeed hair-raising to read. Here I have listed all the ones in this volume, along with alternative names I have discovered they are also known by. I have added the number according to the original classication and order in which they were published. These are based on Marian Edwarde’s selection, and checked against Edgar Taylor’s for authenticity. The text therefore cannot be bettered, in English. Charles Folkard - “The Three Dwarfs in the Wood” It has to be said though, that the presentation of the volume is a disappointment. The illustrations are by Charles Folkard, whose watercolours are very much in the tradition of the golden age children’s illustrators, Arthur Rackham, Edmund Dulac and Kay Nielsen. They match the style of tales perfectly, but there are only eight colour plates in the entire book, two of which I have included here. The volume is roughly the size of a hardback novel, and there are line drawings at the beginning of each story, plus occasional ones in between. The less said about the cover illustration the better. It is not credited, but clearly drawn by a staff artist of the time, who created a contemporary feel. I prefer to do away with this cover, as underneath the cloth-bound book is printed with a silhouette repeated design of the girl and the deer, but this is a personal preference. Because of my disappointment with the reproductions of the art work, I am keeping this review at my default rating of 3 stars. 1. The Dancing Shoes - “The Twelve Dancing Princesses”, “The Worn-Out Dancing Shoes” or “The Shoes that were Danced to Pieces” - 133 2. The House in the Wood - “The Hut in the Forest” - 169 3. The Golden Bird - 57 4. The Twelve Huntsmen - 67 5. The White Snake - 17 6. Little Red Riding Hood - “Little Red Cap” - 26 7. The Singing Lark - “The Singing, Springing Lark”, “The Singing, Soaring Lark”, “The Lady and the Lion” or “Lily and the Lion” - 88 8. The Brave Little Tailor - “The Valiant Little Tailor” or “The Gallant Tailor” - 20 9. Rapunzel - 12 10. The Iron Stove - 127 11. Jorinda and Joringel - 69 12. Hansel and Gretel - “Hansel and Grettel”, “Hansel and Grethel”, or “Little Brother and Little Sister” - 15 13. The Boy Who Set Out to Learn what Fear Was - “The Story of the Youth Who Went Forth to Learn What Fear Was” or “The Story of a Boy Who Went Forth to Learn Fear” - 4 14. Donkey-Wort - “The Donkey” - 144 15. Old Sultan - 48 16. The Fox and the Horse - 132 17. The Travelling Musicians - “Town Musicians of Bremen”, “The Bremen Town Musicians” - 27 18. The Golden Goose - 64 19. The Wishing Table - “The Magic Table, the Gold-Donkey, and the Club in the Sack”, “The Wishing-Table, the Gold-Ass, and the Cudgel in the Sack” - 36 20. Tom Thumb - “Thumbling” and “Thumbling’s Travels” (also known as “Thumbling as Journeyman” - 37 and 45 * 21. Snow White - “Little Snow White” - 53 22. The Three Dwarfs in the Wood - “The Three Little Men in the Wood” or “The Three Little Gnomes in the Forest” -13 23. The Four Craftsmen - “The Four Skilful Brothers” - 129 24. Snow-White and Rose-Red - “The Ungrateful Dwarf” - 161 25. The Twelve Brothers - 9 26. Jack My Hedgehog - Hans My Hedgehog - 108 27. The Sleeping Beauty - “Little Briar Rose”, “The Sleeping Beauty in the Woods” - 50 28. The Raven - 93 29. Bearskin -101 30. Cinderella - “The Little Glass Slipper” - 21 31. Three Spinning Fairies - “The Three Spinning Women”, “The Three Spinners” - 14 32. Rumpel-Stilts-Ken - “Rumpelstiltskin”, “Tom Tit Tot” - 55 33. Mistress Holle - “Mother Holle”, or “Mother Hulda”, or “Old Mother Frost” - 24 34. King Thrush-beard 52 35. Thumbling the Dwarf and Thumbling the Giant - * 36. The Water of Life - 97 37. The Blue Light - 116 38. The Fisherman and his Wife - 19 39. The Goose Girl - 89 40. The Water Fairy - “The Water Nixie” or “The Water-Nix” - 79 41. The Frog Prince - “The Frog King”, or “Iron Henry” - 1 42. The Elves and the Cobbler - “The Elves”, or “The Elves and the Shoemaker”, - 39 43. Giant Golden Beard - “The Giant and the Three Golden Hairs”, or “The Devil with the Three Golden Hairs” - 29 44. King of the Golden Mountain - 92 45. The Two Brothers - 60 46. Hans in Luck - 83 47. The Turnip - 146

  4. 4 out of 5

    Steven Walle

    A very good read. Reminds me of my childhood days when my Grandma used to read these fairy tales to me. They are pretty graphic however. I recommend this book to all. Read to your children folks. It will create a love of reading and a thirst for knowledge. Enjoy and Be Blessed. Diamond

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    Grimm’s Fairy Tales, (the apostrophe is as it is printed on the book’s title page and cover) is Richard Adams’s personal selection of nineteen tales, which he made in 1981. This is a large format book with illustrations by Pauline Ellison. Pauline Ellison is a prolific illustrator of books, producing meticulous detailed watercolour images with use of natural colour tones. These paintings are quite busy, and the characters and interiors have a Germanic or East European feel. They are very attract Grimm’s Fairy Tales, (the apostrophe is as it is printed on the book’s title page and cover) is Richard Adams’s personal selection of nineteen tales, which he made in 1981. This is a large format book with illustrations by Pauline Ellison. Pauline Ellison is a prolific illustrator of books, producing meticulous detailed watercolour images with use of natural colour tones. These paintings are quite busy, and the characters and interiors have a Germanic or East European feel. They are very attractive, and the book displays this art well using glossy paper and printing to a high standard. As I have often found with illustrated books of folk and fairy tales, the actual text is very much the poor relation. Here at least there is one illustration per story, inserted in the story itself, rather than randomly. Yet the size of the book, and the cramped feel of the text does not invite one to read each story. The font size is very small, and the translators are not credited. It seems as if this is a book produced primarily for the artworks. Richard Adams has written a brief essay as an introduction. Presumably he was asked to make this selection because he was at the peak of his popularity in 1981. I was struck by the synchronicity of an editor who originally conceived his most famous book “Watership Down” as a story to tell his daughters on long car journeys, just as the stories here were an oral tradition, which were passed down and developed through many generations, before being collected and fixed in a written form by the brothers Grimm. However, most of his essay was rather dry and academic, which disappointed me, as I do like Richard Adams’s writing style. There is nothing to say what determined his choice of stories; some of which are familiar and others not. It would be interesting to know what drew him to these, when he had over two hundred tales by the brothers Grimm to choose from. Here is the complete list of titles: The Frog King or Iron Henry Hansel and Gretel The Fisherman and his Wife Cinderella Thumbling Mother Holle The Seven Ravens Fitcher’s Bird The Juniper Tre The Six Swans Little Snow-White Little Briar-Rose Rumpelstiltskin The Golden Bird The Golden Goose Bearskin The Blue Light The Moon Little Red-Cap All in all, this is not my preferred book of tales by the Brothers Grimm. I would like to be able to read them without navigating a bulky book and poring over the words. But the illustrations are careful, quality work, so I would rate this book at less than the default average, hence 2 stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Smith

    I'm glad to have read this, simply because fairy tale plots and themes are used so often in modern literature that it felt good to become acquainted with old versions of the tales and get closer to the original folklore. I also enjoyed picking up on some of the values of the time that come across in the stories. That said, most of them are terribly boring. The method of storytelling is something I just could not get comfortable with - rapid, perfunctory, repetitive, bizarrely irrational. It was I'm glad to have read this, simply because fairy tale plots and themes are used so often in modern literature that it felt good to become acquainted with old versions of the tales and get closer to the original folklore. I also enjoyed picking up on some of the values of the time that come across in the stories. That said, most of them are terribly boring. The method of storytelling is something I just could not get comfortable with - rapid, perfunctory, repetitive, bizarrely irrational. It was often disturbingly amoral as well, even more so than stories that try to be realistic about how life goes. There are plenty of the happy endings that have come to characterise fairy tales today, but happy endings were certainly not the standard for these tales - some are incredibly violent and/or downright depressing. I'm not criticising the book or fairy tales in general for this; they're rich cultural texts that still influence literature today. But I decided to go with a subjective rating, which is to say, I did not really enjoy reading this, however valuable the experience.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Manuel Antão

    If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Wolves and Campfires: Grimms Märchen by Die Brüder Grimm (Original Review, 2005-11-30) In Genesis there is suddenly this sentence/observation about giants walking the Earth in them days... I always see those elderly male Jews in Babylon, staring glumly at some campfire, thinking about the good old days and thinking up revengeful plans to smite the enemy. They tell the stories of their tribes but there is that one quite senile idiot alway If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Wolves and Campfires: Grimms Märchen by Die Brüder Grimm (Original Review, 2005-11-30) In Genesis there is suddenly this sentence/observation about giants walking the Earth in them days... I always see those elderly male Jews in Babylon, staring glumly at some campfire, thinking about the good old days and thinking up revengeful plans to smite the enemy. They tell the stories of their tribes but there is that one quite senile idiot always going on about 'them giants' - so in the end they say, "Okay, we WILL put them in. Now shut up already!" I can see myself being the Giant Guy (if more all over the place) and I'm not sure the good campfire folks here need the distraction...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nhi Nguyễn

    Look what the lockdown due to the surges in COVID-19 cases where I live has brought me to :)) This week, I treated myself to a trip down memory lane with this “Grimm’s Fairy Tales” collection. I grew up being exposed to books from an early age, and fairy tales were my first experience with stories. So reading this collection was like returning to a period of my life that I always cherish. There were a lot of stories in this book that I had not known before, but I also got to read the original ver Look what the lockdown due to the surges in COVID-19 cases where I live has brought me to :)) This week, I treated myself to a trip down memory lane with this “Grimm’s Fairy Tales” collection. I grew up being exposed to books from an early age, and fairy tales were my first experience with stories. So reading this collection was like returning to a period of my life that I always cherish. There were a lot of stories in this book that I had not known before, but I also got to read the original versions of a lot of Grimm’s fairy tales that were later popularized across multiple media, with different adjustments. “The Fisherman and his Wife”, “The Twelve Dancing Princesses”, “Rose-Bud” (which is the original version of “Sleeping Beauty”), “Snow-Drop” (which is the original version of “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”), “The Lady and the Lion” (which is a variation of “Beauty and the Beast”), “Hansel and Grettel”, “The Frog-Prince”, “Rumpel-Stilts-Kin”, “The Goose Girl”, and “Ashputtel” (which is the original version of “Cinderella”) were among the familiar stories that I had known before. For “The Lady and Lion”, the first part resembled what I had read and watched when it comes to the “Beauty and the Beast” story, but the later part was heading in a totally different direction, which was so cool. For “Hansel and Grettel”, I felt like the story “Roland and May-Bird” may better resemble the popular version of “Hansel and Grettel” that we all know (two kids got abandoned in the woods by their parents, they later found a house made of sweets that belonged to a witch). The rest of the stories were funny, silly, goofy, and a little bit stupid, to put it frankly :D But I enjoyed them anyway :)) I was particularly impressed with the last one, “The Juniper Tree”, because of not only its brutal and gory aspect (and I don’t know if it is suitable to be read by kids :D), but also its first notable detail of the story, which was that a woman wishing she could have a child as red as blood and as white as snow. That sounded a lot like what happened in “Snow-Drop” or “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”. I guess this is what people at that time considered beauty.

  9. 4 out of 5

    *❆ Kαɾҽɳ ❆*

    I shall be updating this as I read each story. I’ll give their individual star rating and a small review. Last Updated 03/02/2021 The Story of the Youth who went forth to Learn what Fear was - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Hmm this was not a great story and yet I really liked it? Like it was weird and the ending of how he learnt what fear was, was really ridiculous and yet I liked it? I guess since it was so unusual, it worked. The Wonderful Musician - ⭐️ Was not a fan of this one, didn't like how the musician I shall be updating this as I read each story. I’ll give their individual star rating and a small review. Last Updated 03/02/2021 The Story of the Youth who went forth to Learn what Fear was - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Hmm this was not a great story and yet I really liked it? Like it was weird and the ending of how he learnt what fear was, was really ridiculous and yet I liked it? I guess since it was so unusual, it worked. The Wonderful Musician - ⭐️ Was not a fan of this one, didn't like how the musician was unnecessary cruel to the animals who followed him because of his music. Jorinda and Joringel - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This was a better story, about a man who loves his betrothed so much he will find a way to save her no matter how long it takes. I only wish that the story continued on and see if he saved the rest of the seven thousand. The Fox and the Horse - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Okay this was a good story, I liked how the clever fox knew how to help the Horse to get to his master using his words to convince others. The Elves - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ First Story - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This story has three mini stories within. I really liked the first story, unlike some retellings that I have read where the Elves stopped helping (view spoiler)[ when they were given clothes and their curse was broken and the shoemaker no longer prospered (hide spoiler)] Instead, here we see them all have a very happy ending. Second Story - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Well, this took an unexpected twist, not the same as the first story, but about a servant who has been asked to be the godmother of a baby elf. I really enjoyed this. Third Story - ⭐️⭐️⭐️ This was an okay story, nothing really special. Just a helping her in how in to get rid of a changeling who has replaced her baby for themselves, and the elves returning the baby to its mother. The Robber Bridegroom - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This was a horrible story however it was well written and the ending really made me happy that those awful rubbers got what they deserved! The Six Swans - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ I really liked this story, its about family love and sacrifices made for the ones we love. Very moving and touching tale. Old Sultan - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ I am glad that this story was not unhappy for anyone but they all were friends in the end, despite some mistrust between friends. 17/05/2020 The Three Snake-Leaves - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Wow, a really good story. Didn’t like how awful the princess was and how selfish, she deserved her fate. But a very nice story with an honourable peasant farmer The Mouse, the Bird and the Sausage - ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Oh wow! What a gruesome tale! I guess it’s trying to say work together but don’t be selfish and ask for change if something is working well? Wow just wow Little Red-Cap - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Good tale, nothing I didn’t expect, but was surprised a little by the ending and how the wolf was killed. The Straw, the Coal and the Bean - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Wow what a weird but funny tale! It reminded a lot of The Mouse, the Bird and the Sausage but at less this one was a lot more funnier to read! The Bremen Town-Musician - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Aww I liked this tale about animals who find companion in each other and he’ll each other to feel safe, secured and well feed. Cat and Mouse in Partnership - ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Aww poor mouse. That’s all I will say. What a strange tale indeed Faithful John - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Oh wow that was quite the ordeal. But it was a good story and I liked how the King. Alude his faithful servant’s sacrifice and would do anything to get him back. 16/05/2020 Rumpelstiltskin - ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Well that was one gruesome ending! Pretty horrible what Rumpelstiltkin did to himself at the end! The Goose-Girl - ⭐️⭐️ Ah why does every princess have to be beautiful and that is the only reason why a prince marries her? It is no wonder now we live in the same world, where all the girls want to be as beautiful as the girls on the cover magazines and not appreciate their own true self and natural beauty. The Frog-King, or Iron Henry - ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Hmm not much of say about this one. Other than the princess was a little bit ungrateful and mean The Golden Goose - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Okay, this was a very different tale but I love it. It was funny and so weird but so good. Really enjoyed it The Twelve Brothers - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Another favourite, this was a good tale about family and going to all lengths to protect each other. Loved it The Three Spinners - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This reminds me so much of Sleeping Beauty and yet it is not the same as well. Good tale overall. Our Lady’s Child - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This tale had a very unique twist to it. It has religious beliefs and values which I really liked and I love the moral at the end. The Valient Little Tailor - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Well, not entirely a romantic tale or about a princess but a tailor. (view spoiler)[ A tailor who thinks he is invincible because he killed seven flies by one struck of his towel (hide spoiler)] Hence he calls himself the warriors who killed seven in one stroke. While I don’t agree that children should learn about how to lie their way in the world, I did find the talior’s ways very clever and quite funny as well. 09/05/2020 Cinderella - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Cinderella has always been one of my favourite fairytales. I also knew of it grim and dark fate of the stepsisters but what I hadn’t realised was (view spoiler)[ Cinderella’s father was alive and he witnessed how his wife and stepdaughters mistreated her so poorly! I am now glad that when they tell this story, the father is absent, because I do not want to read a story where the father does nothing (hide spoiler)] Still love how special this tale is Little Snow White - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Wow! Snow White is 7 years old! I never thought she was a child! Can you imagine a child with 7 grown men 😱 This was definitely a lot similar and yet so different to what I imagined Snow White to be, but really enjoyed it too. Snow White and Rose Red - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ I very much enjoyed this tale. It’s the same as the Snow White that we know but this talks about the tale of two sisters who are very close and did everything together. I liked how the story focuses on their character and personalities rather than their beauty or about the “bad guys’ motives”. One of my favourites so far. Hansel and Grethel - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ This was also a very good story, I liked how the father still cared for his children even though the stepmother didn’t. (view spoiler)[ Unlike Cinderella’s father (hide spoiler)] Interesting throughout and a satisfying ending 06/05/2020 Rapunzel - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Interesting the ending of this story, very different but still a happy ending. Briar-Rose - ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Similar story to what we know, very fairytale like with a happy ending. Quite enjoyed it. Sweetheart Roland - ⭐️⭐️ Hmm, don't really like this one much, it's like cheating and betrayal. Not my thing.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ¸¸.•*¨*•♫ Mrs. Buttercup •*¨*•♫♪

    I usually rate the books I read based on how much I enjoyed them. However, in this case my level of enjoyment was so low that I should have rated this book one star, and I didn't feel like doing it because of the great historical value of this complete collection of fairytales. I used to love reading fairytales when I was a kid, and now I don't understand if they lost all their appeal to me as a genre or if it's because this edition/collection doesn't meet my taste. Anyway, I just read them as I usually rate the books I read based on how much I enjoyed them. However, in this case my level of enjoyment was so low that I should have rated this book one star, and I didn't feel like doing it because of the great historical value of this complete collection of fairytales. I used to love reading fairytales when I was a kid, and now I don't understand if they lost all their appeal to me as a genre or if it's because this edition/collection doesn't meet my taste. Anyway, I just read them as a document and really couldn't see any other reason to go on with the book than to understand the roots of many of our folk tales and appreciate the value of the linguists' work. This edition, however, is stunning: I love the illustrations and the fact that it is a complete collection. I will always be a proud owner of this volume, regardless of how much (or how little) fun I had reading it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Margie

    I devoured fairy tales when I was a child. I used to read them under the covers with a flashlight. The cover of my book and the illustrations by Fritz Kredel were exactly the same as this edition (originally published in 1945, reprinted in 1977) that I happily found as an adult. It will always be the best Grimms' version for me because of those childhood memories and the wonderful illustrations. Many of these tales are indeed "grim," definitely not the sanitized Disney versions. I don't remember I devoured fairy tales when I was a child. I used to read them under the covers with a flashlight. The cover of my book and the illustrations by Fritz Kredel were exactly the same as this edition (originally published in 1945, reprinted in 1977) that I happily found as an adult. It will always be the best Grimms' version for me because of those childhood memories and the wonderful illustrations. Many of these tales are indeed "grim," definitely not the sanitized Disney versions. I don't remember any of them bothering me as a child, but today many of them have been challenged. I worked in a school where a parent pulled her child from a class because the teacher read the "original" version of Cinderella to the class. She also demanded that the Cinderella books be pulled from the library. Thankfully, the principal stood up for the teacher and the library, and the books remained on the library shelves. A well-known child psychologist, Bruno Bettelheim, contended in his book, The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales, that fairy tales empower children, showing them that the youngest and the innocent always prevail against evil and adversity. Children are tougher than we think, but parents will probably want to screen this version for children up to age eight or nine.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    I couldn't find the edition I had so I went with one that was closest in date. Why only 4 stars for the tails we all remember "fondly" from childhood? Think about it. These are "Grimm's" fairy tales and they certainly are "grim". Still there are tales we remember and love so...4. Their at least not as "grim" as Andersen's fairy tales! I couldn't find the edition I had so I went with one that was closest in date. Why only 4 stars for the tails we all remember "fondly" from childhood? Think about it. These are "Grimm's" fairy tales and they certainly are "grim". Still there are tales we remember and love so...4. Their at least not as "grim" as Andersen's fairy tales!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Obsidian

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Since Marisa Meyers bases her Lunar Chronicles books on the tale of Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, Rapunzel, and Snow White I thought that I re-read these classic fairy tales so I am not in the dark so much about who some of the characters are supposed to be in the books. My version has twenty-five fairy tales which are The Goose-Girl The Little Brother and Sister Hansel and Gretel Oh, If I Could But Shiver! Dummling and the Three Feathers Little Snow White Catherine and Frederick The Valiant Littl Since Marisa Meyers bases her Lunar Chronicles books on the tale of Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, Rapunzel, and Snow White I thought that I re-read these classic fairy tales so I am not in the dark so much about who some of the characters are supposed to be in the books. My version has twenty-five fairy tales which are The Goose-Girl The Little Brother and Sister Hansel and Gretel Oh, If I Could But Shiver! Dummling and the Three Feathers Little Snow White Catherine and Frederick The Valiant Little Taylor Little Red-Cap The Golden Goose Bearskin Cinderella Faithful John The Water of Life Thumbling Briar Rose The Six Swans Rapunzel Mother Holle The Frog Prince The Travels of Tom Thumb Snow-White and Rose-Red The Three Little Men in the Wood Rumpelstilskin, and Little-One-Eye, Two-Eyes, and Three-Eyes I recall watching most of these stories as a kid on Nickelodeon's Grimm's Fairy Tale Classics. Opening Theme to Grimm's Fairy Tale Classics, my link text They actually for the most part kept pretty faithful to the majority of the stories. My favorite of these cartoons was definitely "Bearskin" though, my link text So I read all of these stories and for the purposes of this post I plan on just focusing on Little Snow White, Little Red-Cap, Cinderella, and Rapunzel. Characters I think my main comment for each of these stories are that many of these young women (except for Cinderella) do not seem that intelligent. Snow White does not seem that bright. After being told repeatedly by the seven dwarfs to not open the door to anyone. There are two incidents that happen until The Queen finally in her mind does away with Snow White. Little Red-Cap gets eaten up by the Wolf even though one wonders how great her eyesight was that she totally did not realize a Wolf was sitting in her Grandmother's bed. Cinderella I was happy to see that actually is more close to the live-action Disney movie more than I thought since we get her mother telling her to be good and kind. Rapunzel chose to marry a guy after he climbs her hair and she realizes he is handsome.....yeah. Plot The plot for Snow White is a young Princess trying to escape a Queen who is fixated on being the most beautiful in the land. One wonders why it is so important for the Queen to be deemed the fairest. Snow White escaping and living with the seven dwarfs does make one wonder how her taking care of seven dwarfs was better than going someplace else to hide away from the Queen. Snow White hides away from the Queen and is cautioned against going out and talking to anyone in case it is the Queen looking to harm her. Little Red-Cap in the first half of the story is just on her way to her Grandmother's house and comes across the Wolf who decides to make a meal of her and her Grandmother. There really is not a lot of meat to this story at all. There is one version that is told and another shorter version that we hear about after the unhappy ending to the first version. Cinderella is told by her dying mother to be a good girl and that she will watch her from heaven and watch over her. Unlike with the Disney version Cinderella's father does not die. Instead the guy lives and watches how his new wife and two stepdaughters treat his daughter. In my head that is actually worse, so at least if her father was not around you would hope that he would actually step in and stop having people treat his only daughter like a servant. Cinderella is so good and kind she plans a hazel tree and due to her tears it grows and a little bird comes and lives in it. Rapunzel is taken away as a baby to live with an Enchantress after her father was caught stealing rampion from the Enchantress's garden to feed his pregnant wife. Apparently her father deemed it okay to give away his child to someone who was quite willing to murder him for stealing some herbs. In case you didn't notice it, I am not that fond of the parents in any of these fairy tales. Rapunzel grows up and is locked away in a tower when she is 12 years old. Two years later a passing Prince (why are Princes always passing through?) comes through and sees the Enchantress calling up to Rapunzel so he lies in wait and does the same thing. Writing and Pacing The writing for all of these stories is pretty simplistic. They are children's stories so it is written for them to read and understand. The pacing for all of them were pretty much straightforward since all of the stories, except for Cinderella were very short. Setting Honestly there is not much details to any of the settings. The stories are pretty short so you don't get a lot of detail about that. Endings I think you have to decide for yourself what constitutes a happy ending. For Snow White she wakes up and finds out that a Prince has carried her off who tells her that he loves her more than anything in the world. She consents to be his wife. The Queen after hearing about a new-made Queen that is more beautiful goes to see her becomes ill with passion and becomes choked and dies afterwards. Could this be a potential spoiler to the Lunar Chronicles? Little Red-Cap was quite grim actually. In version one she and her Grandmother are eaten and a passing huntsman shoots the wolf in the head and both Little Red-Cap and the Grandmother presumably die. I think that the Brothers Grimm realized that was not really a happy ending and had another version where the Wolf falls off the wolf into a trough and drowns. Cinderella really does have the best ending. She has a magical tree that provides her with gowns and shoes for a ball and eventually after her stepsisters disfigure their feet goes off and lives with the Prince. You don't really hear about Cinderella's father or the stepmother so one imagines they did not live happily ever after. Rapunzel also had a bleak story-line until the happily ever after. Rapunzel "marries" the Prince when according to the story-line she had to be about 14 years old. Rapunzel makes a not intelligent comment about how heavy the Enchantress is compared to the Prince's son. Due to that the Enchantress flies into a rage, cuts her hair, and leaves her in the desert. The Prince is blinded by thorns when he throws himself out of a tower window. After wandering the desert for years he finds Rapunzel again who heals his eyes with her tears. I I totally prefer Disney's Tangled. All in all these were fast paced stories that I do have to wonder how appropriate some of them were for children. Most of them had stories about children being treated horribly by their parents or just ignored. Heck Hansel and Gretel had a father who didn't want to leave his kids to starve to death in the woods, but does so since he is henpecked by his second wife. He does feel bad though (eyeroll). A lot of the stories barely resemble the Disney counterparts. For example, Briar Rose made me laugh since there is no dragon in this story. Instead the thirteenth fairy is just angry she was not invited and throws a curse that Briar Rose would die upon her fifteenth birthday. A twelfth fairy changes it so that everyone will fall asleep for 100 years. So a Prince passing through on the day of the 100th year is there at the right place and time for Briar Rose to wake up and they marry. That's it. No epic fight with a dragon.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Samidha; समिधा

    Today’s review is going to be a bit different, it is a review of a particular Publisher for the Grimm’s Fairy Tales, folklore and tales compiled by the Brothers Grimm in Germany around the 1800s. Having read the Pantheon version of the Grimm stories, I was already familiar that what Disney turned them into, was not the reality. Maple Press was kind enough to send me a copy of the book, in exchange of an honest review. Last year, I wrote a huge research paper on Grimm’s Snow White, and Red Riding Today’s review is going to be a bit different, it is a review of a particular Publisher for the Grimm’s Fairy Tales, folklore and tales compiled by the Brothers Grimm in Germany around the 1800s. Having read the Pantheon version of the Grimm stories, I was already familiar that what Disney turned them into, was not the reality. Maple Press was kind enough to send me a copy of the book, in exchange of an honest review. Last year, I wrote a huge research paper on Grimm’s Snow White, and Red Riding Hood explaining the latent meaning in both the “cautionary tales”. For that, I used the Pantheon edition which was more detailed and had a variety of foot notes and references. However, not everyone would want to review the stories one by one, or really get to the bottom of all the tales. For general reading I would highly suggest the Maple Press publication. It is not dense, and is very fluid in terms of translation and writing. I read sixteen stories out of the sixty two. They have the entire important, well know stories and then a few others . I chose the sixteen from across the index. Briar Rose, Rapunzel, Snow White and Red Rose, are more known and hence not many pages have been devoted to introduce characters. They keep it precise, and easily readable so that the known stories don’t bore you. There were rare punctuation errors, and the pages were light. The entire book is three hundred and fifty two pages long. The original compilation was much larger, however Maple Press has selected stories from the second edition as the stories are a bit happier, less sensual and more fantastical. The stories are handpicked, to fit this anthology, and not all of them are included, I believe. This is perfect to gift young children, or even for teenagers to read because it really isn’t that hard to grasp. Plus the language and syntax is very direct, there are no fancy words, or dialogues like the middle ages. Would highly recommend to keep in your collection.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    Read for the Coursera Fantasy & Science Fiction course -- which I think it going to be interesting, perhaps especially because I'm not sure I agree with the set texts or with the course description. Anyway, the Grimms' fairytales are obviously classics, and worth reading for that, though the selection here includes some very similar stories. And, of course, the same kind of logic is shared by most fairytales, so it's similar in that way too. Some of the illustrations in this version are quite lo Read for the Coursera Fantasy & Science Fiction course -- which I think it going to be interesting, perhaps especially because I'm not sure I agree with the set texts or with the course description. Anyway, the Grimms' fairytales are obviously classics, and worth reading for that, though the selection here includes some very similar stories. And, of course, the same kind of logic is shared by most fairytales, so it's similar in that way too. Some of the illustrations in this version are quite lovely, though.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I’ve always said I love a good fairy tale. But you know what I’ve realized? I really love longer, more fleshed-out retellings of these choppy, abbreviated originals. Well ... SOME of the originals. Many of these tales are bizarre to the point of ridiculousness and make me wonder what the people were smoking who dreamed them up. I mean, you are definitely high if you’ve decided one of the main characters in your story is a sausage who takes up housekeeping with a bird and mouse. Yep. Good. And. H I’ve always said I love a good fairy tale. But you know what I’ve realized? I really love longer, more fleshed-out retellings of these choppy, abbreviated originals. Well ... SOME of the originals. Many of these tales are bizarre to the point of ridiculousness and make me wonder what the people were smoking who dreamed them up. I mean, you are definitely high if you’ve decided one of the main characters in your story is a sausage who takes up housekeeping with a bird and mouse. Yep. Good. And. High.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Suraia Munia

    I am all about fairy tales. I love reading faory tale book even though i read or heard the story 1000 times already. However, this book was the worst fairy tales book i have ever read. Only attractive part i found was the cover and illustrations inside. Poor writing style! I hate giving bad rating but couldn't stop myself for this one! I am all about fairy tales. I love reading faory tale book even though i read or heard the story 1000 times already. However, this book was the worst fairy tales book i have ever read. Only attractive part i found was the cover and illustrations inside. Poor writing style! I hate giving bad rating but couldn't stop myself for this one!

  18. 4 out of 5

    tiago.

    Most of us know many of the fairy tales that make up this book - Briar Rose (Sleeping Beauty), Snow White, Cinderella, Hansel and Gretel or Rapunzel are just a few that can be named. What nobody tells you is how repetitive these get: there are two tales of Snow White, a neverending amount of tales about three brothers (of which the youngest always fares best), a vast array of evil stepmothers and enchanted princes/princesses, among many other storylines that have been turned into clichés by the Most of us know many of the fairy tales that make up this book - Briar Rose (Sleeping Beauty), Snow White, Cinderella, Hansel and Gretel or Rapunzel are just a few that can be named. What nobody tells you is how repetitive these get: there are two tales of Snow White, a neverending amount of tales about three brothers (of which the youngest always fares best), a vast array of evil stepmothers and enchanted princes/princesses, among many other storylines that have been turned into clichés by the Grimms. Despite it being a little bit repetitive by the end of the book, fairy tales like these have infiltrated our common imaginary to such an extent that you can't help but be charmed by these little folk tales, despite the violence and bloodiness and the questionable morals they transmit (please remember: if you are ugly and/or a stepmother, you are necessarily EVIL, PERIOD). My favorite tales, however, are the really absurd ones about dumb people, like Clever Gretel, Clever Hans or The Story of the Youth Who Went Forth to Learn What Fear Was. A nice way to pass the time, but PLEASE, DO NOT read it to children. The real world is traumatizing enough as it is.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jen (The Starry-Eyed Revue)

    This audiobook was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This review can also be found at The Starry-Eyed Revue. Even though I know that these are all classic tales, I feel like I'm reading them for the first time, like they've been reinvented with a grown-up me in mind: dark and macabre and grotesque. But that's probably because I grew up with the watered-down Disney versions for the most part. Not that I haven't read my fair share of these sometimes bloody lessons in moral This audiobook was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This review can also be found at The Starry-Eyed Revue. Even though I know that these are all classic tales, I feel like I'm reading them for the first time, like they've been reinvented with a grown-up me in mind: dark and macabre and grotesque. But that's probably because I grew up with the watered-down Disney versions for the most part. Not that I haven't read my fair share of these sometimes bloody lessons in morality, but I love having them all in one place like this, and narrated by such a fabulous all-star cast. I love the narration of these stories. This collection kicks off with the incomparable Katherine Kellgren reciting Rapunzel and her performance is perfection. She really nails that witch. And January LaVoy delivers a heart-breaking rendition of Cinderella. Her narration always features so many varied voices and emotions. As does Jim Dale's, whose account of Rumplestiltskin is on par for what I expect from such a talented narrator. From the delightfully whimsical to the perfunctory yet magical performances, this well-rounded cast lends the perfect voice to each of these tales. The musical interludes between each tale were lovely and magical and added just that extra something to the collection. I would love to have these tales bound up with that artwork from the cover to share with my daughter, but I know she'll love this audiobook just the same...when she's read for such grim tales. ;) GIF it to me straight:

  20. 4 out of 5

    this unikorn loves reading

    Dear my future kids, Mum is likely to read you this kind of gore fairy tales because to be completely honest with you, fairy tales aren't as sweet as what disney showed you. I know, sweethearts, beautiful lies, truth hurts. Yours truly, Mum. Dear my future kids, Mum is likely to read you this kind of gore fairy tales because to be completely honest with you, fairy tales aren't as sweet as what disney showed you. I know, sweethearts, beautiful lies, truth hurts. Yours truly, Mum.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kiting Santos

    Some are a bit morbid for a fairy tale.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andreea Reads

    I used to devour this book as a child... And If I could I would give it 6 stars! Reading this is like a trip back to my childhood. Nothing like the old classic fairy tales.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Richard Dominguez

    Well to be perfectly honest Grimm's Fairy Tales by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm was very disappointing. Afraid that somehow I had gotten a mis-titled copy, I did a little research based on the information provided by the book and found that I had the right copy. So let's start with that premise, Grimm's Fairy Tales included 64 tales. The range of stories is quite varied although most included animals that in one way or another are anthropomorphized. Granted that the book was published December 20, 1812 Well to be perfectly honest Grimm's Fairy Tales by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm was very disappointing. Afraid that somehow I had gotten a mis-titled copy, I did a little research based on the information provided by the book and found that I had the right copy. So let's start with that premise, Grimm's Fairy Tales included 64 tales. The range of stories is quite varied although most included animals that in one way or another are anthropomorphized. Granted that the book was published December 20, 1812 the stories are what at that time must have been considered quite dark. The stories I did know of the 64 were exactly as I remembered them and I didn't find them dark at all. Little Red Riding Hood (original title Little Red Riding Cap) is exactly as we remember it and for that time was "dark". On the other hand "Rapunzel" is exactly as it's told today, not dark at all. In many of the stories animals are chocked to death or run over by a ox drawn cart. I can only imagine that for that time stories of animal deaths and mutilations were what the Grimm Brothers thought were dark children's stories and imagine were quite right. There was one story out of the entire 64 stories called "The Robber Bridegroom" which was quite dark even by today's standard as it revolved around cannibalism. Apart from "The Robber Bridegroom" anyone looking to read this book for the "legendary" darkness it is suppose to have would be sadly disappointed. There have been loads of movies during this modern era based on Grimm stories that were made much darker than the stories are hence contributing to the myth. My 3 star rating only reflects the story "The Robber Bridegroom" as that story caught me completely off guard and was rather gruesome.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dustin the wind Crazy little brown owl

    This is an audiobook, featuring 21 stories selected from Grimm's Complete Fairy Tales. Each story has a different narrator. As I listened, I followed along in my printed book. I noticed several things: similar themes & methods of execution, similar titles (yet otherwise unrelated), lots of numbers in titles, titles and wording in the stories may differ by edition, some of these stories are well-known with variations and others are relatively unknown. These classic tales are worth exploring. Belo This is an audiobook, featuring 21 stories selected from Grimm's Complete Fairy Tales. Each story has a different narrator. As I listened, I followed along in my printed book. I noticed several things: similar themes & methods of execution, similar titles (yet otherwise unrelated), lots of numbers in titles, titles and wording in the stories may differ by edition, some of these stories are well-known with variations and others are relatively unknown. These classic tales are worth exploring. Below, I use wording from Barnes & Noble Illustrated Edition: Some Favorite Passages: Rapunzel . . . the King's son climbed up, but instead of his dearest Rapunzel he found the witch looking at him with wicked, glittering eyes. "Aha!" cried she, mocking him, "you came for your darling, but the sweet bird sits no longer in the nest, and sings no more; the cat has got her, and will scratch out your eyes as well! Rapunzel is lost to you; you will see her no more." The King's son was beside himself with grief, and in his agony he sprang from the tower; he escaped with his life, but the thorns on which he fell put out his eyes. Then he wandered blind through the wood, eating nothing but roots and berries, and doing nothing but lament and weep for the loss of his dearest wife. So he wandered several years in misery until at last he came to the desert place where Rapunzel lived with her twin-children that she had borne, a boy and a girl. At first he heard a voice that he thought he knew, and when he reached the place from which it seemed to come Rapunzel knew him, and fell on his neck and wept. And when her tears touched his eyes they became clear again, and he could see with them as well as ever. Then he took her to his kingdom, where he was received with great joy, and there they lived long and happily. Cinderella "Oh gentle doves, O turtle-doves, And all the birds that be, The lentils that in ashes lie Come and pick up for me! The good must be put in the dish, The bad you may eat if you wish." __ "Little tree, little tree, shake over me, That silver and gold may come down and cover me." Then the bird threw down a dress of gold and silver, and a pair of slippers embroidered with silk and silver. And in all haste she put on the dress and went to the festival. But her step-mother and sisters did not know her, and thought she must be a foreign Princess., she looked so beautiful in her golden dress. __ "Little tree, little tree, shake over me, That silver and gold may come down and cover me." Then the bird cast down a still more splendid dress than on the day before. And when she appeared in it among the guests everyone was astonished at her beauty. The Prince had been waiting until she came, and he took her hand and danced with her alone. And when anyone else came to invite her he said, "She is my partner." __ "Little tree, little tree, shake over me, That silver and gold may come down and cover me." Then the bird cast down a dress, the like of which had never been seen for splendor and brilliancy, and slippers that were of gold. And when she appeared in this dress at the feast nobody knew what to say for wonderment. __ Then the two sisters were very glad, because they they had pretty feet. The eldest went to her room to try on the shoe, and her mother stood by. But she could not get her great toe into it, for the shoe was too small; then her mother handed her a knife, and said, "Cut the toe off, for when you are Queen you will never have to go on foot." So the girl cut her toe off, squeezed her foot into the shoe, concealed the pain, went down to the Prince. __ And when her wedding with the Prince was appointed to be held the false sisters came, hoping to curry favor, and to take part in the festivities. So as the the bridal procession went to the church, the eldest walked on the right side and the younger on the left, and the pigeons picked out an eye of each of them. And as they returned the elder was on the left side and the younger one on the right, and the pigeons picked out the other eye of each of them. And so they were condemned to go blind for the rest of their days because of their wickedness and falsehood. Little Red-Cap or Little Red Riding Hood "Little Red Riding Hood, just look at the pretty flowers that are growing all round you; and I don't think you are listening to the song of the birds; you are posting along just if you were going to school, and it is so delightful out here in the wood." Little Red Riding Hood glanced round her, and when she saw the sunbeams darting here and there through the trees, and lovely flowers everywhere, she thought to herself, "If I were to take a fresh nosegay to my grandmother she would be very pleased, and it is so early in the day that I shall reach her in plenty of time." __ Then he went into the room, and walked up to the bed, and saw the wolf lying there. "At last I find you, old sinner!" said he; "I have been looking for you a long time." And he made up his mind that wolf had swallowed the grandmother whole, and that she might yet be saved. So he did not fire, but took a pair of shears and began to slit up the wolf's body. When he made a few snips Little Red Riding Hood appeared, and after a few more snips she jumped out and cried, "Oh dear, how frightened I have been! It is so dark inside the wolf." and then out came the old grandmother, still living and breathing. But Little Red Riding Hood went and quickly fetched some large stones, with which she filled the wolf's body, so that when he waked up, and was going to rush away, the stones were were so heavy that he sank down and fell dead. Little Briar-Rose or The Sleeping Beauty Many a long year afterwards there came a King's son into that country, and heard an old man tell how there should be a castle standing behind the hedge of thorns, and that there a beautiful enchanted Princess named Rosamond had slept for a hundred years, and with her the King and Queen, and the whole court. The old man had been told by his grandfather that many Kings' sons had sought to pass the thorn-hedge, but had been caught and pierced by the thorns, and had died a miserable death. Then said the young man, "Nevertheless, I do not fear to try; I shall win through and see the lovely Rosamond." The good old man tried to dissuade him, but he would not listen to his words. For now the hundred years were at an end, and the day had come when Rosamond should be awakened. When the Prince drew near the hedge of thorns, it was changed into a hedge of beautiful large flowers, which parted and bent aside to let him pass, and then closed behind him in a thick hedge. Little Snow-White or Snow-White and the Seven Dwarfs It was the middle of winter, and the snow-flakes were falling like feathers from the sky, and a Queen sat at her window working, and her embroidery-frame was of ebony. As she worked, gazing at times out on the snow, she pricked her finger, and there fell from it three drops of blood on the snow. And when she saw how bright and red it looked, she said to herself, "Oh that I had a child as white as snow, as red as blood, and as black as the wood of the embroidery frame!" Not very long after she had a daughter, with a skin as white as now, lips as red as blood, and hair as black as ebony, and she was named Snow-White. And when she was born the Queen died. __ "Looking-glass upon the wall, Who is the fairest of us all?" it answered, "Queen, you are full fair, 'tis true, But Snow-White fairer is than you." __ Just at that moment a young wild boar came running by, so he caught and killed it, and taking out its heart, he brought it to the Queen for a token. And it was salted and cooked, and the wicked woman ate it up, thinking that there was an end of Snow-White. __ "Looking-glass upon the wall, Who is the fairest of us all?" And the glass answered, "Queen, thou art of beauty rare, But Snow-White living in the glen With the seven little men Is a thousand times more fair." __ "What a figure you are child!" said the old woman, "come and let me lace you properly for once." Snow-White, suspecting nothing, stood up before her, and let her lace her with the new lace; but the old woman laced so quickly and tightly that it took Snow-White's breath away, and she fell down as dead. "Now you have done with being the fairest," said the old woman as she hastened away. __ "Good wares to sell! Good wares to sell!" Snow-White looked out and said, "Go away, I must not let anybody in." "But you are not forbidden to look," said the old woman, taking out the poisoned comb and holding it up. It pleased the poor child so much and she was tempted to open the door; and when the bargain was made the old woman said, "Now, for once, your hair shall be properly combed." Poor Snow-White, thinking no harm, let the old woman do as she would, but no sooner was the comb put in her hair than the poison began to work, and the poor girl fell down senseless. "Now, you paragon of beauty," said the wicked woman, "this is the end of you," and went off. __ "We cannot hide her away in the black ground." And they had made a coffin of clear glass, so as to be looked into from all sides, and they laid her in it, and wrote in golden letters upon it her name, and that she was a king's daughter. then they set the coffin out upon the mountain, and one of them always remained by it to watch. And the birds came too, and mourned for Snow-White, first an owl, then a raven, and lastly, a dove. Now, for a long while Snow-White lay in the coffin and never changed, but looked as if she were asleep, for she was still as white as snow, as red as blood, and her hair was as black as ebony. __ For they had ready red-hot iron shoes, in which she had to dance until she fell down dead. Rumpelstiltskin . . . . round the fire danced a comical little man, and he hopped on one leg and cried, "Today do I bake, tomorrow I brew, The day after that the Queen's child comes in; And oh! I am glad that nobody knew That the name I am called is Rumpelstiltskin!" __ "Are you called Harry?" she asked again. "No," answered he. And then she said, "Then perhaps your name is Rumpelstiltskin!" "The devil told you that! The devil told you that!" cried the little man, and in his anger he stamped with his right foot so hard that it went into the ground above his knee; then he seized his left foot with both his hands in such a fury that he split in two, and there was an end of him. The Shoes That Were Danced to Pieces . . . she gave him a little cloak, and said, If you put on that, you will be invisible, and then you can steal after the twelve." __ "Something is wrong, did you hear the crack?" But the eldest said, "It is a gun fired for joy, because we have got rid of our Prince so quickly." After that they came into an avenue where all the leaves were of gold, and lastly into a third avenue where they were of bright diamonds. He broke off a twig from each, which made such a crack each time that the youngest started back in terror, but the eldest still maintained that they were salutes. __ "Where have my twelve daughters danced their shoes to pieces in the night?" he answered, "In an underground castle with twelve Princes," and related how it had come to pass, and brought out the tokens. A Riddling Tale Three women were changed into flowers which grew in the field, but one of them was allowed to be in her own home at night. The Twelve Brothers Once upon a time there lived a King and Queen very peacefully together; they had twelve children, all boys. Now the King said to the Queen one day, "If our thirteenth child should be a girl the twelve boys shall die, so that her riches may be the greater, and the kingdom fall to her alone." Then he caused twelve coffins to be made; and they were filled with shavings, and a little pillow laid in each, and they were brought and put in a locked-up room; and the King gave the key to the Queen, and told her to say nothing about it to anyone. __ "My child, what hast thou done! Why couldst thou not leave the twelve flowers standing? They were thy twelve brothers, who are now changed to ravens forever." The White Snake He went and listened, and found that it was the sparrows talking together, and telling each other all they had seen in the fields and woods. The virtue of the snake had given him power to understand the speech of animals. __ Then the servant seized her by the neck, took her into the kitchen, and said to the cook, "Kill this one, she is quite ready for cooking." The Elves As soon as it was midnight they saw come in two neatly-formed little men, who seated themselves before the shoemaker's table, and took up the work that was already prepared, and began to stitch, to pierce, and to hammer so cleverly and quickly with their little fingers that the shoemaker's eyes could scarcely follow them, so full of wonder was he. And they never left off until everything was finished and was standing ready on the table, and then they jumped up and ran off. __ With the greatest swiftness they took up the pretty garments and slipped them on, singing, "What spruce and dandy boys are we! No longer cobblers we will be." Then they hopped and danced about, jumping over the chairs and tables, and at last they danced out at the door. From that time they were never seen again; but it always went well with the shoemaker as long as he lived, and whatever he took in hand prospered. The Six Swans "You must not stay here," said they to her; "this is a robbers' haunt, and if they were to come and find you here, they would kill you." _______ The swans came close up to her with rushing wings, and stopped round her, so that she could throw the shirts over them; and when that had been done the swanskins fell off them, and her brothers stood before her in their own bodies quite safe and sound; but as one shirt wanted the left sleeve, so the youngest brother had a swan's wing instead of a left arm. __ . . . the wicked step-mother was bound to the stake on the pile of wood and burnt to ashes. The Twelve Huntsmen But the King had a lion who was a wonderful animal, for he found out every concealment or secret. __ "strew peas in the antechamber, and you will soon see. A man has a firm step; he will either crush the peas or pass over them without moving them; but maidens will come tripping or shuffling along, and set the peas rolling." Sweet Porridge . . . the porridge rose over the edge, and still it cooked on until the kitchen and whole house were full, and then the next house, and then the whole street, just as if it wanted to satisfy the hunger of the whole world . . .whosoever wished to return to the town had to eat his way back.

  25. 5 out of 5

    TheGeekyBlogger

    Listened for Fun (Borrowed from the Library) Overall Rating: 5.00 Story Rating: 5.00 Character Rating: 5.00 Audio Rating: 5.00 (not part of the overall rating) Tweet Length Review: If you get a chance to listen to the Audiobook Released May 2016 narrated by Jim Dale, Luke Daniels, Katherine Kellgren then DO IT! Tweet Longer: OMG this was just a complete delight and a little twisted. Audio Details: "Rapunzel", read by Katherine Kellgren "Cinderella", read by January LaVoy "Little Red-Cap", read by Simo Listened for Fun (Borrowed from the Library) Overall Rating: 5.00 Story Rating: 5.00 Character Rating: 5.00 Audio Rating: 5.00 (not part of the overall rating) Tweet Length Review: If you get a chance to listen to the Audiobook Released May 2016 narrated by Jim Dale, Luke Daniels, Katherine Kellgren then DO IT! Tweet Longer: OMG this was just a complete delight and a little twisted. Audio Details: "Rapunzel", read by Katherine Kellgren "Cinderella", read by January LaVoy "Little Red-Cap", read by Simon Vance "Little Briar-Rose", read by Grover Gardner "Little Snow-White", read by Kate Rudd "Rumpelstiltskin", read by Jim Dale "The Shoes That Were Danced to Pieces", read by Alfred Molina "A Riddling Tale", read by Janis Ian "The Twelve Brothers", read by Graeme Malcolm "The White Snake", read by Scott Brick "The Elves", read by Bahni Turpin "The Six Swans", read by Davina Porter "The Twelve Huntsmen", read by Dion Graham "The Goose-Girl", read by Edoardo Ballerini "Sweet Porridge", read by Jayne Entwistle "The Golden Goose", read by Luke Daniels "Eve's Various Children", read by Roy Dotrice "Snow-White and Rose-Red", read by Julia Whelan "The Frog-King, or Iron Henry", read by Kirby Heyborne "The Sea-Hare", read by Mark Bramhall "Hansel and Gretel", read by Robin Miles Length: 3 hrs and 39 mins Part of my Read It, Rate It, File It, DONE! Reviews

  26. 4 out of 5

    Neha

    Ever wonder why we stop reading Fairy Tales!! All great cultures have passed on rich heritage for coming generations in the form of art, music, dance, dressing, behaviour, traditions, language, greetings, symbols, scripts, and of course literature. Literature could be in the form of religious scripts, historical recordings, pictorial representations, hymns, songs and folk tales. Aesop Fables of the Greek, Panchtantra Tales of India, Jataka Tales of the Buddhist and the Brothers Grimm’s Fairy Tale Ever wonder why we stop reading Fairy Tales!! All great cultures have passed on rich heritage for coming generations in the form of art, music, dance, dressing, behaviour, traditions, language, greetings, symbols, scripts, and of course literature. Literature could be in the form of religious scripts, historical recordings, pictorial representations, hymns, songs and folk tales. Aesop Fables of the Greek, Panchtantra Tales of India, Jataka Tales of the Buddhist and the Brothers Grimm’s Fairy Tales of Germany stand testimony and essential part of growing up phase of children of various cultures. After a daily dose of Fairy tales in childhood why do we stop reading these fairy tales once we grow up – WHY? Do they start appearing false as the real world opens to us! or is it because our brain develops and we just can’t believe in all magic, luck, destiny and fairies! or is it because hope and dreams become more practical and realistic! All you want is a normal life, family and home rather than that of grandeur, Princes and castles! To read more and share your views.. visit http://storywala.blogspot.in/2012/09/...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    "Seven at one blow--that is my way!" Never has a little book of stories delighted me so. It was easy, breezy and beautiful, like Covergirl. And amusing, and creepy, like all good fairy tales should be. The quote above is from "The Gallant Tailor," a sure favorite, though there are so many I would call favorite. "Six Soldiers of Fortune" holds a certain rebellious essence to it, and could mean a lot to a soldier of today. In the story, soldiers are neglected once one of the king's wars is declared "Seven at one blow--that is my way!" Never has a little book of stories delighted me so. It was easy, breezy and beautiful, like Covergirl. And amusing, and creepy, like all good fairy tales should be. The quote above is from "The Gallant Tailor," a sure favorite, though there are so many I would call favorite. "Six Soldiers of Fortune" holds a certain rebellious essence to it, and could mean a lot to a soldier of today. In the story, soldiers are neglected once one of the king's wars is declared over. Yet, they find that when several of them band together, they each hold a special ability. Joined like this, they hatch a plan to take the king for all he is worth. Oh hell yeah. The book contains recognizable classics like "Tom Thumb," "Snow White," and "Rumpelstiltskin," but also others I hadn't heard before. Many have familiar moral lessons, but others simply condemn liars and, in the case of one tale, even people who just plain drive you crazy. Anyway, I took the book with me everywhere. If that isn't a sign of how into it I was, I'm not sure what is.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kenechi Udogu

    Over the years, I've read a considerable amount of fairytales so I was familiar with most of the stories in this collection (in one form or another). However I was surprised at how dark some of the themes were, especially if they were intended for children. Good always seems to prevail but not in the way we would think. With faithful servants being beheaded and frogs being smashed on walls before their worth emerges, no wonder Disney et al have glossed the stories up to suit modern day sensitivi Over the years, I've read a considerable amount of fairytales so I was familiar with most of the stories in this collection (in one form or another). However I was surprised at how dark some of the themes were, especially if they were intended for children. Good always seems to prevail but not in the way we would think. With faithful servants being beheaded and frogs being smashed on walls before their worth emerges, no wonder Disney et al have glossed the stories up to suit modern day sensitivities. Not all the stories had happy endings and even those that did were not exactly what I would have called pleasant I have no problem with realistic endings so this didn't bother). One to read first before reading out loud to your six year old. My favourite stories were "Bearskin" and "One Eye, Two Eyes and Three Eyes". I'd never heard of either and I was well entertained by the stories.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Josen

    3.5..........I had been wanting to read Grimm's Fairy Tales for a long time because I kept hearing that Disney really cleaned up these original, gruesome stories. I was actually surprised that it wasn't as macabre as I thought they would be. (then again I am into horror so I guess these would be pretty tame in comparison) They did seem to like the eye plucking thing though. ICK. Some of them weren't even scary at all, just fairy tales. Now this wasn't the complete works of the Brothers Grimm so 3.5..........I had been wanting to read Grimm's Fairy Tales for a long time because I kept hearing that Disney really cleaned up these original, gruesome stories. I was actually surprised that it wasn't as macabre as I thought they would be. (then again I am into horror so I guess these would be pretty tame in comparison) They did seem to like the eye plucking thing though. ICK. Some of them weren't even scary at all, just fairy tales. Now this wasn't the complete works of the Brothers Grimm so maybe they have other gruesome stories that I didn't catch. Either way I still liked it and I liked hearing the original Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, Little Red Riding Hood and other stories. But what can I say, I grew up with Disney so I'll always default to the Happiest Place on Earth. :) Lol!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dimitra

    Ahhh... Classic fairy tales... They are so magical!!! I was amazed by many in this collection, which I didn't know about. Some of them were very very very creepy... I really loved the ones I knew already, like Snowdrop (aka Snow-white) which is my favorite tale of all time, and little red riding hood etc. It's so nice to finally read the authentic story! There were stories similar to some Persian tales that I recently read and some which reminded me of others, but, that's the magic of storytelling! Ahhh... Classic fairy tales... They are so magical!!! I was amazed by many in this collection, which I didn't know about. Some of them were very very very creepy... I really loved the ones I knew already, like Snowdrop (aka Snow-white) which is my favorite tale of all time, and little red riding hood etc. It's so nice to finally read the authentic story! There were stories similar to some Persian tales that I recently read and some which reminded me of others, but, that's the magic of storytelling! It is told, travelling across countried, transforming into another story and so on...

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...